Historical Society of Moorestown

Historical Society of Moorestown The Mansion houses collections of regional furniture, textiles, and objects of local historical significance, including samplers, quilts, early Quaker clothing, and tall-case clocks.
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The library has a collection of approximately 500 books on local history, local family scrapbooks and manuscripts, a photo archive, maps and an index of information on Moorestown homes and buildings. The gift shop incudes a variety of items for the home and garden and books and DVDs on local history. The Historical Society of Moorestown is an all volunteer, non-profit organization headquartered in the 1738 Smith-Cadbury Mansion which is listed on the New Jersey State and National Register of Historic Places. The Mansion includes a house museum, a library and a small gift shop and is open for tours, research and special events of the Historical Society of Moorestown. Throughout the year , the Society offers tours, programs, exhibits and activities for the enjoyment and education of all. House Museum Tours and Gift Shop:2nd & 4th Sundays 1-3pm and Tuesdays 1-4pm (closed holidays and July/August). Library:the second Sunday of each month 1-3pm (except holidays) and Tuesdays 1-4pm (closed holidays and July/August).

Photos from Historical Society of Moorestown's post
06/04/2021

Photos from Historical Society of Moorestown's post

Forgotten Friday: Moorestown's celebration of Memorial Day the year after the Great War. Found in the Camden Morning Pos...
05/28/2021

Forgotten Friday: Moorestown's celebration of Memorial Day the year after the Great War. Found in the Camden Morning Post, May 29, 1919.

Forgotten Friday: Moorestown's celebration of Memorial Day the year after the Great War. Found in the Camden Morning Post, May 29, 1919.

Forgotten Friday: Celebrating National Bike Week, old school style!
05/21/2021

Forgotten Friday: Celebrating National Bike Week, old school style!

Forgotten Friday: Celebrating National Bike Week, old school style!

Forgotten Friday: Around the turn of the century - the longtime home of "The Misses Matlack" as described in the 1876 Ma...
05/14/2021

Forgotten Friday: Around the turn of the century - the longtime home of "The Misses Matlack" as described in the 1876 Map of Moorestown by J.D. Scott. Rebecca Matlack and her cousin Rebecca Roberts lived here for close to 40 years. Located on the southeast corner of Chester Ave. and Second St. the house is currently undergoing a facelift by the current owners.

Forgotten Friday: Around the turn of the century - the longtime home of "The Misses Matlack" as described in the 1876 Map of Moorestown by J.D. Scott. Rebecca Matlack and her cousin Rebecca Roberts lived here for close to 40 years. Located on the southeast corner of Chester Ave. and Second St. the house is currently undergoing a facelift by the current owners.

Happy Mother's Day!
05/09/2021

Happy Mother's Day!

Happy Mother's Day!

Forgotten Friday: Teacher Appreciation Week edition. Ellen M. M. Carr Aitken was an early principal and teacher in the M...
05/07/2021

Forgotten Friday: Teacher Appreciation Week edition. Ellen M. M. Carr Aitken was an early principal and teacher in the Moorestown school system, serving the community for over 35 years. After graduating from NJ State College in Trenton, she started teaching in Batsto, NJ in 1873. She became principal of the Moorestown public schools from 1878 until she married Gilbert Aitken in 1885. In 1889 she returned to teaching and opened a night school. Later in her career she became supervising principal of Moorestown schools.

Forgotten Friday: Teacher Appreciation Week edition. Ellen M. M. Carr Aitken was an early principal and teacher in the Moorestown school system, serving the community for over 35 years. After graduating from NJ State College in Trenton, she started teaching in Batsto, NJ in 1873. She became principal of the Moorestown public schools from 1878 until she married Gilbert Aitken in 1885. In 1889 she returned to teaching and opened a night school. Later in her career she became supervising principal of Moorestown schools.

Photos from Historical Society of Moorestown's post
04/30/2021

Photos from Historical Society of Moorestown's post

Forgotten Friday: Spring planting edition. Back in the 19th and early 20th centuries, Moorestown was an important center...
04/23/2021

Forgotten Friday: Spring planting edition. Back in the 19th and early 20th centuries, Moorestown was an important center of suppliers for the agriculture industry. One of the largest and most well know nurseries in the state was Pleasant Valley Nurseries. Started in 1860 by John S. Collins and continued by his son Arthur J. Collins and his sons, the nursery occupied much of the land south of King’s Highway between Pleasant Valley and Strawbridge Lake, in what is now the Collins Park neighborhood.
For the wide variety of plants offered by Collins’ Nursery see the antique catalogs at Internet Archive: https://archive.org/details/CAT31289642/page/n1/mode/2up

