The Granger House Victorian Museum

The Granger House Victorian Museum The Granger House (1848) and its associated carriage house (1879) exist today. The Granger House Victorian Museum is a snapshot in time from the Victorian Era.

Located in Marion, Iowa, the house was built in 1848 and added onto until 1880. Visit the events tab on our website for available tours dates and specialty events. Some tours can be scheduled via appointment by emailing us with your request.

*Please check our website for updated tour and event information.

Self-Guided Tours have begun for the day!  Stop by to take in the beauty of the season.  We will be here until 4:00 pm.
12/03/2023

Self-Guided Tours have begun for the day! Stop by to take in the beauty of the season. We will be here until 4:00 pm.

Stop by for your self guided tour today from 1:00 to 4:00 pm!
12/02/2023

Stop by for your self guided tour today from 1:00 to 4:00 pm!

Stop by this weekend for a self-guided tour of the beautifully decorated museum!  We will be open tomorrow and Sunday fr...
12/01/2023

Stop by this weekend for a self-guided tour of the beautifully decorated museum!

We will be open tomorrow and Sunday from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm.

Happy birthday to board member, Vicki Noah!
11/28/2023

Happy birthday to board member, Vicki Noah!

The museum will be closed today.  Enjoy your snowy day and be safe!
11/26/2023

The museum will be closed today. Enjoy your snowy day and be safe!

Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at the museum!  Have a safe and blessed day.
11/23/2023

Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at the museum! Have a safe and blessed day.

We are closed today so that some very special people to the museum can decorate for the holidays!  🎄We will be open tomo...
11/18/2023

We are closed today so that some very special people to the museum can decorate for the holidays! 🎄

We will be open tomorrow, November 19th for regular tours.

***SOLD OUT*** There's still time to get signed up for this workshop!  Spots are filling fast, but we can accommodate a ...
11/13/2023

***SOLD OUT*** There's still time to get signed up for this workshop! Spots are filling fast, but we can accommodate a few more!

Join us in making traditional fire cider for immune health. Making your own medicine is powerful work and you can select those herbs that work best for you and your family. Bumping up your natural immune system is ideal this time of year. We will use herbs such as horseradish, ginger and garlic t...

You can purchase your very own Granger House dog tag (can also be used on a key ring).  The wooden flag is for sale as w...
11/11/2023

You can purchase your very own Granger House dog tag (can also be used on a key ring). The wooden flag is for sale as well today at the vendor market.

You have 3 more hours to stop by and shop!  We've had a lot of visitors so far, but we'd love to see you too!  A lot of ...
11/11/2023

You have 3 more hours to stop by and shop! We've had a lot of visitors so far, but we'd love to see you too!

A lot of great hoiday shopping ideas for everyone on your list! 🎁

It's a perfect weather day to visit the Market at the Museum!!!Open from 10:00 am - 4:00 pm.
11/11/2023

It's a perfect weather day to visit the Market at the Museum!!!

Open from 10:00 am - 4:00 pm.

Our market has started!  There are a lot of wonderful vendors and products here today!  Get your holiday shopping starte...
11/11/2023

Our market has started! There are a lot of wonderful vendors and products here today! Get your holiday shopping started, and treat yourself to a little something as well!

Some of the items that are available, but way more than what is listed: Engraved signs, charcuterie boards, engraved coasters, t-shirts, books, handmade blankets, holiday decorations, ornaments, Cardinal items, floral, earrings, jewelry, Sun catchers, mug rugs, stuffed animals, key chains, baked goods, yard decorations, handmade holiday trees, handmade signs, bowl warmers, vintage Christmas,

There are no words to express how grateful we are to all of our Veterans. Thank you for the sacrifice you made so that w...
11/11/2023

There are no words to express how grateful we are to all of our Veterans.

Thank you for the sacrifice you made so that we can enjoy this beautiful thing called “freedom”.

Thank you to all who served and continue to serve this amazingly complex country we are all so fortunate to call home. 🇺🇲

SAVE THE DATE!   SAVE THE DATE!  Market at the Museum is fast approaching on Saturday, November 11th!The holidays are ri...
11/10/2023

SAVE THE DATE!
SAVE THE DATE!

Market at the Museum is fast approaching on Saturday, November 11th!

The holidays are right around the corner, so get a head start on your shopping while also supporting local and small businesses.

