Yale Peabody Museum

Yale Peabody Museum The Yale Peabody Museum holds over 14 million objects and specimens in its collections.
(891)

Our programs continue, but our galleries are currently closed for renovations.

Join the Peabody, the Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection (DEEP) and the New Haven Museumfor the...
12/30/2023

Join the Peabody, the Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection (DEEP) and the New Haven Museumfor the 28th Annual MLK Celebration with two days of free events open to all--January 14th and 15th!

Free registration for both days is available at the following link and strongly recommended, as space is limited:
https://peabody.yale.edu/events/mlk-celebration

Thank you to our Presenting Corporate Sponsor and Sponsor for Workforce Development: Citizens

On Sunday, January 14, come to the New Haven Museum at 12:30pm for family storytelling and dance performances, an afternoon of inspiring family programs celebrating Dr. King’s life and legacy.

Celebrate MLK on Monday with the "Z Experience Poetry Slam", which kicks off at 11:30am in the Marsh Lecture Hall of the Science Building. This event is appropriate for adults and young adults with discretion of a parent or guardian.

We're also hosting a post-slam reception with complimentary snacks and beverages for attendees.

Join the Yale Peabody Museum, CT Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, and the New Haven Museum for the 28th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy of Social and Environmental Justice with two days of free events open to all. Generously sponsored by Citizens. Space is limited. Free re...

Looking for a last-minute holiday gift? Become part of a growing, international community of artists and learners by enr...
12/22/2023

Looking for a last-minute holiday gift?

Become part of a growing, international community of artists and learners by enrolling in our Natural Science Illustration Program. You or a loved one can earn online or in-person with opportunities ranging from basic drawing to advanced illustration.

Course catalog and registration here:
https://peabody.yale.edu/education/adult-programs/nsi

All listed courses have openings and are available for registration. Each one-day workshop and multi-week learning experience brings participants into direct contact with naturalists, professional artists, and objects and specimens from our world-renowned collections.

Spend eight weeks learning the basics in our foundational "Drawing 1" course. Or, this spring, spend your Saturdays in the reopened museum with "Drawing from the Peabody Dioramas". Are you interested in painting with watercolors? We've got multiple courses and workshops for you to try, including the popular "Painting Insects in Amber".

Our courses are designed with all skill levels in mind. Audition a potential new hobby or take the four-week "Field Sketching & Nature Journaling at the Marsh Botanical Gardens". Combine art history with hands-on projects and live painting sessions with "The Art of Natural History", or give a gift to a creative friend or family member.

Register today for courses that offer personalized support and encourage learners of all ages to experience the natural world in a whole new way.

The Yale Peabody Museum’s Natural Science Illustration Program, begun in 2010, provides both beginner and professional artists opportunities to learn a wide range of art techniques focusing on nature and natural science illustration. Our skilled and experienced instructors provide personalized sup...

The new Peabody is almost here.  Behind doors that won’t be closed for much longer, the museum is a hive of activity as ...
12/20/2023

The new Peabody is almost here.

Behind doors that won’t be closed for much longer, the museum is a hive of activity as we prepare the Peabody of the future for all of you to enjoy.

In our galleries, the specimens you remember—and some you don’t—are taking shape on mounts and casework. In our offices, staff are hard at work to welcome you back into the new Peabody in the spring.

This work represents just a fraction of our goals, and we need your support to make it all happen. As we approach the end of the calendar year, we invite you to leave your mark on the Peabody and be a part of our ongoing journey to shape the future of scientific discovery and education.

Your tax-deductible gift, no matter the size, makes all the difference to this once-in-a-century effort. We thank you for your partnership, and we can’t wait to welcome you back next year:

GIVE HERE: https://tinyurl.com/giveYPM

We were excited to take a break from installing the new exhibitions to host WTNH News 8's Sarah Cody for a visit last we...
12/19/2023

We were excited to take a break from installing the new exhibitions to host WTNH News 8's Sarah Cody for a visit last week!

Check out her video at the link below to go inside the new Peabody lobby, our live plant display, and a new artwork from local artist Mohamad Hafez:

The Yale Peabody Museum is poised to re-open after a four-year renovation in spring of 2024.

For the first time, the Peabody Museum will be displaying live plants in our public galleries. Many of the species featu...
12/15/2023

For the first time, the Peabody Museum will be displaying live plants in our public galleries. Many of the species featured in this island exhibit, including the thick-trunked cycad in the middle, are largely unchanged since the days of the dinosaurs.

