Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County

Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County This local history museum’s Hjemkomst Viking Ship and Hopperstad Stave Church make a premier destination for Scandinavian and Northern Plains heritage.
The Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County (HCSCC) directs a local history museum and hosts traveling exhibitions in 7,000 sq. feet of space at the Hjemkomst Center. HCSCC is a community resource for over 200,000 people in the Fargo-Moorhead metro area and serves an average of 30,000 visitors a year from all over the world.
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As George Floyd’s family, friends, and community mourn the life that was taken from him a week ago, we are watching a wa...
06/02/2020

As George Floyd’s family, friends, and community mourn the life that was taken from him a week ago, we are watching a wave of protests sweep the country. We share the pain in which these protests are rooted, and with these protesters we mourn.

As a county historical society, we are also aware of how historic this moment is. Like our peers around the state, we know that our history is marked by other incidents of racial violence. We know the names of Philando Castile, Jamar Clark, and countless others — and as our friends at the Minnesota Historical Society have pointed out, we should also remember the names of Elias Clayton, Elmer Jackson, and Isaac McGhie, who were lynched in Duluth almost a century ago.

Here in Clay County, where fewer black lives have been lived, we might remember Gloria West, Mabel Phillips, and Curt Dixon as they navigated life in Moorhead as Moorhead State College’s earliest black students. Or we might remember the challenges of Project E-Quality, a pilot scholarship program initiated by President John Neumaier at Moorhead State College four days after James Earl Ray assassinated Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Project E-Quality students faced overt threats of violence during their time here, including isolated incidents of gunfire, and project fundraisers, President Roland Dille and Professors James and Yvonne Condell, endured vandalism for their support of the program. Sugared gas tanks and buckets of black paint. When the project was announced in the spring of 1968, local media decried the importation of race problems.

As local historians, we know those problems weren’t imported to our community in the 1960s. Felix and Kate Battles carried the pain of slavery when they settled here in Moorhead. Frank and Fannie Gordon carried that same pain when they settled across the river in Fargo. When Frank ran for alderman there in 1900, he was threatened with assassination and area newspapers called it a “cruel, practical joke.” So many others have carried that pain, and the legacy of that pain, in the years since.

As we focus on how we can build a more just and inclusive community, we leave you with these words from Kent Whitworth, director of the Minnesota Historical Society:

“Understanding history matters more than ever in times like these. It is a lens through which we view the experiences of others and empathize with their struggles and triumphs. It is a way that we build a deeper understanding of the events that brought us to the crossroads we find ourselves in today. It challenges us to demand better from our community, from our civic and cultural institutions and perhaps, most importantly, from ourselves.”

- HCSCC

* * *

Photo: Members of Moorhead State College's United Black Students Organization meet with President Roland Dille and Professor James Condell, 1969 (MSUM Archives).

"Summer Storm"Gloria ReissPhotographThe FMVA BIG Art Exhibition, 2020.
06/01/2020

"Summer Storm"
Gloria Reiss
Photograph

The FMVA BIG Art Exhibition, 2020.

We've received some wonderful contributions to our COVID-19 Community History project. Please consider taking part and h...
05/29/2020
COVID-19 in Clay County

We've received some wonderful contributions to our COVID-19 Community History project. Please consider taking part and helping our future community understand these moments.

What should Clay County remember about this time?

covid19, clay county, hcscc, clay county historical society, hcs, hjemkomst center, county historical society, minnesota historical society

05/20/2020
Clay County, Minnesota, 1917

You've heard comparisons between COVID-19 and the H1N1 "Spanish" flu pandemic of 1918, the subject of our current major exhibition. But what was life like in Clay County when the Spanish flu rolled into the Red River Valley?

A brief overview of life in Clay County, Minnesota, in 1917. This video was produced as part of HCSCC's exhibition, "War, Flu, & Fear: World War and Clay Cou...

