Marlow NH Historical Society

Marlow NH Historical Society The Marlow Historical Society is a 501c3 corporation listed with the NH Charitable Trust. Our museum is open May-October or by appt. Our board meets every month. Murray Hall is our current restoration project. Anyone interested in our activities may email us at [email protected]

Monadnock Historical Societies Forum
10/15/2018

Monadnock Historical Societies Forum

Marlow NH Historical Society is holding a MAJOR EVENT on Oct. 27, a Silent Auction to raise the fund for Jones Hall from 12-4pm. Check out their page Friends of Jones Hall for more information.
#marlownh
Marlow, Nh

Friends of Jones Hall
09/29/2018

Friends of Jones Hall

11/09/2017
History3 - Flanders Baptist and Community Church

This URL clearly shows the beliefs and practices of those people from Lyme, CT who first settled in Marlow. http://www.flandersbaptist.org/history3

You will recognize some of the Marlow names. To see the Marlow reference here, scroll down to look under the heading "Daughter Churches".

This is the most complete picture I have seen in one place about the nature of our first settlers.

The Ebenezer Mack mentioned in this posting may be the father of our first settler, Solomon Mack. The father has been referred to by Solomon as "Reverend". On the other hand, it is also possible that this is "the other Ebenezer Mack," a close relative, the one we believe came to live in Marlow.

Baptist Church located in the Flanders section of East Lyme, Connecticut

Born in Marlow, a talented prima donna's tale
08/18/2016
Born in Marlow, a talented prima donna's tale

Born in Marlow, a talented prima donna's tale

Editor’s note: The following column, about Calista Piccioli, was written by David R. Proper and published in The Sentinel in 2007, as one Proper’s regular pieces about the history of the Monadnock region.

Historical Society of Cheshire County
05/02/2016

Historical Society of Cheshire County

75th anniversary of the 1941 Marlow Fire. Great film and discussion, Tracy Messer!

Lexington And Concord? The Bloodiest Battle On The First Patriots' Day Actually Happened in...
04/17/2016
Lexington And Concord? The Bloodiest Battle On The First Patriots' Day Actually Happened in...

Lexington And Concord? The Bloodiest Battle On The First Patriots' Day Actually Happened in...

Inside a modest, two-story, colonial farmhouse just off Massachusetts Avenue in Arlington, Doris Birmingham opens a creaky, heavy-hinged door, revealing a dank, boarded-up passageway that once led to a functioning basement. Inside the dim cubby, light blares through two small openings that could eas…

1941 Forest Fire
04/12/2016

1941 Forest Fire

The Marlow Profile was revealed in the aftermath of the 1941 forest fire.

1941 Forest Fire
04/10/2016

1941 Forest Fire

Charlie Strickland was 15 years old at the time of the 1941 forest fire. He's devoted his life to fire fighter as the fire chief and fire warden for the Town of Marlow and as a special deputy warden for the State of New Hampshire at the Pitcher Mountain fire tower.

1941 Forest Fire
04/10/2016

1941 Forest Fire

The 50th anniversary program was well publicized. The story was covered by a number of publications including the Keene Sentinel and the Monadnock Shopper News, as well as the NH Public Television show New Hampshire Crossroads, hosted by Fritz Wetherbee.
Ironically, so many people showed up at the local elementary school for the event that the fire marshal had to turn people away. An encore presentation was given the following week for those who missed it.

02/25/2016
Brian

Brian

check out what MCA is trying to prevent !!!

FamilySearch
01/09/2016
FamilySearch

FamilySearch

England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975 is one of our most searched collections. It includes records from all over the country and is one of our oldest collections, and yet it continues to yield results when searched. Find the records here:

New England Historic Genealogical Society
01/09/2016
New England Historic Genealogical Society

New England Historic Genealogical Society

[Editor’s note: Katrina Fahy has written a number of posts on researching her Scottish, Irish, and German ancestors. Some of her techniques – and successes – are excerpted below.] From Finding William Muir: When I began working as a genealogist, my mother expressed great interest in learning more about her father’s family: the Muirs. While she had much information on her mother’s side of the family, which was quite large, she knew little about her father’s side of the family beyond her grandparents, so I began there… [ 918 more words. ]

http://vita-brevis.org/2016/01/strategies-scottish-irish-research/

FamilySearch
12/11/2015
FamilySearch

FamilySearch

What stories do your favorite family photos tell? Whether you’re looking for a specific family member or wanting to find photos of your ancestors’ hometowns, these 10 free historical photo sites can help your research.

