Digital Farmington

Digital Farmington The site is a partnership between Dr. Hermes’ HIST 301: The Historical Imagination classes and the SWH to show change over time in Farmington.

DIGITAL FARMINGTON: THE CONCEPT AND DEVELOPMENT

In September, 2014, Prof. Stan Kurkovsky sent this message to other professors at Central Connecticut State University:

“The CCSU Computer Science department regularly offers senior software engineering courses in which student teams participate in design and development of software projects of various sizes and complexity. Usually, the best projec

DIGITAL FARMINGTON: THE CONCEPT AND DEVELOPMENT

In September, 2014, Prof. Stan Kurkovsky sent this message to other professors at Central Connecticut State University:

“The CCSU Computer Science department regularly offers senior software engineering courses in which student teams participate in design and development of software projects of various sizes and complexity. Usually, the best projec

Operating as usual

Events | My Site
10/28/2021
Events | My Site

Events | My Site

Farmington Land Trust's calendar of events.

Check out the latest from Digital Farmington Blog by Sharon Clapp.
12/28/2018
The Will of Amy Pewompskin, A Native Woman of New Hartford

Check out the latest from Digital Farmington Blog by Sharon Clapp.

By Sharon Clapp Amy Pewompskin, also known as Saquama, of New Hartford, Connecticut, died on March 19, 1752, having declared her will on March 10, 1752 (appearing in the Litchfield County Probate R…

Stanley-Whitman House
11/30/2018

Stanley-Whitman House

Check out these hand hooked holiday pillows made in Vermont that would make great gifts for your friends and family! You can get yours at the museum shop at Stanley-Whitman House! We are open Wednesday-Sunday, 10:00 - 4:00 PM!

The Stanley-Whitman House needs a Visitors Service Specialist, a Curator and a Development Officer.
08/21/2018
Careers at Stanley-Whitman House

The Stanley-Whitman House needs a Visitors Service Specialist, a Curator and a Development Officer.

Find your next great career opportunity at Stanley-Whitman House

On May 25, 2018 Prof. Katherine Hermes, J.D., Ph.D. and Prof. Alexandra Maravel, J.D.  of Central Connecticut State Univ...
05/27/2018
“How to find Onepenny: Re-telling Connecticut’s Native History through Wongunk Genealogy”

On May 25, 2018 Prof. Katherine Hermes, J.D., Ph.D. and Prof. Alexandra Maravel, J.D. of Central Connecticut State University, New Britain sat down with Ronna Stuller on the public access television show, “Thinking Green,” to discuss their genealogical research on the Wongunk (Wangunk), the Native people who lived (and in some cases still do) along the Connecticut River from Hartford (Suckiog) in the South Meadows, Wethersfield (Pyquag), South Glastonbury (Nayaug), Middletown, Portland (Wongunk Meadows), Haddam and Thirty Mile Island, East Hampton, Killingly and other towns.

On May 25, 2018 Prof. Katherine Hermes, J.D., Ph.D. and Prof. Alexandra Maravel, J.D. of Central Connecticut State University, New Britain sat down with Ronna Stuller on the public access televisi…

Digital Farmington: The Concept and Development
05/19/2018
Digital Farmington: The Concept and Development

Digital Farmington: The Concept and Development

In September, 2014, Prof. Stan Kurkovsky sent this message to other professors at Central Connecticut State University: “The CCSU Computer Science department regularly offers senior software …

Stanley-Whitman House
05/06/2018

Stanley-Whitman House

The tradition continues at the Stanley-Whitman House- admission is free for mothers on Mother's Day, Sunday, May 13th 12-4:00 pm! Bring mom by for a visit and enjoy a tour together of our colonial house and gardens!

Connecticut League of History Organizations
04/23/2018
Connecticut League of History Organizations

Connecticut League of History Organizations

Announcing the 2018 Connecticut Digital Archive Open Meeting: The CTDA and Digital Initiatives in Connecticut

Join CTDA in Hartford on June 15th for the 2018 Connecticut Digital Archive (CTDA) Open Meeting! Come hear from the CTDA, archivists, curators, librarians and other professionals from across Connecticut about their work on digital heritage projects.