Michelle Roise"Inclined to B" Watercolor and InkThe FMVA BIG Art Exhibition, 2020*exhibition in link below*
05/18/2020

Michelle Roise
"Inclined to B"
Watercolor and Ink

The FMVA BIG Art Exhibition, 2020
*exhibition in link below*

The flood of 1952 was a turning point in Fargo-Moorhead (28.79 ft crest, 20th highest on record) that shifted local meas...
05/13/2020

The flood of 1952 was a turning point in Fargo-Moorhead (28.79 ft crest, 20th highest on record) that shifted local measures from flood cleanup to flood prevention.

After Red River floodwaters devastated Woodlawn Park in Moorhead and much of downtown Fargo that April, a Fargo-Moorhead Flood Control Committee was established to work with the Army Corps of Engineers on the first major local flood prevention project. Fargo-Moorhead would reroute the Red River through several point bars (or oxbows), including one on the western edge of Woodlawn Park and two to the north near the Veteran's Hospital, and build the St. John's Dike across the river in Fargo. These projects were made possible by recent federal legislation, including the Flood Control Acts of 1944 and '48 and the 1950 Disaster Relief Act, and a federal treasury filled by the United States' postwar economic boom.

Throughout the late 1950s, families were moved to safer neighborhoods and dozens of homes were purchased and leveled. Excavation began in July of 1959. On October 29, 1959, the temporary coffer dam was removed and the Red River flowed into its new course, running through what was once the westernmost reaches of Woodlawn Park. On August 25, 1961, the deal was made official when the U.S. Congress approved the North Dakota - Minnesota Interstate Compact. Moorhead, Clay County, and Minnesota had all grown 22.54 acres smaller.

* * * *

The photograph comes from our WDAY TV News Collection, looking to the southwest at Woodlawn Park in April, 1952. The Moorhead power plant can be seen at the top center of the photograph, and St. John's Hospital can be seen across the river, directly to the west, in the top right corner (HCSCC).

Today our blog digs into a little Victory Garden history. Dig in yourself!
05/12/2020
Covid Victory Gardens

Today our blog digs into a little Victory Garden history. Dig in yourself!

COVID Victory Gardens Markus Krueger May 12, 2020 * * * * * * * * * * Reports are coming in from parts of the country where spring planting comes sooner than here: Covid-19 is causing an outbreak of...

Fargo-Moorhead is overflowing with artistic talent. Check it out for yourself, here in the FMVA BIG Art Exhibition!
05/08/2020
FMVA Big Art Gallery

Fargo-Moorhead is overflowing with artistic talent.

Check it out for yourself, here in the FMVA BIG Art Exhibition!

05/06/2020
Cass Gilbert's Sudanese Church (Moorhead, MN)

Clay County, Minnesota, is a small place with big history. That's true of our churches, as well. Here's a brief look at one of them, St. John the Divine Episcopal Church in Moorhead.

A profile of Moorhead, Minnesota's St. John the Divine Church, an Episcopal cathedral that was designed by renowned architect Cass Gilbert in the 1890s. Toda...

The Fargo Moorhead Visual Artists really are a gem in our community. Take some time to explore that for yourself in the ...
05/05/2020
Moorhead's Big Art Exhibition goes virtual during pandemic | INFORUM

The Fargo Moorhead Visual Artists really are a gem in our community. Take some time to explore that for yourself in the first FMVA BIG (Online) Art Exhibition!

Many thanks to our good friends at The Arts Partnership and InForum for shining a light on this year's show!

Annual Fargo Moorhead Visual Artists show at Hjemkomst Center has moved online.

We aren't able to open our doors this spring for the annual FMVA BIG Art Exhibition, but we can still share the tremendo...
05/05/2020
FMVA Big Art Exhibition

We aren't able to open our doors this spring for the annual FMVA BIG Art Exhibition, but we can still share the tremendous talent of our friends at Fargo Moorhead Visual Artists.

Click here to explore the first FMVA BIG Online Art Exhibition!

The FMVA BIG Art Exhibition For two months each spring, the work of the Fargo Moorhead Visual Artists (FMVA) fills our 4th Floor Gallery at the Hjemkomst Center. The pieces come from art educators,...

What a very appropriate place for a crow....We're still assessing when we can safely reopen our museum at the Hjemkomst ...
05/04/2020

What a very appropriate place for a crow....