Forgotten Friday: Spring planting edition. Back in the 19th and early 20th centuries, Moorestown was an important center of suppliers for the agriculture industry. One of the largest and most well know nurseries in the state was Pleasant Valley Nurseries. Started in 1860 by John S. Collins and continued by his son Arthur J. Collins and his sons, the nursery occupied much of the land south of King’s Highway between Pleasant Valley and Strawbridge Lake, in what is now the Collins Park neighborhood.
For the wide variety of plants offered by Collins’ Nursery see the antique catalogs at Internet Archive: https://archive.org/details/CAT31289642/page/n1/mode/2up

Photos from Historical Society of Moorestown's post
04/16/2021

Photos from Historical Society of Moorestown's post

Reminder: On Wednesday, April 7th at 7 pm the Historical Society will conduct its annual spring meeting with a special p...
04/06/2021

Reminder: On Wednesday, April 7th at 7 pm the Historical Society will conduct its annual spring meeting with a special presentation via Zoom.
After a brief business meeting, Speaker Mark Marchand will discuss his book, U.S. Route 1: Rediscovering the New World, about his experience driving the entire length of U.S. Route 1 from Northern Maine through New Jersey and Pennsylvania and finishing in Key West.
“… In late-June 2014, I set out from my home in upstate New York to drive the entire length of U.S. Route 1 from remote, forested northern Maine to artsy, bucolic Key West. As it snakes along the East Coast for over 2,400 miles, this famous — but somewhat ignored — highway winds through some of our nation’s most complex, congested cities before passing through the wide-open expanses of the Carolinas and down into Florida.
Along the way, the super-fast I-95 beckoned me with its lure of no traffic lights and three lanes. But I ignored its siren call.
It was an eye-opening experience. From the fascinating people I met to the sites I visited, I was left with an indelible image of what used to be known as the New World to Europeans and others who first began landing here centuries ago. From the crafty ticket scalper at the Baltimore Orioles’ Camden Yards ballpark to the Baptist minister in Aiken County South Carolina, the people I met along the way were the America I sought to see through the lens of this over 80-year-road.”
Join the Zoom meeting with the information below:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82103438657...
Meeting ID: 821 0343 8657
Passcode: 513689
Moorestown 08057, Delran Historical Society, Historical Society of Haddonfield

Reminder: On Wednesday, April 7th at 7 pm the Historical Society will conduct its annual spring meeting with a special presentation via Zoom.
After a brief business meeting, Speaker Mark Marchand will discuss his book, U.S. Route 1: Rediscovering the New World, about his experience driving the entire length of U.S. Route 1 from Northern Maine through New Jersey and Pennsylvania and finishing in Key West.
“… In late-June 2014, I set out from my home in upstate New York to drive the entire length of U.S. Route 1 from remote, forested northern Maine to artsy, bucolic Key West. As it snakes along the East Coast for over 2,400 miles, this famous — but somewhat ignored — highway winds through some of our nation’s most complex, congested cities before passing through the wide-open expanses of the Carolinas and down into Florida.
Along the way, the super-fast I-95 beckoned me with its lure of no traffic lights and three lanes. But I ignored its siren call.
It was an eye-opening experience. From the fascinating people I met to the sites I visited, I was left with an indelible image of what used to be known as the New World to Europeans and others who first began landing here centuries ago. From the crafty ticket scalper at the Baltimore Orioles’ Camden Yards ballpark to the Baptist minister in Aiken County South Carolina, the people I met along the way were the America I sought to see through the lens of this over 80-year-road.”
Join the Zoom meeting with the information below:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82103438657...
Meeting ID: 821 0343 8657
Passcode: 513689
Moorestown 08057, Delran Historical Society, Historical Society of Haddonfield

04/02/2021
On Wednesday, April 7th at 7 pm the Historical Society will conduct its annual spring meeting with a special presentatio...
03/24/2021

On Wednesday, April 7th at 7 pm the Historical Society will conduct its annual spring meeting with a special presentation via Zoom.

