Ulster County Historical Society

Ulster County Historical Society Ulster County Historical Society is an organization ...

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Museum Monday!This week we would like to let you in on a little-known part of our collection.  Did you know we have the ...
11/15/2021

Museum Monday!

This week we would like to let you in on a little-known part of our collection. Did you know we have the largest collection of Civil War memorabilia in Ulster County? Included in this collection are rifles, cannon balls, dented canteens, belt buckles, cartridge pouches, even a pair of shackles. This collection was given to the museum in 1965 by Will Plank who divided his collection between the Ulster County Historical Society and West Point.

The featured picture for today is of two pairs of epaulets. These were worn on the shoulders and were found at the Seven Pines battlefield. The fancier version was worn with dress uniforms.

Museum Monday!

This week we would like to let you in on a little-known part of our collection. Did you know we have the largest collection of Civil War memorabilia in Ulster County? Included in this collection are rifles, cannon balls, dented canteens, belt buckles, cartridge pouches, even a pair of shackles. This collection was given to the museum in 1965 by Will Plank who divided his collection between the Ulster County Historical Society and West Point.

The featured picture for today is of two pairs of epaulets. These were worn on the shoulders and were found at the Seven Pines battlefield. The fancier version was worn with dress uniforms.

It's Throw Back Thursday! Shave horses were benches wood workers used to make shingles and barrel staves. You sit on it ...
11/04/2021

It's Throw Back Thursday! Shave horses were benches wood workers used to make shingles and barrel staves. You sit on it and the bench has a simple vice to hold the piece of wood that is being worked. Most are simple planks with four removable legs, usually made by the craftsperson. The one pictured here in the foreground of our historic tool room is unique- the maker used a "knee" limb from a tree to replace 2 of the legs, creating a bench that is a piece of sculpture as well as a tool!
(image descriptor- folk art shave horse in foreground with agricultural tools in the background.)

It's Throw Back Thursday! Shave horses were benches wood workers used to make shingles and barrel staves. You sit on it and the bench has a simple vice to hold the piece of wood that is being worked. Most are simple planks with four removable legs, usually made by the craftsperson. The one pictured here in the foreground of our historic tool room is unique- the maker used a "knee" limb from a tree to replace 2 of the legs, creating a bench that is a piece of sculpture as well as a tool!
(image descriptor- folk art shave horse in foreground with agricultural tools in the background.)

Museum Tuesday!Ah, I'm sure all our followers can identify these items.  One a rather simple box with a hole in it, chil...
11/02/2021

Museum Tuesday!

Ah, I'm sure all our followers can identify these items. One a rather simple box with a hole in it, child sized. The other a rather elegant spindle back chair, with beautiful painting on the back and an elegant wooden skirt covering up the space where a chamber pot would be placed. Think of what it must have been like to use these objects. On the one hand, how convenient to have your commode wherever you want it--close by or in another room. On the other hand, think of what was involved in emptying it each morning. Consider the ancient houses many of us live in--where would you carry it to empty the contents. It is the objects like these that we showcase in the Museum, the objects of everyday life, both simple and elaborate, that help connect us to our modern lives and those of the earlier residents of the area.

Museum Monday!INLAID TABLE AND CHAIRThe image shows two 19th century laquered objects made out of paper-mache and with m...
10/18/2021

Museum Monday!

INLAID TABLE AND CHAIR

The image shows two 19th century laquered objects made out of paper-mache and with mother of pearl decoration--a flip top table (this one without a seat-see our posting on October 4) and a chair. The top tilts up so that it can be tucked away against a wall when not in use.

The image shows two 19th century lacquered objects made out of paper-mache and with mother of pearl decoration--a flip-top table (this one without a seat-see our posting on October 4) and a chair. The top tilts up so that it can be tucked away against a wall when not in use. shapers that are easier to create with paper than with wood. And the mother of pearl could be sliced very thinly and applied with glue and varnish to appear as if inlaid. Weight-bearing parts of these objects, such as the base of the table and legs of the chair, are made out of wood and decorated to match.

