African American Museum of Bucks County

African American Museum of Bucks County The African-American Museum of Bucks County is a mobile museum that honors the legacy of the African American experience.
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Isabel Wilkerson, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Humanities Medal, has become a leading figure in narrati...
01/08/2021

Isabel Wilkerson, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Humanities Medal, has become a leading figure in narrative nonfiction, an interpreter of the human condition, and an impassioned voice for demonstrating how history can help us understand ourselves, our country, and our current era of upheaval.

She is a native of Washington, D.C., and a daughter of the Great Migration, the mass movement that she would go on to write about. She won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing in 1994, as Chicago Bureau Chief of The New York Times, making her the first African-American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize in journalism. She then devoted fifteen years and interviewed more than 1,200 people to tell the story of the six million people, among them her parents, who defected from the Jim Crow South.

Photos from African American Museum of Bucks County's post
01/06/2021

Photos from African American Museum of Bucks County's post

01/05/2021
01/05/2021
01/03/2021
01/03/2021
12/31/2020
Bessie Smith made her first recording in 1923 after signing to Columbia Records. Her first recording, Down-Hearted Blues...
12/31/2020

Bessie Smith made her first recording in 1923 after signing to Columbia Records. Her first recording, Down-Hearted Blues, established her as the most successful black performing artist of her time. The song “Down Hearted Blues” was a big success. With her rich, powerful, and clear voice, she became a successful recording artist and toured extensively for the rest of her life. Smith had a great rapport with her audiences, who turned out in droves to see her. She recorded regularly until 1928.

Did you know?!
12/31/2020

Did you know?!

Mary Church Terrell (September 23, 1863 – July 24, 1954) was one of the first African-American women to earn a college d...
12/28/2020

Mary Church Terrell (September 23, 1863 – July 24, 1954) was one of the first African-American women to earn a college degree, and became known as a national activist for civil rights and suffrage.[1] She taught in the Latin Department at the M Street school (now known as Paul Laurence Dunbar High School)—the first African American public high school in the nation—in Washington, DC. In 1896, she was the first African-American woman in the United States to be appointed to the school board of a major city, serving in the District of Columbia until 1906. Terrell was a charter member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (1909) and the Colored Women's League of Washington (1894). She helped found the National Association of Colored Women (1896) and served as its first national president, and she was a founding member of the National Association of College Women (1910).

Although evidence is scarce, an African-American burial grounds was created by Quaker meetings in the region. Byberry Pr...
12/27/2020

Although evidence is scarce, an African-American burial grounds was created by Quaker meetings in the region. Byberry Preparative Meeting, established a small African-American burial ground in 1780. This burial ground is now part of Benjamin Rush State Park near the border between Northeast Philadelphia and Bensalem Township, only about four and a half miles away from Middletown Meeting. Joseph C. Martindale provides a brief account of this burial ground in his book A History of the Townships of Byberry and Moreland in Philadelphia (1876):

"Previous to this time the colored people who died in the townships were generally buried in the orchards belonging to their masters or in the woods; but forty or fifty had been interred in a kind of cemetery for them, on the lands lately owned by Charles Walmsley. It was located in the field fronting the mansion house, not far from Watson Comly’s line. All traces of it have long since been destroyed, and hundreds have since passed over the spot not knowing that they were treading upon the graves of the long since dead. Another of these graveyards was on the farm lately owned by Mary Hillborn, where several slaves were buried. The exact spot is not now known. Many persons by this time had had their attention drawn to the matter, and efforts were made to secure a proper place for the burial of such people. Accordingly, in this year [1780], we find that Byberry Meeting purchased a lot of Thomas Townsend for a burying place for the blacks, and the practice of burying on private grounds was discontinued. The record says that the first person buried there was “Jim,” a negro belonging to Daniel Walton."

Thank you all for your continued support of the African American Museum of Bucks County
12/25/2020

Thank you all for your continued support of the African American Museum of Bucks County

Thank you all for your continued support of the African American Museum of Bucks County!

Thank you all for your continued support of the African American Museum of Bucks County!
12/23/2020

Thank you all for your continued support of the African American Museum of Bucks County!

African American Museum of Bucks County
12/19/2020

African American Museum of Bucks County

Please purchase your tickets asap for this Sunday, December 20th event...so that a Zoom Link can be sent to you on Friday or Saturday.