After a brief business meeting, Speaker Mark Marchand will discuss his book, U.S. Route 1: Rediscovering the New World, about his experience driving the entire length of U.S. Route 1 from Northern Maine through New Jersey and Pennsylvania and finishing in Key West.
“… In late-June 2014, I set out from my home in upstate New York to drive the entire length of U.S. Route 1 from remote, forested northern Maine to artsy, bucolic Key West. As it snakes along the East Coast for over 2,400 miles, this famous — but somewhat ignored — highway winds through some of our nation’s most complex, congested cities before passing through the wide-open expanses of the Carolinas and down into Florida.
Along the way, the super-fast I-95 beckoned me with its lure of no traffic lights and three lanes. But I ignored its siren call.
It was an eye-opening experience. From the fascinating people I met to the sites I visited, I was left with an indelible image of what used to be known as the New World to Europeans and others who first began landing here centuries ago. From the crafty ticket scalper at the Baltimore Orioles’ Camden Yards ballpark to the Baptist minister in Aiken County South Carolina, the people I met along the way were the America I sought to see through the lens of this over 80-year-road.”

Join the Zoom meeting with the information below:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82103438657?pwd=d2RUUGdLNXVJSU1KYXU0MHZrV0lGQT09

Meeting ID: 821 0343 8657
Passcode: 513689

Moorestown 08057, Delran Historical Society, Historical Society of Haddonfield,

On Wednesday, April 7th at 7 pm the Historical Society will conduct its annual spring meeting with a special presentation via Zoom.

After a brief business meeting, Speaker Mark Marchand will discuss his book, U.S. Route 1: Rediscovering the New World, about his experience driving the entire length of U.S. Route 1 from Northern Maine through New Jersey and Pennsylvania and finishing in Key West.
“… In late-June 2014, I set out from my home in upstate New York to drive the entire length of U.S. Route 1 from remote, forested northern Maine to artsy, bucolic Key West. As it snakes along the East Coast for over 2,400 miles, this famous — but somewhat ignored — highway winds through some of our nation’s most complex, congested cities before passing through the wide-open expanses of the Carolinas and down into Florida.
Along the way, the super-fast I-95 beckoned me with its lure of no traffic lights and three lanes. But I ignored its siren call.
It was an eye-opening experience. From the fascinating people I met to the sites I visited, I was left with an indelible image of what used to be known as the New World to Europeans and others who first began landing here centuries ago. From the crafty ticket scalper at the Baltimore Orioles’ Camden Yards ballpark to the Baptist minister in Aiken County South Carolina, the people I met along the way were the America I sought to see through the lens of this over 80-year-road.”

Join the Zoom meeting with the information below:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82103438657?pwd=d2RUUGdLNXVJSU1KYXU0MHZrV0lGQT09

Meeting ID: 821 0343 8657
Passcode: 513689

Moorestown 08057, Delran Historical Society, Historical Society of Haddonfield,

Forgotten Friday: Women’s History Month edition: What did women do for fun after they were done the cooking, cleaning, s...
03/19/2021

Forgotten Friday: Women’s History Month edition: What did women do for fun after they were done the cooking, cleaning, sewing, farming and tending to the needs of their families? Quilting party!!

Forgotten Friday: Women’s History Month edition: What did women do for fun after they were done the cooking, cleaning, sewing, farming and tending to the needs of their families? Quilting party!!

Forgotten Friday: Women’s History Month edition. Mrs. Mary Lippincott who once taught school at Westtown, was a noted ed...
03/12/2021

Forgotten Friday: Women’s History Month edition. Mrs. Mary Lippincott who once taught school at Westtown, was a noted educator in her day. Her school, the Mary Lippincott Boarding School For Girls was patronized by the daughters of many of the most cultured families in South Jersey, Philadelphia and vicinity. The school was located in East Moorestown on the north side of Main Street a little east of Stanwick Avenue and was beautifully located on the ridge, commanding a splendid view of the valley to the south. It was established in 1843 and flourished for about 40 years.

Forgotten Friday: Women’s History Month edition. Mrs. Mary Lippincott who once taught school at Westtown, was a noted educator in her day. Her school, the Mary Lippincott Boarding School For Girls was patronized by the daughters of many of the most cultured families in South Jersey, Philadelphia and vicinity. The school was located in East Moorestown on the north side of Main Street a little east of Stanwick Avenue and was beautifully located on the ridge, commanding a splendid view of the valley to the south. It was established in 1843 and flourished for about 40 years.

On this balmy March 11, we remember the Great White Hurricane which started similarly on this date in 1888.This photo fr...
03/11/2021

On this balmy March 11, we remember the Great White Hurricane which started similarly on this date in 1888.

This photo from the historical society’s collection shows a large number of citizens digging out the railroad tracks above Lenola, so that the trains could get through.

