The Murtogh D. Guinness Collection

The Murtogh D. Guinness Collection From fine arts to fossils, from music to molecules, there’s something for everyone at the Morris Museum. Stroll a 19th century Parisian street, walk the cobblestone pathways of an international exposition or open Charles Dickens’ window to hear a street organ playing outside.
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Musical Machines & Living Dolls vividly explains the start of our modern age of public entertainment, while bringing you on a journey through the history of on-demand, repeatable, replayable entertainment. In the Orientation Theater, be introduced to Murtogh D. Guinness, an heir to the Irish brewing family who assembled the collection and learn how the stories of these amazing objects will unfold in the exhibition. Upon exiting the theater, choose to discover more in four areas of the gallery. Music Revolution explores the advent of mechanical music in the late 1700’s and how it changed how, when and where people could listen to music. Initially, mechanical musical instruments were luxury items such as the rare organ-playing clock made in 1780 by Swiss virtuoso craftsman Pierre Jaquet-Droz. By the late 1800’s they could be heard in parlors and pool halls from Brooklyn to Berlin, playing everything from opera to the blues. View early cylinder musical boxes, hand-cranked organettes and massive public instruments like the Violano-Virtuoso, with its self-playing violin. Mechanical Universe highlights the science and technology behind the objects. You will explore how 19th century craftspeople and factory workers mechanized music and motion to create ingenious machines, ranging from a cacophonous English street piano to the Reginaphone, a New Jersey-made response to the threat of the phonograph (the hybrid is both musical box and record player). Try out a spring motor, play a sound matching game to test your mechanical music listening skills, make a caterpillar move with cams and more. Next, enter the ancient, narrow streets of Paris’ Marais District in Animated Worlds. There, in the 19th century, artisans created moving, musical figures and scenes for sale. Here, automata peek out from store windows: dancing clowns, high-wire acrobats, ballerinas, and a full menagerie of animals. Enjoy seeing these mechanical marvels perform on video, and then make your own automata in a fun flipbook. In The Workshop, you will try out “hands-on” what you have learned in the exhibition by programming a cylinder to play a song, sit in a musical chair to play a tune, pull out an activity box (with puzzles, gears and more) or explore efforts to make tunes longer-lasting, better-sounding and portable. If you have dancing feet, break in the dance floor with a Mechanical Music Jukebox that plays polka, clog or boogie to Hilarity Rag!

Musical Machines & Living Dolls vividly explains the start of our modern age of public entertainment, while bringing you on a journey through the history of on-demand, repeatable, replayable entertainment. In the Orientation Theater, be introduced to Murtogh D. Guinness, an heir to the Irish brewing family who assembled the collection and learn how the stories of these amazing objects will unfold in the exhibition. Upon exiting the theater, choose to discover more in four areas of the gallery. Music Revolution explores the advent of mechanical music in the late 1700’s and how it changed how, when and where people could listen to music. Initially, mechanical musical instruments were luxury items such as the rare organ-playing clock made in 1780 by Swiss virtuoso craftsman Pierre Jaquet-Droz. By the late 1800’s they could be heard in parlors and pool halls from Brooklyn to Berlin, playing everything from opera to the blues. View early cylinder musical boxes, hand-cranked organettes and massive public instruments like the Violano-Virtuoso, with its self-playing violin. Mechanical Universe highlights the science and technology behind the objects. You will explore how 19th century craftspeople and factory workers mechanized music and motion to create ingenious machines, ranging from a cacophonous English street piano to the Reginaphone, a New Jersey-made response to the threat of the phonograph (the hybrid is both musical box and record player). Try out a spring motor, play a sound matching game to test your mechanical music listening skills, make a caterpillar move with cams and more. Next, enter the ancient, narrow streets of Paris’ Marais District in Animated Worlds. There, in the 19th century, artisans created moving, musical figures and scenes for sale. Here, automata peek out from store windows: dancing clowns, high-wire acrobats, ballerinas, and a full menagerie of animals. Enjoy seeing these mechanical marvels perform on video, and then make your own automata in a fun flipbook. In The Workshop, you will try out “hands-on” what you have learned in the exhibition by programming a cylinder to play a song, sit in a musical chair to play a tune, pull out an activity box (with puzzles, gears and more) or explore efforts to make tunes longer-lasting, better-sounding and portable. If you have dancing feet, break in the dance floor with a Mechanical Music Jukebox that plays polka, clog or boogie to Hilarity Rag!

Mission: A private, nonprofit corporation, the Morris Museum’s mission is to elevate the cultural consciousness, excite the mind and enhance the quality of life by advancing the understanding and enjoyment of the visual and performing arts, natural and physical sciences and humanities through exhibitions, performances and educational programs in a welcoming, inclusive and creative environment that responsibly uses all museum resources, including stewardship of a permanent collection.

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Address

6 Normandy Heights Rd
Morristown, NJ
07960

General information

Museum Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11:00am to 5:00pm Sunday, 12:00pm to 5:00pm The Museum is Pay as You Wish on the second and third Thursday of each month from 4:00pm to 8:00pm. Admission: Members: Free Adults: $10 Seniors: $7 Children (3–12): $7 Children (under 3): Free Bank of America/Merrill Lynch Cardholders: Free (first full weekend of every month) Noyes Museum (Oceanville, NJ) Members: Free Active Military Personnel and 5 Family Members: Free

Opening Hours

Tuesday 11:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 17:00
Thursday 11:00 - 17:00
Friday 11:00 - 17:00
Saturday 11:00 - 17:00
Sunday 12:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(973) 971-3700

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