We're still assessing when we can safely reopen our museum at the Hjemkomst Center, but we hope you're still getting out and about for some socially-distanced time in Viking Ship Park. Many thanks to our friends at Moorhead Parks & Recreation who continue to do such a wonderful job taking care of our city's green spaces!

What kind of wildlife have you been seeing?

The Hjemkomst.
05/04/2020

The Hjemkomst.

Life in early Clay County was tough. Tuberculosis, cholera, and malnutrition were regular features of frontier life in t...
04/22/2020
The Horse Flu of 1872 Comes to Clay County

Life in early Clay County was tough. Tuberculosis, cholera, and malnutrition were regular features of frontier life in the 19th century. But the first epidemic? Well, that list really starts with an epizootic (or, more appropriately, a panzootic).

Check out our blog to learn about the Great Epizootic, otherwise known as the Horse Flu of 1872.

The Horse Flu of 1872 Comes to Clay County, Minnesota Davin Wait April 22, 2020 * * * * * * * * * * Life in the early years of Clay County, Minnesota, was far more dangerous than it is today....

In the summer of 1881, two surveyors paused in the Fergus Falls countryside to look westward across the Red River Valley...
04/17/2020

In the summer of 1881, two surveyors paused in the Fergus Falls countryside to look westward across the Red River Valley. One, a 31-year-old geologist from New Hampshire named Warren Upham, jotted a note from his vantage point at the top of a sandy ridge: "It is all fertile prairie, beautifully green, or in many places yellow or purple with flowers during July and August." Upham's rodman was Horace Winchell, a geologist and the son of Newton Horace Winchell, Minnesota's state geologist.

The two men had traveled that summer by foot, horseback, and buggy up and down the Red River Valley mapping the ancient bed of a tremendous glacial lake that Upham had named after Swiss geologist Louis Agassiz only two years earlier. Over the course of the next two decades he spent on the project, Upham traveled more than 11,000 miles. His findings were published in Canada in 1890 and then with the U.S. Geographical Survey in 1895 as 'The Glacial Lake Agassiz.' The outline of Lake Agassiz shown here comes from the book.

Upham's first description of Clay County remarks on the confluence of sand, boulders, marsh, and rolling hills around Willow Creek in Humboldt Township, just to the east of Barnesville.

Today it's estimated that Lake Agassiz held a high volume of 22,700km³ of water. For reference, Lake Superior now holds about 12,000km³.

In the summer of 1885, Moorhead photographer O.E. Flaten and Moorhead painter Ralph DeCamp packed a covered wagon with a...
04/16/2020

In the summer of 1885, Moorhead photographer O.E. Flaten and Moorhead painter Ralph DeCamp packed a covered wagon with art supplies and provisions and headed for the Rockies. They'd been hired by the Northern Pacific Railroad to promote rail tourism to the Great Wide West, focusing their efforts on Yellowstone National Park. Flaten's rumored to have taken 1,500 photographs of and near Yellowstone on this trip, including the photograph shown here of De Camp at work on the shores of Lake Pend Oreille in Idaho.

The two shared much in common as artists, fathers, and widowers on the frontier. Flaten would return to a successful photography career in Moorhead, but DeCamp, enamored with their journey to the West, moved to Montana the following summer. He became one of Montana's most beloved painters, but worked professionally in real estate and surveying. Upon hearing the news of Flaten's death in 1933, DeCamp recalled their 1885 trip as such: "For many years our trails have been divergent, but there was a time when we played the leading parts of two tenderfoot explorers with about as unruly a pack outfit as was ever assembled."

We've fast-tracked our efforts to index and share past HCSCC newsletters online. More are uploaded everyday. Please enjo...
04/13/2020
Newsletters

We've fast-tracked our efforts to index and share past HCSCC newsletters online. More are uploaded everyday. Please enjoy some local history here — and please consider supporting our research with an HCSCC membership!

Published initially by the Clay County Historical Society and Heritage Hjemkomst Interpretive Center, the Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County's quarterly newsletter features local history...

