Schuyler-Hamilton House

Schuyler-Hamilton House Open Sunday afternoons from 1-4. tours are $5 adults $2.50 children under 12. Because the DAR has meetings we will be closed: 9-8, 10-6, 11-3, 12-15, 1-5, 2-2, 3-1, 3-29. Tours available, call 973-267-4039.
Schuyler-Hamilton House, also known as the Jabez Campfield House, was built in 1760 on the eastern edge of the small village of Morristown, N.J. In 1765 it was purchased by a young doctor from Newark. He and his bride, Sarah Ward, lived in the house for fifty six years. Here their only child, William, was born. He too graduated as a doctor from Princeton and practiced in Morristown. The family lived in this attractive four bedroom, Georgian style house until 1821. Dr. Jabez Campfield served as a surgeon during the Revolutionary War. Following the war he became a prominent community leader serving as the first Morris County Surrogate, the founder of the first lending library, a Justice of the Peace and engaged in many other notable activities. During the winter of 1779-80 Dr. Campfield's house served as the home for Dr. John Cochran, who was assigned to General Washington. Dr. Cochran's wife was the sister of General Philip Schuyler. Mrs Cochran knew her niece, Elizabeth (Betsy) Schuyler, had met Alexander Hamilton during the summer of 1779 and she had been very impressed by him. Therefore, when Mrs. Cochran became aware that Alexander Hamilton was stationed at General Washington's Headquarters, which were located only a short quarter of a mile east of the of the Campfield house, she invited Elizabeth to spend the winter with her. Very quickly Alex and Betsy began courting, often in the Campfield House. By April they had reached an "understanding." They were married in Albany, NY at Betsy's home in December 1780. This Colonial House was bought by the Morristown Chapter of the DAR in 1923. The membership decided to name their new Chapter House in honor of Betsy and Alexander, hence the name Schuyler- Hamilton House.
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Open Saturday September 10 Closed Sunday September 11

Wishing everyone a happy and safe Independence Day. The Black and White image is titled "Drafting the Declaration of Ind...
07/04/2020

Wishing everyone a happy and safe Independence Day. The Black and White image is titled "Drafting the Declaration of Independence in 1776,” by Alonzo Chappel.

Spring is in the air and the gardens at the Schuyler-Hamilton House are beginning to spring to life. With social distanc...
04/04/2020

Spring is in the air and the gardens at the Schuyler-Hamilton House are beginning to spring to life. With social distancing in place and our house remaining closed, our regent took some photos of our gardens that our members and volunteers have worked so hard on. We hope you will enjoy a virtual stroll through them.

So if you can’t get out enjoy some history in😊
03/27/2020

So if you can’t get out enjoy some history in😊

While you find yourself at home during the Coronavirus pandemic and are looking for a distraction from the world outside, consider some of these history-related programs:
A More or Less Perfect Union – Watch here: https://www.pbs.org/wnet/more-less-perfect-union/ or on your local PBS Station;
Washington – Watch on the History channel or here: https://www.history.com/shows/washington;
Black Patriots: Heroes of the Revolution – Watch on the History channel or here: https://www.history.com/specials/black-patriots-heroes-of-the-revolution;
The Hello Girls – Winner of the DAR Media and Entertainment Award; watch on Prime Video: https://www.amazon.com/Hello-Girls-Cokie-Roberts/dp/B07V4TP7G2 and/or
TURN – Another DAR Media and Entertainment Award winner; watch on Netflix: https://www.netflix.com/title/70302007
Enjoy!

Stamp act.. the road to Revolution
03/23/2020

Stamp act.. the road to Revolution

#OTD On this day in 1765 the British Parliament passed The Stamp Act, imposing a direct tax on the colonies requiring that printed materials be produced on paper carrying an embossed revenue stamp.

The purpose of the tax was to help pay for troops stationed in North America after the British victory in the Seven Years' War and its North American theater of the French and Indian War. The Stamp Act is considered to be one of the primary factors leading to the American colonies' declaration of independence from the British Empire and eventually the Revolutionary War.

03/18/2020

The Morristown Chapter had decided to close tours of our Schuyler-Hamilton House until the end of March. We will reassess reopening at that time. Please stay safe.

