Barona Cultural Center & Museum

Barona Cultural Center & Museum Dedicated to the preservation and perpetuation of cultural heritage for the Barona Band of Mission Indians. Barona Museum has been on Facebook since March 9, 2009.
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Operating as usual

Sneak peak:  1 more day!😍Thank you, Meacor!😍Our new exhibit opens to the public tomorrow at noon!
06/10/2021

Sneak peak: 1 more day!

😍Thank you, Meacor!😍

Our new exhibit opens to the public tomorrow at noon!

Sneak peak: 1 more day!

😍Thank you, Meacor!😍

Our new exhibit opens to the public tomorrow at noon!

New exhibit:Peyii 'Enyeway 'Esekaayches--We Are Still HereOpens Friday, 6/11!
06/04/2021

New exhibit:

Peyii 'Enyeway 'Esekaayches--
We Are Still Here

Opens Friday, 6/11!

New exhibit:

Peyii 'Enyeway 'Esekaayches--
We Are Still Here

Opens Friday, 6/11!

05/28/2021
While our main gallery is under construction, stop by to see Culture Class projects on display!  1st graders brought in ...
05/22/2021

While our main gallery is under construction, stop by to see Culture Class projects on display! 1st graders brought in their favorite artifacts from home and wrote their own interpretive levels. 2nd graders made pinch pots, decorated them with traditional designs, and wrote their own interpretive labels. 4th graders completed their standard 4th grade mission studies...but with a twist...from the Native perspective! Come look at all their hard work--wonderful final projects from resilient students!

Lots of exhibit prep goin' on by the 8th graders!  Come, learn more of our history in our new exhibit opening June 11th!
05/01/2021

Lots of exhibit prep goin' on by the 8th graders! Come, learn more of our history in our new exhibit opening June 11th!

SNEAK PEAK:  Collections Manager Therese deinstalling "Sports" and making way for the 8th graders' exhibit, "Peyii 'Enye...
04/29/2021

SNEAK PEAK: Collections Manager Therese deinstalling "Sports" and making way for the 8th graders' exhibit, "Peyii 'Enyeway 'Esekaayches--We Are Still Here!" opening June 11th.

SNEAK PEAK: Collections Manager Therese deinstalling "Sports" and making way for the 8th graders' exhibit, "Peyii 'Enyeway 'Esekaayches--We Are Still Here!" opening June 11th.

Come on out tomorrow!  Barona Museum will have a booth set up with goodies from our Store!
04/20/2021

Come on out tomorrow! Barona Museum will have a booth set up with goodies from our Store!

Come on out tomorrow! Barona Museum will have a booth set up with goodies from our Store!

1st graders at Barona Indian Charter School studying artifacts and the stories they tell!
04/14/2021

1st graders at Barona Indian Charter School studying artifacts and the stories they tell!

1st graders at Barona Indian Charter School studying artifacts and the stories they tell!

This week, Thursday through Saturday only, pick up a great book for Spring Break reading!THE SEA OF GRASS, 50% off this ...
03/25/2021

This week, Thursday through Saturday only, pick up a great book for Spring Break reading!

THE SEA OF GRASS, 50% off this week, while supply lasts! $13 each!

"Walter Echo-Hawk's, 'The Sea of Grass' is a powerful evocation of the Native American Plains culture. It is written with notable perception, humility, and imagination. it tells the intricate and arresting story of a unique landscape, a people of profound resilience and pride, and a heritage that is rich and deeply human. It is an American story of American character"--N. Scott Momaday

This week, Thursday through Saturday only, pick up a great book for Spring Break reading!

THE SEA OF GRASS, 50% off this week, while supply lasts! $13 each!

"Walter Echo-Hawk's, 'The Sea of Grass' is a powerful evocation of the Native American Plains culture. It is written with notable perception, humility, and imagination. it tells the intricate and arresting story of a unique landscape, a people of profound resilience and pride, and a heritage that is rich and deeply human. It is an American story of American character"--N. Scott Momaday

This week, Thursday through Saturday only, pick up a great book for Spring Break reading!THE SEA OF GRASS, 50% off this ...
03/25/2021

This week, Thursday through Saturday only, pick up a great book for Spring Break reading!

