Washington Association of New Jersey

Washington Association of New Jersey www.wanj.org The Washington Association was officially chartered in 1874 by a special act of the Legislature of New Jersey to preserve the Ford Mansion, Washington’s Revolutionary War Headquarters during the bitter winter of 1779-80.
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A group of preservation-minded citizens succeeded in purchasing at auction in 1873 the old house and ample grounds upon which it stands from the heirs of the grandson of the builder, Colonel Jacob Ford, Jr. Their purpose was to preserve the mansion as a monument to the heroism of General Washington and the Army. The Association acquired an extraordinary collection of military, domestic and farm articles for display, and the Ford family donated some of the furniture used by Washington. In opening the mansion to the public, the Washington Association was one of the first American organizations devoted to the maintenance of an historic site. In the early 1930s, due to problems in staffing and maintaining the museum, the idea of having the Federal Government take over the mansion was pursued. As a result of the Association’s efforts, the scope of the National Park Service was broadened to include historical sites. In March, 1933, the Ford Mansion was transferred to the Department of the Interior by the Washington Association and became the nucleus of the country’s first National Historical Park. Subsequently, Lloyd Waddell Smith, a former president of the Association, gave the greater part of the Jockey Hollow land, and Clyde Potts, Mayor of Morristown and Association member, was instrumental in acquiring the Fort Nonsense area. Over the years the Park Service has expanded the Jockey Hollow area, the site of the army’s camps in 1779-80, through land purchase and donations with assistance from the Association.

A group of preservation-minded citizens succeeded in purchasing at auction in 1873 the old house and ample grounds upon which it stands from the heirs of the grandson of the builder, Colonel Jacob Ford, Jr. Their purpose was to preserve the mansion as a monument to the heroism of General Washington and the Army. The Association acquired an extraordinary collection of military, domestic and farm articles for display, and the Ford family donated some of the furniture used by Washington. In opening the mansion to the public, the Washington Association was one of the first American organizations devoted to the maintenance of an historic site. In the early 1930s, due to problems in staffing and maintaining the museum, the idea of having the Federal Government take over the mansion was pursued. As a result of the Association’s efforts, the scope of the National Park Service was broadened to include historical sites. In March, 1933, the Ford Mansion was transferred to the Department of the Interior by the Washington Association and became the nucleus of the country’s first National Historical Park. Subsequently, Lloyd Waddell Smith, a former president of the Association, gave the greater part of the Jockey Hollow land, and Clyde Potts, Mayor of Morristown and Association member, was instrumental in acquiring the Fort Nonsense area. Over the years the Park Service has expanded the Jockey Hollow area, the site of the army’s camps in 1779-80, through land purchase and donations with assistance from the Association.

Mission: The purpose of the Washington Association of New Jersey is to support the Morristown National Historical Park in the preservation and interpretation of this renowned American Revolutionary War site, as well as to honor the contributions of George Washington and his troops to the cause of American Independence. These objectives are carried out through both the funding of, and active participation in, the following areas: • Educational programs, lectures, symposia, and publications. • Acquisition of documents, library materials, and museum artifacts. • Enhancement of site and museum interpretation programs. • Preservation and protection of Historic Park properties. • Land acquisition.

Join the North Jersey Round Table for a talk by Bert Dunkerly on Four Winters in Morristown:  Smallpox, Starvation and M...
09/04/2020

Join the North Jersey Round Table for a talk by Bert Dunkerly on
Four Winters in Morristown: Smallpox, Starvation and Mutiny.

Sept 10 via Zoom. Email [email protected] to register for an invitation!

Local connections to Alexander Hamilton.
07/12/2020
National Park Foundation

Local connections to Alexander Hamilton.

How many times did you watch Hamilton this weekend?

07/04/2020

A message from our President Phil Gaffney. Happy 4th of July to all! 🇺🇲🇺🇲🇺🇲

Blazing hot Jersey day
06/28/2020

Blazing hot Jersey day

On this day in 1778, the longest action of the Revolutionary War occurred in what is now known as the Battle of Monmouth. Many casualties are caused by sunstroke on both sides, giving rise to the story of the legendary Molly Pitcher, who both supplied fresh water to American troops and reportedly worked a cannon. As the battle ended, the Americans maintained control of the field as the British withdrew. Read more about the road to Monmouth here: http://ow.ly/DQ1f50zWFu0

Next phase of park reopening.
06/23/2020
Morristown Green

Next phase of park reopening.

The Morristown National Historical Park continues its phased reopening:

Morris County Tourism Bureau

06/18/2020
Archaeological Society of New Jersey

A look inside a soldier’s hut. Thanks Steve Santucci!

Can you imagine sharing a narrow bunk with a stranger in the dead of winter? That was often the case when traveling in the 18th century, and the men of Jockey Hollow were no exception!

Join Steve Santucci on another fascinating adventure inside one of the huts at Jockey Hollow, site of Washington's third winter encampment!

#asnj2020

To Baron von Steuben[Morristown, New Jersey, June 7, 1780]Dr BaronI am commanded by The General to inform you that the e...
06/06/2020

To Baron von Steuben
[Morristown, New Jersey, June 7, 1780]

Dr Baron
I am commanded by The General to inform you that the enemy are out in considerable force and by the last advice were advancing this way. We are going to meet them. The General is just setting out for Chatham and will be happy to see you there.

Yrs. Respecty.

