Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum

Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum The Museum collects, preserves, and interprets the evolving history and traditions of country music.

Located in the heart of downtown Nashville, the Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum documents and interprets the history of country music—a musical genre and culture central to the identity of the city, the state, and the nation. Accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, the museum proudly combines subject expertise, ambitious research, and preservation of an unparalleled collection with

expressions of creativity in music, art, and history. The museum collects artifacts that illustrate the evolving history and traditions of country music while providing diverse learning opportunities. The core exhibit follows the story of country music from its folk beginnings through its emergence as a commercial art form. Rotating exhibits examine a broad range of topics, from country classics to ultra-contemporary and emerging artists in American Currents. The museum owns Hatch Show Print, a letterpress print shop opened in 1879, and it operates Historic RCA Studio B, where Elvis Presley and many others recorded.

Hear the stories behind Eric Church songs including “Talladega,” “Give Me Back My Hometown,” and “Sinners Like Me,” the ...
01/04/2024

Hear the stories behind Eric Church songs including “Talladega,” “Give Me Back My Hometown,” and “Sinners Like Me,” the title track to Church’s debut studio album. Songwriters Luke Laird and Jeremy Spillman discuss and perform songs they wrote with Church. This live performance was recorded earlier this year and offered in support of the exhibition “Eric Church: Country Heart, Restless Soul,” presented by Gibson.

Watch here:

Songwriters Luke Laird and Jeremy Spillman share songs they have written with Eric Church and the stories behind them. This live performance was recorded on July 15, 2023, and offered in support of the exhibition “Eric Church: Country Heart, Restless Soul,” presented by Gibson. During the progr....

“Curious Circumstances,” an exhibition featuring letterpress prints and large drawings by visual artist Marilyn Murphy, ...
01/04/2024

“Curious Circumstances,” an exhibition featuring letterpress prints and large drawings by visual artist Marilyn Murphy, opens January 24 in the Haley Gallery at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.

Marilyn Murphy is a professor emerita of art at Vanderbilt University. Her work has been shown in over 390 exhibits nationally and abroad, including mid-career surveys at the Frist Art Museum and a two-person exhibit at the Huntsville Museum of Art. Murphy’s work often addresses issues of women's identity and roles, creating curious situations that imply a larger story. Many of her current pieces focus on the act of seeing, the creative process, or aspects of the human experience.

Kick your year off with creativity—“Curious Circumstances” opens January 24 with a reception, free and open to the public, from 5:00 – 9:00 PM. All work on view in the Haley Gallery is available for purchase. Prices and details are available upon request.

Learn more: https://www.hatchshowprint.com/haley-exhibit/marilyn-murphy-curious-circumstances

In the fourth episode of the five-part Museum series, “Words & Music: Journey of a Song,” follow student songwriter Aval...
01/03/2024

In the fourth episode of the five-part Museum series, “Words & Music: Journey of a Song,” follow student songwriter Avalon Simpson on her inspiring journey to the heart of what makes a song, and ultimately, a successful recording artist. Guided by #1 hit songwriter and producer Cameron Bedell, Avalon takes her story and her song, "Kenopsia," from the page to the stage, her journey culminating in recording a demo and performing her song live in the CMA Theater with the help of producer and engineer Kevin Dailey and Big Machine Music President, Mike Molinar.

"Words & Music: Journey of a Song," documents the experiences of four teenaged students who took the Museum's crash course in songwriting over a period of four days, each crafting, recording, and performing an original composition with the help of industry professionals. Stay tuned to watch the performance finale.

Watch episode four, out now:

Over the course of four days, four teenaged students took the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum's crash course in songwriting, each crafting, recording, ...

One of the first of the great brother duos of the 1930s, the Delmore Brothers—pictured here in 1944 performing on WIBC i...
01/02/2024

One of the first of the great brother duos of the 1930s, the Delmore Brothers—pictured here in 1944 performing on WIBC in Indianapolis—were perhaps the most musically sophisticated, most creative, and most technically proficient of all the duo acts.

Alton and Rabon Delmore's soft, pliant harmony, dazzling guitar work, love of blues, and well-crafted songs endeared them to generations of fans. And though their hit songs such as “Brown’s Ferry Blues,” “Gonna Lay Down My Old Guitar,” and “Blues Stay Away from Me” became country standards that are still heard today, the Delmores never seemed able to grab the golden ring that would have won them fame and fortune.

