Yale Center for British Art

Yale Center for British Art The largest museum outside of the UK devoted to British art. Located in the final building designed b It is free and open to all.

The Yale Center for British Art houses the largest collection of British art outside the United Kingdom, encompassing works in a range of media from the fifteenth century to the present. It offers exhibitions and programs year-round, including lectures, concerts, films, symposia, tours, and family events. Opened to the public in 1977, the YCBA’s core collection and landmark building—designed by ar

chitect Louis I. Kahn—were a gift to Yale University from the collector and philanthropist Paul Mellon.

Please help us give a warm welcome to Emma Hartman, Postgraduate Fellow in Paper Conservation at the Yale Center for Bri...
12/16/2023

Please help us give a warm welcome to Emma Hartman, Postgraduate Fellow in Paper Conservation at the Yale Center for British Art! In her role, Emma assists our conservators with the care, study, and treatment of works on paper in the collection. In these images, Emma is examining a watercolor and chine collé engraving before starting treatment.

Image:
Emma Hartman, Paper Conservation studio, Yale Center for British Art, photos by Michael Ipsen

🎁 Happy birthday to George Romney, born on this day in 1734! Along with Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough, Romney ...
12/15/2023

🎁 Happy birthday to George Romney, born on this day in 1734! Along with Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough, Romney was one of London’s most popular portraitists in the 1770s and 1780s.

Romney made clever use of marketing to advance his career. His prices for portraits were lower than those of Reynolds and Gainsborough, but still high enough to present an aura of authenticity. He also refused to exhibit in public, relying instead on word of mouth to secure his commissions, further adding to his brand. The great speed with which he painted could make sittings feel more like performances—he sometimes saw up to seven sitters in a single day.

The rapidity of his painting practice is matched in his drawings, such as this sketch for a portrait. In just a few quick graphite lines and strokes of ink applied with both pen and brush, the artist has rendered a stylish and captivating image of a woman. Her soft smile prompts the viewer to wonder what’s going on in her head. The YCBA collection includes more than a thousand works by Romney, which can viewed in high resolution on our collections website!

Image: George Romney (1734–1802), "Sketch for the Portrait of a Lady," undated, brown ink and graphite on paper, Yale Center for British Art, Yale Art Gallery Collection, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. J. Richardson Dilworth, B.A. 1938

Why the long face? It's  ! 🐎 Image: Martin Theodore Ward, "Head of a Grey Arabian Horse," between 1820 and 1830, oil on ...
12/13/2023

Why the long face? It's ! 🐎

Image: Martin Theodore Ward, "Head of a Grey Arabian Horse," between 1820 and 1830, oil on canvas on panel, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

Mark Aronson, Deputy Director and Chief Conservator, Yale Center for British Art, recently began treatment of William Da...
12/12/2023

Mark Aronson, Deputy Director and Chief Conservator, Yale Center for British Art, recently began treatment of William Daniell’s painting “A View in China: Cultivating the Tea Plant” (ca. 1810) at the Yale West Campus conservation studio. This early nineteenth-century painting depicts a river valley in China where people cultivated and prepared tea leaves for export. The artist likely created this vista from paintings made by Chinese artists, as Daniell would not have visited interior parts of China.

Mark has begun to remove several layers of natural resin varnish that yellowed over time. Removal of the old varnish will return the painting to a cooler, bluer palette and reintroduce a sense of recessional space that has disappeared under the discolored varnish and old retouching. A new layer of varnish and more judicious retouching will be added before the restoration is finished.

After the museum reopens, the painting will be included in an exhibition exploring the artists associated with the British East India Company.

Image credit: Mark Aronson at the Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage shared conservation lab, photo by Yale West Campus staff

The artist Lucian Freud was born on this day in Berlin in 1922. The grandson of the psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud (1856–19...
12/08/2023

The artist Lucian Freud was born on this day in Berlin in 1922. The grandson of the psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), Lucian and his family moved to England in 1933 as Hi**er rose to power in Germany. Freud became one of the most influential portraitists of the twentieth century, depicting subjects ranging from drag queens to Queen Elizabeth II.

