Burlington County Lyceum of History & Natural Sciences

Burlington County Lyceum of History & Natural Sciences A museum dedicated to the history of Burlington County. Features exhibits, programs, and events.
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Operating as usual

County Parks System's March Events are Safe, Free and Fun for the Family
03/04/2021
County Parks System's March Events are Safe, Free and Fun for the Family

County Parks System's March Events are Safe, Free and Fun for the Family

March is officially here, and the Burlington County Parks System is back with its monthly program guide. This month, the county parks will host numerous events, both in-person and virtual, that are both safe and free for individuals and families. Are you feeling lucky now that Spring is in the air?....

In honor of Women's History Month we will be highlighting Burlington County women throughout the month. The first is SYB...
03/03/2021

In honor of Women's History Month we will be highlighting Burlington County women throughout the month. The first is SYBILLA RIGHTON MASTERS (1676-1720). Sybilla was the first person residing in the colonies to be granted an English patent. Born in Bermuda, she immigrated to New Jersey in 1687. In June 1712, she traveled to England to pursue patents for two inventions. The first was granted by King George I in 1715 for the process of "Cleaning and Curing the Indian Corn Growing in the Several Colonies of America." This method utilized stamping corn instead of grinding it. This produced what Sybilla called "Tuscarora Rice" which is still popular in America today. It is better known as grits. The patent, however, was issued in her husband's name because women could not receive patents. He husband did, however, put in the patent that it was Sybilla's invention and King George I gave her the credit for it. She also received a patent for a method of weaving straw and palmetto leaves into hats and bonnets. In 1716 she opened her own hat store. Sybilla passed away in 1720 in Philadelphia.

02/23/2021
Burlington County Lyceum Artifact Highlight: Wax Portraits

Be sure to check out the next video in our Archive Highlight series where we take you behind the scenes of our collections. This month features wax portraits. Learn how the artifact came into the collection, the history behind it, and the story it tells. A new video in the series will be posted each month.
https://youtu.be/mjs8aJwKt40

In this video series, we take you behind the scenes of the Burlington County Lyceum of History and Natural Sciences collections. This month features was por...

02/19/2021
Duke Ellington - It don't mean a thing (1943)

In honor of Black History Month, we are sharing the music of African American artists that changed music and entertainment. Click on the links to hear artists such as Duke Ellington, William Grant Still, Smokey Robinson, Aretha Franklin, Prince, Whitney Houston, and many more. We hope you enjoy! What is your favorite?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDQpZT3GhDg Duke Ellington's "It Don't Mean a Thing"
https://youtu.be/8hzFcm6HCeI
William Grant Still's "Symphony No. 1 in A Flat Major"
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLGuWEyF9sG1KmCBEOmAV41EnMZkyLS0MU
A collection of African American artists who changed music.

Duke Ellington and his orchestra playing this awesome tune in 1943."It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)" is a 1931 composition by Duke Ellingt...

02/19/2021
Story Time: Duke Ellington

Join us for "Duke Ellington" by Andrea Davis Pinkney. A winner of the Coretta Scott King Award, Pinkney relates the story of how the young boy who wanted nothing more than to play baseball grew up to be one of the greatest composers of the twentieth century. Following the reading, we invite you to listen music by Ellington and many other African American composers and singers. Links can be found in the event discussion and our page.

Burlington County
02/11/2021

Burlington County

#BlackHistoryMonth #BurlCoBlackHistoryMonthHeroes The Burlington County Minority and Equality Right Task Force honors, Black History Month Hero, William Still. Born free on Oct. 7, 1821, in Burlington County, New Jersey, William Still was the youngest of 18 children. His parents, Levin and Sidney (who later changed her name to Charity) Still, were both escaped slaves from Maryland. His mother had to escape twice, after she was found and captured the first time. For her second escape attempt, she was forced to leave behind two of her four children. The two sons she left behind were later sold to slave owners in the Deep South. An interesting fact is that Still documented the lives and tragedies of the hundreds of escaped slaves he encountered in Philadelphia. Once, he interviewed an escaped slave named Peter who turned out to be his own brother.