Papier-mache is paper pulp and/or paper strips mixed with glue to create a moldable, highly durable material. Machinery for molding and pressing furniture parts made out of papier-mache was developed in the 19th century. Most papier-mache furniture was imported from England. This furniture could be decorated to look like more expensive pieces and was often painted black to resemble ebony.

Museum Monday!

INLAID TABLE AND CHAIR

The image shows two 19th century laquered objects made out of paper-mache and with mother of pearl decoration--a flip top table (this one without a seat-see our posting on October 4) and a chair. The top tilts up so that it can be tucked away against a wall when not in use.

The image shows two 19th century lacquered objects made out of paper-mache and with mother of pearl decoration--a flip-top table (this one without a seat-see our posting on October 4) and a chair. The top tilts up so that it can be tucked away against a wall when not in use. shapers that are easier to create with paper than with wood. And the mother of pearl could be sliced very thinly and applied with glue and varnish to appear as if inlaid. Weight-bearing parts of these objects, such as the base of the table and legs of the chair, are made out of wood and decorated to match.

Papier-mache is paper pulp and/or paper strips mixed with glue to create a moldable, highly durable material. Machinery for molding and pressing furniture parts made out of papier-mache was developed in the 19th century. Most papier-mache furniture was imported from England. This furniture could be decorated to look like more expensive pieces and was often painted black to resemble ebony.

Fabulous workshop-coil baskets with pine needles- today. Watch for future listings of our 2022 workshops and lectures. T...
10/17/2021

Fabulous workshop-coil baskets with pine needles- today. Watch for future listings of our 2022 workshops and lectures. Thank you Katie Grove for patient instruction.

Museum Monday!We would like to do something different this year and invite you to help us with our research! This week’s...
09/20/2021

Museum Monday!

We would like to do something different this year and invite you to help us with our research! This week’s image is a chair in search of more information! We know it is a 19th century Shaker ladder back chair. But look at the legs! It has springs for rocking. What an interesting concept. The back legs are static, while you can rock yourself by means of the front legs. Anyone have more information about this unique object? Perhaps you would like to examine it in person? Come to the museum and visit us!

Museum Monday!

We would like to do something different this year and invite you to help us with our research! This week’s image is a chair in search of more information! We know it is a 19th century Shaker ladder back chair. But look at the legs! It has springs for rocking. What an interesting concept. The back legs are static, while you can rock yourself by means of the front legs. Anyone have more information about this unique object? Perhaps you would like to examine it in person? Come to the museum and visit us!

Curious about how wool goes from the sheep to a shawl?  Come watch the process (except for shearing!) at the museum toda...
09/18/2021

Curious about how wool goes from the sheep to a shawl? Come watch the process (except for shearing!) at the museum today and tomorrow as the Elmendorf Hand Spinners Guild demonstrate carding, spinning, and weaving.

Curious about how wool goes from the sheep to a shawl? Come watch the process (except for shearing!) at the museum today and tomorrow as the Elmendorf Hand Spinners Guild demonstrate carding, spinning, and weaving.

Curious how yarn is created?  Watch the Elmendorf Hand Spinners Guild card yarn, spin, and weave. Today and tomorrow at ...
09/18/2021

Curious how yarn is created? Watch the Elmendorf Hand Spinners Guild card yarn, spin, and weave. Today and tomorrow at the museum

Curious how yarn is created? Watch the Elmendorf Hand Spinners Guild card yarn, spin, and weave. Today and tomorrow at the museum

Antique appraisal day from 10-2.  Come early to avoid the rush. Bring your jewels, objects, furniture and paintings (pic...
09/12/2021

Antique appraisal day from 10-2. Come early to avoid the rush. Bring your jewels, objects, furniture and paintings (pictures work). It’s a gorgeous day to get appraised!!

