Bradbury Science Museum

Bradbury Science Museum Official museum of Los Alamos National Laboratory.
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The Bradbury Science Museum, located in downtown Los Alamos, New Mexico, is your window into the research and history of Los Alamos National Laboratory. More than 40 interactive exhibits trace the history of the WWII Manhattan Project, highlight the Laboratory's current and historic research projects related to defense and technology, and focus on the Laboratory research related to national and international economic, environmental, political, and social concerns. Admission is FREE and open to the public. Photography is allowed. The museum is closed only on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day.

Manhattan Project National Historical Park
06/12/2020

Manhattan Project National Historical Park

Top Secret Technology: Jumbo!

As scientists geared up for the first test of an atomic weapon, questions swirled around the potential success—or failure—of the bomb. Precious materials, like plutonium, could be lost if the test failed. Manhattan Project personnel devised a plan to create a physical containment vessel that could help capture the materials, and Jumbo was born. Designed by the X-2A section of the Los Alamos Lab and manufactured by a company in Ohio, the massive piece of equipment traveled across the country in May of 1945. Weighing in at 214 tons, Jumbo became the heaviest item ever shipped by rail at the time of its transport.

By the time Jumbo arrived in New Mexico, scientists felt more confident about the weapon’s success and thought the vessel would only interfere with data collection. After all of the design, manufacture, and transport hours invested into Jumbo, it endured the Trinity Test suspended from a tower 800 yards away from the explosion. The test destroyed the tower, but Jumbo survived entirely intact. Groves worried that he would catch flak for spending $12 million on a vessel that ultimately served no purpose and ordered it destroyed. Even with eight 500-pound bombs, they only managed to blow the ends off of Jumbo. Today you can still see its remains at the Trinity Site.

#ManhattanProjectNPS #TopSecretTech #STEM

https://www.facebook.com/ManhattanProjectNPS/posts/3274250229338248
06/12/2020

https://www.facebook.com/ManhattanProjectNPS/posts/3274250229338248

Top Secret Technology: The Devil You Know

The Manhattan Project was a major technological and scientific achievement. Manhattan Project scientists and engineers solved deviously complex problems and create intricate devices that had never before been seen. One of the most exactingly designed technologies created for the Manhattan Project were atomic detonators. These detonators were designed to simultaneously trigger numerous explosions around the nuclear core causing the atomic fuel to reach critical mass and start a massive chain reaction. If these devices provided insufficient power or poorly distributed or imperfectly timed explosive force then the bomb would not work. Manhattan Project personnel rigorously tested numerous types and specifications of detonators until they arrived at the proper device. These humorous cartoons from the Los Alamos National Lab demonstrate the process of constructing this once top-secret technology. The entire comic series explaining the detonator construction process and more about detonator history can be found at the following article from Los Alamos National Laboratory: https://www.lanl.gov/discover/publications/national-security-science/2019-fall/devils-in-the-details.php


Image 1 Caption: Thirteen Manhattan Project era detonators likely used to prepare for the trinity test that were recently rediscovered
Image 2 caption: One of the cartoons illustrating atomic detonator production and testing from LANL.

Image 1 and 2 credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory
Hashtags: #ManhattanprojectNPS #Science #Technology #Stem

06/09/2020
Working on the Seismic Seat exhibit at home - with six curious cats.

Bradbury Science Museum educator Mel Strong works at home on a new interactive museum exhibit while his cat co-workers do their best to interfere. Mel gives some tips on how to coexist with your cats while working from home. This is part of the new Nuclear Explosion Monitoring (NEM) exhibit opening at the Bradbury Science Museum.

Bradbury Science Museum educator Mel Strong works at home on a new interactive museum exhibit while his cat co-workers do their best to interfere. Mel gives ...

Bradbury Science Museum Association Night with a NerdYou be the Nerd!"We cannot yet have an in-person NWAN with our plan...
06/09/2020

Bradbury Science Museum Association Night with a Nerd
You be the Nerd!"

We cannot yet have an in-person NWAN with our planned speaker and we're sure that you are all growing weary of listening to lectures via Zoom. So, we decided to do something different this month -- a jeopardy-style game where you have a chance to be a contestant!

The subject is Los Alamos trivia -- the Lab, the town, current and past history, the surrounding area, and more.

