Brass Rubbing Medieval Arts Center

Brass Rubbing Medieval Arts Center A program that conjures up knights in armor, grand ladies, and dragons. The Center is an art and educational outreach to schools and the LB community.
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Brass Rubbing Medieval Arts Center, has been renamed to help answer that age-old question, “What is brass rubbing, anyway?” [Answer: making an impression of a church memorial brass on paper with wax], to emphasize the wide variety of art forms that can be produced using the process with both traditional and modern media, and to acknowledge the rich hands-on art/history lessons that can be absorbed along the way.

Mission: The Center, residing in the Great Hall of Cassidy Castle at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Long Beach, providing the atmosphere of a medieval scriptorium to learn and make art, will once again host individuals and groups to create brass rubbing art. One of the largest collections of Monumental Brass facsimiles in North America will soon have additions purchased specifically for the 25th anniversary.

We hope everyone stays safe and healthy during these trying times. Help each other, be cautious but don't panic, and ple...
03/15/2020

We hope everyone stays safe and healthy during these trying times. Help each other, be cautious but don't panic, and please take great care! And THANK GOODNESS we've made such great medical advances since the middle ages! We will get through this together!

Pick a shimmering shade of gold, copper or silver, then slide the color over midnight black paper. Step back and exclaim...
02/19/2020

Pick a shimmering shade of gold, copper or silver, then slide the color over midnight black paper. Step back and exclaim, “I really made that!” Now hang on wall. I did and it was fun!

—Cathy Franklin, Artist

"I absolutely loved your program and looked forward to it every year. Thank you for providing such a wonderful experienc...
02/10/2020

"I absolutely loved your program and looked forward to it every year. Thank you for providing such a wonderful experience for hundreds of children at such a reasonable cost. It was memorable."

Karen McLain, retired history teacher from St. Barnabas School, Long Beach.

Show us pictures of your kitty—wonky, ugly, pretty, cute—we love them all!
01/31/2020
Ugly Medieval Paintings of Cats

Show us pictures of your kitty—wonky, ugly, pretty, cute—we love them all!

It looks like the medieval painters never laid eyes on a cat.

Such a fabulous collection of fierce snails! 🐌 ⚔️ 🛡 Share your guesses as to the symbolism in the comments! We’d love to...
01/21/2020
Medieval Artists Really Loved Painting Battles With Snails... For Some Weird Reason

Such a fabulous collection of fierce snails! 🐌 ⚔️ 🛡 Share your guesses as to the symbolism in the comments! We’d love to hear our followers’ thoughts on this strange phenomenon!

It seems that artists were inexplicably obsessed with snails in those times. Medieval knights were always fighting them in the margins of gothic manuscripts. And we think it is still a mystery why.

We at the Medieval Arts Center want to wish all our followers a happy holiday season! Stay safe and warm and call your g...
12/22/2019

We at the Medieval Arts Center want to wish all our followers a happy holiday season! Stay safe and warm and call your grandmother!

11/02/2019

And one more, because the trio was so great!

11/02/2019

Another song from the other day

10/29/2019

Live music for a busy day at Cassidy Castle!

Did you know: Cassidy Castle was hand painted by one of our volunteers, the wonderful Jill Cassidy (and there she sits o...
10/29/2019

Did you know: Cassidy Castle was hand painted by one of our volunteers, the wonderful Jill Cassidy (and there she sits on the stage, preparing to serenade today’s tea group!).

We’ve had a great couple weeks at Cassidy Castle! We’re open till November 9th, so be sure to stop by and make a great p...
10/27/2019

We’ve had a great couple weeks at Cassidy Castle! We’re open till November 9th, so be sure to stop by and make a great piece as a holiday gift for a loved one (or for yourself!)

We've had a wonderful Saturday here at the Center! Here’s St. Luke’s rector, Rev. Jane Gould, hard at work on a Celtic c...
10/26/2019

We've had a wonderful Saturday here at the Center! Here’s St. Luke’s rector, Rev. Jane Gould, hard at work on a Celtic cross.

Contest time!! The winner will be randomly selected to win a brass rubbing for themselves and one friend at the Medieval...
09/26/2019

Contest time!! The winner will be randomly selected to win a brass rubbing for themselves and one friend at the Medieval Arts Center (materials and instructions included). To enter the contest, like this post and tag a friend in the comments! You'll get one entry per friend tagged, and posting your favorite image from a medieval manuscript will count as one extra entry as well. Must be local and/or able to travel to Long Beach. The lucky winner will be chosen on October 14th. Good luck!