One of the worst blizzards in American history, it blew through Moorestown and the entire northeast. The Nor’easter lasted for three days and by the end had dropped from 20 to 55 inches of snow throughout the northeast with winds up to 80 mph creating snow drifts up to 50 feet in some places. The storm was preceded by warm weather on March 11, followed by heavy rains that turned to snow on the 12th – 14th as temperatures plummeted. Over 400 people died as a result of the storm.

On this balmy March 11, we remember the Great White Hurricane which started similarly on this date in 1888.

This photo from the historical society’s collection shows a large number of citizens digging out the railroad tracks above Lenola, so that the trains could get through.

One of the worst blizzards in American history, it blew through Moorestown and the entire northeast. The Nor’easter lasted for three days and by the end had dropped from 20 to 55 inches of snow throughout the northeast with winds up to 80 mph creating snow drifts up to 50 feet in some places. The storm was preceded by warm weather on March 11, followed by heavy rains that turned to snow on the 12th – 14th as temperatures plummeted. Over 400 people died as a result of the storm.

Forgotten Friday: Women's History Month edition -- the 1906  Field Club Field Hockey team.
03/05/2021

Forgotten Friday: Women's History Month edition -- the 1906 Field Club Field Hockey team.

Forgotten Friday: Women's History Month edition -- the 1906 Field Club Field Hockey team.

Forgotten Friday: The West End Community Center was created as a recreation and social center for the Black community in...
02/26/2021

Forgotten Friday: The West End Community Center was created as a recreation and social center for the Black community in 1944. Since the Moorestown Community House at the time did not allow use by Black residents, several residents petitioned the township for use of an old township building built in the 1920s, located at 425 N. Church St.

Retired School #7 teacher Roxana Yancy and James Adams (the long time director of the WECC) worked tirelessly to renovate and set up recreation programs in the new community center. The center provided a welcome gathering place and fulfilled an important need in the community for thousands of children and adults over its 25 years. The WECC was closed in 1968 and demolished c. 1975. In its place is now the N. Church St. entrance to Yancy-Adams Park which was dedicated June 18th, 1977.

Forgotten Friday: The West End Community Center was created as a recreation and social center for the Black community in 1944. Since the Moorestown Community House at the time did not allow use by Black residents, several residents petitioned the township for use of an old township building built in the 1920s, located at 425 N. Church St.

Retired School #7 teacher Roxana Yancy and James Adams (the long time director of the WECC) worked tirelessly to renovate and set up recreation programs in the new community center. The center provided a welcome gathering place and fulfilled an important need in the community for thousands of children and adults over its 25 years. The WECC was closed in 1968 and demolished c. 1975. In its place is now the N. Church St. entrance to Yancy-Adams Park which was dedicated June 18th, 1977.

Historic History commemorating Washington's Birthday from the Camden Courier-Post.
02/22/2021

Historic History commemorating Washington's Birthday from the Camden Courier-Post.

Historic History commemorating Washington's Birthday from the Camden Courier-Post.

Photos from Historical Society of Moorestown's post
02/19/2021

Photos from Historical Society of Moorestown's post

02/13/2021

One of our followers had this question: "Looking for any pictures of the fire alarm code card. We had one hanging in our kitchen when I grew up. You could listen to the siren and know where the emergency was located." Does anyone have this card or a photo of one?

Forgotten Friday: Gertrude Preston Williams was an inspiration to hundreds of students who attended School #7 which you ...
02/12/2021

Forgotten Friday: Gertrude Preston Williams was an inspiration to hundreds of students who attended School #7 which you may have read about in a September “Back to School” edition of Forgotten Friday. Gertrude Preston grew up in Moorestown and was the first Black graduate of Moorestown High School. She attended the Hampton Institute to study education and after graduation returned to Moorestown where she taught at School #7 for 48 years, mostly fifth and sixth grade.

You can read her oral history on the Historical Society’s website: https://moorestownhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Gertrude-Williams.pdf.

Forgotten Friday: Gertrude Preston Williams was an inspiration to hundreds of students who attended School #7 which you may have read about in a September “Back to School” edition of Forgotten Friday. Gertrude Preston grew up in Moorestown and was the first Black graduate of Moorestown High School. She attended the Hampton Institute to study education and after graduation returned to Moorestown where she taught at School #7 for 48 years, mostly fifth and sixth grade.

You can read her oral history on the Historical Society’s website: https://moorestownhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Gertrude-Williams.pdf.