Yes, the first official St Patrick's Day Parade was in Morristown New Jersey, ordered by George Washington during his Wi...
03/17/2020

Yes, the first official St Patrick's Day Parade was in Morristown New Jersey, ordered by George Washington during his Winter encampment of 1780

“Sons of St. Patrick”: The Irish at Jockey Hollow
Saint Patrick’s Day, March 17, 1780 was “…ushered in with music and hoisting of colors, exhibiting the 13 stripes, the favorite Harp, and an inscription declaring in capitals, THE INDEPENDENCE OF IRELAND.” The New York Gazette and the Weekly Mercury, April 24, 1780

Irishmen fought on both sides of the American Revolution. On the British side, the Royal Irish Artillery, the Queens Rangers and the Volunteers of Ireland fought in battles from Maine to Georgia. Irish regiments in the French Army fought at Savannah, Georgia in 1779 while Irish regiments serving the Spanish were victorious at the siege of Pensacola, Florida in 1781.
The largest percentage of Irishmen who fought served in the American Army. It is estimated that one quarter of the Continental Army was from Ireland while in some regiments from Pennsylvania and Maryland almost half the soldiers were Irish. Seven out of the eleven brigades in Jockey Hollow were commanded by generals born in Ireland or who had Irish parents.
St. Patrick’s Day was the one holiday General Washington gave his army in Jockey Hollow during the hard winter of 1779-1780. Washington hoped that by recognizing the Irish holiday it might further the current political unrest in Ireland.
General Washington ordered all work parties to cease for the day. In the New York Brigade the officers were told “not to detail for duty any sons of St. Patrick.” Colonel Johnston, commanding the Second Pennsylvania Brigade, bought a large barrel of rum for his men, though he expected them to “conduct themselves with the greatest sobriety and good order.”

Ten years ago, a wayside with this text was placed at the base of the hill where the Pennsylvania brigades built their huts to remember the soldiers of Irish descent who were part of the Morristown encampments .You can still view that sign today at Jockey Hollow just below the replica soldier huts.

Photo: NPS/Ranger Tom Winslow

#FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #NPS #MorristownNHP #GeorgeWashington #AmericanRevolution #RevolutionaryNJ #thisdayinhistory StPatricksDay #Irish

Looking to celebrate the 19th Amendment's 100th anniversary in 2020 at your site? NJ Women Vote created a Public Program...
02/28/2020

Looking to celebrate the 19th Amendment's 100th anniversary in 2020 at your site? NJ Women Vote created a Public Programs Toolkit that offers resources and ideas for organizations and individuals planning programs to commemorate the centennial of the passage of the 19th Amendment and women's suffrage in New Jersey. ➡️ https://www.njht.org/dca/njht/resources/
#njhistory #njwomenvote100

02/26/2020
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Thank you General Washington for all you did.
02/23/2020

Thank you General Washington for all you did.

“Happy Birthday George Washington! (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)

Washington grew up in Virginia, the son of Mary Ball Washington and Augustine Washington, Sr. He would later become a leader in the Virginia militia, becoming involved in the start of the French and Indian War. Washington was selected as a delegate to the First Continental Congress in 1775 and, later, General of the Continental Army. Washington would lead his army to victory over the British during the Revolutionary War through the famous crossing of the Delaware River and the British Army’s surrender in Yorktown in October 1781.

At the Constitutional Convention, he was unanimously chosen as the first President of the United States, creating the first presidential cabinet and producing a plan for government, establishing roles and traditions stemmed from the U.S. Constitution, that are still used today.

The DAR Americana Collection houses a complete set of the signatures of the 39 signers of the U.S. Constitution. As a Constitution signer, Washington’s signature is on a letter to General Huntington acknowledging the General’s intent to retire from the army and thanking him for his dedication and service, 1783. (Americana Collection, acc. 3361)

You can view the collection of the signatures of the U.S. Constitution Signers here: www.dar.org/ConstitutionSigners”

10 Revolutionary War Sites To Visit In Morristown, New Jersey
01/28/2020
10 Revolutionary War Sites To Visit In Morristown, New Jersey

10 Revolutionary War Sites To Visit In Morristown, New Jersey

Most people don’t think of Morristown, New Jersey, when they think of the Revolutionary War, but historians often refer to Morristown as the military capital of the American Revolution.

Morristown National Historical Park
01/23/2020

Morristown National Historical Park

Morristown Encampment #OnThisDay 240 years ago
Saturday, January 22, 1780
General Washington: Life at Headquarters is not without difficulty--we need our own kitchen! The servants (both free and enslaved) meeting the domestic needs of me and my staff are living and working in the kitchen wing with Mrs. Ford's servants--sharing more than just space!