New England Historic Genealogical Society
12/04/2015
New England Historic Genealogical Society

New England Historic Genealogical Society

Thank you @AncestralFindings.com for recommending membership to NEHGS! It's nice to be recognized within the community as one of the best places of research for casual and professional genealogists alike.

FamilySearch
12/02/2015
FamilySearch

FamilySearch

Are you sitting on a collection of old handwritten recipes handed down to you from another generation? If so, consider yourself lucky—to be able to create a meal or favorite dessert from years long past creates a special connection to family members you may never have met. Here are three easy projects that get old recipes into our lives!

Ancestorville Genealogy
11/08/2015

Ancestorville Genealogy

Good Morning, Ancestorville! This is Satruday morning roll call. Tell us where you are from and what's on tap for you today. What surnames are in the forefront?
Remember - the research will be there, but people won't! Be sure to record the stories of your elders and you!! Share how you have done this. ~ Judy Easley Shutts

The Pilgrims
09/24/2015
The Pilgrims

The Pilgrims

The Pilgrims’ narrative has been shrouded in myth, embedded in Thanksgiving Day feasts, football and parades. Who were the men and women who constituted this multifarious band of English Protestants whom we call “the Pilgrims”? Why did their religious beliefs make the old world so intolerable to the…

Historical Society of Cheshire County
09/21/2015

Historical Society of Cheshire County

This Friday experience 2 of Keene's Main Street landmarks as they were before electricity – lit only with candles. Listen to 18th and 19th century music. Play Colonial games of chance. The Wyman Tavern and Horatio Colony House museums are open FREE to the public from 7pm to 8:30pm.

Marlow, New Hampshire
09/15/2015
Marlow, New Hampshire

Marlow, New Hampshire

MARLOW - At the heart of Marlow village, in front of historic Jones Hall, stands a unique hand-sculpted granite World War I monument...read more...

Central New Hampshire Forest Fire Warden's Association
09/15/2015

Central New Hampshire Forest Fire Warden's Association

Next Meeting will be Tuesday September 15, 2015 in Salisbury New Hampshire at the Safety Complex.

From Tom Britton, grandson of Edward Levi Britton (who was Alisson - Alice - Britton's brother), I got a disk full of ph...
09/14/2015

From Tom Britton, grandson of Edward Levi Britton (who was Alisson - Alice - Britton's brother), I got a disk full of photos. I
thought you'd like to see these: 1. Alice Britton 2. Edward Levi and his wife Cora Reed. 3. Reed Farm. Sent by Maria Baril.

Alice Britton became Marlow's lady stage coach driver with a route from Marlow to Concord to Keene and back to Marlow. After the stage coach route was no longer used, she became Marlow's school bus driver. She died in 1933.

A super-sized mystery in Marlow
08/18/2015
A super-sized mystery in Marlow

A super-sized mystery in Marlow

MARLOW — Local lore has it that sometime around the 1840s an elephant and her trainer came to town.

Handwriting Helps — FamilySearch.org
08/03/2015
Handwriting Helps — FamilySearch.org

Handwriting Helps — FamilySearch.org

Discover your family history. Explore the world’s largest collection of free family trees, genealogy records and resources.

March 2002- Murray Hall - Removing the "rube goldberg" stage: Charlie Strickland, Tom Fuschetto and Bill Plotts.
05/07/2015

March 2002- Murray Hall - Removing the "rube goldberg" stage: Charlie Strickland, Tom Fuschetto and Bill Plotts.

English Genealogical Resources
10/23/2014
English Genealogical Resources

English Genealogical Resources

Learn how to trace your English ancestry with this subject guide. Find key records, resources, and repositories.