Freud‘s early portraits border on surrealism, combining exacting detail and distorted features, notably abnormally large eyes and other facial features. As he aged, he traded crisp details for a thick application of paint, capturing the feeling of flesh on the canvas.

In this etching from the Yale Center for British Art’s collection, you can see that his interest in depicting the physical qualities of flesh was not limited to his paintings. From the folds of the woman’s skin to her tattoo, Freud’s careful representation creates a deeply intimate portrait of his subject.

Image: Lucian Freud, "Woman with Arm Tattoo," 1996, etching, Yale Center for British Art. © The Lucian Freud Archive. All Rights Reserved 2023 / Bridgeman Images

Who was F***y Eaton? Born in Jamaica in 1835, F***y Eaton (née Antwistle or Entwistle) moved to London with her mother s...
12/07/2023

Who was F***y Eaton?

Born in Jamaica in 1835, F***y Eaton (née Antwistle or Entwistle) moved to London with her mother sometime in the early 1850s. In 1859, she modeled for a group of London-based artists, including Simeon Solomon and Walter Fryer Stocks. Soon after, she sat for several life-drawing classes at the Royal Academy Schools.

Eaton was featured in Simeon Solomon's history painting "The Mother of Moses," which was exhibited at the Academy’s Summer Exhibition to acclaim in 1860. She subsequently sat for several other Pre-Raphaelite painters, including Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Rebecca Solomon, and Joanna Boyce Wells, the artist behind this sensitive portrayal.

Boyce Wells died in childbirth in 1861 before she could complete two larger works in which Eaton was to appear. Eaton, however, lived until 1924. After her years as an artists’ model, she worked as a housekeeper and cook in the Isle of Wight and London.

Image: Joanna Boyce Wells, "F***y Eaton," 1861, oil on paper laid to linen, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Fund

✨ Issue 25 of "British Art Studies" is now available online! This issue’s cover collaboration features new work by the a...
12/06/2023

✨ Issue 25 of "British Art Studies" is now available online!

This issue’s cover collaboration features new work by the artist Charwei Tsai, created during a recent residency at the Wysing Arts Centre in Cambridge. It is currently on view in "Making New Worlds: Li Yuan-chia and Friends" at Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge.

🔗 Read more: https://www.britishartstudies.ac.uk/issues/issue-index/issue-25

"British Art Studies" is a peer-reviewed online journal, co-published by the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, London, and the Yale Center for British Art.

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Image details:
Charwei Tsai, "Ancient Desires," 2023, ceramic offering vessels, dimensions variable, commissioned by Kettle's Yard and the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, during a residency at Wysing Arts Centre. Made with the support of artists Lawrence Epps and Isobel Meredith-Hardy at Wysing Arts Centre, Cambridge, and Marie Saint Bris, Paris. Digital image courtesy of Charwei Tsai / Photo: Lucy Rose Shaftain-Fenner

Thank you to Connor Arakaki and Josie Reich at Yale Daily News for covering the YCBA's building conservation project! Re...
12/05/2023

Thank you to Connor Arakaki and Josie Reich at Yale Daily News for covering the YCBA's building conservation project!

Read the article here:

Since its closure in February, the YCBA has begun a conservation project for its rooftop and lighting system, and it has continued to hold online and off-site events celebrating artistic endeavors. The museum will formally announce details of its reopening in January 2024.

Graduate students in the Public Humanities at Yale micro-credential course "The Art Museum Exhibition" gave guided tours...
12/02/2023

Graduate students in the Public Humanities at Yale micro-credential course "The Art Museum Exhibition" gave guided tours of "In a New Light: Paintings from the Yale Center for British Art" to their peers. The students shared formal and historical interpretations of selected works in the show.

