Nevada Aerospace Hall of Fame

Nevada Aerospace Hall of Fame Nevada Aerospace Hall of Fame (NVAHOF) honors and preserves the legacy of those who pioneered and advanced our nation's aviation and aerospace programs in Nevada, and offers educational programs through our website, speakers bureau, and archival holdings.
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Nevada Aerospace Hall of Fame (NVAHOF) is a non-profit organization under Section 501 (c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 and received tax exempt status from the U.S. Internal Revenue Service.

Nevada Aerospace Hall of Fame (NVAHOF) is a non-profit organization under Section 501 (c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 and received tax exempt status from the U.S. Internal Revenue Service.

Mission: Nevada Aerospace Hall of Fame’s mission is to educate the public regarding the history of aviation in Nevada and the contribution of Nevada citizens to the development of worldwide aviation, and to preserve the legacy of those men and women who pioneered and advanced our nation’s aerospace programs within the State of Nevada.

Operating as usual

One of the bravest of the brave--Joe Albert Walker He was one of twelve pilots who flew the North American X-15, an expe...
01/12/2021

One of the bravest of the brave--Joe Albert Walker

He was one of twelve pilots who flew the North American X-15, an experimental spaceplane jointly operated by the Air Force and NASA.
Walker was one of those who 'broke the sky' and was a valiant test pilot.
There are many accounts of his fateful death. The general public is not aware of Walker and the many others who sacrificed so much.

Walker was killed on June 8, 1966, when his F-104 Starfighter chase aircraft collided with a North American XB-70 Valkyrie.]

At an altitude of about 25,000 ft, his F-104 drifted into contact with the XB-70's right wingtip. The F-104 flipped over, and, rolling inverted, passed over the top of the XB-70, striking both its vertical stabilizers and its left wing in the process, and exploded. The Valkyrie entered an uncontrollable spin and crashed into the ground north of Barstow, California, killing co-pilot Carl Cross. Its pilot, Alvin White, one of Walker's colleagues from the Man In Space Soonest program, ejected and was the sole survivor.
We honor him and the many others who went to the limit.

Today we think all those who serve in Law Enforcemt National Law Enforcement appreciation day. They deserve or thinks e...
01/09/2021

Today we think all those who serve in Law Enforcemt National Law Enforcement appreciation day. They deserve or thinks every day

This is well worth your time to read this excellent article detailing exploration of the crashed  A-12 spyplane out in t...
01/06/2021
A CIA spyplane crashed outside Area 51 a half-century ago. This explorer found it.

This is well worth your time to read this excellent article detailing exploration
of the crashed A-12 spyplane out in the Nevada desert— 1967.
Thank you for Associate Roadrunner, Jeremy Krans, his colleagues and those before him who have brought to life and honored the many sacrifices those who worked in secret have done to preserve our freedom. 

https://www.popsci.com/story/technology/lost-cia-spyplane-area51/

In January 1967, an A-12, then a secret CIA spyplane, crashed in the Nevada desert outside Area 51. Decades later, one amateur explorer made it his mission to find it.

Wishing you all a wonderful New Year … Looking ahead And for a bright year ahead! 
01/01/2021

Wishing you all a wonderful New Year … Looking ahead And for a bright year ahead! 

Thank you to all those who put themselves on the line…
12/25/2020

Thank you to all those who put themselves on the line…

The Aviator’s Night Before Christmas (2002) AnonymousTwas the night before Christmas, and out on the ramp, Not an airpla...
12/18/2020