William Still helped some 800 slaves escape to freedom and is regarded as the “Father of the Underground Rail Road”. The Underground Railroad was an organized network consisting of black and white abolitionists who helped runaway slaves find food, shelter, and safe passage during their escape. There were homes and businesses which secretly became “stations” along the route toward the north, harboring fugitive slaves temporarily before they could move on to the next safe place. Those who helped escaped slaves move from station to station, like Harriet Tubman, were known as “conductors.” William Still, meanwhile, was a “station master.” He was still a young boy when he first helped a man he knew was being hunted by enslaved catchers and continued to aid countless others.

One of William Still’s most impressive achievements was teaching himself to read and write. Using what little schooling he had, Still studied by reading everything under the sun. His literacy proved to be a potent weapon against American slavery and racism. As he grew older and more successful as a businessman, starting a coal delivery business, Still emerged as a leader of Philadelphia’s black community. In 1852 he became chair of PSAS’s Vigilance Committee, aiding fugitive slaves passing through the city on the Underground Railroad.
In 1859, he penned a letter to the press decrying the racial discrimination in Philadelphia’s streetcars, and in 1867 he expanded on that letter in a self-published book titled, A Brief Narrative of the Struggle for the Rights of Colored People of Philadelphia in the City Railway Cars. Much of his papers are now kept in the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection at Temple University in Philadelphia. The papers, which span between 1865 and 1899, contain 140 letters and 14 photographs related to the Still family.

Still who died in 1902 is quoted stating “The heroism and desperate struggle that many of our people had to endure should be kept green in the memory of this and coming generations.” Abolitionist William Still

Burlington County
02/06/2021

Burlington County

#BlackHistoryMonth #BurlCoBlackHistoryMonthHeroes The Burlington County Minority and Equality Rights Taskforce honors Black History Hero, Dr. James Still, “The Black Doctor of the Pines.”

Born in 1812 in Indian Mills, now Shamong, NJ, to father, Levin and mother, Charity (originally Sidney) Still, two former enslaved Africans, one who bought his freedom and the other who ran away from her master, from the state of Maryland. He was one of 18 children and his brothers included famed abolitionists William Still and Peter Still. Born into poverty and mostly self-educated, he received only 3 months of formal education. For most of his life, beginning at the age of 8 or 9 and into his late twenties, Still worked as a day laborer, chopping wood, making charcoal, picking berries and “grubbing” – digging up roots and trees to clear land. Just before Still turned 18 he was voluntarily hired out as an indentured servant by his father. During the three years of his servitude, Still read everything available about medicine and botany, and learned all he could from the Native Americans of the area. On his twenty-first birthday, he was released from his service, given $10.00 and a new suit. He left immediately for Philadelphia. Dr. Still was so moved to purchase two books on medical botany on one of his trips to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and began practicing medicine somewhat by accident, agreeing to treat a sick man in exchange for some sassafras. Slowly, he found that he was distilling less and healing more. About 1845, Dr. Still stopped distilling and focused entirely on his medical practice. He created a “cough balm” from plants and herbs grown on his farm and soon after his first patient used it successfully Still became famous. Two Philadelphia pharmacists heard of his product and began buying all of the cough balm he could supply. With that money he was able to buy a small house and begin making house-calls to patients. Despite his poverty, the racist attitudes of the day, and having little in the way of formal education, Dr. Still taught himself how to create medicine out of plants and herbs and apply it to heal people. While he was never allowed to formally become a doctor through an institute of higher learning, he saved many lives in his years of service, earning the title “The Black Doctor of the Pines” through respect for his fine work, which often cured people after “regular” doctors had failed.

He became a renowned herbalist and homeopathic healer. Dr. Still believed in the potential for greatness in all human beings, regardless of race, gender, sex, class or religion. In his 1877 autobiography, The Early Recollections and Life of Dr. James Still, he stated, “All persons are born with certain gifts, which sooner or later develop in them, and I think those gifts should be cultivated, let them be of what sort they may be, so that they lead to honorable pursuits.” The property that continues to house Dr. James Still’s medical office was purchased by the State of New Jersey in 2006. This purchase was the first and only State acquisition of an African American historic site in New Jersey. Upon his death, he received recognition as one of the largest landowner and wealthiest men in Burlington County. The public is welcome to the Center during special events. Youth groups and adult organizations may schedule visits for a program and tour by calling (856) 220-6960.