Facilitated by Rachel Chatalbash, Deputy Director for Research, and Stéphanie Machabée, Postdoctoral Research Associate, at the Yale Center for British Art, the course explored art museum exhibitions. YCBA staff and guest speakers from museums across the US met with students to discuss museum practices from planning to installation, communication and marketing, and education and programs.

"In a New Light" closes on Sunday, December 3! Visit the Yale University Art Gallery today from 11 am to 5 pm.

Image details:
Students visiting "In a New Light: Paintings from the Yale Center for British Art," Yale University Art Gallery, photos by YCBA staff

Congratulations to Joy Gregory, winner of the 2023 Freelands Award! Whitechapel Gallery in London will stage her first m...
12/01/2023

Congratulations to Joy Gregory, winner of the 2023 Freelands Award! Whitechapel Gallery in London will stage her first monographic exhibition, surveying a four-decade practice, in fall 2025.

In October and November, Joy was a Visiting Scholar at the Yale Center for British Art. She conducted research on materials in the YCBA collection and the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library that relate to Jamaica during the period 1600 to 1900 to re-create fictional narratives that focus on plants as agents of resistance. This material, in conjunction with interpretations of Hans Sloane's journal documenting his journey to Jamaica, will form the basis for the creation of new work.

Established in 2015, the Freelands Foundation Award is an annual £110,000 prize enabling a UK public arts institution to present a solo exhibition, including new work, by a mid-career woman artist whose work may not have previously received the recognition it deserves.

Image details: Joy Gregory in the Study Room, Yale Center for British Art, photos by Michael Ipsen

Inside the Entrance Court at the Yale Center for British Art, you can observe Louis I. Kahn's distinctive use of natural...
11/30/2023

Inside the Entrance Court at the Yale Center for British Art, you can observe Louis I. Kahn's distinctive use of natural materials. The warm white oak paneling and travertine floors create a dramatic opening to the grand space—four stories tall—and contrast with the cool, poured concrete columns.

Look up and find evidence of the way Kahn brought a sense of order to the museum. As your eye travels upward, the columns become thinner and openings provide visitors with views of the galleries, imbuing the space with a sense of ethereality.

Image: Entrance Court, Yale Center for British Art, photo by Stephanie Anestis

Happy birthday to William Blake! 🎁 Blake (1757–1827) brought poetry and imaginative depictions of the universe to the pa...
11/28/2023

Happy birthday to William Blake! 🎁 Blake (1757–1827) brought poetry and imaginative depictions of the universe to the page, expressing a singular view of the world. His stunning graphic works are among Britain's most celebrated art.

Several works from the museum’s collection such as “The Tyger” are on view at the Getty in the exhibition “William Blake: Visionary.” The show continues through January 14, 2024.

Image details:
William Blake, “The Tyger,” from “Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience,” plate 42 of Copy F, printed 1789 and 1794. Color-printed relief etching with watercolor. Yale Center for British Art, New Haven. Paul Mellon Collection.

Need weekend plans? Take a tour of "In a New Light: Paintings from the Yale Center for British Art" with one of the Yale...
11/25/2023

Need weekend plans? Take a tour of "In a New Light: Paintings from the Yale Center for British Art" with one of the Yale Center for British Art's Student Guides! The exhibition features more than fifty paintings from the YCBA, on view at the Yale University Art Gallery through Sunday, December 3, 2023.

📅 Two Student Guide tours remain this year:
—Sunday, November 26, 11:30 am – 12:30 pm
—Sunday, December 3, 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

No registration is required; check in at the information desk in the Gallery lobby.

Image details:
YCBA Student Guides visiting "In a New Light: Paintings from the Yale Center for British Art," Yale University Art Gallery, photos by YCBA staff

What's on your table today? 🍇 🍏 Happy Thanksgiving from everyone at the Yale Center for British Art! Wishing you all a b...
11/23/2023

What's on your table today? 🍇 🍏

Happy Thanksgiving from everyone at the Yale Center for British Art! Wishing you all a bountiful holiday!

