The Black Archives of Mid-America, Inc. - Kansas City

The Black Archives of Mid-America, Inc. - Kansas City The Black Archives of Mid-America serves to collect and preserve the history of African Americans in the Midwest. The Black Archives is a non-profit organization that serves the community by offering itself as an educational resource as well as a repository of every facet in African American culture in this region.

The collection includes a vast sampling of the local African-American community’s history: thousands of photos, sports memorabilia, taped interviews, documents on slavery and desegregation, and the papers of famous choreographer and activist Alvin Ailey, as well as Kansas City Call founder Chester Arthur Franklin. It’s a collection of unique value to the community. The Black Archives of Mid Americ

The collection includes a vast sampling of the local African-American community’s history: thousands of photos, sports memorabilia, taped interviews, documents on slavery and desegregation, and the papers of famous choreographer and activist Alvin Ailey, as well as Kansas City Call founder Chester Arthur Franklin. It’s a collection of unique value to the community. The Black Archives of Mid Americ

Operating as usual

Come visit the Black Archives Mid-America!We will be hosting Alvin Brooks book signing Wednesday December 1st from 12 pm...
12/01/2021

Come visit the Black Archives Mid-America!
We will be hosting Alvin Brooks book signing Wednesday December 1st from 12 pm - 2 pm

Come visit the Black Archives Mid-America!
We will be hosting Alvin Brooks book signing Wednesday December 1st from 12 pm - 2 pm

UMOJA, Swahili for Unity, is associated with The Seven Principles of the Kwanzaa Holiday celebration. The Black Archives...
11/30/2021

UMOJA, Swahili for Unity, is associated with The Seven Principles of the Kwanzaa Holiday celebration.

The Black Archives of Mid America promotes cultural diversity and community. We are happy to share this flyer for our family JuneteenthKC with purpose to educate and inform of exciting events in Kansas City,MO.

We are proud to participate in the Kwanzaa traditions this year, as well as provide information of its history and practice.

Upcoming Events in the 18th and Vine Jazz District.

UMOJA: Community Holiday Celebration
Sunday, December 19th
Gem Theatre
Noon-5pm

**Gift Distribution 1pm-3pm**

Flyer attached.

This Friday!!!
11/30/2021

This Friday!!!

This Friday!!!

Giving Tuesday is today! Here are five ways you can help The Black Archives of Mid America. Want more  information on ho...
11/30/2021

Giving Tuesday is today! Here are five ways you can help The Black Archives of Mid America. Want more information on how you can help? Visit our website at https://blackarchives.org

Giving Tuesday is today! Here are five ways you can help The Black Archives of Mid America. Want more information on how you can help? Visit our website at https://blackarchives.org

The Hampton Album.Photographs intended for the Paris Exposition of 1900 by photographer Frances Benjamin Johnston, demon...
11/29/2021

The Hampton Album.

Photographs intended for the Paris Exposition of 1900 by photographer Frances Benjamin Johnston, demonstrate contemporary life of the American Negro.

Showcasing Hampton Institute; a historically Black private university, in culture and American history, Johnston's photographs gained the attention of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Accumulated from a total of 159 photographic plates, the museum's Department of Photography selected 44 plates to become "The Hampton Album", a series of photos which would serve to accomplish Hampton Institute’s Founder Samuel Chapman Armstrong's vision for the university,

"The thing to be done was clear: to train selected Negro youth who should go out and teach and lead their people, first by example that they could earn for themselves; to teach respect for labor, to replace stupid drudgery with skilled hands; and to build up for the sake not only of self support, but also for the sake of character."

The photo below entitled, "Stairway of Treasurer's Residence", shows six Hampton students building a staircase on site. Newly risen from the Reconstruction Era, Hampton students were educated and taught skills that would make them useful in a post industrial revolutionary society.

The Black Archives is proud to have "The Hampton Album" available for your research needs.

If you would like to volunteer at the Black Archives or submit cultural artifacts for review, please email Deborah Barker at [email protected] or call (816) 221-1600

The Hampton Album.

Photographs intended for the Paris Exposition of 1900 by photographer Frances Benjamin Johnston, demonstrate contemporary life of the American Negro.