There will be a lot of unique and specialty items, so there will be something for everyone, so be sure to stop by and check out everything!

While you're there, don't forget to stop by The Granger House table and pick up your copy of the Granger Diaries, a t-shirt or a coaster as well! They all make great gifts, or pick one up for yourself!

We are open until 4:00 pm for tours!
11/05/2023

We are open until 4:00 pm for tours!

Don't forget to "fall back" one hour and change your clocks tonight before you go to bed!It's also a great time to chang...
11/05/2023

Don't forget to "fall back" one hour and change your clocks tonight before you go to bed!

It's also a great time to change the batteries in your smoke alarms!

We had a great turnout tonight for the Victorian Rites & Customs presentation!  Thank you to all who attended tonight. A...
11/03/2023

We had a great turnout tonight for the Victorian Rites & Customs presentation! Thank you to all who attended tonight.

A special thank you to Kerri Collins for the content and sharing this information, along with the pictures that helped tell the story!

Victorian Halloween Despite their reputation for straight-laced sobriety, the Victorians celebrated Halloween with great...
10/31/2023

Victorian Halloween

Despite their reputation for straight-laced sobriety, the Victorians celebrated Halloween with great enthusiasm—and often with outright abandon. Victorian Halloween parties were filled with fun, games, and spooky rituals, some of which still feature at Halloween parties today.

Instead of going door-to-door, Victorians would throw lavish parties full of pomp and intricate rituals that involved everyone. While there were still costumes, tricks, games, and spooky stories, the main focus of the night was matchmaking.

Victorian hostesses set the scene with elaborate decorations, which included harvest centerpieces and doorways decorated with hanging apples and horseshoes. They also used more familiar images like black cats, bats, witches, ghosts, and devils.

The practice of carving faces into vegetables became associated with Halloween in Ireland and Scotland around the 1800s. Jack-o-lanterns originated from an Irish myth about a man nicknamed “Stingy Jack,” who tricked the Devil and was forced to roam the earth with only a burning coal in a turnip to light his way.

European immigrants then brought Halloween to the United States, and the celebration became popular in the 1800s, when Irish American immigration exploded. Their folk customs and beliefs merged with existing agricultural traditions, meaning Halloween dabbled in the occult, but stayed grounded in the fall harvest.

Tonight's the night!   Our Spirits Revisited Tour will be going on from 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm!  Stop by for some history and...
10/30/2023

Tonight's the night!

Our Spirits Revisited Tour will be going on from 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm! Stop by for some history and a little additional lore about the family museum. We look forward to seeing you for an evening tour!

Tour Prices
Adults 13 and above: $10.00
Children 3 - 12: $5.00
Children under 3: Free
GHVM Member: Free (please show your membership card)

Temps are getting cooler, so why not wear one of our soft, comfortable long sleeve shirts!  They come in a variety of co...
10/29/2023

Temps are getting cooler, so why not wear one of our soft, comfortable long sleeve shirts! They come in a variety of colors and sizes.

Add a Granger House slate coaster to set your hot mug on while you relax in your favorite spot!

All are available for purchase at the museum, along with other items.

We are open for tours today from 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm. We are also open tomorrow, October 30th from 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm for our special Spirits Revisited tour.

See you soon!

Open today for tours from 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm!   Enjoy the beautiful weather today!
10/22/2023

Open today for tours from 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm! Enjoy the beautiful weather today!

Spirits Revisited Tour is happening today from 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm!  Stop by for some history and a little additional lore...
10/21/2023

Spirits Revisited Tour is happening today from 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm! Stop by for some history and a little additional lore about the family museum.

Tour Prices
Adults 13 and above: $10.00
Children 3 - 12: $5.00
Children under 3: Free
GHVM Member: Free (please show your membership card)

Tomorrow, Saturday October 21st the "Spirits Revisited" museum tour is back, where the Granger family history and lore, ...
10/20/2023

Tomorrow, Saturday October 21st the "Spirits Revisited" museum tour is back, where the Granger family history and lore, meets the paranormal. So if you are curious to get a little extra information, we will be open from 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm!

Tour Prices
Adults 13 and above: $10.00
Children 3 - 12: $5.00
Children under 3: Free
GHVM Member: Free (please show your membership card)

Night time at the museum.
10/19/2023

Night time at the museum.

It may be chilly outside, but it's warm inside the museum!  Open today for tours from 1:00 pm to 4 pm.
10/14/2023

It may be chilly outside, but it's warm inside the museum! Open today for tours from 1:00 pm to 4 pm.