We are thrilled to be able to share this powerful 1 hour film with so many. And as an added bonus, the director will be available for questions and comments! Please join us!

Please purchase your tickets asap for this Sunday, December 20th  event...so that a Zoom Link can be sent to you on Frid...
12/17/2020

Please purchase your tickets asap for this Sunday, December 20th event...so that a Zoom Link can be sent to you on Friday or Saturday.

We are thrilled to be able to share this powerful 1 hour film with so many. And as an added bonus, the director will be available for questions and comments! Please join us!

The task facing the AAMBC is to deliver programming during a pandemic that has severely restricted in-person visits and ...
12/03/2020

The task facing the AAMBC is to deliver programming during a pandemic that has severely restricted in-person visits and confined both school and work to the home.

With this in mind, we are thrilled to host this online event. This one hour film tells the stories of several heroic women of the Civil Rights Movement, whose valiant efforts reached from the fields of Mississippi Delta to the floors of the US Congress.

The stories told in Sisters’ are from a specific historic struggles, but are equally relevant today, connecting our past with our present.

Join the AAMBC and Sherry Sadoff Hanck the daughter of the late Joan Sadoff, producer’s of the film. Sherry will introduce the film, and my hope is that everyone attending will find meaning and inspiration from these extraordinary women.

12/02/2020
The "Langhorne, PA" jigsaw puzzles are here! Thanks to all who have already ordered these beautiful, limited edition, 50...
11/28/2020

The "Langhorne, PA" jigsaw puzzles are here! Thanks to all who have already ordered these beautiful, limited edition, 500 piece puzzles. We are beginning our deliveries today, so if you are within reasonable driving distance from Langhorne, check your porch or front door today or tomorrow. Those beyond the Langhorne area will be mailed ASAP. If you haven't ordered your puzzles yet, you can do so by going to www.LanghorneArts.org. There you will find ordering instructions. Or, beginning next week, you can purchase puzzles at Judy's Corner Frame Shop (thank you, Judy Sloan!). Unique gift, contactless shopping, benefits the Langhorne Council for the Arts student scholarship fund -- win, win, win!

11/26/2020

We are thankful for you, for your interest and support of the AAMBC on this day and, always!
Thank You!

11/22/2020
An anthropologist invited the children from an African tribe to play a game.  He placed a basket of fruit near a tree an...
11/21/2020

An anthropologist invited the children from an African tribe to play a game. He placed a basket of fruit near a tree and told the children: "The one of you who reaches the tree first will be rewarded with all the sweet fruits." He signaled to the children to start the race. They joined their hands tightly and ran together, and then they all sat together and enjoyed the delicious fruit.
The astonished anthropologist asked the children why they all ran together, because one of them could enjoy all the fruit by themselves. The children replied: "Obonato". Is it possible for one to be happy if everyone else is sad? "Obonato" in their language means: "I exist because we exist."

Obonato!

11/17/2020
Who is Hazel Scott? Alicia Keys shouts-out a legendary double piano player
11/16/2020
Who is Hazel Scott? Alicia Keys shouts-out a legendary double piano player

Who is Hazel Scott? Alicia Keys shouts-out a legendary double piano player

Those with keen ears might have noticed that during Alicia Keys’ beguiling Grammy Awards performance, which she began sitting side-saddle between two pianos to play Scott Joplin’s “Maple Leaf Rag,” she mentioned Hazel Scott.

11/13/2020
African American Museum of Bucks County

We are excited to share a collection consist of ephemera from 1861 - 1945, covering the Civil War Reconstruction, and Jim Crow eras of Americans-history. exhibit.
History of Yesterday,

A wonderfully informative video by Ben Herman, trained historian, introducing an exhibit that the AAMBC is planning for the future.

We are so grateful to the Olshin family for their generous donation of these artifacts.

11/13/2020

A wonderfully informative video by Ben Herman, trained historian, introducing an exhibit that the AAMBC is planning for the future.

We are so grateful to the Olshin family for their generous donation of these artifacts.