Tips for searching on AmericanAncestors.org - Vita Brevis
07/18/2014
Tips for searching on AmericanAncestors.org - Vita Brevis

Tips for searching on AmericanAncestors.org - Vita Brevis

When we were deciding how our AmericanAncestors.org database search would work, one of the key considerations was that we didn’t want to return search results that contained a lot of ‘noise.’ On other websites, the database architects allowed for a… [ 630 more words. ]

Stories in Stone: A Field Guide to Cemetery Symbolism and Iconography
07/08/2014
Stories in Stone: A Field Guide to Cemetery Symbolism and Iconography

Stories in Stone: A Field Guide to Cemetery Symbolism and Iconography

Certain symbols abound in modern Western culture that are instantly recognizable: the cross signifies Christianity, the six-pointed Star of David is revered by Jews, the golden arches frequently means it's time for lunch. Other symbols, however, require a bit of decoding-particularly those found ...

I believe some of our Marlow settlers and their relatives in Lyme participated.Loisanne
07/01/2014

I believe some of our Marlow settlers and their relatives in Lyme participated.

Loisanne

Privateers -- America's pirate navy -- was 26 times as large as the continental navy and wreaked havoc on British settlements from the Caribbean to Nova Scotia. On July 1, 1782, the most spectacular raid of all took place. http://bit.ly/1mGahcm

Online family histories, old and new - Vita Brevis
06/26/2014
Online family histories, old and new - Vita Brevis

Online family histories, old and new - Vita Brevis

The NEHGS Digital Library and Archive has a growing collection of family histories, covering a wide range of subjects and surnames. Roughly three quarters of the 137 titles currently in the collection are older books from the stacks of the NEHGS Library –… [ 370 more words. ]

Tiptoe through the tombstones - Vita Brevis
06/20/2014
Tiptoe through the tombstones - Vita Brevis

Tiptoe through the tombstones - Vita Brevis

When I first began researching at the NEHGS Library, I was drawn to the wide array of cemetery records that could be found in published books and donated manuscripts. It’s not by choice that I spend time locating cemetery records; it is because many… [ 424 more words. ]

Family stories in official records - Vita Brevis
06/10/2014
Family stories in official records - Vita Brevis

Family stories in official records - Vita Brevis

Ancestry.com has an interesting database category called Immigration & Travel, which includes a variety of passenger list and passport application databases. I have used them over the years to track members of my family as they traveled to and from… [ 432 more words. ]

Historical Society of Cheshire County
06/09/2014
Historical Society of Cheshire County

Historical Society of Cheshire County

The Historical Society of Cheshire County has been collecting, preserving, and communicating the history of Cheshire County, New Hampshire since ...

05/27/2014

Here's some of our recent genealogical sleuthing. Win some. Lose some. I think we are getting closer to the lowdown on Marlow's early settler, Aaron Brown.

If you know anything about this fellow, apparently born in 1761 in Lyme, CT and a tax-paying resident of Marlow in 1794, please let us know. A lady known as Ms. Buswell is searching for her ancestor.


__________________________________________

Hi, Marcia and Larry,

I’m sorry I apparently missed your request about Aaron Brown until your email of May 21, Marcia. I’m “on it” now. I’m not sure who in Marlow could help with the answers, but Ill share what I’ve come up with so far.

I enjoyed talking with you at the museum, Larry.

First, I checked my copy of Elgin Jones’ Notes on the History of the Town of Marlow, N. H. , published in Keene, N.H at the request of Elgin A. Jones, 1941. This rare book contains lots more detail than Jones included in our town history, for instance, the first Proprietors and the subsequent owners who purchased Marlow lots from them. I find Edward Brown listed as an early Proprietor (Few of whom even visited their Marlow land).

I found from Jones’ book that Joseph Brown purchased 100 acres on the right of Marshfield Parsons on June 9, 1769. [100] As nearly as I can determine, this land was in the original Marlow settlement in the area we call Baker Corner today. I believe he is a likely candidate to be the father of “our” Aaron Brown.

My next move was to go to my Barbour Collection of Connecticut Town Vital Records, Lyme 1667 – 1852 because most of our early settlers came from Lyme, CT, the first seventeen families and twenty-eight families in all. Sure enough, the birth of Aaron Brown, born Feb. 7, 1761 to Joseph and Anna Brown is recorded. He’s a likely candidate for “our” Aaron Brown. Dates and location make sense, anyway. Joseph and Anna are also the parents of Joseph Brown, b. May 22, 1756 and Ruth, born July 28, 1758 according to Barbour.