Happy Friday the 13th!The Fear of 13Just like walking under a ladder, crossing paths with a black cat or breaking a mirr...
10/13/2023

Happy Friday the 13th!

The Fear of 13
Just like walking under a ladder, crossing paths with a black cat or breaking a mirror, many people hold fast to the belief that Friday the 13th brings bad luck. Though it’s uncertain exactly when this particular tradition began, negative superstitions have swirled around the number 13 for centuries.

While Western cultures have historically associated the number 12 with completeness (there are 12 days of Christmas, 12 months and zodiac signs, 12 labors of Hercules, 12 gods of Olympus and 12 tribes of Israel, just to name a few examples), its successor 13 has a long history as a sign of bad luck.

The ancient Code of Hammurabi, for example, reportedly omitted a 13th law from its list of legal rules. Though this was probably a clerical error, superstitious people sometimes point to this as proof of 13’s longstanding negative associations.

Fear of the number 13 has even earned a psychological term: triskaidekaphobia. The fear of Friday the 13th.

Why is Friday the 13th Unlucky?
According to biblical tradition, 13 guests attended the Last Supper, held on Maundy Thursday, including Jesus and his 12 apostles (one of whom, Judas, betrayed him). The next day, of course, was Good Friday, the day of Jesus’ crucifixion.

The seating arrangement at the Last Supper is believed to have given rise to a longstanding Christian superstition that having 13 guests at a table was a bad omen—specifically, that it was courting death.

Though Friday’s negative associations are weaker, some have suggested they also have roots in Christian tradition: Just as Jesus was crucified on a Friday, Friday was also said to be the day Eve gave Adam the fateful apple from the Tree of Knowledge, as well as the day Cain killed his brother, Abel.

The Thirteen Club
In the late-19th century, a New Yorker named Captain William Fowler (1827-1897) sought to remove the enduring stigma surrounding the number 13—and particularly the unwritten rule about not having 13 guests at a dinner table—by founding an exclusive society called the Thirteen Club.

The group dined regularly on the 13th day of the month in room 13 of the Knickerbocker Cottage, a popular watering hole Fowler owned from 1863 to 1883. Before sitting down for a 13-course dinner, members would pass beneath a ladder and a banner reading “Morituri te Salutamus,” Latin for “Those of us who are about to die salute you.”

Four former U.S. presidents (Chester A. Arthur, Grover Cleveland, Benjamin Harrison and Theodore Roosevelt) would join the Thirteen Club’s ranks at one time or another.

Friday the 13th in Pop Culture
An important milestone in the history of the Friday the 13th legend in particular (not just the number 13) occurred in 1907, with the publication of the novel Friday, the Thirteenth written by Thomas William Lawson. The book told the story of a New York City stockbroker who plays on superstitions about the date to create chaos on Wall Street, and make a killing on the market.

The horror movie Friday the 13th, released in 1980, introduced the world to a hockey mask-wearing killer named Jason, and is perhaps the best-known example of the famous superstition in pop culture history. The movie spawned multiple sequels, as well as comic books, novellas, video games, related merchandise and countless terrifying Halloween costumes.

*Verbiage content courtesy of hisotry.com

Make us a part of your day!  Tours are from 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm.
10/08/2023

Make us a part of your day! Tours are from 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm.

09/30/2023

Stop by to see how really awesome the museum is! We will be open from 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm.

Tour Prices
Adults 13 and above: $10.00
Children 3 - 12: $5.00
Children under 3: Free
GHVM Member: Free (please show your membership card)

It's a gorgeous fall day outside, but make a point of visiting the museum today for a tour!  We are open 1:00 pm - 4:00 ...
09/24/2023

It's a gorgeous fall day outside, but make a point of visiting the museum today for a tour! We are open 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm.

Tour Prices
Adults 13 and above: $10.00
Children 3 - 12: $5.00
Children under 3: Free
GHVM Member: Free (please show your membership card)

Happy First Day of Fall!  🍂🌿🍁What Is The Fall Equinox?In mid-September each year, we greet the fall season with the arri...
09/23/2023

Happy First Day of Fall! 🍂🌿🍁

What Is The Fall Equinox?
In mid-September each year, we greet the fall season with the arrival of the fall equinox (otherwise known as the autumnal equinox). This is the moment when the Sun crosses the Equator, and those of us living in the Northern Hemisphere will begin to see more darkness than daylight. Regardless of whether it has been chilly for weeks or there are still balmy summer-like temperatures, this is the start of astronomical fall. This is different from “meteorological fall,” which began on September 1st.