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Image details:
William Henry Hunt, "Apple, Grapes and a Cob-Nut," ca. 1850, watercolor and gouache over graphite on paper, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

☁️ How’s the weather up there?  Kevin Derken, Head of Installation, and Andrzej Dutkanicz, Museum Technician, recently u...
11/20/2023

☁️ How’s the weather up there?

Kevin Derken, Head of Installation, and Andrzej Dutkanicz, Museum Technician, recently used a lift to see parts of the museum that are rarely seen. The lift was instrumental in the replacement of skylights inside the Entrance Court and Library Court. While it was at the museum, our installation team used this machine to investigate options for anchoring future installations. The lift extends more than forty feet from the ground, allowing Kevin and Andrzej to see the top of the concrete stairwell up close from inside the Library Court.

Image: Kevin Derken and Andrzej Dutkanicz, Library Court, Yale Center for British Art, photo by Richard Caspole

Recognize this face? Anita Dey started a new role as Assistant Paper Conservator at the Yale Center for British Art! In ...
11/18/2023

Recognize this face? Anita Dey started a new role as Assistant Paper Conservator at the Yale Center for British Art! In her position, she examines, documents, treats, and provides preventative measures for paper-based artworks in the museum’s collection. She is currently researching the materials and techniques used by eighteenth-century British, Chinese, and Indian artists in preparation for an upcoming exhibition.

Here, Anita is pictured with one of her favorite works from the collection, “The Enchantress” by Richard Earlom. Anita loves how she finds more details in this frightening scene the more time she spends with this print.

Look closely and you’ll see a menagerie of ghouls and fantastical creatures: a three-headed dog, another dog with hands clasped in prayer, and a figure with the face of a bird, among others. Learn more about this work here: https://bit.ly/3QBrw68

Image details:
[1] Anita Dey with “The Enchantress” by Richard Earlom, Study Room, Yale Center for British Art, photo by YCBA staff

Earlier this month, Daniel H. Weiss (Yale MPPM 1985), former president and CEO of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, joined...
11/15/2023

Earlier this month, Daniel H. Weiss (Yale MPPM 1985), former president and CEO of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, joined three Yale Center for British Art Student Guides—Tommy Kinservik ’24, Isaidy Medina ’25, and Ana Rodrigues ’25—for a panel exploring the role of art museums within our culture. Weiss discussed his book "Why the Museum Matters" (2022) and shared his reflections on the evolving nature of cultural institutions.

Support for the program was provided by the Norma Lytton Fund for Docent Education, established in memory of Norma Lytton by her family. Lytton was an active docent at the YCBA for more than twenty years and subsequently spent a decade engaged in research for the museum’s department of Paintings and Sculpture.

📺 Stay tuned for a recording of this program!

Image details:
"Why the Museum Matters," Hastings Hall, Yale School of Architecture, photo by Michael Ipsen

Can you count the birds in this painting by Prunella Clough?  Clough was born on this day in 1919 in London. The niece o...
11/14/2023

Can you count the birds in this painting by Prunella Clough?

Clough was born on this day in 1919 in London. The niece of the designer Eileen Gray (1878–1976), she enrolled as a part-time student at Chelsea School of Art in 1937. During World War II, she drew charts and maps at the Office of War Information. This experience may have influenced the subject matter of her later works, many recalling industrial landscapes.

In the late 1940s, Clough began making paintings of people working at the docks at Lowestoft along the Thames, but by the end of the next decade, Clough’s subjects had become more abstract, as seen in this dusky painting, “Machine and Birds.” Taken as a whole, Clough’s varied outputs as a painter and printmaker convey her wide interests and extensive visual curiosity. In 1999, she won the Jerwood Painting Prize, a prestigious award for originality in painting in the UK, three months before her death at age 80.