A Hamilton ADC

https://www.facebook.com/146510708712035/posts/3608802439149494/
05/30/2020

https://www.facebook.com/146510708712035/posts/3608802439149494/

Morristown Encampment #OTD 240 years ago
May 30, 1780 – “The Commander in Chief is pleased to Order a release of all prisoners now under Confinement except prisoners of war and those of the Connecticut Brigade who were confined for Mutiny…” General Orders,

May 30, 1780 –“Strayed from Morris Town, the 18th instant, a bay horse, about 14 hands high, shod all round, left hind foot white, star in his forehead, and, when he strayed, was a little inclined to limp; by very close examination might be perceived a mark or brand on his left buttock, but the letters cannot be very well distinguished. Whoever will deliver said horse at Mrs. Ford’s, in Morris Town, or give information, so that he may be got again, shall be handsomely rewarded. May 30, 1780.”
The New Jersey Journal, Vol. II, No. LXX, June 14, 1780, NJ Archives 1779-1780, pg. 429

May 30 and 31, 1780 – “the Enemy has been out at Paramus, our people hearing thay was coming retreated from their Quarters, the Enemy came out in two parties one of which arrived at the Ground our People left sumtime before, the other, when the other party came up they seeing men on the Ground our People had left, fired upon them & killed 10 men & wounded several others then returned to their Lines with their Victory.” Jeremiah Greenman, RI Regt., Stark’s Brigade

NPS photo by Ranger Tom Winslow of the Ford Mansion, home of Theodosia Ford and General George Washington from December 1779 to June of 1780.
#FindYourVirtualPark #MorristownNHP #NPS

https://www.facebook.com/146510708712035/posts/3608806009149137/?sfnsn=mo
05/30/2020

https://www.facebook.com/146510708712035/posts/3608806009149137/?sfnsn=mo

On this day...eighty-eight years ago
On May 30, 1932 (Memorial Day that year) the marker for the “Jockey Hollow Cemetery” was dedicated with New Jersey governor A. Harry Moore and other officials taking part in the ceremonies.
According to the plaque (still seen across the road from the replica soldier huts) over one hundred soldiers who died during the Hard Winter of 1779-80 are buried on the site--this was based on local tradition.

After the creation of Morristown National Historical Park in 1933, archeology done on the site of the supposed cemetery found no evidence of human remains but did find artifacts such as a bullet extractor and a lead bullet that had teeth marks—supposedly a way for a soldier to withstand the pain of surgery. This discovery led to the belief that a hospital was on this site. A replica log hospital based on a design of Continental Army doctor James Tilton was constructed near the marker by the Civilian Conservation Corps. Further research revealed that Basking Ridge was the site of the hospital, and so the deteriorating replica hospital was not reconstructed after it was dismantled in 1980.

#FindYourVirtualPark #MorristownNHP #OTD

05/29/2020
Morristown National Historical Park

https://www.facebook.com/146510708712035/posts/3601693939860344/

Morristown NHP is working to increase access to the park in a phased approach. Jockey Hollow & NJ Brigade grounds and trails are open from 8:00 am - 6:00 pm daily. Access to Jockey Hollow is thru Tempe Wick Rd entrance. Fort Nonsense Area and all buildings and restroom facilities remain closed. Portable toilets are available at the Jockey Hollow Visitor Center
We will continue to monitor all park functions to ensure that visitors adhere to CDC guidance for mitigating risks associated with the transmission of COVID-19 and take any additional steps necessary to protect public health.
For more information go to https://www.nps.gov/morr/planyourvisit/conditions.htm

#FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #MorristownNHP
#RecreateResponsibly

05/29/2020
Archaeological Society of New Jersey

How to build a winter hut without using nails in the roof! Steve Santucci is one of the Washington Association’s newest trustees.

If you were a soldier in George Washington's army in 1778, what would you use to build the roof of your hut? Keep in mind, supplies are scarce!

Join Steve Santucci as he explores the mechanics of the roof construction on the huts at Jockey Hollow, site of Washington's third winter encampment!

#asnj2020

The Cross Estate Gardens at Jockey Hollow are open and are at their Springtime best!
05/20/2020

The Cross Estate Gardens at Jockey Hollow are open and are at their Springtime best!

Great to be back on the trails.
05/16/2020
Morristown National Historical Park

Great to be back on the trails.

Recreational Access of Jockey Hollow & New Jersey Brigade Grounds and Trails Begins May 20, 2020

Beginning Wednesday, May 20, 2020, Morristown NHP will reopen access to Jockey Hollow and New Jersey Brigade Areas with certain restrictions in place. When recreating, the public should follow local area health orders, including the latest public safety recreation regulations in the state of New Jersey.

On May 20th, the following will be open for recreation in accordance with state guidance from 8 am to 6 pm daily:

• Jockey Hollow Area parking lots at Visitor Center, Wick House, and Soldier Huts, and New Jersey Brigade/Cross Estate Area parking lot.
• Jockey Hollow Tour Road
• Soldier Huts
• All 27 miles of hiking trails
• Equestrian trail use (5 trailer spaces at the visitor center parking lot only)

Appropriate recreation includes such activities as:
• walking
• hiking
• running
• bicycling

Prohibited activities include:
• group gatherings and activities
• picnicking

Permanent restroom facilities in Jockey Hollow will be closed; however, portable restroom units will be available for public use. Parking will be restricted to the park’s surface parking lots only and are at a reduced number based on state guidelines. Visitors are encouraged to follow Leave No Trace principles (carry in / carry out) at the New Jersey Brigade Area.

Additionally, the following areas will remain closed to the public in this phase in the interest of public health and following federal, state and local guidelines:

• Vehicular use of the Tour Road at Jockey Hollow between the Soldier Huts and Visitor Center (Tour Road is accessible by pedestrians and bicyclists only in this area)
• Western Avenue Park Access Gate (at Jockey Hollow Road) will be closed to vehicular access
• New York Brigade parking lot and Comfort Station
• Jockey Hollow Trail Center parking lot
• Jockey Hollow Visitor Center
• Wick House and herb garden
• Fort Nonsense Area
• Washington’s Headquarters Area: Ford Mansion and Washington’s HQ Museum (grounds and parking lots are open for passive recreation)

“We encourage visitors to safely enjoy the park as the weather warms up and we head into Memorial Day Weekend,” said Tom Ross, superintendent of Morristown NHP. “Please follow recommended social distancing practices at all times. Since many trails are less than six feet wide, we encourage good, healthy hiking etiquette by yielding to other hikers in wider trail spots and turning your face away as you pass other hikers.”

The health and safety of our visitors, employees, volunteers, and partners continues to be paramount. At Morristown NHP, our operational approach will be to examine each facility function and service provided to ensure those operations comply with current public health guidance and are regularly monitored. We continue to work closely with the NPS Office of Public Health using CDC guidance to ensure public and workspaces are safe and clean for visitors, employees, partners, and volunteers.