After an early record for Columbia in 1931 (“Got the Kansas City Blues”), the Delmore Brothers won a job on the Grand Ole Opry in 1933. They soon began attracting buckets of mail, and by 1936 the Opry reported that they were the most popular act on the show.

However, disagreements with the Opry management over bookings led the Delmore Brothers to leave the show by 1939. That decision proved to be a mistake: while their records continued to do well (they switched to Decca in 1940), the brothers had a hard time finding a new radio base. The Delmores moved to several cities in the following years, temporarily landing in Cincinnati at powerhouse radio station WLW, a critical step in reviving their career.

In 1943, Alton organized the gospel quartet Brown’s Ferry Four with Merle Travis and Grandpa Jones; it became country’s first really successful gospel quartet. Though their commercial success waned, the Delmore Brothers continued to record and perform until the early 1950s. They were inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2001.

Learn more about the Delmore Brothers in Alton Delmore's book “The Delmore Brothers: Truth Is Stranger Than Publicity”—recently reissued by CMF Press and available in The Museum Store—and here: https://shop.countrymusichalloffame.org/collections/books/products/truth-is-stranger-delmore-bros

Merle Haggard was a guest on ABC-TV’s “Johnny Cash Show” in 1969 when he mentioned to Cash: “The first time I ever saw y...
01/01/2024

Merle Haggard was a guest on ABC-TV’s “Johnny Cash Show” in 1969 when he mentioned to Cash: “The first time I ever saw you perform, it was at San Quentin.” To which Cash replied: “I don’t remember you being in that show, Merle.”

“I was in the audience,” Haggard replied.

It’s a true story. The Johnny Cash concert at San Quentin State Penitentiary in California took place on New Year’s Day 1958. Haggard was serving a sentence of one-to-fifteen years there at the time. He and a buddy had hatched a scheme to burglarize a Bakersfield restaurant after hours. But they got drunk beforehand and lost track of time. When they tried to break in the back door, the restaurant was still open. Haggard was apprehended, then shipped 290 miles north to San Quentin after trying to escape from the county jail. He was twenty years old (and he did turn twenty-one in prison, as he sang in “Mama Tried").

Haggard was in the San Quentin audience that New Year’s Day when Cash performed. Cash completely won over the hardened criminals, said Haggard. “He was just mesmerizing,” he noted. “There was just this excitement. It didn’t even matter that he was free, because there was a connection there, an identification. This was somebody who was singing a song about your personal life. Even the people there who weren’t fans of Johnny Cash—it was a mixture of people, all races—were fans by the end of that show.”

Haggard was released from prison in October 1960 and was determined to leave behind his life of petty crime and make it as a country singer. Three years later, he scored his first chart hit with “Sing a Sad Song.” Johnny Cash would go on to perform many times at prisons. In 1968, Cash released the best-selling “At Folsom Prison” live album. He followed it in 1969 with another best-selling live album, “At San Quentin.”

Cash became a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1980, and Haggard joined him in the Hall of Fame in 1994. (The photo of Cash—onstage with guitarist Luther Perkins—dates from 1959. The publicity photo of Haggard is from the early 1960s.)

The year might be ending, but the fun’s just beginning. The first four Tuesdays in January—January 2, 9, 16, and 23—the ...
12/29/2023

The year might be ending, but the fun’s just beginning. The first four Tuesdays in January—January 2, 9, 16, and 23—the Museum will extend its hours to 8:00 PM and include music-centric evening programs. This after-hours programming is included with pay-what-you-want admission for residents of Davidson and bordering counties (now through January 31).

Tuesday night programs will include a “silent” country disco (headphones will be issued) with DJ Jerry on January 2, Charlie Worsham featuring Long Jon on January 9, East Nash Grass on January 16, and Stephanie Urbina Jones and the H***y Tonk Mariachi on January 23.

Start your new year off right with live music and hands-on activities when you reserve your pay-what-you-want tickets today.