Showcasing Hampton Institute; a historically Black private university, in culture and American history, Johnston's photographs gained the attention of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Accumulated from a total of 159 photographic plates, the museum's Department of Photography selected 44 plates to become "The Hampton Album", a series of photos which would serve to accomplish Hampton Institute’s Founder Samuel Chapman Armstrong's vision for the university,

"The thing to be done was clear: to train selected Negro youth who should go out and teach and lead their people, first by example that they could earn for themselves; to teach respect for labor, to replace stupid drudgery with skilled hands; and to build up for the sake not only of self support, but also for the sake of character."

The photo below entitled, "Stairway of Treasurer's Residence", shows six Hampton students building a staircase on site. Newly risen from the Reconstruction Era, Hampton students were educated and taught skills that would make them useful in a post industrial revolutionary society.

The Black Archives is proud to have "The Hampton Album" available for your research needs.

If you would like to volunteer at the Black Archives or submit cultural artifacts for review, please email Deborah Barker at [email protected] or call (816) 221-1600

"Spirit of Freedom"Kansas City parks are a haven for residents, to revel in its natural beauty. The naming of our local ...
11/24/2021

"Spirit of Freedom"

Kansas City parks are a haven for residents, to revel in its natural beauty. The naming of our local parks has been a topic of discourse for years. Within City Hall, 1977 found local leaders in a debate concerning the naming of a local park.

City Councilman Bruce Watkins (left) led a group supporting the construction of a fountain on Brush Creek Blvd. The estimated cost of construction was $250,000. The proposal was lauded by the public.
Negotiations were underway, until disagreements surfaced over the naming of the park where the fountain would stand.

The local Southern Christian Leadership Conference, headed by Rev. Emanuel Cleaver, attained 1,300 signatures petitioning the name of Brush Creek Park to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dr. Jeremiah Cameron (right), civic leader and second person of color appointed to KCMO Board of Parks and Recreation, believed this to be a worthy feat. Bruce Watkins, not in favor of the name change, would be charged by Dr. Cameron of speaking against SCLC’s efforts and in response retained his vote in favor of the fountain until Dr. King was honored.

“I’m not going to desecrate the name of Dr. King by burying him in the black community”, said Watkins, “He belongs to the whole world”. Municipal Art Commissioner Leonard Pryor followed up stating, “It will be a major fountain and will be seen and enjoyed by all”.

Dr. Jeremiah Cameron made his position clear, “It isn’t a matter of winner-take-all, it’s a matter of principle”, noting petitioners’ efforts.

As one member of the three-man parks board was on vacation, no vote was cast, and tensions made their way to the press. Accusations of personalities and vendettas surfaced among civic leaders, disrupting the fountain's dedication until 1981.

Today the “Spirit of Freedom” fountain, sculpted by Chicago artist Richard Hunt, reflects the improvisational aspects of Kansas City Jazz. Located on Brush Creek Blvd between Cleveland and Benton, the fountain compliments park scenery and serves as a tribute to our local black leaders in Kansas City.

Photos used are by courtesy of KCMO Parks and Rec. kcparks.org.

If you would like to volunteer at the Black Archives or submit cultural artifacts for review, please email Deborah Barker at [email protected] or call 816-221-1600

"Spirit of Freedom"

Kansas City parks are a haven for residents, to revel in its natural beauty. The naming of our local parks has been a topic of discourse for years. Within City Hall, 1977 found local leaders in a debate concerning the naming of a local park.

City Councilman Bruce Watkins (left) led a group supporting the construction of a fountain on Brush Creek Blvd. The estimated cost of construction was $250,000. The proposal was lauded by the public.
Negotiations were underway, until disagreements surfaced over the naming of the park where the fountain would stand.

The local Southern Christian Leadership Conference, headed by Rev. Emanuel Cleaver, attained 1,300 signatures petitioning the name of Brush Creek Park to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dr. Jeremiah Cameron (right), civic leader and second person of color appointed to KCMO Board of Parks and Recreation, believed this to be a worthy feat. Bruce Watkins, not in favor of the name change, would be charged by Dr. Cameron of speaking against SCLC’s efforts and in response retained his vote in favor of the fountain until Dr. King was honored.

“I’m not going to desecrate the name of Dr. King by burying him in the black community”, said Watkins, “He belongs to the whole world”. Municipal Art Commissioner Leonard Pryor followed up stating, “It will be a major fountain and will be seen and enjoyed by all”.

Dr. Jeremiah Cameron made his position clear, “It isn’t a matter of winner-take-all, it’s a matter of principle”, noting petitioners’ efforts.