Antique appraisal day from 10-2. Come early to avoid the rush. Bring your jewels, objects, furniture and paintings (pictures work). It’s a gorgeous day to get appraised!!

Throw-back Thursday!Spinning wheels were ubiquitous in Ulster County homes through the 19th century. Men raised the flax...
09/09/2021

Throw-back Thursday!
Spinning wheels were ubiquitous in Ulster County homes through the 19th century. Men raised the flax for linen and the sheep for wool, but women spun the fiber to make cloth and made everyone's clothes, so just about everyone had to have a spinning wheel. The Ulster County Historical Society has a great collection of vernacular textile implements currently featured in our museum. Perhaps you have something you want appraised- come to our appraisal day this Sunday and experts will tell you what you have and what it is worth!
(Image descriptor- a wooden spinning wheel on display.)

Throw-back Thursday!
Spinning wheels were ubiquitous in Ulster County homes through the 19th century. Men raised the flax for linen and the sheep for wool, but women spun the fiber to make cloth and made everyone's clothes, so just about everyone had to have a spinning wheel. The Ulster County Historical Society has a great collection of vernacular textile implements currently featured in our museum. Perhaps you have something you want appraised- come to our appraisal day this Sunday and experts will tell you what you have and what it is worth!
(Image descriptor- a wooden spinning wheel on display.)

Museum Monday!POTTERY TO STORE FOOD AND DRINK The abundant clay in Ulster County gave rise to a local pottery industry. ...
09/06/2021

Museum Monday!

POTTERY TO STORE FOOD AND DRINK

The abundant clay in Ulster County gave rise to a local pottery industry. The cabinet to the right of the fireplace houses two types of traditional pottery: stoneware and slipware.

Merchants used the high-fired, extremely durable stoneware to store preserved food stuffs such as sauerkraut and pickles (popular German and Dutch offerings), as well as salted meats and fish. Beer and ciders were sold or dispensed from stoneware bottles and jugs.

The cupboards also display pewter and copper wares, along with a selection of glassware and liquor bottles. There is also an interesting collection of slipware, glazed earthenware decorated with red and yellow slip (liquid clay) decoration. Slipware was popular during the early colonial period and sometimes was made to commemorate landmark events, such as a birth or marriage. Notice the names and lettering on some of these plates.

Curious what the labels say? Visit the Museum on Saturday or Sunday to see these incredible items in person!

Museum Monday!

POTTERY TO STORE FOOD AND DRINK

The abundant clay in Ulster County gave rise to a local pottery industry. The cabinet to the right of the fireplace houses two types of traditional pottery: stoneware and slipware.

Merchants used the high-fired, extremely durable stoneware to store preserved food stuffs such as sauerkraut and pickles (popular German and Dutch offerings), as well as salted meats and fish. Beer and ciders were sold or dispensed from stoneware bottles and jugs.

The cupboards also display pewter and copper wares, along with a selection of glassware and liquor bottles. There is also an interesting collection of slipware, glazed earthenware decorated with red and yellow slip (liquid clay) decoration. Slipware was popular during the early colonial period and sometimes was made to commemorate landmark events, such as a birth or marriage. Notice the names and lettering on some of these plates.

Curious what the labels say? Visit the Museum on Saturday or Sunday to see these incredible items in person!

Eager to know how much Grandma’s quilt is worth? Wondering if that wavy mirror in the hall really has any value, or if M...
09/04/2021

Eager to know how much Grandma’s quilt is worth? Wondering if that wavy mirror in the hall really has any value, or if Mom’s locket is truly special?

Now, you can find out! Join us for some serious fun at the Ulster County Historical Society’s Antiques Appraisal Day on Sunday, September 12 with Sanford Levy of Jenkinstown Antiques, Charlie Kavanagh of Schneider’s Jewelers, Jean Papin, and Bill Merchant, four local specialists, who will examine paintings, vintage tools, furniture, decorative objects, jewelry, and ephemera for you and offer a fair estimate of their current value. Larger items are welcome but may also be shown in photographs.