While these areas are accessible for visitors to enjoy, a return to full operations will continue to be phased and services may be limited. When recreating, the public should follow local area health orders, park vehicles in designated parking spaces, practice Leave No Trace principles, avoid crowding and avoid high-risk outdoor activities.

Details and updates on park operations will continue to be posted on our website www.nps.gov/morr or on Facebook and Instagram using our social media handle: @morristownnps.

In appreciation to the heroes at Morristown Medical Center!  The Washington Association is proud to support our front li...
05/04/2020
Local Revolutionary War Association Supports Morristown Medical Center’s Healthcare Heroes

In appreciation to the heroes at Morristown Medical Center! The Washington Association is proud to support our front line workers. George Washington would have wanted it that way!


https://www.tapinto.net/towns/morristown/articles/local-revolutionary-war-association-supports-morristown-medical-center-s-healthcare-heroes

MORRISTOWN, New Jersey – To help healthcare heroes at Morristown Medical Center continue the fight against COVID-19, the Washington Association has made a $3,000 donation.

Thank you Bergen County Historical Society for this amazing contribution to NJ Revolutionary War History!Last night we w...
03/04/2020

Thank you Bergen County Historical Society for this amazing contribution to NJ Revolutionary War History!

Last night we worked on plans to loan our rare tavern sign to the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia.

Currently still on exhibit at the Steuben House. The portrait of Jefferson was done in his lifetime while he was president.

Historian Kevin Wright wrote:
“The depiction of President Jefferson on John Hopper’s sign was probably based upon Caleb Boyle’s portrait. Margaret Van Horn Dwight, keeping a journal of her journey to Ohio in 1810, noted: “I found it quite amusing to see the variety of paintings on the inn-keepers' signs. I saw one in N. J. with Thos. Jeff’ns. head & shoulders & his name above it”
This tavern sign, which formerly hung from an elm tree in front of John A. Hopper’s Tavern in present-day Ho-Ho-Kus, it was donated to the Bergen County Historical Society by Frederick Z. Board.”
Hopper was making a political statement by hanging Jefferson’s portrait in front of his inn.

The sign, which stands 70” tall, was restored in the 1980s by the Junior League of Bergen County. More recently, we’ve worked with McGowan on many BCHS conservation projects. The BCHS Board and Museum Collection Committee is in favor of this requested loan, details still being worked out.

More info on our website - just search “Bergen County History.” (If I insert a link here - I can’t include a photo, per FB)

Today's Patriot memorial, Lt. Col. Eleazer Lindsley.  Born in Morristown in 1737.  Thank you for your service! 🇺🇲LIEUTEN...
03/01/2020

Today's Patriot memorial, Lt. Col. Eleazer Lindsley. Born in Morristown in 1737. Thank you for your service! 🇺🇲

LIEUTENANT COLONEL ELEAZER LINDSLEY
Lieutenant Colonel Eleazer Lindsley, a Revolutionary War veteran, held commissions in Spencer's Regiment, the Jersey Blues, and the Continental Army. He was commissioned as an ensign in the British Army. When the American colonies revolted, Eleazer quickly sided with the patriots and served as a Lieutenant Colonel in Colonel Oliver Spencer's 3rd Regiment of New Jersey Continental Troops, it is often referred to as the "Fifth Battalion, Jersey Line." Upon his resignation, William Smith was appointed. Lindsley also served in the New Jersey Militia Morris County "Eastern Battalion" as a Second Major, January 13th, 1776, and as Lieutenant Colonel. He, along with other family members, fought at the Battle of Monmouth on June 28, 1778. ["Official Register of the Officers and Men of New Jersey" and "History of Morris County New Jersey"].

On Thursday, 26 Oct 1780, Esqs. Eleazer Lindsley, William Winds, and John Carle, returned (elected to serve one year) as a members of the New Jersey General Assembly for the county of Morris. In 1783, Eleazer Lindsley was appointed Justice of the Peace for Morris Township, where he owned one hundred seven acres of farmland from 1785 until August, 1790. This tract was among the properties that he sold to finance his ventures in New York state.

In 1788 and 1789, Colonel Lindsley traveled through the frontier areas of south central New York State to find land on which to settle. After rejecting the area around the Finger Lakes as unhealthy, he purchased a "rugged and uncompromising tract", approximately 30 square miles, from Gorham and Phelps in Township No. 1 of the second range. The following spring, Lindsley and his party of about forty traveled overland from Roxbury, Morris County, NJ, to Wilkes Barre, Pa. There they transferred their belongings onto seven ton boats and poled up the Susquehanna River to the Cowanesque, arriving at their property on 7 June 1790.

The party included Lindsley and his wife, Mary Wallace Miller (1738-1806), and many of the Lindsley children and their families: Elizabeth (1764-1852) and Capt. John Seelye (1757-1813); Sarah "Sally" (1776-1859) and Ebenezer Backus (d. 1831); Anna "Nancy" (1767-1813) and Dr. Ezekiel Mulford (1764-1813); Samuel Lindsley (1760-1805) and his wife, Lois Bradley (d. 1814); Phebe (1780-1814) and David Paine (d. 1851); and Eleazer Lindsley, Jr. (1769-1825) and his wife, Eunice Halsey (d. 1857). Lindsley's sons-in-law Dr. Mulford (New Jersey Militia) and Capt. Seelye (Pennsylvania Militia) were, like Lindsley, Revolutionary War veterans and loyal members of the Masonic Brotherhood. A daughter and son-in-law, Jemima and Dr. Stephen Hopkins, migrated with the Lindsley party, but due an illness, settled in nearby Luzerne County, Pa.

The Lindsleys were among the wealthiest and most politically influential families in the Painted Post district. Colonel Lindsley was enumerated in 1790 as having six slaves.