Reserve tickets: https://www.countrymusichalloffame.org/locals-pay-what-you-want

Dave Freeman, bluegrass and stringband music anthologist, producer, label head, and fan, died at his home in Chapel Hill...
12/28/2023

Dave Freeman, bluegrass and stringband music anthologist, producer, label head, and fan, died at his home in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, on Christmas morning at the age of eighty-four. (Pictured from left: Freeman, Ralph Stanley, Greg McGraw, and Mark Freeman, celebrating a Stanley album release on Rebel Records. Photo: Alan Mayor.)

Born in 1939 in midtown Manhattan, Freeman heard early country sounds on the radio while on a 1953 family road trip through the South. The excursion, he said later, changed him. He began collecting 78s and 45s found in junk shops and antique stores, and canvassed door-to-door asking strangers for their unwanted records. “I was convinced that I was the only one in New York City that knew anything or cared anything about country music,” he said in an interview.

Freeman began driving through Virginia, North Carolina, and elsewhere, meeting elderly musicians and young bluegrass listeners. He became a crucial conduit for the music—knowledgeable of the makers and the fans from whom he was both buying and selling records, gathering a deep sense of bluegrass’s past (and its precursors) and an understanding of how it could move forward. Freeman launched County Records in 1963, anthologizing hard-to-find older roots music and presenting new recordings by such artists as Red Allen, Kenny Baker, Norman Blake, and Senator Robert Byrd. Freeman printed his first album covers on the same press his father used for his greeting card business. Two years later Freeman created County Sales, a mail-order record outlet.

By then he had already decided to quit his job delivering mail for the federal railway system and turned full-time to presenting the music he loved. Freeman left New York City and moved to the Blue Ridge Mountain town of Floyd, Virginia, never looking back. In 1978, he co-founded Sugar Hill Records, producing such contemporary artists as Ricky Skaggs, Doyle Lawson, Tony Rice, and the Seldom Scene. Freeman acquired the Washington, DC-area bluegrass label Rebel Records a year later.

He spelled out his philosophy to the Old-Time Herald in 1999. “The more local, the better,” Freeman explained. Why did he call his label County? “Every county has its own personality, its own musical tradition. You can go from one place to another and pick up the subtle differences.”

Calling all youth ages 13–18! Check out the new Museum series "Words & Music: Journey of a Song" and the accompanying st...
12/28/2023

Calling all youth ages 13–18! Check out the new Museum series "Words & Music: Journey of a Song" and the accompanying step-by-step guide to write a song of your own. In addition to sharing your song with a friend, family member, or on social media, the Museum invites you to enter your lyrics into the "Words & Music: Journey of a Song" Contest, presented by the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum with support from Omni Nashville Hotel and American Airlines.

Enter by January 31 and you could win a trip to Nashville to join other young songwriters at the Museum’s June Songwriting Camp—a week-long experience designed to encourage student songwriters to hone their craft, learn from professionals, and make new friends.

Pictured here are student songwriter Jazmine Croom and Grammy-winning songwriter, producer, arranger, and BMI executive SHANNON SANDERS. The pair co-wrote an original song for the five-part Museum series, "Words & Music: Journey of a Song," episode two out now.

Learn more and enter the official contest: https://www.countrymusichalloffame.org/learn/words-music-journey-of-a-song

Laura Lynch, who co-founded the Dixie Chicks in Dallas in 1989, died Friday, December 22, at age sixty-five, in an auto ...
12/27/2023

Laura Lynch, who co-founded the Dixie Chicks in Dallas in 1989, died Friday, December 22, at age sixty-five, in an auto accident on Route 62, near Cornudas, Texas. A driver trying to pass on a two-lane highway ran head-on into Lynch’s pickup truck. She died at the scene; the other driver suffered non-life-threatening injuries, said the Texas Department of Public Safety. (The photo here is from 1995. From left: Martie Erwin Maguire, Laura Lynch, and Emily Erwin Strayer. Photo by Ellen Appel.)

Lynch, a former newscaster turned vocalist and bassist, formed the Dixie Chicks with Robin Lynn Macy on guitar and vocals and sisters Martie Erwin Maguire on fiddle and mandolin and Emily Erwin Strayer on banjo and resonator guitar. The band was still nameless when they performed their first show on a street corner in Dallas, earning $400 in tips. By the second show, they called themselves the Dixie Chickens Cowboy Band. They dressed in western show clothes, and Lynch tied a rubber chicken to the top of her acoustic bass. They quickly evolved into the Dixie Chicks (shortened to the Chicks in 2020) at first playing an all-acoustic mix of bluegrass, western swing, and cowboy songs.