The cost per item is $10, or 3 items for $25, with a limit of 3 items per person, unless availability permits otherwise.

We look forward to seeing you at The Bevier House with all of your treasures!

Eager to know how much Grandma’s quilt is worth? Wondering if that wavy mirror in the hall really has any value, or if Mom’s locket is truly special?

Now, you can find out! Join us for some serious fun at the Ulster County Historical Society’s Antiques Appraisal Day on Sunday, September 12 with Sanford Levy of Jenkinstown Antiques, Charlie Kavanagh of Schneider’s Jewelers, Jean Papin, and Bill Merchant, four local specialists, who will examine paintings, vintage tools, furniture, decorative objects, jewelry, and ephemera for you and offer a fair estimate of their current value. Larger items are welcome but may also be shown in photographs.

The cost per item is $10, or 3 items for $25, with a limit of 3 items per person, unless availability permits otherwise.

We look forward to seeing you at The Bevier House with all of your treasures!

Throw back Thursday! Before the invention of the Franklin stove, fireplaces were the only way people had to heat their h...
08/26/2021

Throw back Thursday! Before the invention of the Franklin stove, fireplaces were the only way people had to heat their houses and cook their food. The Ulster County Historical Society's museum is located in an historic home with parts that date to the 1680's! This fireplace, located in the oldest section of the house, is full of various historic items used to prepare meals in a fireplace. Come by and get a look- we are open weekends through October. (image descriptor- an early fireplace full of period cooking elements with pewter ware on the mantel and a flintlock hanging over it.)

Throw back Thursday! Before the invention of the Franklin stove, fireplaces were the only way people had to heat their houses and cook their food. The Ulster County Historical Society's museum is located in an historic home with parts that date to the 1680's! This fireplace, located in the oldest section of the house, is full of various historic items used to prepare meals in a fireplace. Come by and get a look- we are open weekends through October. (image descriptor- an early fireplace full of period cooking elements with pewter ware on the mantel and a flintlock hanging over it.)

Museum Monday!The most prominent of the Society’s early furniture pieces is the large cabinet with overhanging cornice t...
08/16/2021

Museum Monday!

The most prominent of the Society’s early furniture pieces is the large cabinet with overhanging cornice that is displayed in the first-floor hallway. It is a rare example of a German-American Schrank, meant to hold precious household textiles and clothing. It dates back to between 1715 and 1740. It is a variation of the more common Dutch-style kas. But unlike the Dutch kas, the Schrank’s interior provides space for heavier outdoor garments, which are hung on pegs.

This Schrank is a domestic tradition brought to New York by German immigrants who came from the Palentine Region along the Rhine River, or Die Platz. This is the same region as the Huguenots who settled nearby New Paltz. The Palentines settled among the Dutch in the Hudson Valley in the first decades of the 18th century.

Like the Dutch-style kas, the Schrank can be disassembled for easy transportation. The separate pieces are all held in place by the ball-footed base and heavy cornice.

Museum Monday!

The most prominent of the Society’s early furniture pieces is the large cabinet with overhanging cornice that is displayed in the first-floor hallway. It is a rare example of a German-American Schrank, meant to hold precious household textiles and clothing. It dates back to between 1715 and 1740. It is a variation of the more common Dutch-style kas. But unlike the Dutch kas, the Schrank’s interior provides space for heavier outdoor garments, which are hung on pegs.

This Schrank is a domestic tradition brought to New York by German immigrants who came from the Palentine Region along the Rhine River, or Die Platz. This is the same region as the Huguenots who settled nearby New Paltz. The Palentines settled among the Dutch in the Hudson Valley in the first decades of the 18th century.

Like the Dutch-style kas, the Schrank can be disassembled for easy transportation. The separate pieces are all held in place by the ball-footed base and heavy cornice.