As one member of the three-man parks board was on vacation, no vote was cast, and tensions made their way to the press. Accusations of personalities and vendettas surfaced among civic leaders, disrupting the fountain's dedication until 1981.

Today the “Spirit of Freedom” fountain, sculpted by Chicago artist Richard Hunt, reflects the improvisational aspects of Kansas City Jazz. Located on Brush Creek Blvd between Cleveland and Benton, the fountain compliments park scenery and serves as a tribute to our local black leaders in Kansas City.

Photos used are by courtesy of KCMO Parks and Rec. kcparks.org.

If you would like to volunteer at the Black Archives or submit cultural artifacts for review, please email Deborah Barker at [email protected] or call 816-221-1600

"Focus Factor"Declared the "World's Fastest Human" at the 1968 Olympics, gold medalist Jim Hines (pictured left) held th...
11/22/2021

"Focus Factor"

Declared the "World's Fastest Human" at the 1968 Olympics, gold medalist Jim Hines (pictured left) held the 100 meters world record for fifteen years.

Undefeated throughout his high school career, Hines, ranked as the nation's top high school sprinter in 1964, attended Historically Black University Texas Southern. Coached by Bobby Joe Morrow; champion of the 1956 Olympics in the 100-200 meters, Jim Hines would find himself racing in the midst of a tense social and political climate, the Civil Rights Movement.

Standing on the third all black podium in Olympic history, Jim Hines set the pace for all runners and sprinters to follow suit.

Photographed next to Hines is Charles Greene. Charles is a gold medalist of the 1968 Summer Olympics in the 4x 100 meters relay. Earlier in his career, he and Hines competed in the 1966 Amateur Athletic Union's 100 yard dash and 100 meter dash, tying the 100m twice. The event earned the title "A Night Of Speed" by track and field historians.

Serving as a follow-up to his Olympic career, Charles Greene served as an Army Officer and head sprint coach of West Point Military Academy's All Army Team. Upon his retirement from the armed forces, Greene was appointed Director of the Special Olympics International.

Below is an autographed photo of Jim Hines & Charles Greene at the acclaimed "Night Of Speed", available for view at the Black Archives for your research purposes.

If you would like to volunteer at the Black Archives or submit cultural artifacts for review, please email Deborah Barker at [email protected] or call 816-221-1600

"Focus Factor"

Declared the "World's Fastest Human" at the 1968 Olympics, gold medalist Jim Hines (pictured left) held the 100 meters world record for fifteen years.

Undefeated throughout his high school career, Hines, ranked as the nation's top high school sprinter in 1964, attended Historically Black University Texas Southern. Coached by Bobby Joe Morrow; champion of the 1956 Olympics in the 100-200 meters, Jim Hines would find himself racing in the midst of a tense social and political climate, the Civil Rights Movement.

Standing on the third all black podium in Olympic history, Jim Hines set the pace for all runners and sprinters to follow suit.

Photographed next to Hines is Charles Greene. Charles is a gold medalist of the 1968 Summer Olympics in the 4x 100 meters relay. Earlier in his career, he and Hines competed in the 1966 Amateur Athletic Union's 100 yard dash and 100 meter dash, tying the 100m twice. The event earned the title "A Night Of Speed" by track and field historians.

Serving as a follow-up to his Olympic career, Charles Greene served as an Army Officer and head sprint coach of West Point Military Academy's All Army Team. Upon his retirement from the armed forces, Greene was appointed Director of the Special Olympics International.

Below is an autographed photo of Jim Hines & Charles Greene at the acclaimed "Night Of Speed", available for view at the Black Archives for your research purposes.

If you would like to volunteer at the Black Archives or submit cultural artifacts for review, please email Deborah Barker at [email protected] or call 816-221-1600

Photos from The Black Archives of Mid-America, Inc. - Kansas City's post
11/19/2021

Photos from The Black Archives of Mid-America, Inc. - Kansas City's post

"Fourth of Your Lies"Artwork by transdisciplinary artist Mona Cliff (she/her)Open to the public Friday, November 19th.
11/18/2021

"Fourth of Your Lies"

Artwork by transdisciplinary artist Mona Cliff (she/her)

Open to the public Friday, November 19th.

"Fourth of Your Lies"

Artwork by transdisciplinary artist Mona Cliff (she/her)

Open to the public Friday, November 19th.