02/05/2021
Story Time: Mr. Lincoln's Whiskers

Join us today for a story about how Abraham Lincoln took the advice of a young girl that would change his life forever. "Mr. Lincoln's Whiskers", written and illustrated by Karen B. Winnick, tells this true story about why Lincoln grew his now-famous beard. The craft today will turn you into your very own President Lincoln. Enjoy learning about his little known piece of our history.

Burlington County
02/04/2021

Burlington County

Today's #BurlCoBlackHistoryMonthHero is Ms. Louise Calloway, Burlington County Underground Railroad Museum's Founder, Director and Chief. Calloway was born and raised in North Jersey. There, she received her first inklings of the proud ancestry that is her heritage. Later, she lived abroad, in Canada and Cameroon, absorbing lessons from their cultures. Ms. Calloway who is 91 years of age holds a Master's degree. The museum also celebrates black abolitionist heroes and heroines, such as Harriet Tubman, a spy for the U.S. Army during the Civil War; Sojourner Truth, born a slave in New York state and who recruited blacks for the Union Army during the Civil War; writer David Walker; and doctor Martin DeLany, the first black field officer in the U.S. Army during the Civil War who also periodically advocated black immigration back to Africa.

To learn more about the Underground Railroad Museum, visit: https://www.co.burlington.nj.us/1415/Underground-Railroad-Museum
#BlackHistoryMonth #BurlCoBlackHistoryMonthHeroes

The Langstaff Mansion looks beautiful in the snow. We would love to see your pictures of historic sites or nature blanke...
02/02/2021

The Langstaff Mansion looks beautiful in the snow.
We would love to see your pictures of historic sites or nature blanketed in snow. Share in the comments below.
#burlcolycsnow

Burlington County Lyceum of History & Natural Sciences
02/02/2021

Burlington County Lyceum of History & Natural Sciences

Burlington County
02/01/2021

Burlington County

Happy February and Happy #BlackHistoryMonth! We will be featuring #BurlCoBlackHistoryMonthHeroes this month! Our first hero is Oliver Cromwell! Oliver was an African-American soldier, who served in the American Revolutionary War. He was born a free black man in Black Horse (now the Columbus section of Mansfield Township) and was raised as a farmer. Private Cromwell served in several companies of the 2nd New Jersey Regiment between 1777 and 1783, seeing action at the battles of Trenton (1776), Princeton (1777), Brandywine (1777), Monmouth (1778), and at the final siege of Yorktown (1781).

After Yorktown, Cromwell left the army. Commander-in-Chief George Washington personally signed Cromwell's discharge papers and also designed the Badge of Military Merit, which he awarded to Cromwell. Some years after retirement, Cromwell applied for a veteran's pension. Although he was unable to read or write, local lawyers, judges, and politicians came to his aid, and he was granted a pension of $96 a year. He purchased a 100-acre farm outside Burlington, fathered 15 children, then spent his later years at his home at 114 East Union Street in Burlington.

Cromwell died in January 1853. He left behind several children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, but there was no one to raise a marker over the grave of the private. He lived to be 100 years old, outliving 14 of his children and 1 of his grandchildren, and is buried in the cemetery of the Broad Street Methodist Church. His descendants live in the city to this day.

Be sure to check out our new video series where we take you behind the scenes of our collections. This month features "A...
01/26/2021
Burlington County Lyceum Artifact Highlight: A Modern Mephistopheles

Be sure to check out our new video series where we take you behind the scenes of our collections. This month features "A Modern Mephistopheles", a book in the collection rarely seen by the public. Learn how the artifact came into the collection, the history behind it, and the story it tells. A new video in the series will be posted each month. https://youtu.be/B2gTQkzMyVU

In this video series, we take you behind the scenes of the Burlington County Lyceum of History and Natural Sciences collections. This month features "A Mode...

01/22/2021
Story Time: Maria's Comet

Inspired by the life of Maria Mitchell, America's first female astronomer, join us for "Maria's Comet" by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Deborah Lanino. Our craft for today is to create your own constellation using construction paper, crayon/pencil, and a small sewing needle.