Please RSVP by noon on the day of the event and let us know whether you would like to be a contestant or an audience member. (If we have more potential contestants that slots, names will be drawn at random.) You will be sent a Zoom link to join the meeting that afternoon.https://www.bradburyassociation.org/event-3860668

https://www.facebook.com/ManhattanProjectNPS/posts/3238550862908185
05/31/2020

https://www.facebook.com/ManhattanProjectNPS/posts/3238550862908185

Science Sundays

Do you know what makes uranium-235 so special? Uranium only exists in unstable (radioactive) forms. This metal is the heaviest naturally occurring element and, like all elements, has different isotope forms. The number of neutrons in an element’s isotope varies, while the number of protons stays the same. Uranium-235 (U-235) has 92 protons and 143 neutrons, but the number of neutrons isn’t what makes this isotope special. When a freely moving neutron strikes the nucleus of a U-235 atom, it splits and releases energy—and two or three more neutrons. If those neutrons find more U-235 nuclei, those split as well, and the reaction continues.

This type of reaction was instrumental to the Manhattan Project. Do you know what it’s called?

#ManhattanProjectNPS #ScienceSundays #STEM #FindYourPark #FindYourVirtualPark

First Impression Fridays brought to you by the Manhattan Project National Historical Park!Have you ever received an offe...
05/15/2020

First Impression Fridays brought to you by the Manhattan Project National Historical Park!

Have you ever received an offer letter for a new job? Chances are, that offer letter included information about your new position, including what you’d be working on and where your office would be. However, new hires for Project Y in Los Alamos received only a rather cryptic letter like the one pictured here, sent to Nancy Connely in 1945.

Read the entire letter and see other artifacts from the Idenden Collection in the Bradbury’s online collections catalogue at https://lanlmuseum.pastperfectonline.com/

#BSMOnlineCollections #ManhattanProjectNationalHistoricalPark

Today we celebrate the birth of J. Robert Oppenheimer, the theoretical physicist who helped usher in the atomic age. On ...
04/22/2020

Today we celebrate the birth of J. Robert Oppenheimer, the theoretical physicist who helped usher in the atomic age. On what would be his 116th birthday, let’s remember some of his distinctive trademarks!

If you’ve seen a photo of Oppenheimer, you have likely noticed his brown, porkpie hat. A popular style in the 1940s, he wore this whether he was in California, Los Alamos, Washington D.C., or Princeton, New Jersey.

Along with his scientific genius, Oppenheimer’s charm was notorious. In addition to the twinkle in his bright blue eyes and his witty rapport, Oppenheimer was said to always remember a name and never forget a face.

During the Manhattan Project, Oppenheimer hosted parties and informal gatherings at his Los Alamos home on Bathtub Row, where he could often be found making his signature martini. Oppenheimer’s martini recipe was four ounces of gin and a dash of vermouth; the rim of the chilled glass was dipped in honey and lime juice. Pat Sherr, the wife of a Lab physicist, said, “He served the most delicious and coldest martinis.”

Join us in remembering this brilliant scientist whose contributions to the Manhattan Project forever changed the world.

03/16/2020

Beginning Monday, March 16, the Bradbury Science Museum is closed to the public until further notice as the region works to minimize the spread of coronavirus COVID-19.

The closure impacts the Bradbury Science Museum and the Bradbury’s store, Gadgets, run by the Bradbury Science Museum Association. School visits and events at the Museum as well as those run by the museum off-site are postponed.

Given the fluidity and uncertainty of the current crisis, we cannot determine the duration of the closure at this time. We will update this page as we have more information.

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02/03/2020

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01/02/2020

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ThrowBackThursday! Working on your Step Challenge? The 1939 Jack Armstrong hand-wound pedometer NEVER needs to be connec...
03/21/2019

ThrowBackThursday! Working on your Step Challenge? The 1939 Jack Armstrong hand-wound pedometer NEVER needs to be connected to a charger! Los Alamos National Laboratory

Jackhammer Action! Construction begins for our new Bradbury Science Museum Association gift shop #BradburySciMuse.
03/05/2019

Jackhammer Action! Construction begins for our new Bradbury Science Museum Association gift shop #BradburySciMuse.

Stop by this Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 to, first, l http://ow.ly/sQvM30km8t5 earn about the metric system and, later, m...
06/05/2018

Stop by this Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 to, first, l http://ow.ly/sQvM30km8t5 earn about the metric system and, later, magnets! #BradburySciMuse

Address

1350 Central Ave
Los Alamos, NM
87544

Atomic City Transit stops at the Museum. 505.661.7433 (RIDE)

Opening Hours

Monday 13:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 13:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(505) 667-4444

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