Colonel Lindsley's prominence in local affairs led to his election as representative from Ontario County to the New York state assembly. "In 1791, Colonel Eleazer Lindley of a small settlement on the Tioga River, near the Pennsylvania border, is elected to the state legislature as representative from the sparsely settled Ontario County. Although new counties have no official representation he is accepted to serve (two sessions, 1791 and 1792)." [Members of the New York State Assembly, 1790-99].

The New York State Legislature was pressured to subdivide Ontario and form new counties. Established in 1789, Ontario County was created from Montgomery. It encompassed all of western New York State from the Pre-emption Line to Lake Erie and from Lake Ontario to the Pennsylvania border. By 1879, fourteen separate counties, the early history of this vast area is retained in the records of the parent County.

Thus Steuben was taken off in 1796, and Colonel Lindsley's original tract, purchased from Phelps and Gorham, was redistricted and became a part of the newly created Steuben. On the 12th of May 1843, his original tract was set away from Erwin and renamed Lind(s)ley Town in his honor.

According to one historical work, Eleazer was elected a member of the New York state Legislature in 1793, and while attending that session died in New York. But another analogy gives his date of death as June 1794 at his Ontario Co. NY residence.

From the "History of the First Presbyterian Church, Morristown NJ" Part 2, Combined Registers 1742-1899, pp. 136-137, we find the following:

Colonel Eleazer Lindsley was born was 7 Dec 1737; renewed covenant with church 25 Jan 1761, became communicant 3 May 1765; died 1 Jun 1791; in 1789 bought a township in Steuben Co., NY, later called by his name, and settled there with his family in 1790. His wife Mary Miller, daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Wallace) Miller, was born 23 Aug 1738; renewed covenant with church 25 Jan 1761, became communicant 27 Apr 1766; died 20 Nov 1806. Eleazer and Mary had ten children, all born at Morristown, NJ and baptized at the First Presbyterian Church at Morristown.

..~*¨*·.`·´.·*¨*~...
... THEIR CHILDREN ...
..~*¨*·.`·´.·*¨*~...

i. Samuel born 6 Sep 1760; baptized 25 Jan 1761; died 1 May 1805; m. Lois Bradley, who died 18 Jun 1814.

ii. Anne born 24 Jul 1762; baptized 22 Aug 1762; d. 10 Mar 1764.

iii. Elizabeth, a twin, born 17 Jul 1764; baptized 26 Aug 1764; m. Capt. John Seelye.

iv. Mary, a twin, born 17 Jul 1764; baptized 26 Aug 1764; d. 29 Jul 1784, unmarried.

v. Nancy Anne (Anna) born 3 Jul 1767; baptized 2 Jul 1767; m. Dr. Ezekiel Mulford; both died in Jan 1813.

vi. Eleazer, Jr. born 4 Jul 1769; baptized 6 Aug 1769; died 11 May 1825; m. 23 Apr 1787, Eunice Halsey, who died 21 Jun 1857.

vii. Jemima born 28 Jan 1772; baptized 26 Apr 1772; died 16 Aug 1830; m. at Roxbury 3 Apr 1788, Dr. Stephen Hopkins, who d. 29 Mar 1841. Removed to Tioga Point (now Athens), Branford Co., PA.

viii. Micajah born 23 Jun 1774; baptized 26 Jun 1774; died young.

ix. Sarah born 8 Jun 1776; baptized 1 Jun 1777; died 1859; m. Enbenzer Backus, who died 16 Jun 1831. Removed to Tioga Point (now Athens), Branford Co., PA.

x. Phebe born 16 Aug 1780; died 21 Jan 1814; m. David Paine, who died 7 Sep 1851. Removed to Tioga Point (now Athens), Branford Co., PA.



ADDITIONAL HISTORICAL ACCOUNTS OF COLONEL ELEAZER LINDSLEY AND HIS FAMILY.

History of the Settlement of Steuben County, N Y, pub. 1853.
"Col. Eleazer Lindsley, a native of New Jersey, and an active officer of the Jersey Blues during the Revolutionary War, rode through the Genesee country previous to the year 1790, to find a tract of land which he might establish himself, and gather his children around him.

The sickliness of the regions around Seneca and Canandaigua Lakes deterred him from locating his township in the rich northern plains, and he purchased township number one of the second range, a rugged and most unpromising tract for agricultural purpose, but intersected by the fine valley of the Tioga. The healthy hills, the pure springs, and the clear beautiful river, descending from the ravines of the Allegany's, promised, If not wealth, at least freedom from those fevers, agues, cramps and distempers, which prostrated the frames and wrenched the joints of the unfortunate settlers in the northern marches.

In the spring of 1790, Col. Lindsley started from Morristown New Jersey with a colony of about forty persons, who with their goods, were transported in wagons to the Susquehanna. At Wilkesbarre the family and baggage was transferred to seven-ton boats and poled up the river, according to the practice of emigrants penetrating Ontario county by the valley; while the horse and cattle, of which there were thirty or forty, were driven along the trails, or rude roads on the bank. On the 7th day of June, 1790, the colony reached the place of destination.

Two sons of Col. Lindsley, Samuel and Eleazer, and five sons-in-law, Dr. (Ezekial) Mulford, Ebenezer Backus, Capt. John Seelye, Dr. (Stephen) Hopkins and David Payne, started with the colony from New Jersey. Dr. Hopkins remained at Tioga Point (now Athens) to (recover from an illness and there remained to) practice his profession. The others settled near Col. Lindley.

The river-flats were open and overgrown with strong wild grass and bushes. Ploughs were made by the settlers after their arrival, and as soon as these were finished, the flats were immediately broken, as on the Canisteo, with four oxen to each plough. The season was so far advanced, that the crop of corn was destroyed by frost, but a great harvest of buckwheat was secured. With buckwheat, milk and games, life was stayed during the first winter. History, looking sharply into the dim vale of ancient Tioga, smiles to see the image of "Old Pomp," negro pounding buckwheat in a samp-mortar, for the first ice in November till the breaking up of the rivers in March, when canoes can find a passage to Shepard's Mill, on the Susquehanna. History also, in this connection will embrace the opportunity to rescue Old Pomp from oblivion for the notable exploit of killing four bucks at a shot, and has the pleasure, therefore, of handing the said Pompey down to future generations as a fit subject for as much admiration as an intelligent and progressive race may think due to the man who laid low, with a musket at one shot, four fine bucks, as they were standing in the water.