He spoke the truth; his pain was felt across the world. George Floyd died crying out I can’t breathe, but he was not the...
11/08/2020
CNN's Van Jones weeps after Biden's win: 'It's easier to be a parent this morning'

He spoke the truth; his pain was felt across the world. George Floyd died crying out I can’t breathe, but he was not the only one; so many died screaming I can’t breathe.
May the land be heal and restored to normal conditions for us all.♥️💕♥️

TV pundit moved to tears by election result and says: ‘This is vindication for a lot of people who have really suffered’

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215 East Richardson Ave.
Langhorne, PA
19047

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Great to see you at the African American History Day, Mayor’s Park, Langhorne, PA
Hello Linda--Here is my latest post for consideration. Doreen
I have a question, what is the status of the African American Museum of Bucks County? What are the plans for an actual brick and mortar museum? Is there a plan and timeline for when there will be a museum. Thank you.
We'd love to honor you as a co-sponsor!! Let us know! Interested in co-sponsoring this historic day?! Or want to help with organizing? Comment below or email us at: [email protected] Co-Sponsoring means - you add your name to our list, we thank you at the rally, you help signal boost the event by posting info about it in your circles. Thank you! Thank you to the Women to the Front Rally Co-Sponsors: • Rise Up Doylestown • The Peace Center • Arrows for Indians • Bucks County Women’s Advocacy Coalition • YWCA of Bucks County • Planned Parenthood Keystone • Bucks Environmental Action • Welcoming the Stranger • Women for Justice – NorthEast Region • Girls Empowered • Indivisible Bucks County • Bucks United Indivisible • Indivisible Lambertville New Hope • Lower Bucks Indivisible • BuxMont Inclusive and Progressive • Siren Records • Bucks County Does Events • Fridays With(out) Fitzpatrick • Moms Demand Action – Bucks County • Peace Praxis • Hugmobsters Armed with Love • Chalfont-New Britain Democrats • Doylestown Democrats • Natural Health Center • Pangea Builders • Unity Barn • Silverman Family Partnerships • Student Justice League Unlimited • … message us now to get on the list!!
In The Mercer Museum's “Twilight Tales” series, local storytellers and spoken word artists perform in the dramatic atmosphere of the Museum’s Central Court. On Thursday evening, October 5, playwright, songwriter, and storyteller Oni Lasana performs the dialect poetry of African-American writer Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872-1906). Tailored to the setting, and illustrated with materials from the Mercer collection, her entertaining program offers a theatrical portrayal of Dunbar’s poems. Lasana mixes humor, drama and an interactive storytelling style as she imagines and brings to life a character from one of Dunbar’s works. The program is followed by refreshments, an opportunity to meet the performer, and a chance to explore the museum. The performance is appropriate for ages 8 and up. Purchase tickets using the link below or by calling 215-348-9461. PURCHASE TWILIGHT TALES TICKETS HERE: https://www.mercermuseum.org/events/twilight-tales-doin-dunbar-lias-mother/
Christiana, PA: The Christiana Historical Society announces its annual Anniversary Open House on Saturday, September 9, 2017 from 10 AM to 3 PM. Christiana, PA was a major hub in the Underground Railroad and the site of a major stand against slavery. A little-known event, which had a major effect on the country’s view of enslavement, occurred on September 11, 1851 when a slave owner came from Maryland to retrieve what he deemed to be his property. The black community took a stand, they refused his demands and a confrontation ensued which ended with the death of the slave owner. 38 were arrested (35 black and 3 Quaker) and held for trial in Moyamensing Prison in Philadelphia on the charge of treason. A team of lawyers, Led by Congressman Thaddeus Stevens, came to their defense and won. Come to Christiana to meet the descendants of those African Americans and Quakers that were involved in the Underground Railroad as well as those that were arrested and tried. Also joining us will be: the 3rd United States Colored Infantry Re-enactors of which many of the men of Christiana joined during the Civil War; meet Philip Merrill of Nanny Jack & Co. (Philip was a former appraiser on the Antique Roadshow) and see his collection of African American memorabilia that connects with Christiana and African American history in general. The event will be held in the same building in which those arrested were held while waiting to be transported to Philadelphia for trial. Come join us for a day of history and more! The Zercher’s Hotel 11 Green Street Christiana, PA 17509 Contact: Darlene A. Colón, President (and descendant) 717-291-1253 or 717-330-8909
African American Day / Festival Bristol Borough PA - 8/19/17