We are still taking reservations for tea! Please contact Gail Mutke at 562-439-9496 to make reservations or to ask any q...
09/25/2019

We are still taking reservations for tea! Please contact Gail Mutke at 562-439-9496 to make reservations or to ask any questions. See info below:

Tea in our Tea Room is available to groups at $16 per child, $26 per adult. Tea price includes docent talk, instruction and all materials. Reservations are required for Tea.

Tea Time:
Three Tea dates are available to the public with no group minimum. Cost is $16 per child, $26 per adult. This includes a docent talk about medieval women, brass rubbing instruction and all materials. Reservations are required for Tea

Saturday, October 19, Saturday October 26 at 11:30am, and Sunday, November 3 at 1:00

Here’s a taste of what’s to come if you join us for one of our teas this October and November! Word is we have the best ...
09/10/2019

Here’s a taste of what’s to come if you join us for one of our teas this October and November! Word is we have the best scones this side of the Atlantic, too 😉

Brass Rubbing Teas

Hi, friends! This is late notice, but we will be in the library at Cal State Fullerton tomorrow morning! Come join us an...
07/27/2019

Hi, friends! This is late notice, but we will be in the library at Cal State Fullerton tomorrow morning! Come join us and make a brass rubbing! Details to come later this evening.

Interesting!
03/23/2019

Interesting!

A diagram of the human brain illustrating the five powers of thought: 'common sense' (more properly 'the imaging sense'), imagination, estimation, cognition, and memory (Cambridge University Library MS Gg.1.1, f. 490v). This image accompanies a short treatise entitled 'Qualiter caput hominis situatur' ('How the human head is structured'), which describes the locations of different thought processes within the brain. The brain's perceptive powers, for example, are connected to the eyes. Access to memory (at the back of the mind) is controlled by the 'vermis' ('worm') which was believed to open and close like a valve allowing new memories to be stored or old ones remembered. The treatise names Aristotle as its primary source, but the idea of cerebral ventricles or cells is derived from the work of Avicenna. This is just one of fifty-five texts contained in this massive early fourteenth-century manuscript, which was made in the West Midlands. Other texts – in Anglo-Norman French, English, and Latin – include the prophecies of Merlin, chronicles of the reigns of Edward I and II, prayers, hymns, proverbs, and an extended Apocalypse cycle.⁣

This is exciting! Imagine what folks back in Medieval times would think of this!
03/07/2019
The Medieval Masterpiece, the Book of Kells, Is Now Digitized & Put Online

This is exciting! Imagine what folks back in Medieval times would think of this!

If you know nothing else about medieval European illuminated manuscripts, you surely know the Book of Kells. “One of Ireland’s greatest cultural treasures” comments Medievalists.net, “it is set apart from other manuscripts of the same period by the quality of its artwork and the sheer number...

800 Illuminated Medieval Manuscripts Are Now Online: Browse & Download Them Courtesy of the British Library and Biblioth...
02/17/2019
800 Illuminated Medieval Manuscripts Are Now Online: Browse & Download Them Courtesy of the British Library and Bibliothèque Nationale de France

800 Illuminated Medieval Manuscripts Are Now Online: Browse & Download Them Courtesy of the British Library and Bibliothèque Nationale de France

Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel The Buried Giant begins with an immersive depiction of what it might have been like to live in a European village during the middle ages. Or what it might feel like for us moderns, at least.

Dark Ages & The Medieval Era
02/02/2019

Dark Ages & The Medieval Era

John Skilitsa was a Byzantine clerk and chronicler from the end of the 11th and the beginning of the 12th century. From 1081 to 1118 A.D. he was a dignitary of the Byzantine Emperor Alexei I Komnin, initially occupying the position of a binar of the cogwheel (assumed to be the head of the palace guard), and then the high honorary post-palace. The main work of Skilitsa "Historical Review" (Synopsis Istorion )Known as "Chronicle of Skilitsa" recreates the history of Byzantium death of Nicephorus I in 811 A.D. to overthrow Mikhail IV in 1057 A.D. There prodal- women "Historical Overview", the exhibition brings to 1079 A.D., hereinafter "Prolonged of Skilitsa."