Check out the latest Peabody Evolved post for all the photos and a short video: https://peabodyevolved.yale.edu/taking-root/

These plants were generously contributed to the Peabody's new Central Gallery by our friends at the Marsh Botanical Garden. Curators Erika Edwards and Michael Donoghue teamed up with collections manager Patrick Sweeney to select plants that could thrive inside the museum, and a team of Peabody staff, featuring Nate Utrup, moved them all in just one day.

These seasoned professionals make moving an 800-pound sago palm look easy. We'll be keeping all of them well-watered in preparation for reopening in the spring.

Yale paleontologist Dalton Meyer has discovered a new lizard species, an ancestor of modern geckos he named Helioscopos ...
12/14/2023

Yale paleontologist Dalton Meyer has discovered a new lizard species, an ancestor of modern geckos he named Helioscopos dickersonae in honor of his grandmother, Helen Dickerson, and Mary Cynthia Dickerson, the first curator of herpetology at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

https://news.yale.edu/2023/11/28/yale-study-gives-grandmother-gecko-place-honor-and-new-name

Meyer and his colleagues, including Peabody curator Jacques Gauthier, used computed tomography (CT) scans to develop 3D images of a skull that dates back to the late Jurassic period, 163.5 to 145 million years ago.

“It is one of the earliest known gecko relatives in the fossil record,” Meyer said. “This means that the gecko line made it to North America nearly 100 million years before the prior known earliest record.”

Dalton joined us on Zoom earlier this month to discuss the discovery. Hear him here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgVk15RX6YU

Helioscopos dickersonae lived in North America in the late Jurassic period, 100 million years earlier than any previously known early gecko relative.

12/07/2023

Hiking the Himalayas for DNA: A Quest to Count Radial Flowered Honeysuckles

The Himalayas span at least five nations in Asia and contain the highest peaks in the world, including Mount Everest. They are home to high-altitude plants, many threatened with extinction from climate change and human activities. Yet because many species grow in hard-to-reach remote peaks and valleys across several countries, we still don’t have a clear idea of how many are there. We may lose them before they are even discovered.

Among these is the radially flowered honeysuckle plant group, Lonicera section Isoxylosteum. Ph.D. candidate Mansa Srivastav will share what it was like collecting plant DNA on foot across the Himalayas and what her efforts tell us about how many radially flowered honeysuckles exist and how their distribution is affected by climate and geological changes that occurred millions of years ago.

Don't miss "Hiking the Himalayas for DNA: A Quest to Count Radial Flowered Honeysuckles" TOMORROW (12/7) @ 4pm. There's ...
12/06/2023

Don't miss "Hiking the Himalayas for DNA: A Quest to Count Radial Flowered Honeysuckles" TOMORROW (12/7) @ 4pm.

There's still time to register: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/5717012024806/WN_ile5rU00TuGHYyiRoOWveA

The Himalayas span at least five nations in Asia and contain the highest peaks in the world, including Mount Everest. They are home to high-altitude plants, many threatened with extinction from climate change and human activities. Yet because many species grow in hard-to-reach remote peaks and valleys across several countries, we still don’t have a clear idea of how many are there. We may lose them before they are even discovered.

Among these is the radially flowered honeysuckle plant group, Lonicera section Isoxylosteum. Srivastav will share what it was like collecting plant DNA on foot across the Himalayas and what her efforts tell us about how many radially flowered honeysuckles exist and how their distribution is affected by climate and geological changes that occurred millions of years ago.

We couldn't be more excited to welcome the newly commissioned work "Eternal Cities" from local artist Mohamad Hafez into...
12/06/2023

We couldn't be more excited to welcome the newly commissioned work "Eternal Cities" from local artist Mohamad Hafez into our Human Cultures galleries. And we look forward to sharing it with the world when we reopen next year.

This week Connecticut Public's Where We Live interviewed Mohamad about the inspiration for his new piece and spoke with Peabody exhibitions lead Kailen Rogers and curator Agnete Lassen. He describes the inspiration for it and what it could represent for the future of museums:

"This collaboration becomes such a fundamental win-win situation, for the institutions that have now discovered a way to explore and feature their arsenal of beautiful objects in an unorthodox way; and the local Middle Eastern artists that are also reexamining these objects and reintroducing them in an also unorthodox way... I hope to God that we see a lot more and more collaborations like this from all over the world, to engage so many artists and open up these archives to them."

This hour, we get a sneak preview of one of the new exhibits at the Yale Peabody Museum, set to reopen in early 2024. Mohamad Hafez's "Eternal Cities" features miniature replicas of Babylonian artifacts, bridging the millennia between ancient Mesopotamia and present-day Syria. He joins us.