THE SEA OF GRASS, 50% off this week, while supply lasts! $13 each!

"Walter Echo-Hawk's, 'The Sea of Grass' is a powerful evocation of the Native American Plains culture. It is written with notable perception, humility, and imagination. it tells the intricate and arresting story of a unique landscape, a people of profound resilience and pride, and a heritage that is rich and deeply human. It is an American story of American character"--N. Scott Momaday

This week, Thursday through Saturday only, pick up a great book for Spring Break reading!

THE SEA OF GRASS, 50% off this week, while supply lasts! $13 each!

"Walter Echo-Hawk's, 'The Sea of Grass' is a powerful evocation of the Native American Plains culture. It is written with notable perception, humility, and imagination. it tells the intricate and arresting story of a unique landscape, a people of profound resilience and pride, and a heritage that is rich and deeply human. It is an American story of American character"--N. Scott Momaday

Looooking good!  So excited!  Will the students notice?
03/24/2021

Looooking good! So excited! Will the students notice?

Looooking good! So excited! Will the students notice?

This week, Thursday through Saturday only, pick up a great book for Spring Break reading!THE SEA OF GRASS, 50% off this ...
03/24/2021

This week, Thursday through Saturday only, pick up a great book for Spring Break reading!

THE SEA OF GRASS, 50% off this week, while supply lasts! $13 each! Call to purchase over the phone (619-443-7003 x 219) or visit in person--we're open Thursday and Friday, 12pm to 5 pm, and Saturday 10am to 4pm.

"Walter Echo-Hawk's, 'The Sea of Grass' is a powerful evocation of the Native American Plains culture. It is written with notable perception, humility, and imagination. it tells the intricate and arresting story of a unique landscape, a people of profound resilience and pride, and a heritage that is rich and deeply human. It is an American story of American character"--N. Scott Momaday

This week, Thursday through Saturday only, pick up a great book for Spring Break reading!

THE SEA OF GRASS, 50% off this week, while supply lasts! $13 each! Call to purchase over the phone (619-443-7003 x 219) or visit in person--we're open Thursday and Friday, 12pm to 5 pm, and Saturday 10am to 4pm.

"Walter Echo-Hawk's, 'The Sea of Grass' is a powerful evocation of the Native American Plains culture. It is written with notable perception, humility, and imagination. it tells the intricate and arresting story of a unique landscape, a people of profound resilience and pride, and a heritage that is rich and deeply human. It is an American story of American character"--N. Scott Momaday

Something's happening here!
03/23/2021

Something's happening here!

03/19/2021
First sign of Spring in our Native Plant Garden!
03/19/2021

First sign of Spring in our Native Plant Garden!

First sign of Spring in our Native Plant Garden!

Enjoy a bit of the beautiful outdoors with photography by Mandy Curo de Quintero of Barona!  $30 each.  Each is signed a...
03/18/2021

Enjoy a bit of the beautiful outdoors with photography by Mandy Curo de Quintero of Barona! $30 each. Each is signed and matted: "Buckwheat," "Bedrock Mortars," and "Oak Tree." Purchase today through Saturday and receive a 10% discount, while supply lasts. We're open 12-5pm today and tomorrow, and 10-4 on Saturday. Call to purchase over the phone: 619-443-7003 x 219.

More Dr. Seuss celebration today!  Kindergarten and 4th grade had tons of spirit!
03/03/2021

More Dr. Seuss celebration today! Kindergarten and 4th grade had tons of spirit!

3rd grade had the most spirit!
03/02/2021

3rd grade had the most spirit!

It's Dr. Seuss's birthday at the Joan Phoenix library!
03/02/2021

It's Dr. Seuss's birthday at the Joan Phoenix library!

8th graders made 'awii bookmarks!  🐍
02/10/2021

8th graders made 'awii bookmarks! 🐍

8th graders made 'awii bookmarks! 🐍

02/10/2021

Daniel McCarthy, a Tribute by Travis Armstrong

If Daniel McCarthy had been born a piece of rock art, he would have towered above the other panels looking down at the canyon below. The drawings carved into the boulder would have been mysterious and enigmatic, debated by professional and avocational archaeologists alike, never quite sure of their meaning. But below the etchings deep inside the rock would rest a generous heart revealed time and again by teaching others to be in awe of the ancient past around them.