04/09/2020
War, Flu, and Fear: World War I and Clay County Exhibit Video Tour

Our Programming Director Extraordinaire Markus Krueger is as knowledgeable and charming in this video as you'd expect. He just forgot to turn his phone 90 degrees! We're adjusting to pandemic life, too, friends...

While we do, please enjoy some local history on a guerilla video tour of "War, Flu, & Fear: World War I and Clay County."

For all the kids at home who can't take their field trip to the Hjemkomst Center this year, we made this guided tour through our local history exhibit "War, ...

04/03/2020
Welcome to Beerhead: Moorhead's Saloon Era 1890 to 1915

Do you have 30 minutes? Tune in and enjoy a history of Moorhead's Saloon Era from HCSCC Senior Archivist Mark Peihl. This lecture is titled, "Welcome to Beerhead: Moorhead's Saloon Era, 1890 to 1915."

HCSCC Senior Archivist Mark Peihl, offers a history of Moorhead's Saloon District, a section of old Moorhead that cropped up along the Red River and catered ...

In 1952, Moorhead VFW Post 1223 built a "wooden lung" to combat local cases of polio. VFW volunteers including Merle Wen...
03/31/2020

In 1952, Moorhead VFW Post 1223 built a "wooden lung" to combat local cases of polio. VFW volunteers including Merle Wentzell, Glen Monson, and Arnold Stronstad constructed the unit using plans shared in the January 1952 issue of "Popular Mechanics." The machine worked like iron lungs at the time, utilizing a series of pumps to cycle pressure around a patient's torso, inflating and deflating their lungs with each cycle. However, the wooden lung was designed for easy construction and affordability, costing less than $200 at a time that conventional iron lungs sold for $2,000.

The wooden lung was kept at St. Ansgar Hospital for six years before it was donated to the Clay County Historical Society in 1958. By that time, the introduction of Jonas Salk's formalin-inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) had already shown tremendous results in fighting the debilitating and deadly disease. One count shows the incidence of paralytic poliomyelitis in the United States decreased from 13.9 cases per 100,000 people in 1954 to 0.8 cases per 100,000 people in 1961.

03/30/2020
"A Million Things I Want to Tell You..." The WWI Letters of Maurice & Kenneth Masterson

Twin brothers Maurice and Kenneth Masterson went from the small town of Barnesville, Minnesota, to the frontline trenches of France during World War I. Both brothers were wounded in action. Both were cited for bravery. Both were gifted writers.

Today their letters home are preserved in the MSUM Archives. Explore these letters for a local look at the Great War.

Twin brothers Maurice and Kenneth Masterson went from the small town of Barnesville, Minnesota, to the front line trenches of France in World War I. Their le...

Do you explore our blog? Do it!Today we share a piece from HCSCC Programming Director Markus Krueger, who reminisces abo...
03/26/2020
Walter, Karin, and the Polio Epidemic of '52-53

Do you explore our blog? Do it!

Today we share a piece from HCSCC Programming Director Markus Krueger, who reminisces about his grandparents' experiences with the polio epidemic of 1952.

Walter and Karin Krueger in the 1952-53 Polio Epidemic Markus Krueger March 26, 2020 * * * * * * * * * * I remember when I was not yet ten, my grandpa and grandma, Walter and Karin Krueger, wrote up...

As we adjust to an immediate future of canceled events and a closed museum, we're taking effort to better share our loca...
03/23/2020
Unearthing the Forgotten Flu: Spanish Flu in Clay County

As we adjust to an immediate future of canceled events and a closed museum, we're taking effort to better share our local history online. This article, "Unearthing the Forgotten Flu: Spanish Flu in Clay County," comes from the Spring 2018 issue of our newsletter, "The Hourglass."

In the meantime, please do what you can to stay safe.

There’s something of a local legend here about Concordia College’s fall quarantine in 1918. The story goes that Concordia’s President J.A. Aasgaard closed the perimeter on October 8, and as a...

03/17/2020

As of today, March 17, the museum at the Hjemkomst Center is closed by order of Governor Walz at least until March 27. We anticipate the closure will be longer, but we will keep you posted via Facebook and website.