Colonel and Mrs. Lindsley were members of the Presbyterian Church, at Morristown, in New Jersey. In his settlement the Sabbath was strictly observed. Traveling missionaries were always welcomed, and when none such were present, the settlers were collected to hear a sermon read by Col. Lindsley himself. In 1793, Col. Lindsley was elected a member of the Legislature, and while attending the session of that body died in New York. Numerous descendants of Col. L. live in the neighborhood settled by him. His son, Hon. Eleazer Lindsley, jr. was, for several years, a Judge of the County Court; died in 1825." ["History of the Settlement of Steuben County, N Y", pub. 1853, (Chap 3: History of the Settlement of the Tioga Valley).pp. 53-54].

History of Steuben County, New York, pub. 1879.
L I N D L E Y.
The town of Lindley was formed from Erwin, May 12, 1837. It lies upon the southern border of the county, east of the centre, and is bounded by Erwin on the north, Caton on the east, the Pennsylvania line on the south, and Tuscarora on the west. The east and west parts of Lindley are elevated and hilly uplands, divided by the deep valley of the Tioga River, which is about one mile wide, and bounded by steep hill-sides from 400 to 600 feet high. The soil on the hills is a heavy, shaly loam, and in the valleys a rich alluvium. A large portion of the surface of the hills is still covered with forests, from which lumbering has been extensively carried on.

The first settlement in this town was made upon the Tioga Flats, by Colonel Eleazer Lindsley, in the year 1790. Mr. Lindsley was a native of New Jersey, and had been an active officer of the "Jersey Blues" during the Revolutionary war. Previous to 1790 he had ridden through the Genesee country to find a tract of land where he might establish himself and gather his children around him. The unhealthiness of the region around Seneca and Canandaigua Lakes prevented his settling in that region, and he chose a tract less promising for agricultural purposes, but one that promised freedom from the diseases to which the more fertile northern plains were subject.

His colony consisted of about forty persons, who, with their goods, were transported to the Susquehanna. At Wilkesbarre these were transferred to boats and poled up the river, while the horses and cattle were driven along the trails or rude roads upon the banks. They arrived at their place of destination June 7, 1790. Plows were made, and the river-flats were immediately broken. These flats were covered with rank grass, bordered by higher land covered with Indian corn-hills, which had been hilled up year after year, until so prominent as to be yet seen where undisturbed. It was on these corn-lands the first crop of the pioneers was raised. The season was too far advanced for corn, but a great harvest of buckwheat was secured. Buckwheat, corn, milk, and game constituted their food the first winter.

"Old Pomp," a negro belonging to Col. Lindsley, made himself useful by pounding buckwheat in the dug-out top of a stump, with pestle hung from an old-fashioned well-sweep, from the time the ice closed the river in autumn until spring removed the impediment, and allowed the transportation of train in canoes to Shepard's mill at Tioga Point, fifty-two miles down the river. Old Pomp seems to have been something of a hunter as wel as a miller, killing three bucks at one shot as they were feeding upon the moss in the river, and being kicked over a log and into the brush and nearly killed himself, from the recoil of the gun, which he always loaded with a handful of powder, and the entire contents of the old-fashioned brass moulds,-an ounce ball and nineteen buckshot of various sizes.

Colonel and Mrs. Lindsley were members of the Presbyterian Church ar Morristown, N.J., and in this new settlement the Sabbath was strictly observed. Traveling missionaries were cordially welcomed, and when none of these were present to conduct the religious services, Col. Lindsley himself would read a sermon.

In 1793 he was elected a member of the Legislature (he was a member of New York state assembly from Ontario County, 1791-92). He died at home soon after, and his remains were the first to be placed in the plat he had himself selected for the cemetery of the colony, his death taking place in June, 1794 (church register reflects 1 Jun 1791). This cemetery is situated on the left bank of the river, and contains the remains of many of the early pioneers. It is known as the Lindsley Burying-ground. His was the first death in the new colony, which lost in him an energetic and worthy founder.

Col. Lindsley was accompanied to his new home in the Tioga Valley by his two sons, Samuel and Eleazer, and by his sons-in-law, Dr. Ezekial Mulford, Ebenezer Bachus, and Capt. John Seelye. David Cook and David Payne, who, in company with Mr. Bachus, built the first mill at Lindley Station, also accompanied the colony. Eliza Mulford, daughter of Dr. Ezekiel Mulford, was the first child born in Lindley, and first while female child born in the county of Steuben, her birth occurring Aug. 10, 1792.

David Cook and Elizabeth Cady were the first couple united in marriage. Col. Lindsley, before his death, had erected a saw-mill, the irons for which he had brought with him from New Jersey, and which was in operation in 1790, being one of the first mills on the Phelps and gorham purchase, and the first in the Tioga Valley. This mill was located at a fall, a short distance up Watson Creek. The first grist-mill was built soon after, between this and the river. Mrs. Lindsley, after the death of her husband, kept the first public-house between Williamsport and Bath, and entertained Col. Williamson and his crew on their early journey through the wilderness. She died in Lindleytown, Nov. 20, 1806.

Many of the descendants of the Lindsley, Mulford, and Seelye families still live in Tioga and adjoining valleys. The principal descendant of the Lindsley family is Bradley Lindsley, who occupies the original home of his grandfather, much improved and beautified, but still exhibiting the old style of liberal hospitality and welcome. Charles Ford, only son of the first merchant in the valley, and grandson of Col. Lindsley, married the daughter of Gen. Cruger, of Bath, and still lives in sight of the little cemetery where sleep the colonists and many of their children. A visit to his home is a rare treat to the antiquarian, the house being filled with many mementos of early public men, as well as of the early settlers of Steuben County.