"I have been at my prest. Quarters since the 1st day of Dec[embe]r. and have not a Kitchen to cook a Dinner in, altho’ the Logs have been put together some considerable time by my own Guard. Nor is there a place at this moment in which a servant can lodge, with the smallest degree of comfort. Eighteen belonging to my family, and all Mrs. Ford’s, are crowded together in her Kitchen, and scarce one of them able to speak for the colds they have caught.”
General Washington to General Greene
https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/03-24-02-0178"

Photo: Ford Mansion kitchen NPS/Ranger Tom Winslow
#FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #NPS #MorristownNHP #GeorgeWashington

America 250
01/23/2020

America 250

After a 250-year journey, the States deserve a celebration like no other. That’s why the U.S. Semiquincentennial Commission is planning one that will go down in history. Like our page for updates or head to america250.org to find out how we’re bringing Americans together on this once-in-a-lifetime occasion.

12/30/2019

Dear friends this Sunday January 5th, Schuyler-Hamilton House will be closed to the public.
Please schedule your visit for the following week

Tara Ross
12/26/2019

Tara Ross

On this day in 1776, General George Washington wins the Battle of Trenton. 1776 had been a difficult year. The victory provided a much-needed morale boost.

As discussed in yesterday’s post, the beginning of December found Washington and British General William Howe on opposite sides of the Delaware River. As the weather deteriorated, Howe had decided to go into winter quarters. Washington, instead, decided to make a difficult crossing of the Delaware. His plan was to arrive at Trenton at 5 a.m., well before sunrise, so he could launch a surprise attack.

It wasn’t to be. Instead, Washington arrived at Trenton at 8 a.m., one hour after sunrise. Moreover, Washington had a smaller force than anticipated because two prongs of the American army had decided that the Delaware crossing was too difficult to attempt.

There were about 1,500 Hessians stationed at Trenton. (Hessians were German troops that had been hired by the British.) Interestingly, the Hessian officer in charge at Trenton, Johann Gottlieb Rall, had received two warnings that Americans were coming. He dismissed them both. A small shooting incident between some Hessian guards and an American patrol had occurred on Christmas Day, and Rall thought this was the attack of which he’d been warned.

He did not believe Americans capable of a larger attack, especially given the terrible weather.

Indeed, that weather turned out to be both a blessing and a curse. The snow and ice made the crossing almost impossible, but it also kept the Hessians from realizing that an attack was under way.

Americans attacked at 8 a.m.

One American officer, Henry Knox, later wrote: “The storm continued with great violence, but was in our backs, and consequently in the faces of the enemy.” Thus, the Hessian guards couldn’t tell what was happening at first. Once they realized what was happening, they began an orderly retreat back into the city.

The Americans had been up all night; they were tired, wet, and cold, but they fought gallantly. They set up cannons and cleared the main streets quickly. Meanwhile, the side streets were full of Hessians and Americans engaged in hand-to-hand combat. Things were happening quickly. Snow and gunpowder smoke swirled around and added to the confusion. Before long, Rall ordered a retreat to a nearby orchard, but the Hessians found themselves surrounded. They laid down their arms and surrendered: 900 of them were taken prisoner; 500 escaped; 21 were killed; 90 were wounded. By contrast, only four Americans were wounded and none were killed.

The battle was over in less than 45 minutes. Washington had won a stunning victory just when it was needed most.

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Gentle reminder: History posts are copyright © 2013-2019 by Tara Ross. I appreciate it when you use the share feature instead of cutting/pasting.

Permalink: https://www.taraross.com/post/tdih-battle-trenton

#TDIH #OTD #AmericanHistory #USHistory #liberty #freedom #ShareTheHistory

A blessed union forged in Morristown, at Schuyler-Hamilton House
12/15/2019

A blessed union forged in Morristown, at Schuyler-Hamilton House

239 years ago, Elizabeth Schuyler married Alexander Hamilton at the Schuyler family home in Albany. Engaged since April of that year, this was a lengthy engagement in the middle of the war, (especially when compared to her parents' engagement period, which was measured in days, not weeks or months!)

While initial correspondence between Hamilton and his future in-laws indicates cool caution on Philip and Catharine's part, Philip Schuyler had definitely warmed up to Alexander by the time that the new couple left Albany to celebrate with Hamilton's military family.

To learn more about the wedding and the Hamiltons' relationship with this family, house, and community, check out or events page for information on our Hamilton focus tours. In the meantime, please join us in congratulating the happy couple!

Joseph Plumb Martin's Journal is owned by the Morristown National Historic Park, Washington's Headquarters.  His comment...
11/22/2019
Joseph Plumb Martin

Joseph Plumb Martin's Journal is owned by the Morristown National Historic Park, Washington's Headquarters. His comments on the winter of 1780 in Morristown are legendary

At age 70, Joseph Plumb Martin wrote "A Narrative of Some of the Adventures, Dangers, and Sufferings of a Revolutionary Soldier, Interspersed with Anecdotes of Incidents that Occurred Within His Own Observations," one of the only accounts of the Revolutionary War told by one of the common soldiers w...