Want to learn more about Clough? Book an appointment to visit the Reference Library: https://bit.ly/3QfMrf6

Image details: Prunella Clough (1916–1999), “Machine and Birds,” undated, oil on canvas, Yale Center for British Art, Gift of the Libra Foundation, from the family of Nicholas and Susan Pritzker © 2023 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS, London

On Remembrance Day, we are sharing this printed handkerchief, first manufactured in 1914, with the words and music of "T...
11/11/2023

On Remembrance Day, we are sharing this printed handkerchief, first manufactured in 1914, with the words and music of "Till the Boys Come Home (Keep the Home Fires Burning)." Lena Guilbert Ford wrote the lyrics and Ivor Novello composed the music.

The border of the handkerchief is made up of flags of Britain's allied nations. Three illustrations at the bottom depict marching Scottish soldiers, a family singing together, and a team of soldiers operating a field gun.

Explore more works from the museum’s collection: https://bit.ly/35KYppz

Image: "Till the Boys Come Home (Keep the Home Fires Burning)," printed handkerchief made in Great Britain, 1914 or 1915.

A demon in Sir Joshua Reynold's painting “The Death of Cardinal Beaufort” has resurfaced following a restoration project...
11/10/2023

A demon in Sir Joshua Reynold's painting “The Death of Cardinal Beaufort” has resurfaced following a restoration project by the National Trust, an English conservation charity. In this article in The New York Times, Mark Aronson, Deputy Director and Chief Conservator at the Yale Center for British Art, discusses some of the challenges of conserving works by the leading portrait painter of the eighteenth century.

Read the article:

“The Death of Cardinal Beaufort” by Sir Joshua Reynolds was originally maligned for its depiction of a fanged figure, which was later painted over.

Happy birthday, William Hogarth! 🎁 Born in London on this day in 1697, Hogarth gained fame for his satirical paintings a...
11/10/2023

Happy birthday, William Hogarth! 🎁 Born in London on this day in 1697, Hogarth gained fame for his satirical paintings and prints.

The artist’s influence extends well beyond the eighteenth century. Playwright Jasmine Lee-Jones used Hogarth’s engraving “Strolling Actresses Dressing in a Barn” as a jumping-off point for her play “Curious” (2021). According to Lee-Jones, her work focuses on the “specter of the forgotten Black woman.”

Hogarth’s print depicts actresses inhabiting the personas of classical goddesses. It inspired Lee-Jones to explore the story of the Black woman dressed as Night, who darns stockings in the lower right foreground. Based in Britain, Lee-Jones used the high-resolution images available on the YCBA collections website for her study.

Lee-Jones is the youngest recipient of the Windham-Campbell Prizes, which she was awarded for Drama earlier this year.

Image: William Hogarth, “Strolling Actresses Dressing in a Barn,” 1738, etching with line engraving, Yale Center for British Art, Gift of Suzanne and William H. Speaker

Applications are now open for the 2025 Residential Awards at the Yale Center for British Art! The deadline is Monday, De...
11/08/2023

Applications are now open for the 2025 Residential Awards at the Yale Center for British Art! The deadline is Monday, December 18, 2023.
Learn more and apply: https://bit.ly/3FTzJxz

The Yale Center for British Art offers several short-term residential awards to academics, artists, curators, doctoral candidates, and writers to access the YCBA's collections and library.

Applications are now open for the 2025 residential awards at the Yale Center for British Art! The deadline is Monday, De...
11/08/2023

Applications are now open for the 2025 residential awards at the Yale Center for British Art! The deadline is Monday, December 18, 2023.

⭐ The YCBA offers several short-term residential awards to academics, artists, curators, doctoral candidates, and writers to access the YCBA's collections and library. While the museum is currently closed for building conservation, the Study Room and Reference Library are open to researchers.