Dr. Ezekial Mulford, the physician of the colony, was a direct descendant of John Mulford, of Maidstone, Sussex, England, who was one of the first thirty-five english settlers in the State of New York, he settling on Long Island in 1639. Dr. Mulford and his wife both died within a few hours of each other during the fever of 1812, leaving a family of fifteen children. Lindsley Mulford, who was the oldest of the family, became known throughout the country as a woodsman and hunter, living a life of adventure with a young Indian for some years; finally settling down as a prosperous farmer, and dying at the age of eight-seven years.

Jeremiah and Eleazer were intimately connected with the early development of Lindleytown, which was built upon their farms, and were highly respected by the community in which they lived. Eleazer Mulford, the last survivor of the Lindsley colony, who came in 1809, died in 1871, at the age of eighty-four years. In 1811 he was married to Miss Betsey Lillibridge, who had come to the settlement to teach school.

John C. and E. P. Mulford are the leading members of the family in the town, and prominent citizens. Lee and Uri Mulford, well-known journalists and writers in Steuben County, are of this family. Castilla was the father of gen. John E. Mulford, who acquired a national reputation by his connection with the exchange of prisoners during the late war. Eliza, the first child born in the colony, was the mother of rodney Bachus, the inventor.

Joseph Miller, the school-teacher of the colony, grandfather of Horace Vastbinder, informs us, in the school commissioner's report for 1826, that "the school-books used in the four districts of the town are Webster's Spelling-book, Murray's English Reader, Murray's Grammar, Walker's Dictionary, Daboll's Arithmetic, Flint's Surveying, and Moar's Geography."

Charles Seelye, who occupies the old homestead of his grandfather, Capt. John Seelye, near the Lawrenceville depot, is a son of William Seelye, long a leading citizen of Lindley, and the only one left to bear the name. Col. Gabriel T. Harrower, grandson of Rev. David Harrower, and for many years one of the leading lumbermen of Tioga Valley, served as colonel of the 161st New York Volunteers in the late Rebellion, and represented this district in the State Senate in 1871.

Of the seven slaves brought by the colony from New Jersey some of their descendants are still living in various parts of the country. "Old Pomp" fell a victim to the epidemic fever after tending the sick during the terrible winter of 1813.

William More, one of the most extensive farmers in the southern part of the county, Col. G. T. Harrower, Hiram Middlebrook, S. M. Morgan, and Rev. W. H. Hill have been leading business men of Lindleytown for many years. T. J. Presho and S. Hammond are leading business men at Erwin Centre.

Joseph Miller, one of the colony, who was in later years for a long time school commissioner, taught the first school, near the Pennsylvania line, in 1793, which shows that the first settlers of this wilderness did not remain long without the means of education for their children. Dr. Mulford located himself near the State line, and devoted himself to his profession. Col. Lindsley sold to John P. Ryerss a portion of the northeast corner of the town, and in 1804, James Ford came from the East as his clerk, bringing a stock of goods and opening the first store in the valley, near the Orr place, below Cooks Creek. Amos Halsey came after the colony, and was accidentally killed in 1802.

The first post-office was at Judge (Eleaser, Jr.) Lindsley's house, and afterwards, in 1830, at the store of Lyan & Morgan, Albert Morgan being postmaster. Rev. David Harrower, a Scotch Presbyterian preacher, resided in Lindley, and preached in the surrounding country at that date. Joshua Russell came to Lindley in 1823, settling on the Calder farm, at the mouth of Mulford Creek. Lime was burned at this point from marl, in the hills, in 1846. Coal has been found also, on the surface among the hills on this creek, in small quantities. This was one of the heaviest timbered towns in the county, no less than fourteen miles having been located along the river within the present town limits.

Robert, a brother of Ben Patterson the scout and hunter, who participated in the engagement at Freeling's Fort and, other scenes of the early Indian wars, was one of the early settlers, removing from the old tavern at Knoxville, and locating at the mouth of the creek which bears his name, in 1804. Among the later arrivals previous to 1830 are found the names of E. F. Tremans, A. F. Lyon, A. C. and Julius Morgan, John P. Ryerss, Abner Thurber, Frederick Heckart, and Eber Scofield. Elam Watson has been justice of the peace almost continuously from 1830.

The Lindsley colony brought with them several slaves, who remained with their masters until years after the legislation abolishing slavery in New York. Death emancipated them from a not burdensome servitude.
The line of road past the Patterson place was in earlier days a well-known racing-ground, and the scene of many a rural frolic among the hardy pioneers and their children.

The river, which is now confined to its narrow bed, covered much of the flat with its shallow waters, and fords were convenient at each settlement. Oak timber in the flats furnished acorns to fatten the half-wild hogs, and butternuts covered the ground in their season. Every family had its dug-out, and deer were shot at will in the woods or while feeding on the rich mosses in the dark shadows of the river.

Col. Lindsley portioned his lands to his children and followers in long strips across the town, the old partition surveys still annoying their possessors by their inconvenient angles. The now rich river-flats were in many cases abandoned by their owners for hill farms, which, when developed, were vastly inferior in value to those they left… [Clayton, W. Woodford, History of Steuben County, New York: with illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers,: Philadelphia: Lewis, Peck & Co., 1879, pp. 350-355].

History of Steuben County, New York, pub. 1879
The Township of Lind(s)ley was set-off from Erwin, May 12, 1837, and was named in honor of Col. Eleazer Lindsley, the original proprietor. It lies upon the southern border of the county, east of the centre, and was "Township No. 1, of the Second Range." It is bounded north by Erwin, east by Caton, south by Pennsylvania state line, and west by the town of Tuscarora. The east and west parts are hilly uplands, divided by the valley of the Tioga river, which is bounded by steep hillsides from four to six hundred feet high. The course of the Tioga is from south to north through the town, a little east of the centre. The soil upon the hills is a heavy, shaly loam, and in the valley, which is about a mile in width, a rich alluvium. The population of the town, according to the census enumeration of 1890, was 1,527."