01/20/2021
MSNBC

Watch Amanda Gorman as she recited a poem on unity at the Presidential inauguration. Such powerful words! She references some other powerful words throughout our history from Presidents Washington and Lincoln and the message of others who have come before.

WATCH: Amanda Gorman, the youngest inaugural poet in U.S. history, recites a poem on unity in the U.S. at #Inauguration2021

01/18/2021
01/18/2021
01/08/2021
Story Time: Martin's Big Words

Today, in honor of Martin Luther King Jr., we will be reading "Martin's Big Words" by Doreen Rappaport, illustrated by Bryan Collier. I hope you find inspiration in his story and in his words. To participate in the craft you will need the following: 1 piece construction paper, 1 piece tissue paper, scissors, tape, and pencil.

Burlington County Parks System
12/28/2020

Burlington County Parks System

As we wrap up 2020, we would like to wish all of you a very Happy New Year from all of us at the Division of Parks.
We look forward to 2021 and bringing you many programs throughout the upcoming year!
January's Program Guide is available now: https://view.publitas.com/p222-7429/january-programs-2021/

Burlington County Parks System
12/21/2020

Burlington County Parks System

Happy Winter Solstice! Today marks the longest night and shortest day of the year here in the Northern Hemisphere - also known as the first day of Winter.
What’s even more unique about the Winter Solstice this year is that falls on the same day that Jupiter and Saturn will align in the night sky! This rare event is called the “Great Conjunction” or the “Christmas Star” where the two planets will be the closest they have been in almost 400 years. When viewed, it will look as though Jupiter and Saturn are on top of each other, forming one point of light. It may be visible to the naked eye depending on where you are viewing from, so make sure to get outside tonight and look up at the beautiful night’s sky!

Our final award recipient is Evesham Historical Society for History Organization of the Year.  Congratulations! We hope ...
12/11/2020
2020 History Organization of the Year Award: Evesham Historical Society

Our final award recipient is Evesham Historical Society for History Organization of the Year. Congratulations! We hope you enjoy learning more about this dedicated group of individuals and their efforts to preserve Evesham history.

https://youtu.be/TgR1C4exknY

Congratulations to Evesham Historical Society for Burlington County's History Recognition Award in the category of History Organization of the Year. Learn mo...

We are very proud to share our next History Award for Achievement and Leadership, Dick Toone. Mr. Toone's story is fasci...
12/10/2020
2020 History Award for Achievement and Leadership: Richard Toone

We are very proud to share our next History Award for Achievement and Leadership, Dick Toone. Mr. Toone's story is fascinating. We hope that you enjoy learning about his life, work, and continued dedication to our nation's history as much as we enjoyed interviewing him.
https://youtu.be/n382fUQcDcU

Congratulations to Richard Toone for Burlington County's History Recognition Award in the category of Achievement and Leadership. Learn more about Richard i...

This week we will be highlighting our final 3 History Award recipients for 2020. Today we begin with Linda Raymond for A...
12/09/2020
2020 History Award for Achievement and Leadership: Linda Raymond

This week we will be highlighting our final 3 History Award recipients for 2020. Today we begin with Linda Raymond for Achievement and Leadership. Watch the video to learn more about Linda and her work and dedication to the local history community. https://youtu.be/JoogLVSM5-4

Congratulations to Linda Raymond for Burlington County's History Recognition Award in the category of Achievement and Leadership. Learn more about Linda in ...

Address

307 High Street
Mount Holly, NJ
08060

Opening Hours

Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00
Sunday 12:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(609) 265-5858

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Welcoming Fall ! Call 856-896-5148 shiatsu massage with Nellie at Medford acupuncture and chiropractic 30 Jackson Road suite A1🍁🐿 call for appointment. Tuesdays and Thursdays!🌳🍂🍃
Be sure to check out our event page for all of the great programs coming up in August.
Lots of fun last night. Join us next Tuesday. Bring your own drinks and snacks.
Beautiful facility and the AFHM is looking forward to our next event on September 18, 2019. 😊
Is there a historian's roundtable? I miss the one the county historian ran.
One of my favorite history topics. Prepare to be amazed.
So interesting visit. Loved the tour. xx