Kent Historical Society Museum

Kent Historical Society Museum The Kent Historical Society & Museum is dedicated to preserving and documenting our history through the collection of artifacts, documents and oral histories of the people of Kent, Ohio.
Telephone: 330-678-2712 HOURS: KHS is open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays March thru December. Special appointments for research and group tours also can be made. Admission to the Museum is always free. Please email or phone with any questions you may have.
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Today wraps up a national week of Teacher Appreciation, and we want to echo the many voices of appreciation for the pers...
05/09/2020

Today wraps up a national week of Teacher Appreciation, and we want to echo the many voices of appreciation for the perseverance, ingenuity and compassion of Kent teachers (from K-12 and beyond) during an unexpectedly swift change of course due to the coronavirus. Your flexibity, creativity and stamina in altering the “how” of your teaching merits a Very Loud THANK YOU!
The Kent public of 1920 also recognized the advantage of sufficient and qualified teachers. The Kent Normal College hosted a conference in April to promote good practices and identify needs in education, especially personnel. Posted here are clips from a Kent Tribune report of April 22, 1920 that extend our echo of appreciation and support for a full century of teachers.

Kent local proprietors advertised their gift selections for Mother on Her Day in Kent in 1920 (May 9). Using brief ads i...
05/09/2020

Kent local proprietors advertised their gift selections for Mother on Her Day in Kent in 1920 (May 9). Using brief ads in the Kent Tribune, Byron Bailey & Co. (flowers), Harger's (chocolates), Hale B. Thompson's and Trory's drug stores (cards and chocolates) competed for the very sales that Anna Jarvis, creator of a day set aside to honor all mothers, had begun to condemn. Jarvis decried such “commercialism,” preferring handwritten expressions of love and gratitude. For interesting reading about Anna Jarvis (and her own mother Ann Jarvis), visit https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/archive/mothers-day/.

May 12, 1920..the day the circus came to Kent: rain, mud, elephants, parade--and adamant editors! [Kent Tribune 1920-05-...
05/08/2020

May 12, 1920..the day the circus came to Kent: rain, mud, elephants, parade--and adamant editors! [Kent Tribune 1920-05-06, 13]

City of Kent
05/06/2020

City of Kent

As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of the May 4th events today, we have partnered with Each + Every, the Kent Historical Society Museum, and the Kent State University Wick Poetry Center and Mapping May 4th project, to bring banners installed in select locations in Kent that highlight the events and oral histories of individuals that lived through the days of May 1 to May 4, 1970.

During COVID-19, please adhere to social distancing guidelines and wear face coverings if in close proximity to others.

Jen Mapes, KSU Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and Sara Koopman, KSU Assistant Professor in the Schoo...
05/04/2020

Jen Mapes, KSU Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and Sara Koopman, KSU Assistant Professor in the School of Peace and Conflict Studies, have completed the interactive Mapping May 4, 1970 project. It will be displayed at the KHS Museum when we (hopefully) reopen on June 5. You can read more about the project at https://mappingmay4.kent.edu/about.

Kent's need for a new high school in 1920 found the necessary community support in the April bonds vote. Note the intend...
05/02/2020

Kent's need for a new high school in 1920 found the necessary community support in the April bonds vote. Note the intended location. Our KHS Historian, Roger Di Paolo, explained that further discussion about the site caused the school board to abandon that plan. Instead, in 1922, the newly organized City of Kent built a fire station/City Hall. That building, designed by Charles Kistler and heavily remodeled in the early 1970s, still stands. It most recently housed the police department and City Hall. More about the alternate choice will come later to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the final decision.

Kent Historical Society Museum's cover photo
05/02/2020

Kent Historical Society Museum's cover photo

While we wait for the 2020 results of the Ohio spring primaries and local issues, we can read in the April 29, 1920 edit...
05/01/2020

While we wait for the 2020 results of the Ohio spring primaries and local issues, we can read in the April 29, 1920 edition of the Kent Tribune about the outcome of Kent and Portage County spring voting. Results published feature some historically familiar names and record Kent's willingness to support the growth of their school district. Here are the political reports; more on the school bonds/building to follow in another post.