Their self-released first album, Thank Heavens for Dale Evans (1990), featured Lynch and Macy sharing lead vocals. The band’s sound expanded to include drums by their second album, Little Ol’ Cowgirl (1992). Macy left in August 1992, and with Lynch as lead singer, the trio recorded with Nashville producer Steve Fishell on a third album, Shouldn’t a Told You That. The record included songs written by Radney Foster, Jim Lauderdale, Jamie O’Hara, and Kim Richey.

“Laura can relate to an audience better than anyone I’ve ever seen,” Maguire said in a 1995 interview in Nashville. “She’s so at ease in the way she talks to an audience, and she makes everybody have fun, including Emily and me.”

The group earned accolades during Lynch’s tenure. The Dallas Observer weekly newspaper named them Best Country Band for three consecutive years, starting in 1990, the same year they won Best Band at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival. The trio played inauguration balls for President Bill Clinton in 1993 and for then Texas Governor George W. Bush in 1995. They performed on a Monday Night Football telecast of a Dallas Cowboys home game and appeared on Nashville Network programs Nashville Now, American Music Shop, and Texas Connection and on Garrison Keillor’s American Radio Company. They opened concerts for Garth Brooks, Alan Jackson, and Restless Heart.

More than a decade older than the sisters, Lynch was battling anemia in 1996 when she left the trio. Natalie Maines, daughter of famed Texas steel guitarist and record producer Lloyd Maines, became the trio’s lead singer, and the group shifted to a more modern country sound. The band signed a development deal with Sony Music Entertainment in 1996.

Lynch later said leaving the band was not her idea, but that she supported the band’s success and felt no regrets. In a statement posted online, the members of the Chicks wrote, “We are shocked and saddened to learn of the passing of Laura Lynch. . . . We hold a special place in our hearts for the time we spent playing music together, laughing and traveling together. Laura was a bright light. . . her infectious energy and humor gave a spark to the early days of our band.”

In the third episode of the five-part Museum series, “Words & Music: Journey of a Song,” follow student songwriter Max R...
12/27/2023

In the third episode of the five-part Museum series, “Words & Music: Journey of a Song,” follow student songwriter Max Rees on his inspiring journey to the heart of what it takes to write a song. Guided by singer songwriter and Monument Records recording artist Caitlyn Smith, Max takes his story and his song, "Ticket," from the page to the stage, his journey culminating in recording a demo and performing his song live in the CMA Theater with the help of producer and engineer Kevin Dailey and Big Machine Music President, Mike Molinar.

"Words & Music: Journey of a Song," documents the experiences of four teenaged students who took the Museum's crash course in songwriting over a period of four days, each crafting, recording, and performing an original composition with the help of industry professionals. Stay tuned to follow each of their journeys.

Watch episode three, out now:

Over the course of four days, four teenaged students took the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum's crash course in songwriting, each crafting, recording, ...

By age twelve, William Orville “Lefty” Frizzell—who received his lifelong nickname after decking a schoolmate with a lef...
12/26/2023

By age twelve, William Orville “Lefty” Frizzell—who received his lifelong nickname after decking a schoolmate with a left hook—had resolved to be a professional singer. Captivated by Jimmie Rodgers’s yodel, young Lefty began performing when he was still in middle school.

“Always Late (with Your Kisses),” which opens with Curly Chalker's ascending steel guitar and spent twelve weeks at #1, is perhaps the definitive example of the artist’s revolutionary vocal technique: Frizzell leans into his multisyllabic delivery of the words “always late,” demonstrating the intimate, vowel-bending style for which he is known.

Described by Merle Haggard as “the most unique thing that ever happened to country music,” Frizzell has influenced countless recording artists in the years since he burst to stardom in 1950. George Jones, Roy Orbison, George Strait, Randy Travis, and Keith Whitley have all noted their debt to him.

Read more about Frizzell:
https://countrymusichalloffame.org/artist/lefty-frizzell/

12/24/2023

Sixty-five years ago, on October 19, 1958, thirteen-year-old Brenda Lee stepped into her producer Owen Bradley’s studio and recorded a Christmas classic: “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree.” When it was first released in November of that year, it didn’t make the charts and initially sold only about 5,000 copies. But two years later, Decca Records re-released the Christmas song as a follow-up to Lee’s #1 pop hit with “I’m Sorry.” “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree” broke into the Top Ten, and it has been a perennial holiday favorite ever since. (Lee’s performance here is from a syndicated TV show in 1984.)