The Chronicle of Skilitsa has gained popularity not as an independent work but as a part of the Historical Review of the Byzantine historian from the end of the 11th or the beginning of the 12th century Georgiy Kedrin, whose life is hardly known. It is supposed only that he was a monk. Kedrin's "Historical Review" is a compilation of earlier chronographs. It begins from the creation of the world and covers the Jewish, Roman and Byzantine history until the inauguration of the Byzantine throne of Isaac Komnin in 1057 A.D. Cedar follows strictly its predecessors, and in the part of his work, covering the period 811-1057 A.D., reads the chronicle of Skilitsa, bringing in only some add-ons. The extraordinary popularity of Georgiy Kedrin in the Middle Ages was known as "Kedrin-Skilitsa Chronicle".

Picture of a 12th century A.D. illustration showing the Varangian Guard defending a city. The Varangians were an elite corps of the Byzantine army and palace bodyguard from the 11th to 13th centuries A.D. They were first composed of Vikings and then later with Anglo-Saxons. (From the Madrid Skylitzis, National Library of Spain, Madrid) Courtesy of Wikipedia, uploaded by Mark Cartwright, November 9, 2017.

Download your own digital copy here:
https://dl.wdl.org/10625/service/10625.pdf

#DarkAgesandTheMedievalEra #Codex_Skylitzes_Matritensis #Madrid_Skylitzes #Codex_Græcus_Matritensis_Ioannis_Skyllitzes #Synopsis_of_Histories #John_Skilitsa #Varangian_Guard #Byzantine_Empire #Eastern_Roman_Empire

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Here's some wacky medieval art to start off your weekend!
12/01/2018

Here's some wacky medieval art to start off your weekend!

False Prophet
(Revelation 16:13)

Beatus of Liébana, Commentaria in Apocalypsin (the 'Beatus of Saint-Sever'), Saint-Sever before 1072 (BnF, Latin 8878, fol. 184v)

We thought our fellow art lovers would appreciate this!
11/21/2018
Open Culture

We thought our fellow art lovers would appreciate this!

Download 569 Free Art Books from The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Medieval Art
11/20/2018
Medieval Art

Medieval Art

Soon, the full collection will be available - all 800 manuscripts!

Well, that's the 32nd season of Brass Rubbing all wrapped up! A hearty thank you! to all who participated, either as vol...
11/15/2018

Well, that's the 32nd season of Brass Rubbing all wrapped up! A hearty thank you! to all who participated, either as volunteers or as guests. It was good fun and we can't wait to see everyone next year! Oh! And don't forget--we will be at the Bowers Museum the next few weekends. Stop on by!

Julie
11/06/2018

Julie

Brass Rubbing Teas

11/04/2018

We are still taking reservations for Brass Rubbing and our English Tea on Sunday, November 4 at 1:00pm. This is a nice way to entertain friends with something unique. Brass rubbings also make great gifts! For reservations, please contact [email protected]

Thanks a million to Long Beach Press-Telegram for another great feature! There's a week and a half left, folks! There's ...
10/31/2018
Long Beach Press-Telegram

Thanks a million to Long Beach Press-Telegram for another great feature! There's a week and a half left, folks! There's still time to come make a brass rubbing! Make one as a Christmas gift or as a great piece of art to hang on your wall!

Through a combination of history, folklore, and art, the center uses one of the largest collections of monumental brass facsimiles in North America, providing an atmosphere of medieval times where learning and making art flourish.

Here's a rubbing of St. George and the Dragon made yesterday by McKenzie, one of our volunteers!
10/27/2018

Here's a rubbing of St. George and the Dragon made yesterday by McKenzie, one of our volunteers!

Thanks to Long Beach Press-Telegram for the lovely feature!
10/23/2018
Long Beach Press-Telegram

Thanks to Long Beach Press-Telegram for the lovely feature!

St. Luke's Long Beach is once again hosting demonstrations of the 17th century activity.

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525 E 7th St
Long Beach, CA
90813

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Brass Rubbing Medieval Arts Center has been renamed to help answer that age-old question, “What is brass rubbing, anyway?” [Answer: making an impression of a church memorial brass on paper with wax], to emphasize the wide variety of art forms that can be produced using the process with both traditional and modern media, and to acknowledge the rich hands-on art/history lessons that can be absorbed along the way.