Keds' “Champion”  sneaker style arrived in stores in 1916. Although the  U.S. Rubber Company developed the technology fo...
05/01/2020

Keds' “Champion” sneaker style arrived in stores in 1916. Although the U.S. Rubber Company developed the technology for men's sneakers around 1892, the company only later began to offer this inventive design of the practical (and noiseless) rubber soles and canvas tops to women. Kent retailers knew to stock Keds for everyone, as shown here in Kent Tribune ads from 1918 to 1920. In addition, from 1910-1920s Keds published a series of “Hand-books for Girls” which “encouraged young women to get out and exert their independence—a revolutionary move in a time when society was telling women to sit pretty and ask for permission.” [This screenshot, quote and the modernized version of the handbook can be seen at www.keds.com/en/made-for-women/.]
Do you have a family photo of women wearing Keds in the 1920s (or any decade) that you can share? Upload into the comment section here or send a scan to [email protected].

How many of us can recall an historic moment (lived or learned, general or specific) from 1965? Some 1920 Kentites would...
04/30/2020

How many of us can recall an historic moment (lived or learned, general or specific) from 1965? Some 1920 Kentites would surely remember the 1865 explosion of the steamboat Sultana involving both Confederate and Union soldiers. The 1920-04-29 Kent Tribune printed a short brief on page 1 to note the 55th anniversary of this maritime disaster in which some area soldiers barely escaped. In 2015, on the 150th anniversary of the sinking, an Arkansas town created a memorial to commemorate all lives lost, those saved and the rescuers. [See “The Shipwreck That Led Confederate Veterans To Risk All For Union Lives” by Jon Hamilton from his April 27, 2015 NPR Morning Edition report—audio or print, online. Engraving of the Sultana from Library of Congress/NPR]

If you have the time, we have the history: How to browse KHS ORAL HISTORIES at https://ohiomemory.org/digital/collection...
04/25/2020

If you have the time, we have the history: How to browse KHS ORAL HISTORIES at https://ohiomemory.org/digital/collection/p16007coll83. By clicking on the Browse button, we arrived at the records list and noticed an interview with a Leonardo Amodo, born in 1906. A click on that link took us to the recording page [shown in 2 screenshots here]. Amodo and his wife Mary covered a wide range of topics during their 58 minute interview in 1989, as noted in the Subject list. As a browser, we could look through this list to see if the Amodos mention a historical topic of interest to us. If so, we would listen to the interview. EASY! ENJOY!

Today, you may recognize the Royal brand as pudding mixes, but in 1920 Royal's baking powder could also be found in Kent...
04/24/2020

Today, you may recognize the Royal brand as pudding mixes, but in 1920 Royal's baking powder could also be found in Kent grocery stores. A little online scavenger hunt prompted by this ad [screenshot] from the 1920-04-22 Kent Tribune discovered a website that displays a 1922 Royal Cook Book [2 screenshots], most likely similar to that offered in this 1920 ad. Our history is shared not just in major developments or events, but also in the small things that both sustain and connect generations. Today, as major history is being “made” with shelter-at-home restrictions, a resurgence of baking as a coping skill also is making quieter history. Simple baking soda, no matter the brand, likely makes the bread and cookies rise, and perhaps spirits, too.

Bored? Need a diversion? We have posted a new cover screenshot  from the Kent Historical Society & Museum website [https...
04/23/2020

Bored? Need a diversion? We have posted a new cover screenshot from the Kent Historical Society & Museum website [https://www.kentohiohistory.org/] to entice you to explore the variety of interesting reading in the Collections section. We suggest, especially, that you listen to the Oral History Collection: “To date, the Kent Oral History Project — started in the early 1980s by the Kent Historical Society as part of its mission to preserve the town’s history — consists of more than 200 recorded interviews with local residents discussing their personal experiences and perspectives on life in Kent, Ohio.” Real people—real experiences. As a bonus, if listening sparks a memory or 3 of your own, please let us know. For now, you can write us an email or call 330-678-2712 and leave a message. When we can resume personal recordings of your Kent histories, we will make arrangements with you.