This year, “Rockin’” (as Lee likes to call it) did something amazing: it went to #1 for the first time on the all-genre “Billboard Hot 100” chart, knocking Mariah Carey’s ever-popular 1994 hit “All I Want for Christmas Is You” off the #1 pedestal. No one could have predicted such an enduring hit sixty-five years ago.

The song’s writer, Johnny Marks, was something of a specialist in Christmas songs. He also wrote “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” “A Holly Jolly Christmas,” “Silver and Gold,” and other holiday tunes. Having heard Brenda Lee’s records, Marks sent several songs to producer Owen Bradley in 1958 hoping that Lee would record some. She and Bradley picked “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree” as the most promising of the bunch. It was the only Christmas song Marks sent, and Lee liked it the best.

To get her into the yuletide spirit, Bradley had the air conditioning turned to the max and decorated his Quonset Hut studio with colored lights and a Christmas tree. The A-Team musicians on board for the session wore Santa hats. The session pros for the 5:00 PM session were Hank Garland on lead guitar, Harold Bradley on electric bass, Bob Moore on string bass, Doug Kirkham on drums, Floyd Cramer on piano, Boots Randolph on saxophone, and a chorus comprising leader Anita Kerr with Dottie Dillard, Millie Kirkham, James Hall, Louis Nunley, and Gil Wright. Working with Owen Bradley and Lee, they created an up-tempo record that has turned out to be both catchy and evergreen.

There aren’t many recordings with the staying power of “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree.” “I thought it would be successful,” Lee said in a 1995 interview. “I never dreamed it would be the Christmas standard that it is.”

12/22/2023

In the mid-1970s, record sales skyrocketed to new heights, with Los Angeles established as the center of the booming music industry. The L.A. sound made inroads into mainstream country music: Eagles, Emmylou Harris, and Linda Ronstadt registered hits on the country charts.

The Sho-Bud Pro-II pedal steel guitar pictured here was played by Dan Dugmore onstage and in the studio with Linda Ronstadt, including on her 1977 country and pop hit "Blue Bayou.” Dugmore, a renowned session player and Pasadena native, also used it on James Taylor's "Carolina in My Mind," Deana Carter's "Strawberry Wine," and hundreds of other recordings made in Los Angeles and Nashville.

L.A.-based steel players represented diverse styles and backgrounds. All shared a common vision: to move pedal steel beyond traditional country music into genres like rock, pop, and folk. These players introduced new techniques to steel guitar, helped expand its popularity, and dispelled any notion that all roads for steel guitar led to Nashville.

To learn more about the steel-influenced sound of the L.A. country-rock scene, make plans to visit "Western Edge: The Roots and Reverberations of Los Angeles Country-Rock," presented by City National Bank.

Witness history. Reserve today: https://www.countrymusichalloffame.org/calendar/western-edge-exhibit

Country Music Hall of Fame member Don Schlitz takes the Ford Theater stage on Saturday, January 6, for a special “Songwr...
12/22/2023

Country Music Hall of Fame member Don Schlitz takes the Ford Theater stage on Saturday, January 6, for a special “Songwriter Session.”

Schlitz launched his songwriting career with the Kenny Rogers classic “The Gambler” and later wrote the Rogers hits “The Greatest” and “You Can’t Make Old Friends,” which features Dolly Parton. He also wrote a string of Randy Travis hits, including “Forever and Ever, Amen,” “Deeper Than the Holler,” and “On the Other Hand.” Among the other hits in Schlitz’s catalog are “40 Hour Week (For a Livin’)” (Alabama), “Give Me Wings” (Michael Johnson), “He Thinks He’ll Keep Her” (Mary Chapin Carpenter), “Rockin' with the Rhythm of the Rain” (The Judds), “Strong Enough to Bend” (Tanya Tucker), and “When You Say Nothing at All” (Alison Krauss, Keith Whitley).

