The Museum at Mountain Home - Tennessee

The Museum at Mountain Home - Tennessee Since our inception, we have worked to preserve and conserve the medical history of the VA Med. Ctr @ Mountain Home and NE Tennessee and SW Virginia

The Museum at Mountain Home, in Johnson City, Tennessee, fills a singular place in the documentation of the heritage of South Central Appalachia. Although the Museum displays are still under construction, when completed they will illustrate the history of the Veterans Administration Medical Center at Mountain Home and the story of the development of health care in South Central Appalachia. The dis

The Museum at Mountain Home, in Johnson City, Tennessee, fills a singular place in the documentation of the heritage of South Central Appalachia. Although the Museum displays are still under construction, when completed they will illustrate the history of the Veterans Administration Medical Center at Mountain Home and the story of the development of health care in South Central Appalachia. The dis

Thanksgiving menu from Mountain Home mess hall
08/22/2016

Thanksgiving menu from Mountain Home mess hall

More items from our pharmaceutical collection
08/19/2016

More items from our pharmaceutical collection

Steam sterilizer, early 20th Century
08/17/2016

Steam sterilizer, early 20th Century

Timeline Photos
08/16/2016

Timeline Photos

Student nursing gown
08/15/2016

Student nursing gown

Timeline Photos
08/14/2016

Timeline Photos

Timeline Photos
08/13/2016

Timeline Photos

Some of the museum's pharmaceutical collection
08/12/2016

Some of the museum's pharmaceutical collection

Culture jar from early years of Penicillin production
08/11/2016

Culture jar from early years of Penicillin production

Timeline Photos
08/09/2016

Timeline Photos

More from the museum collection
08/07/2016

More from the museum collection

Typical accommodations @ Mountain Home VA early 20th Century
08/06/2016

Typical accommodations @ Mountain Home VA early 20th Century

Bottle used to culture penicillin mold
08/06/2016

Bottle used to culture penicillin mold

Red Cross hat
08/04/2016

Red Cross hat

Red Cross uniform
08/03/2016

Red Cross uniform

Blood Life, also called “The Great and General Tonic and Blood Purifier”, was a popular and big selling product of the A...
08/02/2016

Blood Life, also called “The Great and General Tonic and Blood Purifier”, was a popular and big selling product of the Adams Drug Co. of Boston Georgia. Its primary ingredient, as noted in its originator’s private formulae book, was Potassium Iodide. In the days before iodinated salt residents of inland areas often suffered from a deficit of iodine and goiter was a result. Iodine supplementation would prevent or treat goiter as well as being frequently used at the time for bronchitis and asthma. The usual price was $1 a bottle or $5 for a case of 6. The product was actually registered under the Pure Food and Drug act of 1906 (product No. 7692). Unlike the current food and drug act the 1906 version was little more than a truth in labeling law, but they at least complied, and used it as an advertising point.
Of course, in the spirit of the times and of patent medicines dating back into the 17th century, the claims for Blood Life in advertising and labeling held that it was a remedy for Scrofula (swellings of the lymph glands in the neck), rheumatism, syphilitic sores, old sores, boils and pimples as well as other skin eruptions, erysipelas, cancerous humour, and other diseases resulting in impure blood. Though the efforts of Pasteur and Koch and others, modern scientific medicine was in full bloom, but the 2000+ years of the humoral medical theories hung on among many practitioners and most of the public. Thus, under that system the concept of impure blood and thus the need for a blood purifier needed no further explanation.
The inventor of Blood Life was one Mr Redden Whitaker Adams, a pharmacist in Boston, Georgia. Born on October 23, 1885 in Thomas County Georgia, Redden would follow his father and older brother (James C. Adams and Denzil Roy Adams, respectively) into the pharmacy profession. Redden trained by apprenticeship in drugstores in Madison, Florida and Tifton, Georgia and was licensed in both Florida and Georgia in 1903, before his 18th birthday. In 1905 James C. Adams and his two sons joined together to buy the City Drug Store in Boston, Georgia from Dr. Henry C. Vann, which had been in operation since 1822. It was here, under the name of The Adams Drug Company that Blood life was manufactured.
Redden was an accomplished musician, being the first chair violinist in the Boston (Georgia) Symphony Orchestra as well as working with his wife Lilly to establish the free library in Boston. Typical of his civic mindedness Redden volunteered for and was commissioned a Captain in the American Red Cross. He served in Greece, establishing a refugee station and aid center in Serres in the face of a raging Typhus epidemic (which claimed the life of at least one of his fellow relief workers). His actions earned him recognition from the King of Greece who awarded him the Silver Cross of St. Sauveur as well as the Medal of Military Valor, 4th class, for his actions in the face of the epidemic.
After returning to the United States Redden was active in the Georgia Pharmaceutical Association and continued to operate the store until the mid-1950’s. He passed away in 1974, aged 88.