Daniel left us this month after a quiet and private battle with cancer. Although tired and weak from his fight, Daniel was a commanding and stoic figure even in his final days. From his recliner under a blanket would come a shake of his head, half-smirk or subtle eye-roll that those accustomed to him in the field knew usually meant one had to do better, for yourself and for the resources you had been entrusted with documenting and stewarding.

Daniel went away to Vietnam and returned to find professional purpose and solace in the mountains and deserts of Southern California. He usually would not speak much or at all in the field about the war. But those times would reveal themselves in unexpected ways, such as a story about going back there to search for the remains of lost servicemen. Or in more subtle ways, such as when he would bend down to draw a diagram in the sandy wash or provide maps of that day’s plan of attack that had a degree of military precision.

For many years he and Bill Sapp ran a field school through the San Bernardino National Forest and San Manuel Band of Mission Indians. They trained a generation of archaeologists and tribal cultural resource specialists working in Southern California and beyond.

Stories abound of Daniel disappearing in the field with a bewildered crew of students wondering where he was. He would call down to them from the top of a big hill or canyon cliff. How’d he get up there? “Come up here,” he’d yell down. Inevitably the budding archaeologists would take the shortest path up the steep hillside with tumbles along the way. Asked years later why he did this, his response was, “I wanted to see if they would actually use the topo maps we gave them to find the way up.”

Learning by doing was one of Daniel’s trademarks. There was a good chance a question to him would be answered back with a question to prompt you to think about the landscape around you.

He taught classes and led field trips for regional organizations ranging from the Desert Institute at Joshua Tree to the Malki Museum on the Morongo Reservation. He served as a president of the museum and was on the editorial board of its academic press.

Daniel had managed the cultural resources department for the San Manuel tribe after working at the U.S. Forest Service. He was not a tribal member but earned the trust and respect of tribal communities in Southern California through his work on their behalf and by prioritizing the training of tribal members in archaeological practice.

Daniel is known for this pioneering archaeology and discoveries in the mountains and deserts. It is not a stretch to say that any researcher picking up a site record from the 1970s or 1980s in certain areas would find one first written by him.

He was a role model in marrying academic archaeology and professional cultural resource management archaeology in his work. One of his last volunteer projects was recording sites in the Rodman Mountains, a place where he found comfort and inspiration after coming back from Vietnam.

Yet, lesser-known, Daniel also emphasized research on seasonality and cultural landscapes. He co-authored a book on medicinal plants used by tribal people in Southern California. He and his sister Cadie for years served traditional foods on their menu for the annual gala of the tribal-run Dorothy Ramon Learning Center. He’d gather and juice prickly pear fruit every year for drinks at the gala’s dinner.

He’d lead the gathering of agave plants every spring with tribal and non-tribal people to continue the traditional harvest, and then roast the agaves on the reservation for a museum fundraiser. But if you’d look at some of the plants around you during the harvest in the Santa Rosa Mountains, you might catch the glimpse of little numbers marked on some of them. He had been keeping track of their growth patterns for years because wild agaves had been understudied he said.

Going out with Daniel in the field, he might say, “Oh there’s a pinyon pine that I don’t have mapped.” Another project. How many more did he have?

With Daniel’s passing many people have lost a friend, mentor and teacher. But the loss of the lifetime of knowledge he possessed also is incalculable. It is up to those he touched to carry on that legacy of learning and passing it on.

Travis Armstrong, an enrolled member of the Leech Lake Reservation Band of Ojibwe, is a CAL FIRE archaeologist and former Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Morongo Band of Mission Indians. Daniel McCarthy hired him as his field assistant for a Serrano rock art recording project near Joshua Tree.

We have so much fun in the Joan Phoenix Library!  Any guesses as to what we are making?
02/09/2021

We have so much fun in the Joan Phoenix Library! Any guesses as to what we are making?

We have so much fun in the Joan Phoenix Library! Any guesses as to what we are making?