A member of the Songwriters Hall of Fame, Schlitz has won many ACM - Academy of Country Music; American Society of Composers, Authors & Publishers (ASCAP); CMA Country Music Association; and Grammy awards.

Reserve tickets: https://www.countrymusichalloffame.org/calendar/songwriter-session-don-schlitz?date=01/06/2024&time=1703246400|1703249100

Enter Keith Urban’s “Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade Getaway” for a chance to win the trip of a lifetime while giving bac...
12/22/2023

Enter Keith Urban’s “Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade Getaway” for a chance to win the trip of a lifetime while giving back to the Museum. Keith Urban & Universal Music Group have joined forces this holiday season to bring you Universal’s Music 4 Good Holiday Giveback, including this once-in-a-lifetime VIP experience donated by Keith Urban, to benefit the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum and First Responders Children's Foundation.

One lucky winner will receive: airfare for two to New York City, a three-night hotel stay, two tickets to the 2024 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade viewing, two tickets to the 2023 Christmas Spectacular featuring the Radio City Rockettes, a personalized video message from Keith Urban, a hand-signed URBAN guitar by Yamaha Music USA, a Keith Urban merch pack, and much more.

Learn more: www.charitystars.com/keith

In the second episode of the five-part Museum series, “Words & Music: Journey of a Song,” follow student songwriter Jazm...
12/20/2023

In the second episode of the five-part Museum series, “Words & Music: Journey of a Song,” follow student songwriter Jazmine Croom on her inspiring journey to the heart of what makes a song, and ultimately, a successful recording artist. Guided by Grammy-winning songwriter, producer, arranger, and Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) executive SHANNON SANDERS, Jazmine takes her story and her song, "Last Thing," from the page to the stage, her journey culminating in recording a demo and performing her song live in the CMA Theater with the help of producer and engineer Kevin Dailey and Big Machine Music President, Mike Molinar.

"Words & Music: Journey of a Song," documents the experiences of four teenaged students who took the Museum's crash course in songwriting over a period of four days, each crafting, recording, and performing an original composition with the help of industry professionals. Stay tuned to follow each of their journeys.

Watch episode two, out now:

Over the course of four days, four teenaged students took the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum's crash course in songwriting, each crafting, recording, ...

Country Music Hall of Fame member Charlie McCoy takes the Ford Theater stage at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museu...
12/19/2023

Country Music Hall of Fame member Charlie McCoy takes the Ford Theater stage at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum on Sunday, December 31 for a special “Musician Spotlight.”

The Grammy-winning, multi-instrumentalist served as musical director on the hit television show “Hee Haw” for eighteen years and became a member of the Grand Ole Opry in 2022. McCoy has been an in-demand session player for over fifty years, playing with the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Ringo Starr, and Country Music Hall of Fame members Bobby Bare, Johnny Cash, Vince Gill, Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton, and ELVIS PRESLEY.

Don’t miss Charlie McCoy live in an intimate setting. Reserve tickets: https://www.countrymusichalloffame.org/calendar/musician-spotlight-charlie-mccoy-3?date=12/31/2023&time=1702990800|1702993500

12/19/2023

Staying local over the holidays?

Now through January 31, 2024, the Museum is offering pay-what-you-want admission for residents of Davidson and surrounding counties (Cheatham, Robertson, Rutherford, Sumner, Williamson, and Wilson). This admission covers family programs, live performances, and gallery access.

Wait, there’s more—the Museum will stay open until 8:00 PM on Tuesdays January 2, 9, 16, and 23, for special programming. Complimentary parking is available across the river at Nissan Stadium, with optional two-way shuttle service to the Museum (5-7 minutes).

Reserve tickets: https://www.countrymusichalloffame.org/locals-pay-what-you-want

The Museum collects, preserves, and interprets the evolving history and traditions of country music.

“Rodney Crowell: The Chicago Sessions Tour” at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum's CMA Theater on 10.28.23.
12/18/2023

“Rodney Crowell: The Chicago Sessions Tour” at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum's CMA Theater on 10.28.23.

Jean Shepard rose to stardom on the West Coast not with smooth singing but with hard-edged honky-tonk vocals and songs t...
12/18/2023

Jean Shepard rose to stardom on the West Coast not with smooth singing but with hard-edged honky-tonk vocals and songs that dealt frankly with the pain and pleasures of romantic love. No mere “girl singer” with a band or part of a husband-wife team, she was one of the first women in country music to front her own tours, paving the way for artists such as Loretta Lynn and Tammy Wynette in the 1960s and beyond.