The first settlement in this township, Lindsley Town, was made upon the Tioga Flats, by Colonel Eleazer Lindsley, in the year 1790. Mr. Lindsley was a native of New Jersey, and had been an active officer of the "Jersey Blues" during the Revolutionary war. Previous to 1790 he had ridden through the Genesee country to find a tract of land where he might establish himself and gather his children around him. The unhealthiness of the region around Seneca and Canandaigua Lakes prevented his settling in that region, and he chose a tract less promising for agricultural purposes, but one that promised freedom from the diseases to which the more fertile northern plains were subject.

His colony consisted of about forty persons, who, with their goods, were transported to the Susquehanna. At Wilkesbarre these were transferred to boats and poled up the river, while the horses and cattle were driven along the trails or rude roads upon the banks. They arrived at their place of destination June 7, 1790. Plows were made, and the river-flats were immediately broken. These flats were covered with rank grass, bordered by higher land covered with Indian corn-hills, which had been hilled up year after year, until so prominent as to be yet seen where undisturbed. It was on these corn-lands the first crop of the pioneers was raised. The season was too far advanced for corn, but a great harvest of buckwheat was secured. Buckwheat, corn, milk, and game constituted their food the first winter.

"Old Pomp," a negro belonging to Col. Lindsley, made himself useful by pounding buckwheat in the dug-out top of a stump, with pestle hung from an old-fashioned well-sweep, from the time the ice closed the river in autumn until spring removed the impediment, and allowed the transportation of train in canoes to Shepard's mill at Tioga Point, fifty-two miles down the river. Old Pomp seems to have been something of a hunter as well as a miller, killing three bucks at one shot as they were feeding upon the moss in the river, and being kicked over a log and into the brush and nearly killed himself, from the recoil of the gun, which he always loaded with a handful of powder, and the entire contents of the old-fashioned brass moulds, an ounce ball and nineteen buckshot of various sizes.

Colonel and Mrs. (Mary Miller) Lindsley were members of the Presbyterian Church at Morristown, NJ, and in this new settlement, the Sabbath was strictly observed. Traveling missionaries were cordially welcomed, and when none of these were present to conduct the religious services, Col. Lindsley himself would read a sermon. In 1793, he was elected a member of the Legislature. He died at home soon after, and his remains were the first to be placed in the plat he had himself selected for the cemetery of the colony, his death taking place in June, 1794. This cemetery is situated on the left bank of the river, and contains the remains of many of the early pioneers. It is known as the Lindsley Burying-ground. His was the first death in the new colony, which lost in him an energetic and worthy founder.

Col. Lindsley was accompanied to his new home in the Tioga Valley by his two sons, Samuel and Eleazer, and by his (five) sons-in-law, Dr. Ezekial Mulford, Ebenezer Bachus, Capt. John Seelye, and (Dr. Stephen Hopkins, who traveled as far as Tioga Point (now Athens) before halting to recover from an illness and there remained to practice his profession). David Cook and David Payne, who in company with Mr. Bachus, built the first mill at Lindley Station, also accompanied the colony. Eliza Mulford, daughter of Dr. Ezekiel Mulford, was the first child born in Lindley, and first while female child born in the county of Steuben, her birth occurring Aug. 10, 1792. David Cook and Elizabeth Cady were the first couple united in marriage.

Col. Lindsley, before his death, had erected a saw-mill, the irons for which he had brought with him from New Jersey, and which was in operation in 1790, being one of the first mills on the Phelps and Gorham purchase, and the first in the Tioga Valley. This mill was located at a fall, a short distance up Watson Creek. The first grist-mill was built soon after, between this and the river. Mrs. Lindsley, after the death of her husband, kept the first public-house between Williamsport and Bath, and entertained Col. Williamson and his crew on their early journey through the wilderness. She died in Lindleytown, Nov. 20, 1806. [Clayton, W. Woodford, History of Steuben County, NY: with illus & biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers, Philadelphia: Lewis, Peck & Co., 1879, pp. 350-355].

A History of Old Tioga Point and Early Athens, Pennsylvania, pub. 1908.
The summer of 1790, an unusually large party of colonists for New York State arrived, headed by Colonel Arthur Erwin's friend and rival, in the Phelps & Gorham tract, Lieutenant Colonel Eleazer Lindsley, of Col. Oliver Spencer's 5th Regiment, New Jersey, who was in the Sullivan expedition. He had made a purchase next to that of Erwin, called Lindleytown, now in Steuben County. He brought with him a colony of sixty, including his own large family and several sons-in-law.

The arrival of this party made a great stir at Tioga Point (now Athens), the more so because one of Lindley's son-in-laws was taken sick here, and had to be left behind. A most fortunate illness for Tioga Point, for it gave the settlement its first regular physician, Doctor Stephen Hopkins. Moreover, it made a link between the towns, and brought later one or more wives to other pioneers. Ebenezer Backus, one of the sons-in-law, (husband of Sarah "Sally" Lindsley), came with this party, and became actively connected with Athens.

"Two sons of Col. Lindley, Samuel and Eleazer, and four sons-in-law, Dr. Mulford, Ebenezer Backus, Capt. John Seely, and Dr. Hopkins, started with the colony from New Jersey. Dr. Hopkins remained at Tioga Point to practice his profession."

Col. Lindsley had a number of slaves, and one or more was given to each married daughter. Old Cato, long the faithful servant of Francis Tyler, was the son of one; also Black Nellie and Aunt Betsey, well remembered by the older people, who though freed in time by law, continued to live in Athens. In 1896, there died near Rome, New York, a colored man over 100 years old, who called himself "Edward Hopkins" and told of Tioga Point families. Doubtless he or his kin had belonged to Mrs. Ebenezer Backus or her sister. Mr. Backus' active connection with Tioga Point at a later date is to be found in a subsequent chapter.

The Lindsley Family.
"After the foregoing chapter was in type we learned of a manuscript concerning this family in the possession of Mrs. S. W. Badger, a resident of Athens today (1908). This is a copy of the gleanings of Mrs. E. B. Beaumont (deceased), a descendant of Col. Eleazer Lindsley.