Our post-holiday clearance sale ends Saturday, Feb 6th at 4pm!  Come see us and grab up these bargains--50% off!
02/04/2021

Our post-holiday clearance sale ends Saturday, Feb 6th at 4pm! Come see us and grab up these bargains--50% off!

Our post-holiday clearance sale ends Saturday, Feb 6th at 4pm! Come see us and grab up these bargains--50% off!

The Joan Phoenix Library has a sleepy patron today.  Milyaapan.
02/03/2021

The Joan Phoenix Library has a sleepy patron today. Milyaapan.

The Joan Phoenix Library has a sleepy patron today. Milyaapan.

February 2, 1848.  Do you know what happened on this day?The Treaty of Peace, Friendship, Limits and Settlement between ...
02/02/2021
Home | Barona Cultural Center & Museum | California

February 2, 1848.
Do you know what happened on this day?

The Treaty of Peace, Friendship, Limits and Settlement between the United States of America and the Mexican Republic was signed at Guadalupe Hidalgo, a city to which the Mexican government fled with the advance of US forces, now known as the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. The signed Treaty ended the war between the United States and Mexico with Mexico ceding about 55% of its territory, including all or parts of ten states, including southern California.

The southern border of California was determined to be a straight line from the junction of the Colorado and Gila Rivers westward to the Pacific Ocean, so that it passes one Spanish league south of the southernmost portion of San Diego Bay. This was done to ensure that the US received San Diego and its natural harbor.

Prior to this, Mexico had claimed these areas after winning its independence from the Spanish Empire in 1821, following the Mexican War of Independence. The land of Alta California was divided among wealthy Mexican land grantees and the success of their ranchos relied upon Native labor. With the secularization of the Missions in 1834, the Native People were living wherever they could and were employed on the ranchos working for food and cloth. Rarely did they receive money for their work.

When the Treaty was ratified, Mexicans living in the ceded territories had the choice of relocating to within Mexico’s new boundaries or receiving American citizenship with full civil rights. (Native Americans were not granted citizenship until 1924!) No consideration was given to the Native People in Alta California at that time, whose original territory had been claimed by Spain, divided up by Mexico, and now bisected by this new line on a map, splitting families, and reducing access to resources.

This was just the beginning of this difficult history with the new border. Native People struggled at the hands of newcomers. It wasn’t until the 1870s that some groups of Native People in southern California were granted federal recognition and reservations were established, and those that were not, often moved south of the border, being chased out by American settlers.
Delfina Cuero (Kumeyaay) who was born in Jamacha around 1900 and was not included in a reservation enrollment, recounts in her autobiography about having to move around often and eventually having to cross the border:

"My father and mother left Mission Valley, they told me, when a lot of Chinese and Americans came into the Valley and told them that they had to leave. They did not own the land that their families and ancestors had always lived upon. They moved
east…. They lived around wherever there was work or wild food to be gathered…. We just lived out away from the ranch houses in the brush of some small canyon. The Indians had to move around from place to place to hunt and gather enough food, so we knew lots of places to camp. Later on, white people kept moving into more and more of the places and we couldn’t camp around those places any more. We went farther and farther from San Diego looking for places where nobody chased us away. My grandparents crossed the line first. In those days we didn’t know it was a line, only that nobody chased us from there [the south]….Later we went down there, my mother, father, and I."

Delfina, born in San Diego before Native Americans were granted citizenship and pushed to the south, only told her story in the hopes that she would be able to return to the US permanently and legally. Learn more about her life and times in her book, Delfina Cuero, available for purchase in the Barona Museum Store.

Sadly, Delfina’s is not an isolated case and today, ramifications of this Peace Treaty’s border between nations affect the Native population, some 170 years later. Any recent review of local news will show the border wall erected on sacred sites. Families still split. Cultural customs and traditions interrupted. Resources are inaccessible. Land taken.

February 2, 1848. Now you know.

Learn more at Barona Cultural Center & Museum, www.baronamuseum.org
We’re open Thursdays and Fridays, 12pm-5pm and Saturdays 10am-4pm.