Address

2682 State Route 209
Kingston, NY
12401

Opening Hours

Saturday 11am - 4pm
Sunday 11am - 4pm

Telephone

(845) 377-1040

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The Mohonk Mountain House Hotel Complete 1932 Brochure, also known as Lake Mohonk Mountain House, is an American resort hotel located on the Shawangunk Ridge in Ulster County, New York. Its location in the town of New Paltz, New York, is just beyond the southern border of the Catskill Mountains, west of the Hudson River.
I’ve recovered a group of 24 photographs belonging to the EDWARDS, SHERMAN, BRANDOW, HINMAN, CORNWELL, DOYLE, and WALCOTT Families including: 1 – Helen Leone EDWARDS, 1890’s or early 1900’s, age 9 years old, identified as daughter of William EDWARDS and Julia SHERMAN 2 – Verenah Irene EDWARDS, 1890’s or early 1900’s, age 16 years old, identified as daughter of William A. EDWARDS and Julia SHERMAN 3 – LeRoy Sherman EDWARDS, taken at Wynn Studio in Brooklyn, NY, 1890’s or early 1900’s, in his 20’s, son of William A. EDWARDS and Julia A. SHERMAN 4 – Verenah Irene EDWARDS, 1890’s or early 1900’s, age 16 years old with two unidentified males 5 – Helen Leone EDWARDS, 1890’s or early 1900’s, about 8 years, daughter of William A. EDWARDS and Julia SHERMAN 6 – LeRoy Sherman EDWARDS and Vernah Irene EDWARDS, taken at W. Whitbeck Studio in Hudson, NY, 1880’s or 1890’s, about 5-12 years, children of William A. EDWARDS and Julia A. SHERMAN 7 – LeRoy Sherman EDWARDS, 1890’s or 1900’s, in his teens or 20’s, son of William EDWARDS and Julia SHERMAN 8 – Vernah Irene EDWARDS and LeRoy Sherman EDWARDS, taken at V. Whitbeck Studio in Hudson, NY, 1880’s or 1890’s, about 5 – 12 years, children or William A. EDWARDS and Julia A. SHERMAN 9 – LeRoy Sherman EDWARDS, taken at Chas C. Wells Studio in Coxsackie, NY, 1890’s, in his teens, son of William A. EDWARDS and Julia A. SHERMAN 10 – LeRoy Sherman EDWARDS, taken at McDonnald & Sterry Studio in Albany, NY, 1880’s, about 4 years, son of William & Jul 11 – EDWARDS Family Photograph taken at Grandma and Grandpa EDWARDS Farm for 50th Wedding Anniversary1890’s or early 1900’s, incl. Uncle Roy; Nanna; Her Father; Her Mother (My Great Grandparents); Aunt Helen on Great-Great Grandfather’s lap; and his wife. 12 – Vernah I. EDWARDS, taken at Prattsville, NY at age 17, 1900’s 13 – LeRoy Sherman EDWARDS, 1890’s or 1900’s, in his 20’s, son of William A. EDWARDS and Julia SHERMAN 14 – Mary Louisa SHERMAN BRANDOW, taken at Jorgensen’s Studio in Kingston, NY, 1890’s, in her 40’s or 50’s, #93 Henry St. Kingston, NY, sister of Julia Ann SHERMAN EDWARDS 15 – Walter SHERMAN, taken at Teush Studio in Saugerties, NY, 1880’s, in his 20’s, identified as “Uncle” 16 – Frank Walter SHERMAN Jr., taken at Harrington Studio in Logansport, IN, dated 8 Mar 1903, son of Frank Walter SHERMAN Sr. 17 – Benjamin F. SHERMAN, 1900’s, son of Benjamin SHERMAN and Mary Louisa HINMAN, identified as “Uncle Ben” and “Dad’s Brother” 18 – Harriet CORNWELL EDWARDS, 1870’s, in her 30’s, wife of George EDWARDS and Mother of William A. EDWARDS and sister of Elizabeth CORNWELL VAN NATTAN, identified as “Great Grandmother” 19 – Mr. CORNWELL, 1860’s or 1870’s, in his 50’s or 60’s, Father of Harriet CORNWELL EDWARDS and “Great Grandfather CORNWELL” 20 – Mrs. CORNWELL, 1860’s or 1870’s, in her 50’s or 60’s, Mother of Harriet CORNWELL EDWARDS and “Great Grandmother” 21 – Edith May DOYLE, 1890’s or early 1900’s, age 10 years old, daughter of Arthur DOYLE and Mabel BRANDOW 22 – Arthur DOYLE, taken at F. D. Lewis Studio in Kingston, NY, 1900’s, in his 20’s or 30’s, husband of Mabel BRANDOW DOYLE 23 – Mrs. BRANDOW and Edith May DOYLE, Grandma is 80 years and Edith age 16 months, taken 1880’s or 1890’s, Mother of Edwin D. BRANDOW and Great Granddaughter 24 – Ward WALCOTT, 1890’s or 1900’s, in his 50’s or 60’s, second husband of Mary Louisa SHERMAN BRANDOW WALCOTT I’m hoping to return all the photographs to family and would appreciate you contacting me if you are a member of one of these families, or if you know someone who might be. Thanks, Shelley