Welcome to a beautiful day in Kent to make your own small piece of history! Today marks the 50th Earth Day celebration—s...
04/22/2020

Welcome to a beautiful day in Kent to make your own small piece of history! Today marks the 50th Earth Day celebration—so celebrate! Bike, walk, run along the river or on any of the re-purposed historic railroad lines (see Portage County Hike and Bike Trail map online). Walk in your neighborhood and admire the historic houses. Wear plastic gloves and carry a plastic grocery bag to pick up litter. Take your phone/camera and document Mother Nature’s work in 2020 Kent. Maintain your social distance and b r e a t h e! ENJOY the day!

Kent Historical Society Museum's cover photo
04/18/2020

Kent Historical Society Museum's cover photo

We appreciate all of our Friends--and those of you who have happened to drop by. For more Kent views from lots of angles...
04/18/2020

We appreciate all of our Friends--and those of you who have happened to drop by. For more Kent views from lots of angles, please give our page a "LIKE"👍. Thanks for stopping by! This picture is a postcard, titled "Aerial View of Business District, Kent, Ohio." Which direction are we looking--and what landmarks do you recognize? Leave a comment and give us a 👍! Enjoy today's sunshine!🌞

We missed a page in the 1920-04-15 Kent Tribune: here's the official ad for the Mae Murray movie. Faster! Faster!  Bonus...
04/17/2020

We missed a page in the 1920-04-15 Kent Tribune: here's the official ad for the Mae Murray movie. Faster! Faster! Bonus: what do you know about Kent's "Great White Way"?

A small report on page 1 of the 1920-04-15 Kent Tribune sent us off to the web to find out more about the “pretty stage ...
04/17/2020

A small report on page 1 of the 1920-04-15 Kent Tribune sent us off to the web to find out more about the “pretty stage and screen player,” Mae Murray, coming on screen to the Kent Opera House the following week. A 2011 online interview with author Michael Ankerich provided his brief description of Mae Murray, based on his research for his book, “Mae Murray: The Girl with the Bee-Stung Lips.” Reading this interview excerpt gives 21st Kentites an inside peek at a national star who twinkled briefly over the Kent Opera House. Unfortunately, no Kent response of the local reception of Murray's screen performance appeared in following editions, but weekly ads continued to offer fine entertainment in the Opera House.
[Murray photo and interview screenshot from https://immortalephemera.com/9029/interview-with-michael-ankerich-dangerous-curves-atop-hollywood-heels/ and circa 1915 and 1927 Opera House photos from KHS files.]

Slow news week in 1920-04-08 Kent Tribune, but, as always, ads reflected life in that year: Brunswick Tires – in 75th ye...
04/09/2020

Slow news week in 1920-04-08 Kent Tribune, but, as always, ads reflected life in that year:
Brunswick Tires – in 75th year of quality operation.
Studebaker—do you have a memory of one in your lifetime?
Spring Cleaning??? We've got you covered!

While this post isn't exactly about Kent history, we imagine that almost every business and household has used, or is us...
04/06/2020

While this post isn't exactly about Kent history, we imagine that almost every business and household has used, or is using, this marvel of ingenuity. [from home page of https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org ]

See first album of today's posts for details.
04/03/2020

See first album of today's posts for details.

See first album of today's posts for details.

See first album of today's posts for details.
04/03/2020

See first album of today's posts for details.

See first album of today's posts for details.

Carlile & Bachtel: “Lou Carlile has sold a half interest in his plumbing, heating and lighting business to R.L. Bachtel....
04/03/2020

Carlile & Bachtel: “Lou Carlile has sold a half interest in his plumbing, heating and lighting business to R.L. Bachtel. Their rooms on North Water [s]treet are being remodeled and redecorated and they will be able to serve you with the best in their line” [Kent Tribune, 1919-02-27]. This small announcement hailed the beginning of a series of “Fix & Fit” advertisements for the new partnership. As we look at these weekly ads, think about the skill of the copy writer (anonymous) and the illustrator (initials only) to create 37 snappy bits of advertising. So pen caps off to these unknown humorists!

Carlile & Bachtel: “Lou Carlile has sold a half interest in his plumbing, heating and lighting business to R.L. Bachtel. Their rooms on North Water [s]treet are being remodeled and redecorated and they will be able to serve you with the best in their line” [Kent Tribune, 1919-02-27]. This small announcement hailed the beginning of a series of “Fix & Fit” advertisements for the new partnership. As we look at these weekly ads, think about the skill of the copy writer (anonymous) and the illustrator (initials only) to create 37 snappy bits of advertising. So pen caps off to these unknown humorists!

