The Apron Museum

The Apron Museum A unique museum dedicated to aprons. To plan your visit, it’s best to call ahead to make sure the museum will be open. Call (662) 279-2390.
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Operating as usual

The Apron Museum wishes all our Apron friends a very Merry Christmas. We pray you  stay healthy. History proves that hap...
12/24/2020

The Apron Museum wishes all our Apron friends a very Merry Christmas. We pray you stay healthy. History proves that happier times await us.

Smart Apron
12/03/2020

Smart Apron

Send us a comment on which new colors we should add in 2021: Gray, Brown, Green, Blue, Red, Burgundy, White, Khaki, etc? Thanks from Smart Apron!
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#RestaurantManager #usfoods #RestaurantOwner #FoodserviceStrong  #syscofoodie 
#Restaurants #RestaurantOwners #RestaurantLife #syscoarizona
 #FoodServiceIndustry #ServiceIndustry #Sysco #DickiesUniforms #modern #uniform #smartaproncanada #aramarkuniforms #cintas_corp #waitstaff #apparel #crownuniform
#restaurantsupply #foodservice #restaurantequipment #waiters #waitress #myrtle_industry #apron #smartapron #thesmartapron

More great Apron moments with Brenda Gantt and good message about the importance of teachers. Nit an easy time to be in ...
11/17/2020

More great Apron moments with Brenda Gantt and good message about the importance of teachers.
Nit an easy time to be in education. Thanks teachers out there.

Me and Dr. Eric Mackey

I have only watched a couple of her videos but learned something each time. And of course she is into wearing her Aprons...
09/24/2020

I have only watched a couple of her videos but learned something each time. And of course she is into wearing her Aprons.

Hey FaceBook friends. I wanted to let you all know that I will be on NBC the Kelly Clarkson Show. Tomorrow September 25. You will have to look up the Time in your TIME ZONE . Thank you for watching. The Kelly Clarkson Show

If you visit Bangor, Maine, be sure to check out Antique Marketplace & Cafe. There are so many treasures, including a va...
08/15/2020

If you visit Bangor, Maine, be sure to check out Antique Marketplace & Cafe. There are so many treasures, including a variety of used books, rare books, weathervanes, and all types of antiques. Caroline (shown in these photos) is wonderful to deal with! @antiquemarketplacecafe #antiquemarketplace

These are a few of the aprons donated to the museum today by Bill Henderson of Orono, Maine. Bill is a retired Navy air ...
08/03/2020

These are a few of the aprons donated to the museum today by Bill Henderson of Orono, Maine. Bill is a retired Navy air traffic controller - and a pretty good Henry Fonda lookalike, too!

Columbia Falls, Maine ~ Wild Blueberry Land is family-owned, built, and operated by Farmer Dell Emerson and his wife, Ch...
07/26/2020

Columbia Falls, Maine ~ Wild Blueberry Land is family-owned, built, and operated by Farmer Dell Emerson and his wife, Chef Marie. @wildblueberryland. Visit them online at www.wildblueberryland.com

07/11/2020
al.com

al.com

This Alabama grandma is charming thousands with her cooking videos! (via This is Alabama)

Sharing some Apron affection from Bar Harbor, Maine. http://www.thefloweredapron.com/about
06/21/2020
About — The Flowered Apron

Sharing some Apron affection from Bar Harbor, Maine. http://www.thefloweredapron.com/about

Welcome to The Flowered Apron, a small bakery and eclectic boutique in downtown Bar Harbor, Maine. For the wellbeing of all, the porch shop is closed for the Summer 2020 season. You can find our delicious treats at Peekytoe Provisions and A&B Naturals. Watch for POP-UP MARKETS on our lawn througho.....

06/14/2020

The Apron Museum is open by request. Call (662) 279-2390 to plan your visit. Stay active & healthy!

Started our day this morning with the Palmer family from Utah. Mr. Palmer is riding his bike across America. Wow. A hund...
06/13/2020

Started our day this morning with the Palmer family from Utah. Mr. Palmer is riding his bike across America. Wow. A hundred miles a day cycling. The Mother and daughter both sew. Mom being a volunteer costume designer for her local community theatre events.