A photograph of Georgetown settler Adam Stein's Civil War gear, circa 1906. Stein was a Bavarian Forty-Eighter, one of t...
03/06/2020

A photograph of Georgetown settler Adam Stein's Civil War gear, circa 1906.

Stein was a Bavarian Forty-Eighter, one of the men who fought in the failed democratic revolutions of Europe in 1848. Shortly afterward he sailed to the United States and walked to the Red River Valley, where he built the Hudson's Bay Company warehouse in Georgetown. In 1861 he joined Company G of the 4th Minnesota Infantry. His unit marched through Mississippi in the Vicksburg Campaign and captured the state capitol. Then, on the 4th of July, 1863, the day after Lee's defeat at Gettysburg, they captured Vicksburg. The 4th Minnesota were the first to parade through the city.

Following his second civil war, Stein returned to Georgetown with his wife Wilhelmina, where they raised a family, farmed, and operated a ferry across the Red River.

* *

If you'd like to take a closer look at Clay County's Civil War history, please join us Tuesday, March 31 for our opening of "Boys in Blue: The Grand Army of the Republic." We'll be joined by the Hartford Street Brass Band and HCSCC program director Markus Krueger will share a history of Felix Battles, a Civil War veteran who served with the United States Colored Infantry before settling in Moorhead.

Opening Reception: The Grand Army of the Republic.

A sunset over snowy Fargo-Moorhead, the "Gateway to the West."Photo by Lee Smalt @ RedSent Aerial Solutions.
02/24/2020

A sunset over snowy Fargo-Moorhead, the "Gateway to the West."

Photo by Lee Smalt @ RedSent Aerial Solutions.

Tomorrow at 1:00PM we host Dr. Chris Lehman for Slavery's Reach: Southern Slaveholders and the North Star State. The lec...
02/21/2020
Minnesota fought for the Union in the Civil War. So how did the state benefit from slavery? | INFORUM

Tomorrow at 1:00PM we host Dr. Chris Lehman for Slavery's Reach: Southern Slaveholders and the North Star State. The lecture is taken from the title of his new book exploring the legacies of slavery in Minnesota. The event is free and open to the public, so join us in the auditorium!

Many thanks to Patrick Springer at InForum for highlighting the event!

MOORHEAD — Minnesota is proud of its heritage as the first state to offer men to fight for the Union in the Civil War. Its historical collections include a Confederate flag captured by Minnesota infantry volunteers during bloody Pickett's Charge in the Battle of Gettysburg.

Address

202 1st Ave N
Moorhead, MN
56560

The city MAT bus makes stops at the Museum upon request. You may call from the gift shop to make arrangements.

General information

Museum admission: HCSCC members Free Adults $10 Seniors + College Students $9 Youth (5-17) $8 Children (4 & under) Free Admission is free from 5 - 8 p.m. on the third Tuesday of the month.