The meeting will be an all day event with registration opening at 9:30am and the final session wrapping up at 3:45pm.

The event is free and open to all.

Connecticut Humanities, UConn Libraries, CT State Historic Preservation Office, Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, Ccsu Historians, Connecticut State Library

https://mailchi.mp/5b0c283c0d5b/2018-ctda-open-meeting

A DEEPER LOOK AT LOYALISTS IN NEWGATE PRISONFebruary 20, 2018Author: Morgan Bengel, CCSU MA in Public History student
02/24/2018
A Deeper Look at Loyalists in Newgate Prison

A DEEPER LOOK AT LOYALISTS IN NEWGATE PRISON

February 20, 2018
Author: Morgan Bengel, CCSU MA in Public History student

Author: Morgan Bengel On May 12, 1781, one woman was permitted to visit her prisoner husband in the mine shaft of New-gate Prison. Upon entering, the door was unlatched and roughly twenty men rushe…

A new blogpost by Jessica Dabrowski!
02/06/2018
“Newgate: Connecticut’s First State Prison”

A new blogpost by Jessica Dabrowski!

Author: Jessica Dabkowski In 1773, Connecticut’s General Assembly chose the copper mines in Simsbury to be the state’s first prison, renaming it Newgate Prison. During the Revolutionary Era, Newgat…

A new blogpost by Ian Long.
01/16/2018
Daggett’s Charge: The Revolution in New Haven

A new blogpost by Ian Long.

Author: Ian Long On the morning of July 5th British ships with troops under the command of Major General William Tryon sailed into New Haven’s harbor, bringing the Revolutionary War to the Connecti…

Emily McAdam is the author of a new blogpost on Digital Farmington Blog!
01/01/2018
Republican Motherhood and Sarah Pierce’s Litchfield Female Academy

Emily McAdam is the author of a new blogpost on Digital Farmington Blog!

Author: Emily McAdam Before the American Revolution, New Englanders considered learning to be masculine and education for girls unnecessary. However, women’s contributions to the political revoluti…

Building Peace after the Revolution: William Spratts and Old Gate Mansion – Digital Farmington Blog
12/21/2017
Building Peace after the Revolution: William Spratts and Old Gate Mansion – Digital Farmington Blog

Building Peace after the Revolution: William Spratts and Old Gate Mansion – Digital Farmington Blog

Building Peace after the Revolution: William Spratts and Old Gate Mansion December 20, 2017December 16, 2017 Author: Teresa Lewis Figure 1 Cowles House, built 1780-1782. Picture taken 1942, Courtesy of the Smithsonian Institute. Today, many historians are attempting to revise Connecticut’s revo....

Digital Farmington's cover photo
12/17/2017

Digital Farmington's cover photo

10/01/2017

Stanley-Whitman House Celebrates Renovated Gallery Opening

FARMINGTON — The Stanley-Whitman House museum of Early American history will unveil a newly renovated gallery focusing on the remarkable life and culture of Colonial Farmington during an open house from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 1.

The open house will feature refreshments and a children's workshop creating silhouettes led by local artist Nancy Conlan. Museum Executive Director Lisa Johnson says the gallery profiles residents of early Farmington, as well as historic events taking place as early as 400 years ago.

Featured are the voices and images of 11 Farmington residents portrayed by museum educators filmed by videographer Alyson Grisham of Southington.

Among other rare historical items highlighted in the gallery are a rare hand-colored lithograph of Cinque, leader of the Mendi Africans, and a sword procured by Fisher Gay, a young merchant who served General George Washington in the early days of the American Revolution.

The museum complex at 37 High St. also includes a modern classroom, collection storage, research library, and galleries. The landscape features period gardens, an orchard and heritage stone walls.House tours are $7 for adults; $4 for children ages 5-18; and $5 for seniors over the age of 63. Visit www.stanleywhitman.org or 860-677-9222 for more information.

A lovely autumn evening in a charming village…dinner in a beautiful private home…hors d’oeuvres and desserts in stunning...
09/19/2017
The Farmington Table: A Moveable Feast (October 14, 2017 Set for Popular Fall Fundraising Event) – Digital Farmington Blog

A lovely autumn evening in a charming village…dinner in a beautiful private home…hors d’oeuvres and desserts in stunning village houses….This year’s elegant progressive dinner fundraising event promises an experience to remember. Reservation only. Reserve your tickets now, as seats are limited.