The Aviator’s Night Before Christmas (2002) Anonymous

Twas the night before Christmas, and out on the ramp, Not an airplane was stirring, not even a Champ. The aircraft were fastened to tiedowns with care in hopes that come morning, they all would be there.
The fuel trucks were nestled, all snug in their spots, while peak northwest gusts reached 39 knots. I sat near the fuel desk, at last all caught up, and settled down comfortably upon my but.
When over the radio, there arose such a clatter; I turned up the scanner to see what’s the mater. A voice clearly heard over static and snow, asked for clearance to land at the airport below.
He barked out his transmission so lively and quick,
I could have sworn that the call sign he used was “St. Nick”. Away to the window I flew like a flash,
Sure that it was only Horizon’s late Dash.
Then he called his position, and there could be no denial, “This is St. Nicholas One, and I’m now turning final.” When what to my wondering eyes should appear,
A Rutan sleigh, and eight Rotax Reindeer.
Cleared for the ILS, down the glideslope he came, As he pased all fixes, he called them by name: “Now Ringo! Now Tolga! Now Trini and Bacun! On Comet! On Cupid!” What pils was he takin’!?
The last several fixes left the controllers confused. They called down to the office to give me the news. The message they left was both urgent and dour: “When Santa pulls in, could he please call the tower?”
He landed like silk, with the sled runners sparking,
Then I heard “Exit at Charlie,” and “Taxi to parking.”
He slowed to a taxi and exited Three-Two,
As he came down the taxiway the sleigh bells ’jingle grew.

He stepped out of the sleigh, but before he could talk,
I had run out to him with my best set of chocks.
He was dressed all in fur, which was covered with frost And his beard was all blackened from Reindeer exhaust.
His breath smelled like peppermint, gone slightly stale And he puffed on a pipe, but he didn’t inhale.
His cheeks were rosy and jiggled like jelly,
His boots were as black as a crop dusters belly.
He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old fool,
And he kindly informed me that he needed some fuel. A wink of his eye and a twist of his toes,
Led me to know he was desperate to powder his nose.
I spoke not a word, but went straight to my work,
And I filled up the sleigh, but I spilled like a jerk.
He came out of the restroom with a sigh of relief, and then picked up a phone for a flight service brief.
And I thought as he silently scribed in his log,
That with Rudolph, he could land in eighth-mile fog.
He completed his preflight, from the front to the rear, Then he put on his headset, and I heard him yell “Clear!”
And laying a finger on his push-to-talk,
He called up the tower for his clearance and squawk.
“After departure fly heading three two zero,” The tower called forth, “and watch for a Cessna inbound from the North.”
Then I heard him exclaim, as he climbed in the night, “Merry Christmas to all, the traffic’s in sight!”

Because of these two souls and their God-given talents, we have certainly come along way from that day in 1903… December...
12/17/2020

Because of these two souls and their God-given talents, we have certainly come along way from that day in 1903… December 17. We could go on and on about all the accomplishments that have made in Aerospace and Aviation after all these years… Thank you to the Wright Brothers!!

12/17/2020

Cold War Warrior, Dean ENGBERG
Final Flight

Roadrunners Internationale is saddened to inform the aviation community of Dean R. Engberg (Msgt, USAF Ret) taking his final flight.
Engberg arrived from Hamilton AFB to Edwards AFB (Hanger 1810) for assignment to Detachment 9, 4608 Support Squadron (ADC) on June 1, 1965, as a crew chief for testing and evaluating the YF-12A Mach 3 interceptor under Col Vern Henderson's command. There, he worked side by side with maintenance personnel from SAC, AFSC, and Lockheed on both the YF-12 formerly flown at Area 51 and the SR-71.

Engberg served a tour at the Phu Cat Air Base, Vietnam after which he was assigned to the newly activated 4786 Test Squadron (F-12/NASA Test Force) at Edwards AFB to train NASA personnel in the FY-12A. Engberg was the crew chief for Air Force YF-12 Article 0936 that crashed near Boron, California following an engine fire. Former CIA A-12, and then an Air Force YF-12 pilot, Col Jack Layton and his RSO Maj Billy Curtis safely ejected from the YF-12 that on May 1, 1965, had set a speed record of 2,070.101 mph and an altitude record of 80,257.65 feet.

Engberg continued his career at Edwards AFB as flight chief for the T-38 fleet and as Line Chief for the F-15 CTF. He retired from the Air Force in 1976 and continued testing the F-16 CTF at Edwards AFB in the Instrumentation Section.