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Brass Rubbing Teas
Brass Rubbing & Medieval Arts Center Celebrating Our 32nd Year! October 16 – November 10, 2018 ​​ Each year, mid-October to mid-November, the Brass Rubbing Medieval Arts Center resides in the Great Hall of Cassidy Castle at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Long Beach. The Center provides an atmosphere of medieval times where learning and making art flourish. The program describes the historic background and importance of monumental brasses as well as the colorful people they commemorate. We provide an interesting combination of history, folklore, and art, using one of the largest collections of monumental brass facsimiles in North America. During a visit, you may choose from more than 100 reproduction-engraved plates of brass to do a rubbing. A trained instructor will provide rag paper, metallic waxes, and instructions for you to create your rubbing masterpiece. Hangers are provided for the finished artwork. Picture frame matting is also available at a minimal cost. For Groups: Hands-on workshops are offered for groups of 10 or more, Tuesday-Saturday, 9:00-3:00. The workshop includes a docent talk, instruction for brass rubbing, and all materials. The cost is $8 for each participant. Reservations are required for groups. Tea in our Tea Room is available to groups at $16 per child, $26 per adult. Tea price includes docent talk, instruction and all materials. Reservations are required for Tea. General Public: All materials provided. Price is $8-$15 depending on size of rubbing. Saturdays - 11:00 to 3:00 – no reservations needed Weekdays – by appointment, due to group scheduling – 562-439-9496 Tea Time: Three Tea dates are available to the public with no group minimum. Cost is $16 per child, $26 per adult. This includes a docent talk about medieval women, brass rubbing instruction and all materials. Reservations are required for Tea Saturday, October 20, Saturday October 27 at 11:30am, and Sunday, November 4 at 1:00 Address: St. Luke’s Episcopal Church 525 E. 7th St. (at Atlantic Ave.) Long Beach, CA 90813 Parking: Parking is available in our lot just north of the church on Atlantic Ave. Contact Us: Email: [email protected] – reservations or questions Phone: Gail Mutke – 562-439-9496 – reservations or questions / Church – 562-436-4047
Brass Rubbing & Medieval Arts Center Celebrating Our 32nd Year! October 16 – November 10, 2018 ​ Each year, mid-October to mid-November, the Brass Rubbing Medieval Arts Center resides in the Great Hall of Cassidy Castle at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Long Beach. The Center provides an atmosphere of medieval times where learning and making art flourish. The program describes the historic background and importance of monumental brasses as well as the colorful people they commemorate. We provide an interesting combination of history, folklore, and art, using one of the largest collections of monumental brass facsimiles in North America. During a visit, you may choose from more than 100 reproduction-engraved plates of brass to do a rubbing. A trained instructor will provide rag paper, metallic waxes, and instructions for you to create your rubbing masterpiece. Hangers are provided for the finished artwork. Picture frame matting is also available at a minimal cost. For Groups: Hands-on workshops are offered for groups of 10 or more, Tuesday-Saturday, 9:00-3:00. The workshop includes a docent talk, instruction for brass rubbing, and all materials. The cost is $8 for each participant. Reservations are required for groups. Tea in our Tea Room is available to groups at $16 per child, $26 per adult. Tea price includes docent talk, instruction and all materials. Reservations are required for Tea. General Public: All materials provided. Price is $8-$15 depending on size of rubbing. Saturdays - 11:00 to 3:00 – no reservations needed Weekdays – by appointment, due to group scheduling – 562-439-9496 Tea Time: Three Tea dates are available to the public with no group minimum. Cost is $16 per child, $26 per adult. This includes a docent talk about medieval women, brass rubbing instruction and all materials. Reservations are required for Tea Saturday, October 20, Saturday October 27 at 11:30am, and Sunday, November 4 at 1:00 Address: St. Luke’s Episcopal Church 525 E. 7th St. (at Atlantic Ave.) Long Beach, CA 90813 Parking: Parking is available in our lot just north of the church on Atlantic Ave. Contact Us: Email: [email protected] – reservations or questions Phone: Gail Mutke – 562-439-9496 – reservations or questions / Church – 562-436-4047 Proudly powered by Weebly