🏆 Awardees are given a dedicated working space in the museum's Reference Library and encouraged to participate in events and programs, as well as to engage with the scholarly community of the university. They can also take advantage of the extensive collections at other Yale museums and libraries.

🔗 Learn more: https://bit.ly/3FTzJxz

Image: Reference Library, Yale Center for British Art, photo by Stephanie Anestis

It’s Guy Fawkes Day! This British holiday, also referred to as Bonfire Night or Fireworks Night, is celebrated with bonf...
11/05/2023

It’s Guy Fawkes Day! This British holiday, also referred to as Bonfire Night or Fireworks Night, is celebrated with bonfires, festivals, and fireworks.

The day marks a failed attempt to assassinate King James I on November 5, 1605, known as the Gunpowder Plot. One of the conspirators, Guy Fawkes, planned to ignite the House of Lords during the State Opening of Parliament, in order to kill the Protestant James I and install a Catholic successor. English officials thwarted the plot, and all conspirators were found guilty and executed.

Image: John Wilson Carmichael, “A Fireworks Display,” nineteenth century, pen and black ink and watercolor and white gouache, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

11/03/2023
Some 🔥 FIRE to finish  !“Double, double, toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble!” In this creepy watercolor by...
10/31/2023

Some 🔥 FIRE to finish !

“Double, double, toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble!” In this creepy watercolor by Mary H***e, the three witches from Shakespeare’s "Macbeth" concoct potions from ingredients such as eye of newt and tongue of frog.

We hope your night is equally full of spooky activities with friends and family! Happy Halloween! 🎃

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Image details: Mary H***e, "The Three Witches from Macbeth: Double, Double, Toil and Trouble," 1781, watercolor with black ink and scraping over graphite on paper, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

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🦇 Did someone say  ? How could we resist sharing Edward Lear's "B" the bat?B was a BatWho slept all the day And flew all...
10/28/2023

🦇 Did someone say ? How could we resist sharing Edward Lear's "B" the bat?

B was a Bat
Who slept all the day
And flew all about
When the sun went away.
B!
Beautiful Bat!

Image details: Edward Lear, Alphabet Book, 1857.

Before construction began on the Yale Center for British Art, Louis I. Kahn created drafts and scale models, such as the...
10/27/2023

Before construction began on the Yale Center for British Art, Louis I. Kahn created drafts and scale models, such as the one documented in these images by architectural photographer George Pohl.

The YCBA Archives provides access to the architectural history of our building, from concept sketches to photographs of construction.

Learn more about our Archives: https://bit.ly/3QfMrf6

Image: A002 Constance Clement collection of Yale Center for British Art photographs and negatives

🎣 Anyone else craving fish and chips (or more Bonington)?In this painting, “A Fish-market near Boulogne,” fishermen unlo...
10/25/2023

🎣 Anyone else craving fish and chips (or more Bonington)?

In this painting, “A Fish-market near Boulogne,” fishermen unload their catch against a radiant sky. Buyers flock to the scene, while the tall masts of several ships peek out from the background. Bustling with life, this piece was one of the largest and most ambitious oil paintings by Richard Parkes Bonington, who was born near Nottingham on this day in 1802.

Check out the subtle variations of clear light and reflections on the smooth water. See this painting in the “In a New Light: Paintings from the Yale Center for British Art” exhibition at the Yale University Art Gallery, open today from 10 am to 5 pm.

Image:
Richard Parkes Bonington, “A Fish-market near Boulogne,” 1824, oil on canvas, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

For today's  ’s prompt—SHALLOW—two boats sit high and dry on the beach. Their masts puncture the cloudy sky, where the a...
10/24/2023

For today's ’s prompt—SHALLOW—two boats sit high and dry on the beach. Their masts puncture the cloudy sky, where the artist has left the white paper virtually untouched. In this moment of low tide, local fisherman tend to their boats, the English Channel visible as a streak of blue in the distance.