The records say that this name, both in England and America, has always had as many spellings as it has letters, father and son often using different ones. It was originally derived from the numerous linden trees with which the family lands abounded in Linddeseya, later Lindsaye and now Lincolnshire. The original emigrant John Lindsley came from England (near London) and settled in Guilford, Conn., where he died in 1630. The family were all strong Presbyterians, therefore persecuted; Frances, son of John, was a friend and staunch adherent of Cromwell, after whose death he decided to follow his family to America, about 1659.

A few years later, during the troubles between different Connecticut Colonies, the brothers, John and Frances, joined a band of the disaffected, and purchased a large tract of land in New Jersey, and laid out the city of Newark. John, son of Frances, was the first boy born in the new settlement, and the proprietors gave him a tract of land where Orange now stands. Later, Frances bought a tract covering the present site of Morristown, where he died at the age of 104.

Colonel Eleazer Lindsley was a great grandson of Frances, being a son of Jonathan, son of Jonathan, son of Frances, as found in Connecticut and New Jersey State records. Eleazer married Mary Miller, granddaughter of Thomas Miller and Margaret Wallace, and had two sons and six daughters. Mrs. Hopkins, Mrs. Backus and Mrs. Paine have already been mentioned. One of the sons was also a temporary resident of Athens. Anna m. Dr. Ezekiel Mulford and had thirteen children. According to notes of Edward Herrick, Jr., the Mulfords also lived at Athens, and died there of the "cold fever." They were the great-great grandparents of Mrs. Badger.

Eleazer Lindsley was in active service all through the Revolution, attaining to the rank of (Lt) Colonel; was aide-de-camp to Washington, and finally on the staff of General Lafayette, who became a personal friend and visited at the Lindsley home some weeks. On his departure, he bestowed upon his host a ring from his finger and a court vest, which was preserved by the family by being cut up into pincushion covers.

This manuscript also contained extracts from a rare old book, published in Scotland, entitled "The Lives of the Lindsays," by Alexander William, 24th Earl of Crawford. The only copy known in America belongs to Mrs. Mary Lindsley Porter. It contains the history of the family, autographs, crests, armorial bearings and a genealogical table. The family of Eleazer claim descent from Sir John Lindsay of Craigi Castle. All the Scotch and English families were celebrated for their literary talents, as well as for their staunch adherence to the Presbyterian faith. Lack of space precludes further mention of this interesting family." [Louise Welles Murray, "A History of Old Tioga Point and Early Athens, Pennsylvania", Closson Press, 1908, pp. 320-321, 350]. Endnote: Mrs. S. W. Badger (Alice Gertrude Middaugh), b. Oct 1856 in Lawrenceville, PA; m. Samuel W. Badger b. Jan 1849 in NY state. Alice was a daughter of Chester Middaugh and Anna Repass, a d/o William Repass and Nancy L. Mulford, who was a d/o Anna Vanire and Jeremiah Mulford, a son of Ezekial Mulford and Anna "Nancy" Lindsley, who was a daughter of Mary Miller and Lt Colonel Eleazer Lindsley, a son of Jonathan Jr., who was a son of Jonathan Sr., a son of Francis, who was a son of John Lindsley.

....~*¨*·.`·´.·*¨*~.....
..... MEMORIAL DAY .....
.....~*¨*·.`·´.·*¨*~.....

The finest tribute we can pay
Unto our hero dead today,
Is not a rose wreath, white and red,
In memory of the blood they shed;

It is to stand beside each mound,
Each couch of consecrated ground,
And pledge ourselves as warriors true
Unto the work they died to do.

Into God's valleys where they lie
At rest, beneath the open sky,
Triumphant now o'er every foe,
As living tributes let us go.

No wreath of rose or immortelles
Or spoken word or tolling bells
Will do today, unless we give
Our pledge that liberty shall live.

Our hearts must be the roses red
We place above our hero dead;
Today beside their graves we must
Renew allegiance to their trust;

Must bare our heads and humbly say
We hold the Flag as dear as they,
And stand, as once they stood, to die
To keep the Stars and Stripes on high.

The finest tribute we can pay
Unto our hero dead today
Is not of speech or roses red,
But living, throbbing hearts instead,

That shall renew the pledge they sealed
With death upon the battlefield:
That freedom's flag shall bear no stain
And free men wear no tyrant's chain. --
"Memorial Day" by -- Edgar A. Guest

Gravesite Details first to be interred; h/o Mary (Miller); Revolutionary War Officer; founder of Lindsley Town (now Lindley NY)
Flowers • 6

Left by Karen Traver on 30 Dec 2019

Left by Jessica Whetsel Moralez on 27 Jan 2020

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Created by: Laurie H
Added: 27 Mar 2010
Find A Grave Memorial 50314140
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The Association members meet twice a year, once in February to celebrate George Washington’s birthday, and in the spring for the Martha Washington Reception. The former gathering encompasses the annual business meeting, a membership luncheon, and an annual address presented by a notable speaker. The address is a scholarly presentation relating to General Washington and the American Revolution, and is published by the Association. The Association sponsors education initiatives, such as the Primary Source Seminar, utilizing the library’s vast collection. In addition the Association co-sponsors additional monthly lectures and symposia relating to Washington and the Revolution that are held at the Museum, in conjunction with the North Jersey American Revolution Round Table and the National Park Service. Application for Membership Membership in the Washington Association is achieved by payment of a $100 registration fee and a subscription to a share of stock in the amount of $100. The stock ownership entitles the subscriber to lifetime participation in the organization. There are no annual dues. Membership may be transferred from one living individual to another, or bequeathed to another person, subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees. In such an event, the original stock certificate is replaced by a certificate of succession in the name of the new member, and a transfer fee of $50 is charged. Membership application and inquiries should be directed to the Washington Association of New Jersey via email, phone or mail. Benefits of Membership Membership in the Washington Association offers a splendid opportunity to participate in our historical legacy and provides the following benefits: • Stockholder membership status in one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious historic preservation organizations. • Attendance at two annual meetings • George Washington’s Birthday • Martha Washington Reception • Monthly programs at the Morristown National Historical Park, in conjunction with the New Jersey American Revolution Round Table and the National Park Service. • Discount on special programs AND the knowledge that one is contributing to the support of our wonderful historic heritage.

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