Building bridges between communities is necessary to sustain the strength of a city, which is why the Black Archives of ...
11/18/2021

Building bridges between communities is necessary to sustain the strength of a city, which is why the Black Archives of Mid America is proud to host transdisciplinary indigenous visual artist Mona Cliff.

Earning a B.F.A in Printmaking from Cornish College of the Arts, Mona pursues the concepts of generational knowledge while exploring topics such as native futurism and identity.

Serving as a Diversity, Equity, and inclusion field representative for indigenous communities for the Kansas Creative Arts Industry Commission, her piece entitled “Fourth of Your Lies” brings attention to shared frustrations in the Black and Native American communities of racism and prejudice hiding under the guise of patriotism.

We are happy to connect with our friends at the Kansas City Indian Center, to share and distribute information related to the shared history between Black and Native Americans.

Visit us Friday November, 19th to view the opening of "Fourth of Your Lies"

If you would like to volunteer at the Black Archives or submit cultural artifacts for review, please email Deborah Barker at [email protected] or call (816) 221-1600

Building bridges between communities is necessary to sustain the strength of a city, which is why the Black Archives of Mid America is proud to host transdisciplinary indigenous visual artist Mona Cliff.

Earning a B.F.A in Printmaking from Cornish College of the Arts, Mona pursues the concepts of generational knowledge while exploring topics such as native futurism and identity.

Serving as a Diversity, Equity, and inclusion field representative for indigenous communities for the Kansas Creative Arts Industry Commission, her piece entitled “Fourth of Your Lies” brings attention to shared frustrations in the Black and Native American communities of racism and prejudice hiding under the guise of patriotism.

We are happy to connect with our friends at the Kansas City Indian Center, to share and distribute information related to the shared history between Black and Native Americans.

Visit us Friday November, 19th to view the opening of "Fourth of Your Lies"

If you would like to volunteer at the Black Archives or submit cultural artifacts for review, please email Deborah Barker at [email protected] or call (816) 221-1600

11/09/2021

Presented on Zoom, in partnership with the Kansas City Veterans Writing Team, we invite you to hear dynamic stories and original writings by local military veterans and their family members in this interactive and moderated reading centered around, "Discovering Heroism in Service."

Free and open to the public, register today by signing up here:
https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07eikmwmedbe75570c&oseq=&c=&ch=

A Veterans Reader's Theater: A Conversation on Heroism will be led by script supervisor, Virginia Bracket and will be moderated by creative director, George Pettigrew.

Virginia Brackett is a professor Emeritus of English; she retired in 2016 from Park University She was named Park University Faculty Member of the Year (2013) for exceptional services to student veterans. Brackett has authored 16 books and dozens of blog entries, articles, and stories for adults and children. Her most recent book, “In the Company of Patriots” focuses on the long-term effect of the death of her father, Captain Edmund Roberts, during his service in Korea. Brackett developed and directed several public events, including the Park University Ethnic Voices Poetry Series, Poetry at Park, “Warriors Telling Stories” through the Park University Warrior Center, and co-coordinated an on-campus presentation, “A Call to Words; Veterans and Why They Write.” Brackett serves on the Kansas City Veterans Writing Team (KCVWT), as well as the Moral Injury Association Board.

George Pettigrew is a Vietnam-era Navy veteran currently serving as the Executive Vice President and Historian of the Alexander/Madison Chapter of the Kansas City 9th and 10th Horse Cavalry Buffalo Soldiers Museum. As a Certified Oral Storyteller, he has presented at Fort Leavenworth, VFW National Headquarters, U.S. Park Service, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Mid-Continent Public Library, The Black Archives of Mid-America, and more. He was a certified Career Counselor; Ombudsman for Amphibious Construction Battalion ACB-2 (Seabees), and program facilitator for the Women in the Navy and Racial Awareness/Diversity training programs. He served as Special Assistant for Community Development to the Mayor of Kansas City, Missouri. Pettigrew is a member of the Missouri Humanities Speakers' Bureau, as well as a partner in Freedom's Frontier National Heritage, and a member of the KCVWT.