One of our great American heroes has passed… Please take the time to read this biography of Brigadier General Sullivan....
12/14/2020

One of our great American heroes has passed… Please take the time to read this biography of Brigadier General Sullivan.

From our Executive Director, Thornton Barnes:
My sad duty is to inform the Central Intelligence Agency, US Navy, the US Air Force and friends that today, 14 December 2020 of BGen Dennis B. Sullivan's final flight.

General Sullivan was born in 1927, in Chippewa Falls, Wis., where he graduated from McDonell High School in 1944. In 1946 he entered the US Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., graduating in 1950 with a Bachelor of Science degree and a commission as a second lieutenant in the US Air Force. He received a master's degree in international affairs from The George Washington University, Washington, DC, and is a graduate of the Advanced Management Program for Executives, Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh, the Air Command and Staff College at Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala., and the National War College, Fort Lesley J. McNair, Washington, DC.

Sullivan's initial pilot training began in June 1950 in T-6s at Randolph Air Force Base, Texas, and continued in F-80s at Williams Air Force Base, Ariz., and Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada.

In January 1952, Sullivan joined the 80th Fighter-Bomber Squadron, 8th Fighter-Bomber Wing in South Korea, where he flew 100 combat missions in F-80s.

After completing his tour of duty in South Korea, he transferred to Truax Field, Wisconsin, and flew F-86 Sabrejets and F-102 Delta Daggers with the 126th, 432nd, and 323rd Fighter-Interceptor squadrons.

In October 1957, he moved with the 323rd Fighter-Interceptor Squadron to Harmon Air Force Base, Newfoundland, where he continued flying F-102s until September 1960. Following graduation from the Air Command and Staff College in July 1961, General Sullivan served with the 318th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron at McChord Air Force Base, Wash., flying F-106s.

According to Sullivan's official general officer bio, from June 1963 to August 1968, General Sullivan was a special projects officer at Headquarters US Air Force, Washington, DC. In reality, Sullivan had been sheep-dipped from the US Air Force to the CIA at Area 51 for the Mach 3 A-12 Project Oxcart. Known as Dutch 23, Sullivan first flew the A-12 on 14 April 1963. In 1967, Project OXCART went operational with Sullivan and five other Agency pilots rotating between Area 51 and Kadena, Okinawa, for Operation BLACK SHIELD.

On 19 July 1967, Sullivan flew CIA Mission BX6709 in A-12 Article #131 at Mach 3.17 and 82,000 feet over North Vietnam for 4:58 hours. The imagery quality was excellent.

On 28 October 1967, Sullivan flew CIA Mission BX6732 again in A-12 Article #131 at Mach 3.15 and 83,500 feet over North Vietnam for 3:49 hours. The imagery quality was good.

On 30 October 1967, Sullivan flew CIA Mission BX6734 in A-12 Article 129 at Mach 3.20 and 85,000 feet over North Vietnam for 3:44 hours. The imagery quality was good.

During this 30 October 1967 flight, Sullivan detected radar tracking on his first pass over North Vietnam. Two sites prepared to launch missiles, but neither did. The North Vietnam air defense fireed at least six missiles at Sullivan's plane during the second pass, each confirmed by missile vapor trails on mission photography. Sullivan saw these vapor trails and witnessed three missile detonations. Post-flight inspection of the aircraft revealed that a piece of metal had penetrated the lower right wing fillet area and lodged against the wing tank's support structure. The fragment was not a warhead pellet but may have been a part of the debris from one of the missile detonations observed by the pilot. The pellet is on display in the CIA Museum at Langley, Virginia.

In August 1968, Sullivan rejoined the US Air Force for an assignment to Headquarters Aerospace Defense Command, Ent Air Force Base, Colorado, as chief, Test Branch, Weapons Division. He attended the National War College and concurrently earned his master's degree in international affairs from The George Washington University from August 1969 to August 1970.