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Why is the 2020 page at 2019? ;)
Check it out! A story on how the SuperMonster市City! show at the Kjemkomst Center in Moorhead MN inspired others to curate a group show called "Marvels, Monsters, and Memorabilia" featuring local artists! Fantastic! . . . #hjemkomstcenter #SuperMonsterCity #HCSCC
Hi. I live in Fargo and was wondering if your organization has ever thought of inviting a group of Civil War reenactors up to Moorhead? The group I'd love to see are the Second Minnesota Battery of Light Artillery Reenactors. (https://www.facebook.com/Second-Minnesota-Battery-of-Light-Artillery-Reenactors-371220336239/) The reason I'm interested in this group is because my g-g-g grandpa, Knut Torgerson, served in this unit at the same time as his two brothers. All three emigrated from Telemark, Norway along with their wives & children only a couple years prior to enlisting. Pretty awesome, right?! Would you please consider inviting them up to our area?
Viking Battalion Hero Walk May 25 & 27 Minneapolis, Minn. Ft. Snelling to honor the 'Vikings', a MN-based WWII ski battalion. Come join the 99th Infantry Battalion Educational Foundation at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, 7601 34th Ave S, On Memorial Day weekend To place the flags on Saturday Morning at 8:30 a.m. Help them tell their the story of the fallen heroes on Saturday to the volunteers. On Monday, enjoy the ceremony at 10 a.m. and march in the Honor Walk behind the Colors. 76 soldiers have returned to Fort Snelling where they’re buried. There will be a ceremony for these Vikings, including the dedication of a new monument. The event begins at 8:30 a.m. on Mallon Drive.
A new book is out about the very first settler at Lake Park, Becker County. Some of the text includes Clay County, as a few of them crossed the western border of Becker. Ole Iver Berg and Hans Hansen came to Becker in 1871. Ole Iver became a driving force in the budding religious society, designed and helped build the Lutheran church, built the first framework home and became the mayor. Hans had the crucial position as the first blacksmith in town. The book is built on a first hand account by Mathilde Berg, who was Ole Iver's 9 years old daughter when the train of wagons left Rushmore, Fillmore for Lake Park, Becker in May of 1871. A very interesting account mixed with new research, showing what the pioneers faced in the Minnesota wilderness.
We're excited to be holding our annual convention just across the river in Fargo this summer :)
Did you know there was many voyages by Greenland and Iceland explorers to North America. https://www.britannica.com/place/Vinland#ref226392 Everything you read from here down is based on two Iceland sagas. You can read the sagas in english using the links below. The Saga of Eric the Red - two translationshttp://www.americanjourneys.org/pdf/AJ-056.pdf https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/s/sagas/icelandic/erik-the-reds-saga/ Full text of "The Saga of the Greenlanders (Reeves Translation) https://notendur.hi.is/haukurth/utgafa/greenlanders.html According to the Grænlendinga saga, Bjarni Herjólfsson became the first European to sight mainland North America when his Greenland-bound ship was blown westward off course about (A.D. 985) He apparently sailed along the Atlantic coastline of eastern Canada and from there returned to Greenland. About 1000 a crew of 35 men led by Leif Eriksson (A. D. 1008), son of Erik the Red, went to Bjarne Herjulfson, and bought the ship of him, set out to try to find the land sighted by Bjarni. Leif’s expedition came first to an icy barren land that he called Helluland (“Land of Flat Rocks”); sailing southward, they encountered a flat wooded land, which Leif named Markland (“Land of Forests”). Again they set sail southward and came to the warmer, more-hospitable area where they decided to stay for winter and build three large houses, Leifsbúðir (“Leif’s Camp”). Exploring from there, they found fine lumber and wild grapes, which led them to name the land Vinland (“Land of Wine”). In spring back Greenland. http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/nda/nda19.htm A couple of years later Leif’s brother Thorvald (A. D. 1002) led an expedition of 30 men to Vinland and spent two years there before he died in a skirmish with native inhabitants. The following year a third brother, Thorstein Erikson (A. D. 1005) tried to reach Vinland to take Thorvald’s body back to Greenland, but storms kept him away. Encouraged by the reports of the riches of Vinland, Thorfinn Karlsefni, an Icelandic trader visiting Greenland a couple of years later (A.D. 1007-10), led another expedition to Vinland. of three ships and a band of explorers. Snorri, the son of Thorfinn and his wife, Gudrid, is thought to be the first European baby born in North America. By the time that party had stayed there three years, trade with the local indigenous people had turned to warfare, so the colonists gave up and returned to Greenland. http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/thorfinnr_thordarson_1E.html The last Vinland expedition was led by Erik the Red’s daughter Freydis in partnership with two Icelandic traders Helgi and Finnbogi (A. D. 1011) their crews. According to the Grænlendinga saga, Freydis had her people kill the Icelandic crew before she returned to Greenland. So ended the Norse visits to the Americas as far as the historical record is concerned.