Archaeology Magazine just named Peabody curator Richard Burger's genetic study of the workers at Machu Picchu one of the...
12/05/2023

Archaeology Magazine just named Peabody curator Richard Burger's genetic study of the workers at Machu Picchu one of their "Top 10 Discoveries of 2023".

Burger's work alongside Yale University archaeologist Lucy Salazar found that the team of retainers—skilled workers including craftspeople and religious specialists—who maintained the palace year-round for the emperor came from all corners of the Incan empire, including Amazonia.

“This suggests that at least part of the Amazon was more fully integrated into the Inca Empire in ways that scholars hadn’t appreciated before,” Burger says. “Amazonian people weren’t just on the other side of a frontier that had distant trade relations with the Inca.”

Machu Picchu, Peru

Join us live on ZOOM, this Thursday (12/7) @ 4pm for "Hiking the Himalayas for DNA: A Quest to Count Radial Flowered Hon...
12/04/2023

Join us live on ZOOM, this Thursday (12/7) @ 4pm for
"Hiking the Himalayas for DNA: A Quest to Count Radial Flowered Honeysuckles" with Ph.D. candidate Mansa Srivastav.

Register here: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/5717012024806/WN_ile5rU00TuGHYyiRoOWveA

The Himalayas span at least five nations in Asia and contain the highest peaks in the world, including Mount Everest. They are home to high-altitude plants, many threatened with extinction from climate change and human activities. Yet because many species grow in hard-to-reach remote peaks and valleys across several countries, we still don’t have a clear idea of how many are there. We may lose them before they are even discovered.

Among these is the radially flowered honeysuckle plant group, Lonicera section Isoxylosteum. Srivastav will share what it was like collecting plant DNA on foot across the Himalayas and what her efforts tell us about how many radially flowered honeysuckles exist and how their distribution is affected by climate and geological changes that occurred millions of years ago.

Interactive workshop this Saturday (12/2)--PROPAGATING NATIVE WILDFLOWERS FROM SEEDRegister here: https://peabody.yale.e...
11/30/2023

Interactive workshop this Saturday (12/2)--PROPAGATING NATIVE WILDFLOWERS FROM SEED

Register here:
https://peabody.yale.edu/events/propagating-pollinator-plants-from-seed

Including native plants in your garden is a great way to provide food and habitat for pollinators. You can expand your native plantings inexpensively by growing them yourself from seed.

Join us this weekend for a workshop from 10am-12pm at Yale's West Campus where we’ll discuss the germination requirements for different species and get you fully prepared for next season. We’ll send you home with a plastic milk jug filled with a planted seed selection to stratify over the winter.

Proper after care will also be shared. Seeds and soil provided.
Registration is $40

Including native plants in your garden is a great way to help pollinators. Expand your native plantings inexpensively by growing them yourself from seed. In this 2 hour course we’ll discover different germination requirements for different kinds of seeds. We'll plant and bring home a plastic milk ...

11/30/2023

A Tale of Two Lizzies: Fossils from the American West and the Origin of Lizards

Lizards are the most diverse group of land-living vertebrates alive today. They thrive everywhere in the world, except at the poles. Yet a poor fossil record keeps the origins of the major lizard groups hidden.

Yale Ph.D. candidate Dalton Meyer will show us how 3D-imaging has brought new life to two fossil lizards from the American West and filled a gap in our understanding of two distantly related lizard groups. Hailing from 150 and 30 million years ago, each fossil tells us what these early lizards would have looked like and how their modern relatives have spread throughout the world.

Join us on Zoom TOMORROW (Nov. 30) @ 4pm for "A Tale of Two Lizzies: Fossils from the American West and the Origin of Li...
11/29/2023

Join us on Zoom TOMORROW (Nov. 30) @ 4pm for

"A Tale of Two Lizzies: Fossils from the American West and the Origin of Lizards"

REGISTER HERE: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/9017002330151/WN_sz-s8asaRjiToSMazrueAQ

Lizards are the most diverse group of land-living vertebrates alive today. They thrive everywhere in the world, except at the poles. Yet a poor fossil record keeps the origins of the major lizard groups hidden.

Yale University Ph.D. candidate Dalton Meyer will show us how 3D-imaging has brought new life to two fossil lizards from the American West and filled a gap in our understanding of two distantly related lizard groups. Hailing from 150 and 30 million years ago, each fossil tells us what these early lizards would have looked like and how their modern relatives have spread throughout the world.