On Veterans weekend here’s a post about one of the youngest and longest serving veterans of them all
11/10/2019

On Veterans weekend here’s a post about one of the youngest and longest serving veterans of them all

In May of 1861, 9-year-old John Lincoln "Johnny" Clem ran away from his home in Newark, Ohio, to join the Union Army, but found the Army was not interested in signing on a 9-year-old boy when the commander of the 3rd Ohio Regiment told him he "wasn't enlisting infants," and turned him down. Clem tried the 22nd Michigan Regiment next, and its commander told him the same. Determined, Clem tagged after the regiment, acted out the role of a drummer boy, and was allowed to remain. Though still not regularly enrolled, he performed camp duties and received a soldier's pay of $13 a month, a sum collected and donated by the regiment's officers.

The next April, at Shiloh, Clem's drum was smashed by an artillery round and he became a minor news item as "Johnny Shiloh, The Smallest Drummer". A year later, at the Battle Of Chickamauga, he rode an artillery caisson to the front and wielded a musket trimmed to his size. In one of the Union retreats a Confederate officer ran after the cannon Clem rode with, and yelled, "Surrender you damned little Yankee!" Johnny shot him dead. This pluck won for Clem national attention and the name "Drummer Boy of Chickamauga."

Clem stayed with the Army through the war, served as a courier, and was wounded twice. Between Shiloh and Chickamauga he was regularly enrolled in the service, began receiving his own pay, and was soon-after promoted to the rank of Sergeant. He was only 12 years old. After the Civil War he tried to enter West Point but was turned down because of his slim education. A personal appeal to President Ulysses S. Grant, his commanding general at Shiloh, won him a 2nd Lieutenant's appointment in the Regular Army on 18 December 1871, and in 1903 he attained the rank of Colonel and served as Assistant Quartermaster General. He retired from the Army as a Major General in 1916, having served an astounding 55 years.

General Clem died in San Antonio, Texas on 13 May 1937, exactly 3 months shy of his 86th birthday, and is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Schuyler-Hamilton has a piece of furniture from Lord Sterling ‘s home come visit it
09/30/2019

Schuyler-Hamilton has a piece of furniture from Lord Sterling ‘s home come visit it

His name is everywhere in Somerset County, but how much do you know about Lord Stirling, General William Alexander? Visit the site of his manor in Basking Ridge on Sunday for the 1770s Festival and travel back in time as exhibitors and militias recreate Colonial life. More information: http://ow.ly/n88050wgGVd

Thank him for his service! 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸
09/24/2019

Thank him for his service! 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

The Heritage Commission and the Morristown Chapter - DAR have installed an exhibit to celebrate Constitution Week in the...
09/18/2019

The Heritage Commission and the Morristown Chapter - DAR have installed an exhibit to celebrate Constitution Week in the Morris County Library's Reader Services Department on the first floor.

I have always loved how incensed John Adams was that Franklin slept naked...
09/10/2019

I have always loved how incensed John Adams was that Franklin slept naked...

Today in #NJhistory: #OTD September 9, 1776, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and Edward Rutledge were en route to Perth Amboy, #NewJersey. They had been sent by the Continental Congress to meet with Lord Howe in Staten Island. Because there were so few rooms available, Adams and Franklin were forced to share a room at the Indian Queen Tavern in New Brunswick. Here is an excerpt from Adams' diary relating the experience: "The Taverns were so full We could with difficulty obtain Entertainment. At Brunswick, but one bed could be procured for Dr. Franklin and me, in a Chamber little larger than the bed, without a Chimney and with only one small Window. The Window was open, and I, who was an invalid and afraid of the Air in the night, shut it close. Oh! says Franklin dont shut the Window. We shall be suffocated. I answered I was afraid of the Evening Air. Dr. Franklin replied, the Air within this Chamber will soon be, and indeed is now worse than that without Doors..." #SpreadTheHistory

Address

5 Olyphant Pl
Morristown, NJ
07960-4231

Opening Hours

Sunday 13:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(973) 267-4039

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Comments

Could you post this year's Holly walk as a Facebook Event. Then it will show up in FB calender.
Had a lovely time today chatting with this houses wonderful ladies. Hope I didn't wear out my welcome. You gals are the best. Thanks for a fantastic time!
Happy Birthday!
Had a great visit yesterday. Really interesting and informative!
Enjoyed my visit this afternoon! Here's the book I told you about.