Another Brown is recorded as an early Marlow settler. In 1795, Francis Brown purchased 10 acres and 9.133 acres on the Marshfield Parsons right, the same vicinity and from the same Proprietor as that assumed earlier by Joseph Brown, so there is probably a connection. I have found extensive information on the internet on both Joseph and Francis Brown which I can send to you, Larry, or hold for you until you come again to Marlow to scan the French family photos we have. I have been unable to establish the connection of the two that I surmise must be there.

There is one oddity mentioned. In an article titled “Descendancy Narrative of Aaron Brown, Sr.” : Aaron Brown is considered a resident of Marlow in August of 1794, but the tax levy table lists him on the same line as Ripley Bingham, taxing both men as a unit. “The levy was recorded on Aug. 13 and Aaron recorded his marriage banns on 25 August. Was Aaron just a boarder in town, waiting for the marriage to take place in Sept.? …Bother Aaron Brown and Ripley Bingham are gone from the tax list in 1795. Other Browns were present in Marlow, notably Francis Brown, but no connection between them and Aaron has been found.”

“Records for 1798 show a Seldon Brown born to Aaron and Anna his wife.” [Other sources on genealogy sites confirm this.] There is a Francis Brown with a wife Anna with four children born from 1786 to 1803. It does confuse things and raises the possibility of two Aarons in town at the same time.”

Aaron, Sr. was in Putney, VT in 1798 where Isaac was born, then in Acworth in 1803 when the family births were recorded in town records.” The narrative goes on extensively with a number of descendants in various places. I will make a copy available.

Aaron Brown, 1761 - ? , married Anna Gee (1764 – 1851], d. of Stephen Gee (1732 -1808) and Eunice Moore (1731 – 1828).

Seldon Brown (1798 – 1875) b. in Marlow to Aaron Brown and Anna Gee. Married Sally, b. 1800.

Also found: Application for military pension

“Selden Brown of Marlow in the State of New Hampshire, son and only heir of Aaron and Anna Brown. Service 8 months. Suspended for want of proof of identity. Application to Congress made by widow.”

[Was this pension from Aaron’s service?? Since Seldon was born in 1798, he could hardly have fought in the Revolutionary War.]

_______________________________________

From Gen Forum:

Aaron Brown, Marlow, NH, 1794

m. Mary (Polly) Gates, dau. of Isaac Gates and Mary Wheelock Gates [of Gates Mt., Acworth] in Marlow, NH on Sept. 18, 1794. Their three children were: Aaron, Jr., born, 1795 in Acworth, NH, m. Eady Watts; Polly, m Alden Gee, and Isaac, m. ary Newton and Sarah Bliss. {This would not include the children born to them after they left the area.]

Aaron’s 25 grandchildren married into Watts, Arnold, Lewis, Bundy, Savory, Snow, Eastman, Moulton, Whittemore, and other families. Great grandchildren married into Trow, Prouty, Bruce, Lamprey, and others.

From Rootsweb, I found that a Joseph Brown from Watertown and Hannah his wife came up the Conn. River to the Winooski, VT area. Thereby hangs a tale probably not related to ours.

I also found that Francis Brown (Esther Mason, Joseph, Joseph, Hugh) born in Watertown, MA on April 16, 1755 died in Marlow on March 18, 1827. He participated in the Battle of Lexington, Niles’ Regiment. He married his cousin on Feb. 17, 1785, in Alstead, Anna Brown, dau. Of Abraham Brown and Mary Livermore They had these children: Francis (1786 - ), Jonathan (1789 - ),
Calvin, b. Aug 10, 1794, physician, m. 1824 Lydia Patten of Westford, settled first in Marlow and afterward in Fairfield Co., Adams, Ill., Gardner, b. (1796 - ) and Harry, b. on Jan. 14, 1803 in Marlow. This is from an extensive article also.

If there is a connection between Aaron Brown and Francis Brown, it is not obvious, Aaron having come with his parents from Lyme, and Francis having come from Watertown.

We might try casting a wider circle around Lyme. Many of the Lyme/Marlow families are related to the towns surrounding Lyme. So far, I’m not sure where Joseph Brown came from. New London and Stonington might be fertile grounds for search. I’ll keep poking when I can.

We can check our early town records so well-preserved at Marlow's Town Hall.

I hope this helps.

Loisanne

Address

118 RT-123
Marlow, NH
03456

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