Explore how the Peabody's Horse Island Research Station is redefining the relationship between architecture and the envi...
11/22/2023

Explore how the Peabody's Horse Island Research Station is redefining the relationship between architecture and the environment.

The new structure is both a dynamic teaching space and an experiment in regenerative architecture, a design philosophy that aims to create structures that go beyond sustainability and reverse environmental damage:

A Yale-owned research station that is an experiment in "regenerative architecture" poses a profound question about the future of making, and unmaking, buildings: how can new construction not just have zero impact on the environment…

❗️TONIGHT @ 5PM in the Marsh Lecture Hall, 260 Whitney Ave❗️Join us for this semester's Bass Distinguished Lecture "Conn...
11/15/2023

❗️TONIGHT @ 5PM in the Marsh Lecture Hall, 260 Whitney Ave❗️

Join us for this semester's Bass Distinguished Lecture "Connecting Environment and Economy" with Yale professor Eli Fenichel:

https://peabody.yale.edu/.../connecting-environment-economy

Fenichel discusses where, why, and how the environment is emerging as a primary driver of economic policy decisions both domestically and internationally.

❗️TONIGHT @ 5:30PM in Kroon Hall, 195 Prospect Street ❗️Peabody curator and Yale ornithologist Richard Prum sits down wi...
11/13/2023

❗️TONIGHT @ 5:30PM in Kroon Hall, 195 Prospect Street ❗️

Peabody curator and Yale ornithologist Richard Prum sits down with professor Joanna Radin to discuss his new book
"Performance All the Way Down: Genes, Development, and Sexual Difference":

https://peabody.yale.edu/events/performance-all-the-way-down

This much anticipated follow-up to 2017’s "Evolution of Beauty", a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, applies q***r feminist theory to developmental genetics, arguing that individuals are not essentially male or female.

Their conversation will be followed by a brief Q&A and light refreshments. Books will be available for purchase from event partner RJ Julia Booksellers and Dr. Prum will sign copies immediately following the program.

A new study from curator Derek Briggs has solved a prehistoric mystery and honored one of the Peabody's most prolific fo...
11/08/2023

A new study from curator Derek Briggs has solved a prehistoric mystery and honored one of the Peabody's most prolific fossil hunters:

https://news.yale.edu/2023/11/06/last-turn-ezekiels-wheel-honors-yale-affiliated-fossil-hunter

Of the 11,000+ specimens Samuel J. Ciurca Jr. generously donated to the Peabody, he labeled just one of them 'the most beautiful fossil ever found.' And until now, Ezekiel's Wheel, as he called it, remained scientifically unidentified.

Thanks to Briggs and his former student Nicolás Mongiardino Koch, we now understand it to be an extinct and very unusual cephalodiscid. And, henceforth, it shall be known as Rotaciurca superbus: “rota,” which is Latin for “wheel,” “ciurca” after the man who thought it was beautiful, and “superbus,” the Latin word for “splendid.”

Yale paleontologists have identified a “problematic” fossil as an ancient sea creature that lived in the plankton 420 million years ago.

11/02/2023

Birds Go to Prom: Behavior, society, and s*x in adolescent birds

Most birds have some growing up to do before they start to breed. Despite reaching full size within weeks or months of hatching, some species will not raise offspring for years, or even decades.

Yale Ph.D. candidate Liam Taylor explores the strange things that some birds need to do before they reproduce—from meeting a fishing buddy on a rocky island to finding a dance partner on a rainforest floor. Looking back through millions of years of evolution, we will uncover how behavioral, social, and s*xual development continues to create new challenges and opportunities for adolescent birds.

"Birds Go to Prom" tomorrow at 4pm on Zoom! Register here: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/7116978218259/WN_NIuOft...
11/01/2023

"Birds Go to Prom" tomorrow at 4pm on Zoom!

Register here: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/7116978218259/WN_NIuOftu-TqaelN93t_ZPRQ

Most birds have some growing up to do before they start to breed. Despite reaching full size within weeks or months of hatching, some species will not raise offspring for years, or even decades.

Yale Ph.D. candidate Liam Taylor explores the strange things that some birds need to do before they reproduce—from meeting a fishing buddy on a rocky island to finding a dance partner on a rainforest floor. Looking back through millions of years of evolution, we will uncover how behavioral, social, and s*xual development continues to create new challenges and opportunities for adolescent birds.