The Farmington Table: A Moveable Feast (October 14, 2017 Set for Popular Fall Fundraising Event)September 19, 2017A lovely autumn evening in a charming village…dinner in a beautiful private home…hors d’oeuvres and desserts in stunning village houses….This year’s elegant progressive dinner fundraisin...

05/04/2017

Infrared Scanning of Memento Mori Cemetery
On Thursday, May 4, from 10 am until approximately 2:30 pm, retired state srchaeologist Nick Bellantonind a team will conduct a procedure to scan "unoccupied" areas of ancient Memento Mori cemetery to ascertain whether burials exist in those areas. The investigation is part of an effort to determine if there was a separate area for the burial of slaves. Join us at any time while the team is at work. Park at the Barney Library and walk to the cemetery or park on a cross-street and cross Main Street (very carefully). No parking is allowed on the cemetery portion of Main Street.

Avon Historical Society invites the public to an OPEN HOUSE on Sunday, November 20 at the historic Derrin Farm House to ...
11/10/2016

Avon Historical Society invites the public to an OPEN HOUSE
on Sunday, November 20 at the historic Derrin Farm House
to view mitigation since fire in May

The Avon Historical Society invites the public to view the mitigation work done on the historic Derrin Farm House, 249 West Avon Road, on Sunday, November 20 from 1:00 – 4:00pm. Since an accidental fire occurred in May of this year, American Integrity Restoration LLC (AIR) of Glastonbury, CT has been working on the demolition, mitigation and some repairs and restoration of a select group of artifacts. Work by AIR began on August 15th and is completed today, November 4th.
According to Society president Terri Wilson, “the Board of Trustees is pleased to open its doors to the public to view the outstanding work done by AIR and to touch and feel the new and the old. Staff from AIR will be present to answer questions and show off their workmanship. As many have said, this old house has “good bones” and was able to be saved thanks in large part to the efforts of the four volunteer fire departments that responded very quickly to the fire. We are now in the unique position to have the public view it before additional work is done and the restored artifacts are returned. And we invite residents to share their thoughts on future use of the house.”
Selected artifacts such as some of the furniture, implements, framed pictures, kitchen items, beds, etc., were restored back to their original condition whenever possible. Some were completely covered in soot and needed gentle cleaning while others needed much more attention. For example, an early 20th century Hoosier cabinet donated by the Thompson family farm in Avon sustained strong smoke and soot damage and its cabinet windows blown out. AIR was able to have it restored to its pre-fire condition.
Prior to the work by AIR, the Trustees of the Society spent ten weeks working with experts on the necessary steps toward adaptive reuse to put the structure back to its pre-fire condition. This included an environmental review to ascertain the presence of any asbestos and lead, a full inventory and documentation of the damage, including the artifacts inside and interviewing restoration companies and carpenters to determine what needs to be done to restore the building to pre-loss condition. The four rooms that suffered the most damage have been gutted and restored while others were cleaned of the soot and smoke damage. According to AIR, this process required the use of dry ice to remove debris and ozone treatments for odor removal.
The Society’s insurance paid for much of the work to be done, but new electrical wiring is needed and water and duct work added to the building for future use. In addition some new carpentry work will be needed in several rooms. The Avon Historical Society has been restoring the Derrin Farm House since leasing it from the State Department of the Military in 1996. Previous to that it was used by the First Co. Governor’s Horse Guards, located across the street, as the caretaker’s house since 1954. The Society was going to commemorate the Derrin family acquiring of the property in 1766 (250 years ago) on June 12 of this year, just weeks after the fire.
As the stewards of local history, the Avon Historical Society has been focusing on the adaptive reuse of the “Rockwood Red” Derrin Farm House and the Horse Guard Barn for many years. It is only through the very generous donations of time and labor from volunteers organized by long time Society member, Len Tolisano, for the past twenty years that the Society is able to now work again on restoring what was with new life and excitement. The Society invites the public to share thoughts on how this structure might be used in the future as house museum attendance is dramatically low.
In addition to visiting the Derrin Farm House, the public is invited to hike the .41 mile trail blazed as an Eagle Scout project in 2013 by Justin Alessio behind the property. A trail head kiosk provides further information on the Horse Guard State Park which was created in 1964 by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP).
Anyone wishing to make a donation toward the extra expenses not covered by insurance, the Society has a social media fundraising site at: www.gofundme.com/derrin Or donations can also be sent to: Avon Historical Society, P.O. Box 488, Avon, CT 06001. All donations are tax deductible.
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AVON HISTORICAL SOCIETY MISSION: to identify, collect, preserve, utilize, publish, display, and
promote the history and heritage of Avon. (approved by the AHS Board, Jan. 10, 2001)