Our friends Ulster County Historical Society and History Alliance of Kingston member have an article in the Kingston Wire! It’s free to read!
What a monumental day! We are honored to announce that Harambee Kingston NY received title to the Pine Street African Burial Ground, and has forever protected the sacred site through a conservation easement granted to the Kingston Land Trust! Thank you to Harambee, Scenic Hudson, The old Dutch Church, and all the organizations and community members that came together to make this possible and helped bring history to light. Check out the full press release: https://kingstonlandtrust.org/news/burial-ground-transfer-announcement Land Trust Alliance Open Space Institute Hudson Highlands Land Trust Kingston YMCA Farm Project Growing Films KaN Landscape Design City of Kingston Friends of Historic Kingston Ulster County Historical Society Historic Huguenot Street Northeast Farmers of Color Land Trust Soul Fire Farm SUNY New Paltz
What can you tell me about "Dolsontown?" Is it named after Asa Dolson, my great, great great grandfather Dr. John T. Jansen's father-in-law?
Anyone recognize this sketch of a mural possibly in Kingston, NY area? I discovered this tucked in a book I purchased from the Harry H. Honhorst collection.
On another page was this photograph, saying the photographer was from Rondout, NY, and dated 12/31/1896. Any idea where this is?
I am our family genealogist and I have an original newspaper from Ulster County, New York dated Jan. 4, 1800 announcing the death of General George Washington. Due to the folds it is intact in 4 separate parts of the page. It has been stored in an old Archer family bible all these years. Does anyone know what it would be worth? What would you do with it?
To register, E-mail [email protected] with the subject heading "Missing Chapter" to receive the link to this event.
If anyone here is interested in tracking the movements of Early American glassblowers (and other glassworkers), take a look at my project spreadsheet at https://sites.google.com/site/robinson1857/home/daniel-robinson If you would like to contribute any information, please contact me. The more glass workers we can identify and confirm, the easier it will be to zone in on the communities of glass workers that lived near/on company grounds (Sand Lake, Woodstock, Guilderland, Utica, Redford, etc.)
So, I'm selfishly wondering what measures, if any historical societies are using to remain active and useful during this pandemic. I have several document requests floating out there, paid for, and hope they don't get lost and eventually get answered. I'm fortunate to have a small garden plot in a local community garden nearby, not controlled by the town, where we are still able to garden by careful, thoughtful procedures that limit the number of people in the garden at a time, wearing masks and gloves, at scheduled times. I would like to offer this as an example of how to continue operations.
Hello, does anyone know what this structure is in the woods off East Strand Street in the Rondout?