Invalid feeders, 19th-early 20th Century
08/02/2016

Invalid feeders, 19th-early 20th Century

Hand cranked wheelchair
08/01/2016

Hand cranked wheelchair

The Museum at Mountain Home is located in what used to be the mess hall. We retain an original table & service to recogn...
07/31/2016

The Museum at Mountain Home is located in what used to be the mess hall. We retain an original table & service to recognize the history of our museum space.

The Museum at Mountain Home - Tennessee
07/31/2016

The Museum at Mountain Home - Tennessee

Open house today
07/30/2016

Open house today

One more pix from today's seminar
05/13/2016

One more pix from today's seminar

Scenes from today's seminar!
05/12/2016

Scenes from today's seminar!

Timeline Photos
05/02/2016

Timeline Photos

It's a bit dry, but here are the year end stats for the museum.  The data is extracted from our guest book and formal pr...
01/16/2016

It's a bit dry, but here are the year end stats for the museum. The data is extracted from our guest book and formal programs, so probably represents an undercount.

The Museum at Mountain Home would like to note the recent passing of Dr Harold W. Burnette.  Dr Burnette was a Korean Wa...
01/13/2016

The Museum at Mountain Home would like to note the recent passing of Dr Harold W. Burnette. Dr Burnette was a Korean War Veteran and practiced at the Mountain Home VA Medical Center as well as the VA in Beckley, WV. He was a staunch and generous advocate for the Museum at Mountain Home and its mission of preserving the history of medicine and related fields in the Appalachian region.

New Exhibit Opening this weekend!
10/02/2014

New Exhibit Opening this weekend!

Fun at the Museum:
07/09/2014

Fun at the Museum:

07/08/2014
Vivitur ingenio | The 500th anniversary of Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564)

Vivitur ingenio | The 500th anniversary of Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564)

The physician Andreas Vesalius was born 500 years ago in 1514; he died fifty years later, in 1564. He is best known for his Seven books on the fabric of the human body (commonly known as the Fabrica after its Latin title) published in 1543. It was a landmark publication in the history of medicine, w…

More photos from Vernon Martzin
05/19/2014

More photos from Vernon Martzin

Some pix taken by fellow IPMC pharmacist Vernon Martzin whose mother was in the last (1956) KGH Nursing class:
05/15/2014

Some pix taken by fellow IPMC pharmacist Vernon Martzin whose mother was in the last (1956) KGH Nursing class:

Mrs. Earl Leming, left, Margaret Parks, and Bobbie Merritt are shown with an angiocardiograph machine at Knoxville Gener...
05/13/2014

Mrs. Earl Leming, left, Margaret Parks, and Bobbie Merritt are shown with an angiocardiograph machine at Knoxville General Hospital on Aug. 8, 1956. The $3,282 machine is among more than $11,000 worth of medical equipment making the move to UT Hospital with the closure of General Hospital

Knox General Hospital Nurses
05/12/2014

Knox General Hospital Nurses

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4th Street, Building #34 VA Med Ctr Campus
Johnson City, TN
37614

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