In high school, Shepard sang and played upright bass in the Melody Ranch Girls, an all-female group she organized with friends. Before she was out of her teens, she caught the attention of Capitol Records powerhouse Hank Thompson, who recommended her to his producer, Ken Nelson. Shepard signed with Capitol in 1952.

Shepard’s first release, 1952’s “Crying Steel Guitar Waltz,” did not chart; however, her second single, “A Dear John Letter”—a duet with Ferlin Husky—shot to #1 on the "Billboard" country chart and became a #4 pop hit as well. She went on to place at least one song on the charts every year through 1978.

In 1955, Shepard was invited to join the Grand Ole Opry and recorded “Songs of a Love Affair,” possibly country music’s first concept album by a female singer. She was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2011.

Read more: https://www.countrymusichalloffame.org/hall-of-fame/jean-shepard

12/14/2023

Earlier this year, the Museum celebrated the career of Lorianne Crook at its fifteenth Louise Scruggs Memorial Forum. The television and radio host shared stories from her life and work, including her role as co-host and executive producer of the “Crook & Chase: Nashville Chats” on IHeartMedia Nashville/Premiere Networks. The Louise Scruggs Memorial Forum honors a music industry leader who has continued in Scruggs’s legacy as a formidable businesswoman.

In this clip from the forum, Crook describes her unconventional path pursuing a career in entertainment, including turning down work from the National Security Agency and Central Intelligence Agency.

Watch the full recording here: https://watch.countrymusichalloffame.org/videos/louise-scruggs-memorial-forum-lorianne-crook-2023

Calling all youth ages 13–18! Check out the new Museum series "Words & Music: Journey of a Song" and the accompanying st...
12/14/2023

Calling all youth ages 13–18! Check out the new Museum series "Words & Music: Journey of a Song" and the accompanying step-by-step guide to write a song of your own. In addition to sharing your song with a friend, family member, or on social media, the Museum invites you to enter your lyrics into the "Words & Music: Journey of a Song" Contest, presented by the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum with support from Omni Nashville Hotel and American Airlines.

Enter by January 31 and you could win a trip to Nashville to join other young songwriters at the Museum’s June Songwriting Camp—a week-long experience designed to encourage student songwriters to hone their craft, learn from professionals, and make new friends.

Pictured here are student songwriter Abby Whitman and two-time ACM - Academy of Country Music Award winner Tenille Townes. The pair co-wrote an original song for the five-part Museum series, "Words & Music: Journey of a Song," episode one out now.

Learn more and enter the official contest: https://www.countrymusichalloffame.org/learn/words-music-journey-of-a-song

Show your support for local art—Specialty Arts License Plates are an easy way to spread art and artistry in Tennessee. P...
12/14/2023

Show your support for local art—Specialty Arts License Plates are an easy way to spread art and artistry in Tennessee. Proceeds from every plate support the Tennessee Arts Commission and its vision for “a Tennessee where the arts inspire, connect, and enhance everyday lives.”

Learn more and personalize yours today: tnspecialtyplates.org

Looking for a unique gift for the music lover in your life? This holiday season, bring history home—archival pigment pri...
12/13/2023

Looking for a unique gift for the music lover in your life? This holiday season, bring history home—archival pigment prints of the photos formerly on display in the Museum exhibition "Raeanne Rubenstein: Shooting Stars" are now available for purchase.

The exhibit celebrated the career of famed photographer Raeanne Rubenstein (1945–2019) through an up-close-and-personal look at Rubenstein’s one-of-a-kind photographs. Choose from photos featuring subjects such as Country Music Hall of Fame members Emmylou Harris, Waylon Jennings, Kris Kristofferson, Charley Pride, Dottie West, and more.

Made from Rubenstein’s original negatives and administered on behalf of her estate, these limited-edition, museum-quality prints are available in three sizes. Each sold supports the Museum’s ongoing work to preserve its unrivaled country music collection in perpetuity, including the more than 500,000 historic photographs in its archives.

Shop prints: https://prints.countrymusichalloffame.org/

Address

222 Rep John Lewis Way S
Nashville, TN
37203

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Share

Category