Check out the great blog posts by CCSU students about Farmington's past: taverns, Native Americans, farming, schooling, ...
06/16/2016
Digital Farmington Blog

Check out the great blog posts by CCSU students about Farmington's past: taverns, Native Americans, farming, schooling, and more!

Farmington, 1625 to the Present

FARMINGTON MAP PROJECTAN INTERACTIVE COMMUNITY PROJECT by Farmington High School
06/16/2016
Farmington Map Project

FARMINGTON MAP PROJECT
AN INTERACTIVE COMMUNITY PROJECT by Farmington High School

An Interactive Community Project

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History Department, CCSU
New Britain, CT
06050

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DIGITAL FARMINGTON: THE CONCEPT AND DEVELOPMENT In September, 2014, Prof. Stan Kurkovsky sent this message to other professors at Central Connecticut State University: “The CCSU Computer Science department regularly offers senior software engineering courses in which student teams participate in design and development of software projects of various sizes and complexity. Usually, the best projects come from working with local non-profits or campus departments and organizations, rather than letting students work on projects that they would make up just for the purposes of this course. In case if your department, any of your faculty, or perhaps a local non-profit that you may have a connection with, might have some software development needs, I will be glad to discuss how CS majors in our software engineering classes could help.” Prof. Katherine Hermes in the History Department responded. She wanted to collaborate with Lisa Johnson, director of the Stanley-Whitman House in Farmington, Connecticut, to create a website modeled after “Digital Harlem,” which allowed site visitors to use maps and analytical categories to see change over time with respect to events plotted on the map. Dr. Hermes and Ms. Johnson met with Dr. Kurkovsky and his students to discuss the project. They examined various map programs, including MapScholar, and three teams were assigned to develop “Digital Farmington.” The plan was that once “Digital Farmington” was created, Dr. Hermes’ class on historical methods, History 301: The Historical Imagination, could then develop the points of interest and analytical categories for the map and share their research on Farmington with the public. In Spring, 2015, Dr. Hermes began teaching her first “Digital Farmington” class. The three teams came up with several different designs, each excellent in its own way. Only one design could be chosen, however, so Lisa Johnson held a focus group event at the Stanley-Whitman House. One prototype, developed by Kevin Gregory, Marianella Rydzewski, and Alex Shorthouse, used a MapScholar-type interface and Google Maps to create an interactive display. Another team was composed of undergraduates, who had thoughtful ideas about security issues. David Benoit, Eric Heidelmark, Jon Montwell, and Aaron Zamojski gave us ideas about how to administer our site safely. The winning model, though, was created by Sweta Mishra, Trung Phung, and Chad Tower, which will be unveiled at the “Making History: a CSU Conference” to be held at Southern Connecticut State University on March 27, 2015. Recently a new team, Austin Miller, Adrian Ward-Manthey, Arnike Obrusnik, and Chelsea Edwards added features to the map that make it very user-friendly. You can view the map at http://www.digitalfarmingtonmap.org.

Blog posts were written by students in the History 301: Historical Imagination class as they uncovered interesting historical events in Farmington, CT. For Spring, 2015, students worked on Colonial Farmington. Students in a graduate class, HIST 565, Revolutionary America, in Fall, 2017, recently contributed their work. This project will continue to gather research on Farmington’s history, ranging from the local to the transoceanic. We’ll go as far as it takes us! You can view the blog at http://www.digitalfarmington.org

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