Todays Tuesday Sept 25th article “Here’s a writer you should hire for a Leiv Eriksson Festival” attached to end of this short message. Until Oct 9th i plan to post a Leif Erickson article every day on “Sons of Norway District 1” Facebook that you might use or enjoy reading. Images are 3.5 x 300 perfect size for 2 column newsletter or best your lodge face book. Its up to you to use as is or rewrite the copy provided. OCTOBER 9th IS FAST APPROACHING “LEIF ERICKSON DAY” Leif Erikson Day is a observance and not a federal public holiday in the United States. Norwegians across North America put out their flags for the observance and hold celebrations. Leif Erikson Day doesn’t get as much recognition because it’s overshadowed by Monday’s Columbus Day—which, unlike Erikson’s day, is a federal holiday, meaning government employees get off work, as do many students and private-sector workers. In 1929 the Wisconsin Legislature passed a bill to declare it Leif Erikson Day and in 1964 the US Congress authorised and requested the President to proclaim each year that October 9th be Leif Erikson day, but. More in depth article about the day: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/10/151011-columbus-day-leif-erikson-italian-americans-holiday-history/ Leif Erikson is the common English spelling, the surname can also be spelled Ericson. In Norway, it's much more common to see the Norwegian variant Leiv Eiriksson, or even the Norse variant Leifr Eiríksson. Below is todays article Tuesday Sept 25th “Here’s a writer you should hire for a Leiv Eriksson Festival” Fascinated since childhood with Leif Eriksson’s triumphant sailing voyage a thousand years ago from Greenland to North America, Hodding Carter could not shake his crazy idea of reenacting Eriksson’s epic journey in a precise replica of the precarious Viking cargo ship known as a knarr. This extraordinary book is the account of how he pulled it off. A Viking Voyage is an unforgettable adventure story that will take you to the heart of a journey like no other. A Viking Voyage: In Which an Unlikely Crew of Adventurers Attempts an Epic Journey to the New World. A video of crew and ship: Their first attempt broke down https://youtu.be/fbHEO031jrM But wait ! ! ! I just discovered a new book about the viking voyage adventure was just published. An Illustrated Viking Voyage: Retracing Leif Eriksson's Journey in an Authentic Viking Knarr. Featuring the breathtaking images of award-winning photographer Russell Kaye, An Illustrated Viking Voyage tells the tale of an awe-inspiring modern expedition. In 1997, journalist and history buff W. Hodding Carter, along with a ragtag band of amateur sailors, set out to retrace Leif Eriksson's journey to North America. They sailed a handmade ship modeled after a traditional Viking "knarr." It was the first voyage by Westerners to precisely follow the Vikings' route in nearly a thousand years. Hint: Many libraries have a copy of the books for free. The original all copy book is well worth reading. Not sure about photo version - haven’t seen it. Beginning in a small boathouse in Maine, Carter's fifty-four-foot open-decked Viking boat, the Snorri, took shape from wooden planks and individually pounded iron rivets. Over the next year, the Snorri sailed from the ports and fjords of Greenland through the Arctic circle to a victorious landing at l'Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland. Through the extraordinary images of photographer Russell Kaye, and a colorful running text from Carter, the chronicle of this remarkable voyage is captured in rich detail. Experience the feat of building an authentic Viking vessel; the power of sublime Arctic landscapes; the beauty and treachery of icebergs; and the fishermen of local villages who offered advice and companionship despite language barriers. An unforgettable adventure as seen through a celebrated photographer's lens, An Illustrated Viking Voyage chronicles a once-in-a-millennium occurrence, one which fans of Viking lore and seafaring journeys will come back to time and again.
Every Norwegian-American can now read a first edition of the book that made someone build & sail a Gokstad Viking ship to America in 1893 now located in Geneva, Illinois at Good Templar Park, http://www.vikingship.us the ship created physical fights in Brooklyn NY on arrival. The book gave Scandinivians pride, ridicule by other ethnic groups, mockery & contempt by the Italians. Over time it could be true, Norwegians where first to discover North America and was promoted. Numberous statues where soon erected and finally the US President 1925 gave recognition to Leif Erikson as the discoverer of America. Heres a 3.5 jpg for a two column newsletter or use on your lodge face book with some or all the copy below. The book America Not Discovered by Columbus by Rasmus B. Anderson You can read the book