I like the Logo design on her Apron.
05/29/2020

I like the Logo design on her Apron.

The one and only Kate McDermott, author of Art of the Pie, is coming to King Arthur (virtually) to answer your pie-related questions!

What do you want to hear her talk about? She'll be joined by our very own Mel Wanders to chat about all things pie.

LIFE in Quotes
05/23/2020

LIFE in Quotes

There’s some apron history here (a few paragraphs into the article)
04/28/2020

There’s some apron history here (a few paragraphs into the article)

POCKETS FULL OF MIRACLES.—When nurse Mary Husband could not to be found tending patients in Union army hospitals, chances are she would be visiting guardhouses.

She sought out soldiers convicted of desertion, and usually discovered them in various states of neglect. On a trip during the winter of 1863-1864, while the Army of the Potomac was encamped at Brandy Station, Virginia, she encountered one such man. Mary interviewed him and became convinced that he was innocent of the charges.

Some might have left him to his fate. Not Mary. A familiar face in camp—she was matron of a division hospital in the Third Corps—Mary set out to overturn his sentence. According to an account written soon after the war, she visited the headquarters of the brigade to which the soldier belonged and made a case for his release. Her request failed to make an impression. She continued up the chain of command to the division and corps levels and was again disappointed. Mary then met with the commander of the army, irascible Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, and he rejected the request. Undaunted, she traveled to Washington, D.C., where she finally won the case and saved a life.

Though the account did not specify who she saw in the capital, it might have been President Abraham Lincoln. She had met with him on other occasions to plead for pardons for an undocumented number of soldiers who awaited execution. The compassionate commander-in-chief was well known for clemency in these cases, much to the bane of generals who were intent on army discipline.

“Probably no woman in the United States did more than she to sustain spirits that had been crushed under the iron wheel of war and to rescue those that were about to suffer injustice under the sentence of a drum-head court-martial,” observed one writer in a profile that appeared in a medical journal. “Her exertions to save life in this way were unremitting, and as successful as they were unwearied.”

Born Mary Morris in 1820, she hailed from a distinguished family of patriots. Her grandfather, wealthy financier Robert Morris, signed the Declaration of Independence.

Her husband, Joshua, was a well-regarded member of the Philadelphia Bar.

Had the war not happened, Mary might have led a quiet life caring for her husband and two boys, and volunteering at a local library and a hospital. But after hostilities began in 1861, both of her son joined the army.

Mary, then 40 years old, also became involved. About July 1, 1862, Mary accompanied a transport from Philadelphia to Harrison’s Landing in Virginia to bring back sick and injured from the Peninsula Campaign. She made several round trips in quick succession, and the experience profoundly moved her.

Inspired to become more involved, she laid the groundwork to outfit a mission to bring supplies and care to Maj. Gen. John Pope’s Union army as it embarked on what became known as the Second Bull Run Campaign. Her plans never came to fruition, as she was not able to obtain military passes. But another nurse, then little-known Clara Barton, managed to secure passes and supplies at the beginning of what would be a long and brilliant career.

Mary’s abilities had, by this time, come to the attention of Washington’s top nurse, Dorothea Dix. She invited Mary to serve as temporary matron at Camden Street Hospital in Baltimore. Mary’s arrival was timely, as waves of casualties from the battles of Second Bull Run and Antietam crowded area hospitals.

After the regular matron returned, Mary traveled to Antietam and spent two months in service at Smoketown Hospital. “Her presence at this hospital brought perpetual sunshine,” noted one biographer, who also described how Mary made the double-wide tent she shared with another nurse more visible to patients in need. “She had made a flag for her tent by sewing upon a breadth of calico a figure of a bottle cut out of red flannel, and the bottle-flag flew to the wind at all times, indicative of the medicines which were dispensed from the tent below.”