Image: Richard Parkes Bonington, "Beach Scene," ca. 1825, watercolor with scraping out, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

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To celebrate  , we're sharing this paint box from our collection! This rare artist’s paint box from the nineteenth centu...
10/22/2023

To celebrate , we're sharing this paint box from our collection!

This rare artist’s paint box from the nineteenth century holds supplies intended for painting on porcelain. On the left are vials of pigments, while the ceramic palette in the center shows examples of how the colors should look when prepared for use. The box also contains brushes of various sizes, a thin metal stylus, a glazed ceramic oval palette, two steel palette knives, and a glass muller used to grind and mix colors.

Make an appointment to see this object in person in our Study Room! Email [email protected] to schedule your visit.

Image details: Reeves & Sons (London, England), box of pigments and implements for painting on china, London: Reeves & Sons, 113 Cheapside, ca. 1880.

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❄️ Today’s   is FROSTy! Here, hoarfrost blankets Glen Lyon in the Scottish Highlands. This fluffy white frost forms when...
10/20/2023

❄️ Today’s is FROSTy!

Here, hoarfrost blankets Glen Lyon in the Scottish Highlands. This fluffy white frost forms when water v***r comes into contact with an object below freezing temperature. The moisture in the air freezes into ice crystals, captured here in artist Charles Davidson’s rendering of the feathery, blue-green hills.

Image details: Charles Davidson (1824–1902), "Hoar Frost, Misty Morning: Glen Lyon," undated, watercolor over graphite on paper, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

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🐴 Let’s SADDLE up for today’s   post!This prancing pony looks decked out for the day, complete with an elegant saddle an...
10/18/2023

🐴 Let’s SADDLE up for today’s post!

This prancing pony looks decked out for the day, complete with an elegant saddle and plumed headpiece. The artist and architect Inigo Jones (1573–1652) first became famous for his designs for costumes and stage settings for courtly masques. The energetic sketch exemplifies Jones’s expressive drawing technique and captures the movement of the horse—perhaps ready to perform!

Image: Attributed to Inigo Jones, "A Plumed Saddle-Horse," ca. 1640, pen and brown ink on paper, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

👼 ANGEL is the inspiration for today's   post. This plate featuring two angels before an ominous figure comes from Willi...
10/16/2023

👼 ANGEL is the inspiration for today's post.

This plate featuring two angels before an ominous figure comes from William Blake’s "Europe. A Prophecy," of which only nine copies survive. This book was made using Blake’s method of “illuminated printing,” in which he etched both text and image on the same copper plate, allowing them to be printed together. Blake was both an artist and a poet, and this technique allowed for the marriage of the visual and the literary in the books that he created.

Image: Print made by William Blake, "A Prophecy, Plate 12," 'Albions Angel rose . . .'" (Bentley 14), 1794, color-printed relief etching in dark brown ink, with oil, watercolor, and pen and black ink on paper, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

Welcome to Justin Allen! Justin joined the Yale Center for British Art this summer as Communications and Marketing Coord...
10/14/2023

Welcome to Justin Allen! Justin joined the Yale Center for British Art this summer as Communications and Marketing Coordinator. He helps promote the museum's programs and educational opportunities on social media, the website, and around New Haven.

Some of Justin’s favorite works in the collection include a series of etchings by Lynette Yiadom-Boakye collectively called “Fly.” Justin enjoys Yiadom-Boakye’s thoughtful and imaginative depictions of Black figures and the intimate scale of these works.

📸: Justin Allen with "IV" and "X" from Lynette Yiadom-Boakye's series "Fly," Study Room, Yale Center for British Art, photo by YCBA staff

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Happy birthday to Hew Locke! 🎂 Born in Edinburgh in 1959, Locke spent his late childhood and adolescence in Guyana and t...
10/13/2023

Happy birthday to Hew Locke! 🎂 Born in Edinburgh in 1959, Locke spent his late childhood and adolescence in Guyana and trained as a printmaker and sculptor in London, where he now lives.