Address

12 High Street, PO Box 477
Moorestown, NJ
08057

General information

OPEN HOURS: House museum tours and gift shop: Every Tuesday and the 2nd and 4th Sundays of each month -- 1 to 3 pm, excepting holidays and the months of July and August. Library: Tuesdays, 1 to 4 pm, and the second Sunday of each month, 1 to 3 pm, excepting holidays and the months of July and August.

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Comments

Looking forward to our live, ONLINE Spanish conversation workshop Saturday, 1230! I also teach private classes. Inbox me for info!
Question: When did Moorestown schools integrate? I recall 1959 at Roberts school. Was there an earlier time? How about high school or junior high?
I am writing a blog about attending Number 7 school. I see one photo of the students in 1914, but not a picture of the school. Does anyone know why it was #7? Presumably the 7th public school?
I just came across this FB group; I lived in Moorestown from 1961-64; then nearby Mt Laurel until late 1970s; attended & graduated MFS, member Moorestown Friends Meeting. I now live near Allentown, PA. I'm a college history professor, this is really fascinating! I sure recall Cohen's Store, the building of Moorestown Mall, etc. etc.
Thought the locomotive representation by Bill Rose was amazing. What a great job.
Can someone please tell me the historic location of the Washington Hotel on Main Street? My great-great-grandfather Shep Low was the owner of the stage line based there. Thank you.
Free and open to all! Lecture “Christmas Past” at the historic Shipman Mansion at the Red Dragon Canoe Club on Wednesday, November 13. Free mansion tours begin at 6:00 PM and the lecture is at 7:00 PM. Refreshments will be served. This is the final lecture of the fall lecture series. https://www.facebook.com/events/757208741408280/
Today I am honored to put a Stamp on the history of Moorestown. 750 McElwee, the Nelson Moorestown Christmas tree farm will pass hands to a new buyer. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson purchase the property in 1973 and started raising cattle. It didn’t take long for the neighbors to freak out! The cattle would bust through the fence every day to eat the neighbors luscious grass. The Nelson decided to grow, “Anything that had roots in the ground”, said Mr. Nelson. Three years after herding cattle in Moorestown, the Nelson Christmas Tree farm was born. This summer, I heard many, many stories, of the Nelsons farm and the wonderful mystical childhood of 3 kids growing up on 12 acres. Even when the kids burnt the barn down, now have become funny cherished memories. The Nelson reminisces of the 400 to 500 trees they would sell every season. They loved every family and friends who came from near and far for their trees. “Some chopped down their own tree and others had the family dogs with them” When I close my eyes, I imagine the millions of Christmas celebrations cherished around the Nelson’s trees and the magical smiles. I am always honored to represent each client, each with a different history. When Mr. Nelson was 52 years old he had a back operation that left him paralyzed. This did not stop the Nelsons, this high school track star, still farmed everyday his land everyday. Anytime I feel like life throws me a punch, I will never forget the powerful enormous strength and love of this family. “I loved every minute of it” said Mrs. Nelson, “the best times were the years all the grandchildren would come from Pennsylvania and Maryland on the weekends to helps sell. These were some of the best days.” I am also honored to represent the buyers, another amazing loving and strong family. I proud to say this property will remain a farm on Moorestowns new Millionaire row. The new buyers are not sure what they will be farming, in the future. I am still hoping for Moorestown vineyards. My wine glass is ready in hand!
I would be grateful for help. I am a British researcher in the history of medicine and am currently researching a mid-20th century surgical procedure in the treatment of tuberculosis. This involved inserting balls made of lucite and I believe these balls were manufactured in Moorestown by Edgar Nichols of Nichols Products, 325 West Main Street in the 1940s. I wonder if you know of any records that may exist of this company, or any individuals who can remember the company or know/ knew Mr Nichols? I note that Mr Nichols was awarded ‘Moorestown Citizen of the Year’ in 1963. Thank you!
Don’t miss the last lecture of the fall series at the Shipman Mansion at the Red Dragon Canoe Club. FREE and OPEN TO ALL! https://www.facebook.com/events/573501086432373/
Vintage Base Ball coming to Central and South Jersey. Vintage Base Ball is a pastime, with its beginnings and progressions mimicking those that occurred in America over 160 years ago. Teams competing today wear period reproduction uniforms, use period authentic equipment and follow baseball rules from the 19th century in order to accurately present the history of baseball to the public. If interested, message [email protected].
Me and the kids are having fun digging up antique glass and other bits in the yard. Have you or the library ever done any programming around backyard archeology? Also I know have a couple of buckets of this stuff. Would anyone happen know of any artisans or crafts persons who would be interested in it?