In honor of this SPRING day that brought us both warmer temperatures AND sunshine in Kent, have a little fun looking at ...
03/20/2020

In honor of this SPRING day that brought us both warmer temperatures AND sunshine in Kent, have a little fun looking at the Kent Tribune advertisements for spring fashions. These ads give us a peak at style trends and indicate the change from the 1918 war economy (home-made) to 1920 (ready-wear). Kent local proprietors provided clothing, fabric and notion, hats and shoes for women, men and children.
Screenshots are labeled with KT issue dates (from 1918 to 1920).

In honor of this SPRING day that brought us both warmer temperatures AND sunshine in Kent, have a little fun looking at the Kent Tribune advertisements for spring fashions. These ads give us a peak at style trends and indicate the change from the 1918 war economy (home-made) to 1920 (ready-wear). Kent local proprietors provided clothing, fabric and notion, hats and shoes for women, men and children.
Screenshots are labeled with KT issue dates (from 1918 to 1920).

We can remember learning to "crack" gum with Wrigley's Doublemint, being allowed to chew more on while traveling on vaca...
03/19/2020

We can remember learning to "crack" gum with Wrigley's Doublemint, being allowed to chew more on while traveling on vacations, and jingles! How about you?

Speaker phone??? Phffftt...what do we know??? Open the posted screenshots from Kent Tribune, March 18, 1920, and BE AMAZ...
03/19/2020

Speaker phone??? Phffftt...what do we know??? Open the posted screenshots from Kent Tribune, March 18, 1920, and BE AMAZED!

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT: Due to current health concerns, the KHS Museum will be closed until Friday, April 3rd. We will u...
03/13/2020

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT: Due to current health concerns, the KHS Museum will be closed until Friday, April 3rd. We will update as needed. Thank you for your cooperation and support.

Today we salute the hard-working women of the 1920s with this 1920-03-04 Kent Tribune ad for an electric washer-wringer ...
03/07/2020

Today we salute the hard-working women of the 1920s with this 1920-03-04 Kent Tribune ad for an electric washer-wringer combination. Our “women's history” posts will be looking at the women who—besides the men—helped to grow Franklin Mills/Kent into a city.

March:  Women's History Month and basketball “Madness.”  To begin a series of related posts on both subjects, we'll send...
03/06/2020

March: Women's History Month and basketball “Madness.” To begin a series of related posts on both subjects, we'll send up a jump ball between two Kent women's teams (reports from the Kent Tribune, 1922-03-02, p.1 Mason team; 1929-05-23, p.1 high school senior girls).

Kent Historical Society Museum's cover photo
03/06/2020

Kent Historical Society Museum's cover photo

IT'S OPENING DAY AT THE KHS MUSEUM TOMORROW, FRIDAY,  MARCH 6! We will resume our regular hours tomorrow: Fridays and Sa...
03/06/2020

IT'S OPENING DAY AT THE KHS MUSEUM TOMORROW, FRIDAY, MARCH 6!
We will resume our regular hours tomorrow: Fridays and Saturdays, 9am-2pm; other days by appointment—call 330-678-2712 or email [email protected]. We've been rearranging and updating several of the permanent exhibits, as well as making room for our up-coming interactive exhibit for the 50th May 4th, 1970 commemoration (more on that later). Come and visit us—renew your acquaintance or enjoy a first look at the archival objects throughout the historic Clapp-Woodward house at 237 E. Main St., Kent, Ohio. See you soon!

What do you know that we don't know? This screenshot describes another radio-Kent connection found in the Kent Tribune (...
02/29/2020

What do you know that we don't know? This screenshot describes another radio-Kent connection found in the Kent Tribune (1925-02-12). Such fun nuggets of information we can find in the KT archives! Try it!