🏆 "The Prize" is a collage in the museum's collection assembled from screen-printed images of found objects, onto which actual objects have been attached. The trophy is a parody. The flowers are plastic and the gold is paper, suggesting that this is something of a hollow prize.

Locke's work will be the subject of an upcoming exhibition at the YCBA. Stay tuned for more information!

🖼️: Hew Locke, "The Prize," 2007, digital inkjet prints with silkscreen, collaged into a 3D structure, with plastic beads and flowers on moderately thick, smooth, white wove paper, mounted on white board, Yale Center for British Art, Friends of British Art Fund

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As the weather gets chilly, you might find yourself craving something hot and 🌶️ SPICY—the inspiration for today’s   pro...
10/12/2023

As the weather gets chilly, you might find yourself craving something hot and 🌶️ SPICY—the inspiration for today’s prompt.

The residents of Georgian London weren’t so different! In this watercolor by Thomas Rowlandson, street vendors sell hot spiced gingerbread, which surely would have been a hit on a cold autumn day in London.

💭 Did you know that street vendors had distinctive cries to market their goods and entice customers?

Image: Thomas Rowlandson (1756–1827), "Hot Spice Gingerbread All Hot," undated, watercolor with pen and gray and red-brown ink over graphite on paper, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

Today for  : Wheel of (mis)FORTUNE, anyone? William Blake’s etching illustrates John Gay’s fable "Pan and Fortune," abou...
10/10/2023

Today for : Wheel of (mis)FORTUNE, anyone? William Blake’s etching illustrates John Gay’s fable "Pan and Fortune," about a young man who gambled away his inheritance:

“‘Tis a gross error, held in schools
That Fortune always favours fools . . .
‘Tis folly Pan, that is thy foe.”

Debt collectors arrive at his family’s estate and begin cutting down the forested park on the property. Awoken by the axes, the forest god Pan crushes a dice cup beneath his hooves and tears apart a deck of cards while cursing fortune.

The goddess Fortune appears before Pan astride a wheel and reminds him that it is not fortune who determines outcomes, but rather our individual choices.

Image: Print made by William Blake, "Fable XII, Pan and Fortune," 1793, etching and line engraving on paper, Yale Center for British Art, Gift of Kenneth D. Rapoport, MD

📸 Participants in "The View from Here," a six-month photography program for eleventh- and twelfth-grade students and fir...
10/07/2023

📸 Participants in "The View from Here," a six-month photography program for eleventh- and twelfth-grade students and first-year students at public universities or community colleges from Greater New Haven, recently experimented with cyanotypes. This process is one of the oldest photography techniques, yet no cameras are needed!

🌞 Instructors Paul Messier and Kappy Mintie demonstrated how the light-sensitive paper changes color when it is exposed to sunlight. The parts of the paper covered by an object remained white, while the areas exposed to the ultraviolet light developed into a rich blue color.

The program is offered by the Yale Center for British Art and the Lens Media Lab at the Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage, Yale University.

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Image details:
Two students holding cyanotype prints, photo by YCBA staff
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The Yale Center for British Art is a public art museum and research institute that houses the largest collection of British art outside the United Kingdom. Presented to the university by Paul Mellon (Yale College, Class of 1929), the collection reflects the development of British art and culture from the Elizabethan period onward. The Center’s collections include more than 2,000 paintings and 250 sculptures, 20,000 drawings and watercolors, 6,000 photographs, 40,000 prints, and 35,000 rare books and manuscripts. More than 40,000 volumes supporting research in British art and related fields are available in the Reference Library. Admission is free. The Center offers a year-round schedule of exhibitions and programs. Resources include a reference library and study room for examining works on paper, as well as rare books and manuscripts. Opened to the public in 1977, the Center is the final building designed by Louis I. Kahn. Located in downtown New Haven, the Center is near many of the city’s best restaurants, theaters, and shops.

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