General Sullivan served from August 1970 to August 1972 as director of operations and later vice commander of the 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing at Beale Air Force Base, California, the only Air Force unit flying the SR-71 "Blackbird" strategic reconnaissance aircraft. He then moved to Air Training Command as vice commander of Chanute Technical Training Center, Chanute Air Force Base, Ill., where he served for three years.

In July 1975, General Sullivan took command of the only navigator training wing in the Air Force, the 323rd Flying Training Wing at Mather Air Force Base, Calif. From September 1976 to July 1978, he became the deputy chief of staff for operations at Air Training Command headquarters, Randolph Air Force Base. Sullivan received a promotion to brigadier general on 1 February 1977, with a date of rank of 24 January 1977. He was responsible for monitoring and providing staff support to pilot, navigator, and survival training programs at 11 bases and several detachments in this position. He then took command of the 12th Air Division at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas.

In September 1981, Brigadier General Dennis B. Sullivan was a command director in the Cheyenne Mountain Complex for the North American Aerospace Defense Command, headquartered at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo.

General Sullivan is a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots and a command pilot with 7,000 flying experience hours. His military decorations and awards include the Legion of Merit with one oak leaf cluster, Distinguished Flying Cross with oak leaf cluster, Meritorious Service Medal, and Air Medal with two oak leaf clusters.

In 2011, the Wisconsin Aviation Hall of Fame - EAA AirVenture Museum in Oshkosh, Wisconsin inducted General Sullivan into the Wisconsin Aviation Hall of Fame.

The family is not scheduling services at this time due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

See http://roadrunnersinternationale.com/sullivan.html for more about General Sullivan.

Wherever you are--snow, fog, rain or sunshine, we wish you an abundance of peace, health and blessings this season.Stay ...
12/14/2020

Wherever you are--snow, fog, rain or sunshine, we wish you an abundance of peace, health and blessings this season.
Stay safe.

Honoring all those who fought and sacrificed. 🇺🇸🇺🇸
12/07/2020

Honoring all those who fought and sacrificed. 🇺🇸🇺🇸

Nevada Aerospace Hall of Fame's cover photo
11/27/2020

Nevada Aerospace Hall of Fame's cover photo

Happy Thanksgiving dear friends. So much to be thankful for. Be safe wherever you are! 🤎🧡
11/26/2020

Happy Thanksgiving dear friends. So much to be thankful for. Be safe wherever you are! 🤎🧡

What a great tribute!
11/18/2020

What a great tribute!

For those of you who don’t know, there are several active duty USAF U-2 Dragonlady pilots stationed in Las Vegas. We’ve made it a tradition to annually hike to the crash site to pay our respects to the victims of USAF 9068. We will never forget the sacrifices these heroes—and their families—made for the security of our nation. On behalf of the U-2 community, I just want to say thank you all for helping to memorialize those great pioneers! Posted by Jay Raisner 11/17/2020 (65th anniversary of the Nov 17, 1955 crash of USAF 9068 (Douglas C-54 Military Transport Aircraft - headed to Area 51 to work on the U2 reconnaissance aircraft)

11/16/2020
NVAHOF 2020 Induction Presentation

This year, we have posthumously inducted the bold aviatrix, Amelia Earhart into the Nevada Aerospace Hall of Fame. Due to Covid restrictions, we were unable to host a ceremony at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas. Her plaque will be placed at our NVAHOF display in between the B and C concourses shortly. Enjoy this remembrance of her life and accomplishments in the video. Thank you for all your support.

https://youtu.be/Qm6FFPdunI4

2020 virtual enshrinement of Amelia Earhart into the Nevada Aerospace Hall of Fame

Stay tuned for a video honoring our 2020 Enshrinement of Amelia Earhart.
11/16/2020

Stay tuned for a video honoring our 2020 Enshrinement of Amelia Earhart.

Happy Birthday to our the Marine Corp. Thank you for you unwavering service!
11/10/2020

Happy Birthday to our the Marine Corp. Thank you for you unwavering service!