At this point, the Earth’s tilt is moving away from its maximum lean toward the Sun. Its rays are aiming directly at the equator.

The autumnal (fall) equinox marks the turning point when darkness begins to win out over daylight. Essentially, our hours of daylight—the period of time each day between sunrise and sunset—have been growing slightly shorter each day since the summer solstice in June, which is the longest day of the year (at least in terms of daylight). Then, for the next three months, our hours of daylight will continue to grow shorter.

At the autumnal equinox, day and night are approximately equal in length. The name equinox comes from the Latin word aequus, meaning equal, and nox, meaning night. An equinox occurs twice a year (autumnal and vernal, or fall and spring).

Everywhere you look, you can see the visible changes as nature prepares for winter: birds are flying south, temperatures are getting cooler, leaves are changing colors, and animals’ coats are thickening, to name a few. But most significant is the change in daylight.

In mid-December, we will experience the winter solstice, which will mark the shortest day of the year in terms of hours of daylight.

After the winter solstice, the days will begin to grow longer again. It will take another three months until the vernal equinox (also called the spring equinox) for the periods of daylight and darkness to reach equilibrium once again.

Equinox Traditions And Celebrations You Probably Didn’t Know About! All over the world—and throughout history—you’ll find a variety of traditions and celebrations to welcome the autumn season and harvest time (Oktoberfest, anyone?). Here are some other celebrations associated with autumn you might not be familiar with.

Mabon
Mabon is the second of three harvest festivals that take place in the pagan “Wheel of the Year.” This “Second Harvest” is when farmers gathered foods like gourds, pumpkins, grapes, and apples. It’s a time to give thanks for the summer and to pay tribute to the coming darkness. It is known as the “Pagan Thanksgiving,” and is celebrated by gathering friends and family for a feast, decorating your home with autumn colors, and going apple picking. Symbols associated with Mabon include the cornucopia (horn of plenty) and pinecones.

See The Snake of Sunlight in Mexico
Additionally, the Mayan temple at Chichén Itzá in Mexico, known as El Castillo, is dedicated to a serpent god. During the fall equinox, people gather to see the “snake of sunlight”—at the precise moment the equinox arrives, it appears as if a snake made of sunlight slithers down the temple steps.

Enjoy Mooncakes To Celebrate Harvest Time
People in Asian cultures celebrate the autumn equinox as the “Mid-Autumn Festival” or Moon Festival. These celebrations are all about celebrating the bountiful harvest and the Harvest Moon. People often give mooncakes, round pastries filled with assorted fillings, to friends and neighbors. Learn more about mooncakes here!

Happy Higan
In Japan, the Buddhist celebration known as Higan or Higan-e happens during the week of both the spring and fall equinoxes. These celebrations are significant because, at the moment of the equinox, the sun sets exactly at due west—and Japanese Buddhists believe the afterlife is located westward. To honor the dead, people visit the graves of ancestors and loved ones, cleaning them and bringing decorations. It’s also a traditional time to visit relatives and to meditate.

*Content courtesy of farmersalmanac.com
**Fall picture of the museum circa October 2020

Tours are happening today from 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm!  If you've always wanted to see the museum, today is your day!
09/23/2023

Tours are happening today from 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm! If you've always wanted to see the museum, today is your day!

Happy birthday to volunteer, Ed Rogers!
09/21/2023

Happy birthday to volunteer, Ed Rogers!

Happy birthday to board member, Thomas Flagel!
09/15/2023

Happy birthday to board member, Thomas Flagel!

Address

970 10th Street
Marion, IA
52302

Opening Hours

Saturday 1pm - 4pm
Sunday 1pm - 4pm

Telephone

(319) 377-6672

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Our Story

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places and a wonderful example of Victorian Italianate architecture, The Granger House Victorian Museum is the only restored middle-class family home in the Cedar Rapids area. Occupied by a single family for nearly 100 years, the house contains many of its original furnishings and is decorated to reflect the lifestyle of a successful, late 19th-century middle-class family.

The Granger House Victorian Museum offers weekly tours, frequent programs, and several community outreach opportunities.