Barona Cultural Center & Museum is San Diego County’s first museum on an Indian reservation dedicated to the perpetuation and presentation of the local Kumeyaay-Diegueño Native American culture.

Address

1095 Barona Rd
Lakeside, CA
92040

Opening Hours

Tuesday 12:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 12:00 - 17:00
Thursday 12:00 - 17:00
Friday 12:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00

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As San Diego County’s first museum on a Native American reservation dedicated to the perpetuation and presentation of the local Kumeyaay-Diegueño culture, the Barona Museum offers a unique educational journey for visitors of all ages.

The Museum’s collection represents thousands of years of history—some objects dating as far back as 10,000 years—and it demonstrates the artistry and skill of the hemisphere’s first inhabitants.

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Comments

Christopher Columbus Blues. Since 1492, 500+ Year's of the Blues ! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zabyw5VL6lU
Why does the Barona Cultural Center & Museum help the National Park Service promote its Cabrillo myths? Cabrillo was responsible for the r**e and murder of thousands of Native people in Central America. How can you participate in these "celebrations"? https://www.facebook.com/CabrilloNPS/photos/a.130037470341909/3607599735918981
Had a lovely and interesting time doing the native food tasting, visiting the museum and seeing the student planted native garden. Well done, Willie, and thank you to Barona who I previously have only associated with a casino that I would not visit. This type of cultural education for the community is very important and special and has the ability to touch many. I look forward to attending more events here!
Dear friends, We need everybody's help right now here in the back country where politicians and corporate interests are threatening to destroy a huge chunk of pristine and sacred Kumeyaay land that counts over 13,000 species. This may be the biggest battle we have to lead in Lakeside and East County to preserve our quality of life. A sand mining company wants to dig up to the aquifer on over 400 acres of land in the El Monte Valley, sacred Kumeyaay land and home to hundreds of residents. The underground water basin is the third largest in the whole county, in a state plagued by drought. Why sacrifice our water for corporate interests again? Also, the sand is known to contain a fatal fungus known as the Valley Fever that already made countless victims. No one could stop the sand from not spreading during excavations and from affecting everybody in the county during the Santa Ana conditions. Your lives and your children's lives are at stake here. Add to it the destruction of a pristine environment, maybe the last equestrian trail system in the county, home to countless endangered and protected species. Add to it over 250 trucks on 2-lane road, the only exit out of the valley for hundreds of residents and animals in case of fire. There's going to be a public meeting on September 25 at 5:30pm at the Lakeside Community Center and the deadline to speak up about the recent published subsequent Environmental Impact Report is fast approaching in October. Like and share this page with everybody you know, ask everybody to like and share, so you'd stay up to date with the latest info on this project. Watch for upcoming info on how to submit your opinions with the county, which I will post asap. Say NO to sand mining in the El Monte Valley! Thank you. https://www.facebook.com/SaveElMonteValleyAdminAnaNita/
Part of the Kumeyaay history is the making of acorn coffee and shawii. I very interested in trying these. Are they available at Barona?
Thursday, November 30th, 2017 ● 5pm to 7pm Native American Heritage Month Celebrate with Native People in Philanthropy! http://nativephilanthropy.org/ (612) 724-8798 ● [email protected] The California Endowment Community Partners 1000 Alameda St, 2nd floor, Suite C Los Angeles, CA 90012 http://www.calendow.org/ Native Americans in Philanthropy invites you to join us for a special networking reception to celebrate Native American Heritage Month. There will be refreshments and performances by L.A. Native artists. This is a great networking opportunity for nonprofits, foundations, and other organizations serving Native youth, as well as to learn more about the visionary work to support Native youth through Generation Indigenous 2.0. You will also have the opportunity to meet Native Americans in Philanthropy’s new Program Director, Gina Jackson. The event will be held in Native Americans in Philanthropy’s new Los Angeles office location at The California Endowment building in the Community Partners space on the 2nd floor, Suite C. The California Endowment Community Partners 1000 Alameda St, 2nd floor, Suite C Los Angeles, CA 90012 http://www.calendow.org/ Please register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeVID9H8s7FzBW5fyHLqJLtC-cHh96lWza9V07uqdP_yMWIAw/viewform