And still going strong today.
10/14/2020
Lockheed U-2A

And still going strong today.

In complete secrecy, a team headed by Clarence L. "Kelly" Johnson at Lockheed's "Skunk Works" in Burbank, Calif., designed and built the U-2 to fly surveillance missions. With sailplane-like wings

We’re all about aviation and aerospace but there’s a lot of that going on in the Navy… We all work together!!  happy bir...
10/14/2020

We’re all about aviation and aerospace but there’s a lot of that going on in the Navy… We all work together!! happy birthday United States Navy!!! ⚓️⚓️⚓️💙💙🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

SALUTE: Today marks the 245th birthday of the U.S. Navy. Thank you to a hardworking branch of America's military that is always ready to answer the call of duty 🇺🇸

Great news about our 2019 enshrinees, Silent Heroes of the War.. a documentary in the works!
10/10/2020

Great news about our 2019 enshrinees,
Silent Heroes of the War
.. a documentary in the works!

On Oct 2, 2020 - Oct 4, 2020 a documentary film crew began filming the story of the 1955 top-secret USAF 9068 plane crash headed to Area 51. The Douglas C-54 military transport aircraft impacted Mount Charleston on November 17, 1955 at 8:19 a.m. Special thanks to documentary Executive Producer Christy Wilcox (Emmy award winning reporter), Director of Photography Peter Khauo, Photographers Eric Brugger, and Gai Phanalasy. It was a beautiful weekend with perfect weather. The aspen were turning a vibrant yellow, orange, and golden brown. We camped on the South Loop Trail at over 10,000 feet elevation.
We arrived to filmed at the USAF 9068 crash site on Oct 4th. As I have done each time I have visited the crash site I read out load the names of the 14 men who lost their lives so many years ago. We look forward to working with Christy and her crew to complete the documentary and tell the story of the men of USAF 9068.

Never forget this day.
09/11/2020

Never forget this day.

Can you imagine what this world would be like if it wasn’t for Orville and Wilbur. Look at all the innovations since the...
08/19/2020

Can you imagine what this world would be like if it wasn’t for Orville and Wilbur. Look at all the innovations since then… So much to be thankful for due to that day at Kitty Hawk in 1903. Happy Aviation day

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On Saturday afternoon in the NVAHOF hospitality suite during the 2019 enshrinement weekend events, noted aviation author Chris Pocock shared a documentary (with the addition of his own in-person commentary) about the U-2 pilots in Taiwan who flew with the 35th Squadron Black Cats. https://www.twff.ca/2019/lostblackcats.html
Very honored to be included in this group as (apparently) the only Agency U-2 Nav-was Aquatone Det. A 5/56 to 12/57 @ Lakenheath, Weisbaden &Geibelstadt. NAHOF class of 2017.
Here is a link to the NRO homepage and the statement issued from their historian, and the links to the records and photographs being released.
New info being released from the NRO regarding the D-21 Tagboard. Although the missions may have been less than successful, the advances in unmanned low observable technology certainly can still be seen today.
A nice new vid by Nellis posted today about recent NVAHOF inductees the 4477th TES Red Eagles. I really hope this is just a snippet of a 6 hour documentary...
Next weekend I will be the unnamed "aviation expert" from the Desert Research Institute mentioned in the attached article from the Boulder City Review. Along with my colleague Susan Edwards, we recently completed the National Historic Landmark nomination package for the B-29 in Lake Mead. There is a phone number at the end of the article to reserve a seat for the program through the park office, but they are going fast. Looking forward to what should be an interesting panel and video presentation. Now, I just have to decide if I should attend wearing my Commemorative Air Force flight suit for the extra jazz factor!
I am sure TD knows the difference!
Video of our May 2017 flight to the Walter L Ray Memorial. Lots of beautiful scenery along the way and photos taken at the memorial site. Includes an exciting pinnacle landing and low altitude cruising on our way back to Las Vegas!