Address

1722 E 17th Ter
Kansas City, MO
64108

General information

Research Services The Black Archives of Mid-America offers several research services. The Collection Librarian is available to answer information requests. Patrons may also schedule a research appointment with the Collection Librarian to use materials in the holdings of the Black Archives of Mid-America. Digital reproductions of documents and photographs can be provided for a fee. To submit an information request: The Collection Librarian can use the holdings to answer specific research inquiries. To submit an information request, contact the Collection Librarian by telephone at 816.221.1640, by email at [email protected], or by sending an inquiry to the mailing address below. Make your request as specific as possible, including all known names, dates, and places. To schedule a research appointment: The holdings of the Black Archives of Mid-America are open to researchers by appointment only. To schedule an appointment, contact the Collection Librarian by telephone at 816.221.1640, by e-mail at [email protected], or by sending an inquiry to the mailing address below. Black Archives of Mid-America Att: Michael Sweeney PO Box 270333 Kansas City, MO 64127

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 5pm
Wednesday 10am - 5pm
Thursday 10am - 5pm
Friday 10am - 5pm
Saturday 10am - 4pm

Telephone

(816) 221-1600

Products

People



Franklin Collection

The Franklin Collection contains letters, photographs, clippings, and personal papers of Chester and Ada Franklin. The Franklins traveled extensively, and often separately, and the love letters they exchanged reveal their relationship and times in which they lived. Please enjoy this collection, the first portion of the Black Archives of Mid-America's holdings to go online.
Alvin Ailey Personal Papers (pull from KC Museum piece)
Donated by Allan Gray, The Alvin Ailey Personal Papers Collections celebrates the life, career and artistic legacy of Mr. Alvin Ailey. With encouragement from Mr. Ailey and local supporters, the Kansas City Friends of Alvin Ailey was established in 1983. The materials in the collection are from the studio and office of the Ailey company and reflect the dynamic energy of a creative mind. The Ailey materials are on deposit at the Black Archives, and will be the subject of a major exhibit to be unveiled in the fall of 2012.


Political Organizations--Freedom Inc., SAC 20, NAACP

The Black Archives houses materials from political organizations spirited by African Americans throughout the 20th century. The Black Archives hold papers, photos and memorabilia from organizations such as Freedom Inc., SAC 20 and the local NAACP chapters. As sites of conflict and resolution, these local political organizations fought for public accommodations, voting rights, control of historically Black communities, equality in education and economic stability. Patrons will be exposed to these vital and politically vibrant organizations through exhibits and programming throughout the year.


Medical Facilities And Schools —Wheatley Provident, Phillis Wheatley, Queen of the World, MLK, Jr., General Hospital #2

During the Jim Crow era, cities in Missouri implemented policies of segregation within the medical systems. Without medical services, African Americans faced disease and despair with little hope for aid. Systems of racist thought and segregation also prohibited African Americans from receiving education in medicine. African Americans built hospitals and medical in the midst of segregation and exclusion racially-motivated violence because they encroached on the white supremacy, political exclusion and oppression. The Black Archives holds the collections of the Wheatley-Provident, Phillis Wheatley, Queen of the World, Martin Luther King, Jr., and General Hospital #2 hospitals.


Music & Entertainment—Playbills, Sheet Music, Performances, Social Clubs

Kansas City has always been a center of music and entertainment. The Black Archives holds significant collections of materials about the rise of Jazz in the city, the development of the 18th & Vine district and the vibrant social lives of African Americans in Kansas City.


Sports—The Heart of America Golf Club & Gateway Boxing

Kansas City has a long history of excellence in sports history, some of which is still unknown to the greater population. The Heart of America Golf club and Gateway Boxing collections are housed at the Black Archives, and offers Kansas City a new narrative of African American in sports and entertainment in the region.