The biographer also described her distinctive apron. “See her as she comes out of her tent for her round of hospital duties, a substantial comely figure, with a most benevolent and motherly face, her hands filled with the good things she is bearing to some of the sufferers in the hospital; she has discarded hoops, believing Florence Nightingale, that they are utterly incompatible with the duties of the hospital; she has a stout serviceable apron nearly covering her dress, and that apron is a miracle of pockets; pockets before, behind, and on each side; deep, wide pockets, all stored full of something which will benefit or amuse her “boys;” an apple, an orange, an interesting book, a set of chess-men, checkers, dominoes, or puzzles, newspapers, magazines, everything desired, comes out of those precious pockets.”

She is pictured here wearing the apron, and a bonnet to which is attached the badge of the Third Corps.

Beneath the trappings, Mary’s depth of compassion fueled her ceaseless efforts to help soldiers. “She is blonde, with fair hair and sunny laughing blue eyes. The fund of vitality in her seems absolutely inexhaustible, and the flow of spirits perennial,” stated the medical journal writer.

Mary became inseparable from the Army of the Potomac through the rest of the war. She arrived at Gettysburg on July 4 after hitching a ride in Maj. Gen. Meade’s mail wagon. She went on to nurse sick and wounded from the 1864 Overland Campaign and showed up in Richmond after the city fell to conquering federal forces on April 3, 1865. On at least one occasion she came close to death when a rifled cannonball passed between her and another nurse. Individual stories of her humanity abound.

The medical journal writer painted a picture of her service with a broad brush, “Her ministrations never had the cold formality and the rigid conformity to system that was seen in the labors of others of less genial composition. The soldiers in the wards that she visited looked upon her with the same confidence and affection with which they were drawn toward a popular commander in the field. They were her personal friends, for the last one of them she had words of special sympathy and special kindness.”

Her work to save lives from the military justice system received far less coverage. She took on her first case in the autumn of 1863 and continued without fanfare through the war’s conclusion.

Though not one to seek praise for her contributions, she received the thanks of her patients during the Grand Review in Washington, D.C. in May 1865. The two-day victory parade included soldiers from three corps with which she had been connected—the Second, Third and Sixth. “As the regiments passed the window where she stood, the boys would pass the word down the line, ‘There’s Mother Husband!’ And cheer after cheer, and shout after shout, ascended from the ranks of stalwart and brawny fellows, beside whose hospital cots her form had so often stood. It was an ovation in which she might justly feel a genuine and honest pride.”

She responded days later by visiting the men in their encampments as they prepared for their final muster in uniform, and distributing food and luxury items collected by her Philadelphia friends.

Mary remained active in veteran’s affairs for years to come. After the death of her husband in 1880, she moved to Washington and accepted an appointment to a lucrative clerkship in the Patent Office.

Mary died in 1893 at age 73. Her sons survived her.

Carte de visite by John White Hurn of Philadelphia, Pa.

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04/25/2020
DIY Face Mask Tutorial With Kay

Across the nation, people are making face masks to help during the Coronavirus pandemic. If you want to learn how, this video can lend some inspiration. 😆 😀 😂 https://youtu.be/U4c5eo_3-y0

Kay Pruitt's love of posting DYI videos exceeds her actual skill in this comedic tutorial gone wrong.

PANDEMIC STORY IUKA, MSAlmost exactly a hundred years ago during the last Pandemic in America (Spanish Flu 1918-1920) th...
04/22/2020

PANDEMIC STORY IUKA, MS
Almost exactly a hundred years ago during the last Pandemic in America (Spanish Flu 1918-1920) the Dexter Block of buildings were completed in Iuka, MS. Henry and I have been working on restoring these buildings for the last 15 years and one of the buildings is home to the Apron Museum and another Creative Spaces.
A few of our goals was to brighten up our buildings, encourage creativity, open businesses of interest and help our community. The business Creative Spaces of Diana Turner - Dianne Deming & others has exceeded our expectations by not just being creative but helping our country fight the Coronavirus.
The individuals in this photo have been working long hours to make masks for medical workers, essential workers ..... and so many others in need of a protective mask. What a Grand way to celebrate the 100 YEAR ANNIVERSARY of the Dexter Block. Thanks Ladies & Alex

Proud of these ladies in Iuka who are making masks for front line and essential workers! They have made more than 4,000 already, giving them to hospitals, nursing homes, doctor's offices, restaurants, and to all those who have asked. In the photo are: Diana Turner, Vicki Frye, Donna Helton, Susan Smith, Beth Speece, and Dianne Deming. Alex Turner handles all of their deliveries. Keep up the good work! #MS01