Do you know these musicians? On the evening of February 4, 1920, Kent musicians entertained a national audience with a m...
02/29/2020

Do you know these musicians? On the evening of February 4, 1920, Kent musicians entertained a national audience with a musical program on Cleveland's own radio station WTAM. According to reports in several issues of the Kent Tribune, the musicians were widely admired for their excellent musical performances that evening, as well as in years of musical presentations in local celebrations, meetings, churches and Memorial Day honors. Fortunately, several letters to the editor from former residents of Kent described their listening pleasures: from North Wilkisboro, NC, Ettie Gould Albro's listening left her “simply delighted;” from Long Island, NY, Charles C. Green wrote of his “some thrill...to listen to the voices of old friends of mine coming through this magic box;” and from Blencoe, IA, (Rev.) M.P. Jones not only enjoyed the music, but wrote that “I have found no place superior to [Kent] in musical talent” (he listened on a Radiola Super hetrodyne radio).
Much more history and personal details can be found in these articles: use KHS Kent Tribune archive to look up the reports from 1920-01-29, 1920-02-05 and 1920-02-12 (use this date format).
Kent Tribune, 1925-02-05, p.1 photo supplied to the newspaper by the “Radio Section of the Plain Dealer.”

On this Presidents' Day, let's take a look at the man who was recognized as the “president from Portage” by Loris Troyer...
02/17/2020

On this Presidents' Day, let's take a look at the man who was recognized as the “president from Portage” by Loris Troyer in his book, “Portage Pathways” [p. 217].
James Abram Garfield, born November 19, 1831, lived most of his life centered around the town of Hiram, Ohio. He attended school there at the Western Reserve Eclectic Institute (later Hiram College), becoming a teacher there in 1856 and in 1857, the principal. He also became lay minister in the Disciple of Christ church and preached at least once in the DOC church in Franklin Mills [later, Kent]. He married Lucretia Randolph on November 11, 1858. He also began to study law, passing the Ohio bar in 1860. His unexpected political career began in 1859.
According to the account by Karl H. Grismer (“History of Kent”), “On August 23, 1859, an event occurred in Franklin Mills...[when] a Republican convention was held in the Town Hall for the purpose of nominating a state senator. David Ladd Rockwell, of the village, was one of the candidates and he had several strong opponents. A deadlock developed and, in order to break it, a man who heretofore had never held political office was finally nominated. He was James A. Garfield, of Hiram […]. After receiving the nomination, Garfield was elected, and he went steadily up the political ladder until finally he was elected as the twentieth president of the United States.”
Garfield's steady climb up the political ladder actually paused when he entered military service during the Civil War, first as a colonel, then a brigadier general from 1861-1863. He resigned his commission and returned to his political career in the House of Representatives for nine terms from until March 3, 1881 [Ohio Civil War Central website]. He continued his representation of the Ohio 19th district until his election to the Presidency in 1880.
While Garfield had not sought the Republican Party nomination, he once again found himself being chosen as the compromise candidate (after 35 stalemated ballots). He served as the 20th U.S. President from March 4, 1881 until September 19, 1881 when he died of infections after being shot twice by the assassin Charles Guiteau.
Pictures were gathered from various websites: https://art-now-and-then.blogspot.com/2015/11/james-garfield-portraits; https://ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=399; https///www.senate.gov/artandhistory/art/inauguration/inauguration; http///www.firstladies.org/biographies/; html; https://www.pbs.org/newshour/health/dirty-painful-death-president-james-garfield.

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237 E. Main St.
Kent, OH
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Comments