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The Negro Leagues Book, #2: the Players, 1862-1960 Just released in celebration of Jackie Robinson’s debut day with the Brooklyn Dodgers is the ultimate, most comprehensive collection of information about players from the Negro Baseball Leagues ever published. More than 7,000 players are listed with their respective years and teams. A special section about female team owners is included. Also, debut dates of every Major Leaguer from the Negro Leagues; an East-West All-Star team section; and a listing of World Series rosters. Players who played in other sports; listing of relatives; listing of historical markers, monuments, roadways and ball parks named in their honor; and books authored by Negro League players. This is only source for uniform numbers; players who served in the military; collegiate players and cemetery burial sites. Now available on the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Negro National League in 1920 in the heart of America. Available only from Amazon at a low introductory price until the end of this month:
Join us for the 2nd Annual Black Archives Open House!
join us. :-)
AM Bayo from south Africa 27 years old am here to give a testimony on how i became a member of the illuminati brotherhood it happened like a miracle i have been trying to join the illuminati for 6 years now have come across many scams that took my money i have have suffered alot but i never give up and am happy and grateful to Mr berry castle that helped me join the illuminati he made me understand that believing and ready to serve and obey the illuminati brotherhood was the most important thing before you can be a member and know that the illuminati is a society of riches power fame and every good thing in life , now am living a happy life have what ever i wish to, when i meant Mr Patrick Kingsley he promised me that he will help me join the illuminati brotherhood and told me the illuminati brotherhood doesn’t break promises so i took that as a reason to trust him he did as he promised i received all my benefit in 6 days am using this media to let you know that with the illuminati brotherhood you can become anything you want in life but you must believe and ready to serve and obey the botherhood i will advise you confirm for yourself and have a life change all your problem will be solved and you will become all rich respected and powerful, this the end of poverty in your life you must not waste this great opportunity all that is required from you is just to pay 350usd for your initiation fee and be committed you can whatsapp Mr Patrick Kingsley on 08126611061
AM AKHIGBBE BAYO from south Africa 39 years old am here to give a testimony on how i became a member of the illuminati brotherhood it happened like a miracle i have been trying to join the illuminati for 6 years now have come across many scams that took my money i have have suffered alot but i never give up and am happy and grateful to Mr berry castle that helped me join the illuminati he made me understand that believing and ready to serve and obey the illuminati brotherhood was the most important thing before you can be a member and know that the illuminati is a society of riches power fame and every good thing in life , now am living a happy life have what ever i wish to, when i meant Mr Patrick Kingsley he promised me that he will help me join the illuminati brotherhood and told me the illuminati brotherhood doesn’t break promises so i took that as a reason to trust him he did as he promised i received all my benefit in 6 days am using this media to let you know that with the illuminati brotherhood you can become anything you want in life but you must believe and ready to serve and obey the botherhood i will advise you confirm for yourself and have a life change all your problem will be solved and you will become all rich respected and powerful, this the end of poverty in your life you must not waste this great opportunity all that is required from you is just to pay 350usd for your initiation fee and be committed you can whatsapp Mr Patrick Kingsley on 08126611061.
Greetings, My name is LaGarrett King, associate professor and founding director for the CARTER Center for K-12 Black history education at the University of Missouri. I am writing to invite you to attend and/or submit to our 2nd Teaching Black history conference for k-12 educators this summer. This year's theme is 400 years and counting: Teaching slavery and its afterlife. We are expecting over 300 educators for this year's conference. Attached is our flyer and conference proposal information. For more information, please visit https://education.missouri.edu/learning-teaching-curriculum/carter-center/. Also highlights from last year are here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQgpu3ss2ow. Thank you for your time. LaGarrett King Founding Director
I am currently writing a book about Pete and Charlotte O'Neal. I have gathered a good deal of material about the Black Panther Party in Kansas City in the process. Would you be interested in this material after I have completed the book?
Being behind on your mortgage. We don’t want to talk about it, or even share it with family or friends. Yet, people are losing their homes to foreclosure by the thousands per day. Some folks are afraid of how others will look or judge them. Wither it is from medical issues, work, separation or, too many times going out for steak dinners. No one can walk in your shoes and feel the pain as you do. There’s a song that goes, “riding high in April, shot down in May”. Well, that’s life! My point is this, no matter where you are, you’re somewhere. We all need a place to lay our heads down and rest. If you have a home that’s facing foreclosure, it’s better to live in it as long as you can, then be put out. After all, it’s also your investment. For many of you, the banks and lenders really don’t seem to work with you, in a way that you can keep up. Trying to take care of your home, your family, transportation and have a moment of peace where you can sit back alone and breathe. That’s the real dream! I don’t care how much money you make, you have to watch your pocket, because it can all be gone it a blink of the eye. It can be hard trying to find the right direction to go or help to use, in saving your home when you’re too far behind. Just don’t let them take it, when there is a way for you to keep it. Contact us and ask your questions. We believe we can help make things better
Greetings Blacktech Weekend is coming to Kansas City next week. Would love to have you as our guest. Check out the video from one of our stops https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0Ulla--A_Y RSVP here: https://blacktechweekendkansascity.splashthat.com