In a major new work to be published in the Bulletin of the Peabody, curator and Yale ichthyologist Thomas Near revises b...
10/26/2023

In a major new work to be published in the Bulletin of the Peabody, curator and Yale ichthyologist Thomas Near revises branches of the Tree of Life, creating an 800-page monograph that represents a new and 'comprehensive encyclopedia of fish.'

“Our knowledge of the fish Tree of Life is dramatically different than it was 20 years ago,” said Near. “Genetics has upended our understanding of how major fish lineages relate to each other."

In a major new work, Yale ichthyologist Thomas Near revises branches of the Tree of Life concerning most fish species based on the latest scientific knowledge.

Yale paleontologist and Peabody curator Bhart-Anjan Bhullar served as one of the primary scientific consultants for the ...
10/20/2023

Yale paleontologist and Peabody curator Bhart-Anjan Bhullar served as one of the primary scientific consultants for the new series "Life on Our Planet", co-produced by Steven Spielberg and premiering on Netflix next week.

YaleNews sat down with Dr. Bhullar for an insightful Q&A on his experience working on the program. Read it here:

https://news.yale.edu/2023/10/19/invisible-threads-stitched-together-life-our-planet

Episodes feature the feathered dinosaur Deinonychus, identified by the Peabody's John Ostrom in the 1960s, and many are organized similarly to the Yale paleontology course "History of Life", taught by Bhullar and other museum curators.

The series tells the story of life on Earth as a tale of competing dynasties that vie for dominance amid a series of cataclysmic extinction events that periodically reset the playing field.

Yale paleontologist Bhart-Anjan Bhullar talks about his work as a scientific consultant for the new Netflix documentary series, which premieres Oct. 25.

Researcher Alison Carranza has been spending a lot of time in the Peabody’s herbarium and on the shoreline of the Long I...
10/19/2023

Researcher Alison Carranza has been spending a lot of time in the Peabody’s herbarium and on the shoreline of the Long Island Sound. She contributed the photos above and wrote the following description of her work:

“Herbarium specimens, which are pressed and dried plants mounted on paper, contain an abundance of information about genetics, historical environmental conditions, and the timing of life events (flowering, fruiting, etc.) The Peabody’s herbarium has plant specimens collected from around the world that span hundreds of years and, therefore, provide a unique opportunity to study change over spatial and temporal scales. Interestingly, the Peabody houses multiple species of seagrasses collected throughout CT from as early as 1822.

Given this rich repository of collected specimens, which can be rare, I am attempting to track levels of a stable isotope of nitrogen throughout both Long Island Sound and the rivers that feed into it. Stable isotopes, atoms that don’t decay over time, act as unique tracers of a specific element. As an essential nutrient, nitrogen is absorbed by the seagrass, meaning that the amount of stable nitrogen isotopes within the herbarium specimens
can be representative of historic environmental nitrogen levels. These levels can fluctuate with influxes of runoff and wastewater into bodies of water, which can cause nitrogen pollution, and often results in high levels of algae and increased fish deaths due to decreased oxygen availability.

I hope to examine whether the marsh grass specimens in ’s herbarium are an accurate representation of historic nitrogen levels. To do so, it is critical to have contemporary samples from 2023, so I have collected marsh grasses at several points along the Connecticut coast to compare the levels of this stable isotope of nitrogen in the marsh grasses growing there today to those that were collected there throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. It is my hope that the marsh plants there today have lower levels of this isotope than the earlier specimens, likely in correlation with the Clean Water Act and other measures aimed to reduce pollution in our water.”

Join two Peabody experts on Saturday (10/14) for a day in the trees at Yale West Campus. Hosted by Education Coordinator...
10/12/2023

Join two Peabody experts on Saturday (10/14) for a day in the trees at Yale West Campus.

Hosted by Education Coordinator, Jim Sirch, and Collections Manager of Botany, Patrick Sweeney, "Trees of Connecticut: Ecology and Identification" introduces participants to the state's landscape history and ecology, focusing on the changing composition of our forests over time.

The presentation is followed by a walk through the woods where you'll enjoy the fall foliage and learn how to identify trees by their twigs, bark, and other features. Course fee is $25.

Register here:

Go inside our new human culture galleries with WTNH News 8's Sarah Cody and watch our exhibitions team installing the ob...
10/12/2023

Go inside our new human culture galleries with WTNH News 8's Sarah Cody and watch our exhibitions team installing the objects you'll be able to see in-person next year!

Every day, find a delicate team sport as employees are once again displaying artifacts from the Mesoamerican collection.

Address

170 Whitney Avenue
New Haven, CT
06511

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Yale Peabody Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Share

Nearby museums