at: https://archive.org/details/americanotdiscov00ande was published in 1874, helping popularize the idea that Vikings were the first Europeans in the New World. (Click on the 120 pages and they flip to the next page) During his appearance at the Norse-American Centennial in 1925, President Calvin Coolidge gave recognition to Leif Erikson as the discoverer of America due to research by Norwegian-American scholars such as Knut Gjerset and Ludvig Hektoen. In 1929, Wisconsin became the first U.S. state to officially adopt Leif Erikson Day as a state holiday, thanks in large part to efforts by Rasmus Anderson. https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Records/Newspaper/BA14971 In 1931, Minnesota did also. By 1956, Leif Erikson Day had been made an official observance in seven states (Wisconsin, Minnesota, South Dakota, Illinois, Colorado, Washington, and California) and one Canadian province (Saskatchewan). In 1963, the U.S. Representative from Duluth, John Blatnik, introduced a bill to observe Leif Erikson Day nationwide. The following year Congress adopted this unanimously. In 1964, the United States Congress authorized and requested the President to create the observance through an annual proclamation. Lyndon B. Johnson did so, as has each President since. Presidents have used the proclamation to praise the contributions of Americans of Nordic descent generally and the spirit of discovery. In addition to the federal observance, some states officially commemorate Leif Erikson Day, particularly in the Upper Midwest, where large numbers of people from the Nordic countries settled. October 9 is not associated with any particular event in Leif Erikson's life. The date was chosen because the ship Restauration coming from Stavanger, Norway, arrived in New York Harbor on October 9, 1825, at the start of the first organized immigration from Norway to the United States. Here’s a long resume about Rasmus B. Anderson from NAHA: https://www.naha.stolaf.edu/pubs/nas/volume18/vol18_2.htm Here’s some good sites to learn more about Lief Erickson discovering North America and latter settlements. The Saga of Erik the Red tells the Vinland story as a single expedition led by Thorfinn Karsefni, a rich trader from Iceland who married Gudrid, Leif Eriksson's widowed sister-in-law, and traveled with her to Vinland , where they lived for several years. While in Vinland, Gudrid gave birth to Snorri, the first European known to be born in America. Here’s a link to a PDF: “Saga of Erik the Red in English”: http://sagadb.org/eiriks_saga_rauda.en 1880 translation into English by J. Sephton from the original Icelandic 'Eiríks saga rauða'. Web site: Where is Vinland http://www.canadianmysteries.ca/sites/vinland/whereisvinland/newbrunswick/indexen.html You Tube: Chronicle - The Vikings in North America (1966) 49 Minutes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqJfThOwjbQ National Film Board of Canada - Viking Visitors to North America - Full Length 23 Minutes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAooNpKZAAc Journal Article: Contact between Native North Americans and the Medieval Norse: A Review of the Evidence (Read on-line free at public Library or College Library) http://www.jstor.org/stable/280509 Short Bio about Rasmus Bjørn Anderson (January 12, 1846 – March 2, 1936) was an American author, professor, and diplomat. He brought to popular attention the idea that Viking explorers discovered the New World and was the originator of Leif Erikson Day. Anderson was born in Albion in Dane County, Wisconsin to parents who were immigrants from Stavanger in the county of Rogaland, Norway. His parents were part of a small band of Quaker sympathizers who organized the first Norwegian emigration to America in the early 1820s. Anderson was a graduate of Luther College and the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He was a professor at the University of Wisconsin–Madison from 1867-1883. While there, he was the founding head of the Department of Scandinavian Studies, the oldest such department in an American university. Rasmus B. Anderson founded a publication company, The Norrœna Society, which focused on republishing translations of texts devoted to "the History and Romance of Northern Europe". Anderson was the author of a number of books with Scandinavian themes. He also did a series of translations from Scandinavian languages, most notably the writings of Norwegian novelist Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson. From 1885 to 1889, Anderson served as the United States Ambassador to Denmark. After his return to the U.S. in 1889, he was editor (1898–1922) of the Norwegian language weekly, Amerika. Anderson's book America Not Discovered by Columbus helped popularize the now familiar idea that Vikings were the first Europeans in the New World. Anderson was the originator of the movement to honor Leif Erikson with a holiday in the United States. Through efforts he started and led, Leif Erikson Day became an official observance in his native Wisconsin and other U. S. states. Decades after Anderson's death, it first became a federal observance by Presidential proclamation in 1964.