Question: if the original Central School was razed in 1955, but the second Roosevelt HS was not built until 1959, then where did the 7th and 8th graders attend school in the late ‘50s? Thanks 🙂
Just read an 1880 history of Portage County. Your ancestor Col. Garrett was mentioned several times. My ancestors were mentioned too but not as "kindly" :-)
Hoping to see a lot of our Kent community today. Park at the courthouse and come on in for delicious food and memorable artifacts. We're open every Friday and Saturday from 9-2 or by appointment for groups and family reunions.
The Portage County Historical Society and Museum Open House The Portage County Historical Society and Museum will host its annual Open House from 1 to 4 pm. December 15. PCHS Historian Wayne Enders will do a presentation of “Christmases Past” Guests begin their tour at the Lowrie-Beatty Museum, where everyone will see artifacts from the Portage County area. New this year will be the Trexler Rubber Company display. From there, guests will visit the 1834 Carter House. The next stop will be the 1869 Strickland House. Both houses are decorated for the holiday season. The Carter House and the Strickland House are historic homes and, as a result, are not handicapped accessible. Attendees will want to visit the Indian Village that is being built by Robert Kunst. A full-size round house, cooking area with underground fire pit, and a weaving rack are all in different stages of being built. Weather permitting. Raffle tickets will be available $1 each or six for $5. Items to be raffled off include various Portage County history books and collectibles, plus a free one year membership. Membership will also be available. The event is open free to the public, although donations are appreciated. Light refreshments will be available. The Historical Society is located at 6549 North Chestnut Street, in Ravenna, next to Ravenna High School. For more information call 330-296-3523, PCHS website www.http://history.portage.oh.us or visit us on facebook at Portage County Ohio Historical Society.
I don't know if it's appropriate to post to this site, but I thought I would pass it along to you in case your members would be interested ... Free Silver Lake Park history presentation Weds., Oct. 10, 2018 at 7 p.m. at Cuyahoga Falls Library Many of you may know the name Daisy Lodge Wolcott, as the former Kent resident who created the lovely and historic Lilac Gardens. But did you know that prior to that, Daisy and her siblings ran one of NE Ohio's most successful Victorian-era amusement parks - Silver Lake Park? If you’d like to know more about that park, you are cordially invited to attend the Oct. 10 meeting of the Cuyahoga Falls Historical Society at 7 p.m. at the Cuyahoga Falls Library, 2015 Third St., where I will give a slide presentation on the history of Silver Lake Park. The meeting is free and open to the public. As many of you know I have been researching Silver Lake Park for years, including meeting with descendants of the park's founding family. Following the presentation, I will be selling copies of my Silver Lake Park book, part of Arcadia Publishing’s Images of America series. Hope to see you there! – Mary McClure
We have a new website.
This thermometer is from Bissler's Furniture/Funeral Home. I am guessing from the vehicle that it dates to the 1920's? It can't be seen in the photo, but there is a phone number of three digits (I think) at the top. Anyone know when that would have been?
Wonderful Gabrielle was kind enough to make a rubbing of Nellie's gravestone for me. First, she and a French caretaker washed the stone. Then they went to work! The staff at the American cemetery is fabulous. Since I frequented the Kent Free Library as a child (and was the children's librarian in the early 80s) Nellie's name has been part of my life since childhood. I was very happy to make the trek to Surenses and complete the circle!
This is a video I took last July at Surenses, where Nellie Dingley is buried. I am standing at the top of the cemetery, with Nellie's grave below. What a marvelous view of Paris. (Note the Eiffel Tower) One can use the Metro to get from Paris proper to the suburb of Surenses; but it is not a direct ride. One must make a couple transfers, but not bad at all. Once at the Surenses station stop, it is a short uphill walk to the American Cemetery. Anyone wishing detailed (Metro) directions, I'll be happy to repond to inquiries.
Hello those of you who are interested in Kent Historical Society Museum. My name is Helen Davey, and I'm one of two living granddaughters of John Davey. My father Jim Davey was almost 30 years older than my mother, and that's why my sister Jeanne and I are still alive! My mother, brother Jim, Jeanne, my grandmother, and I lived in Kent for one year in 1956. My brother and sister went to Roosevelt High, and I went to Central School (7th grade). How I loved that town and my relatives and the friends I made! It broke my heart when we moved back to North Carolina after a year. Nancy Snyder Watters, you referred to "Mrs. Davey," and I think (although my mother was also classy and beautiful) that you might be referring to my cousin Brub Davey's wife Betty. She was tall and looked like a model. I'm a psychoanalyst, psychotherapist, and writer in Los Angeles. I'm in the process of writing a book about my family, and have been doing this for many years. If you have an interest in learning more about John Davey, you can go to my blog posts on The Huffington Post, listed under "The Most Famous Man You Never Heard Of." My book will contain much more information but the blogs marked the beginning of my writing about him. Just type in www. HuffingtonPost/ Helen Davey and the archived material will be there. My sister and I visited Kent two years ago, and we were able to go into our grandfather's home courtesy of the lovely owners. We were enchanted, because we hadn't been there for many years. I felt that I could almost "hear" the voices of the family. I never met my grandfather because he died in 1923, but my father talked about him so much that I felt like I grew up with him and knew him well. I always felt he was my muse. The next time I visit Kent, I'll be sure to visit the Kent Historical Society Museum!