04/11/2020
Apron Relief Program | Progressive Insurance

Last year Progressive sent the Apron Museum 2 aprons, signed by Flo herself! During the Coronavirus pandemic, an apron is the perfect symbol of the hard work, dedication, and perseverance that will get us through. https://youtu.be/Jz93k43C1og

To us, the apron is a symbol of protection. That’s why we’re assisting our customers, employees, communities and agents by committing over $1 Billion to them...

Never truer ........and a Face Mask
03/25/2020

Never truer ........and a Face Mask

Sometimes pieces of life fall together as in a puzzle. In this case an actual puzzle. While Christmas shopping we discov...
03/22/2020

Sometimes pieces of life fall together as in a puzzle. In this case an actual puzzle. While Christmas shopping we discovered a Mississippi puzzle we liked. We didn’t know at first glance that True South Puzzle Company of nearby Nashville, Tennessee, had chosen an Apron to represent our corner of the State of Mississippi, the location of the Apron Museum. A puzzle is a perfect fit for our need to Social & Physical distance.
So give us a call if you want to spend some time with a puzzle. Our ‘Pandemic’ Special is $20.00 plus shipping. We’ll also gladly open the shop for a personal purchase. We have the beautiful Mississippi puzzle but also a limited number of Alabama, Florida, Nashville, the Appalachian Trail and a Mutt puzzle of furry friends.
Sort of a “I Survived and thrived project” for these difficult times.
Let’s begin to put the pieces of our life together.
Stay safe and creative.

Hello to all our Apron Friends. We wish you well.  Since our Apron Symposium we have been a bit confined due to leg and ...
03/22/2020

Hello to all our Apron Friends. We wish you well. Since our Apron Symposium we have been a bit confined due to leg and foot surgeries and problems (both of us). Just as we are doing better the world gets turned up side down. Now the entire world is confined at home with us.
History proves that good times follow bad times so we are confident that the future is bright for everyone. Getting to the future is the challenge.
Life can get messy ...... Let’s put on our Aprons and deal with the mess.
Thinking of each of you dear Apron Friends.

My Apron Story
03/05/2020

My Apron Story

The NRH Annual Apron Celebration used to take place at the old Rec Center on 820....now home of Babe's Restaurant. It was a 90 minute celebration and took 2 hours to set up and 2 hours to tear down. Always worth it to share aprons and apron stories with those who attended!

We are grateful to the volunteers from the Salvation Army in Starkville, Mississippi for donating an apron to the Apron ...
02/27/2020

We are grateful to the volunteers from the Salvation Army in Starkville, Mississippi for donating an apron to the Apron Museum. They even autographed it! @SAStarkville

The Apron Museum's cover photo
02/27/2020

The Apron Museum's cover photo

Remember the Alamo!
02/01/2020

Remember the Alamo!

I visited this wonderful shop a few years ago when I went to New York. The shop was small in someways but HUGE in charm,...
01/29/2020

I visited this wonderful shop a few years ago when I went to New York. The shop was small in someways but HUGE in charm, creativity, interesting finds and simply a place that made one feel good.
The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is a great series too.

See those cookbooks on the set of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel (that’s her mother-in-law’s kitchen)? They came from my shop! I do relish the irony of having had Amazon buy books from me (and it was quite a big purchase).

Address

110 W Eastport St
Iuka, MS
38852

General information

Located in downtown Iuka, Mississippi, this special destination fits the definition of a museum as "a building in which objects of historical, scientific, artistic, or cultural interest are stored and exhibited." This particular museum is arranged to facilitate hands-on interaction with the exhibits. Some of the aprons are part of the permanent collection, including garments donated from all over the United States (and a few from other countries). The shop offers aprons for sale, including new and vintage. Visitors are allowed to try on different styles and remark at the patterns, fabrics, and stitching. Aprons have changed in form and function through the years, and the museum features examples of various styles dating back several generations. Some displays are labeled by geographic region or other distinguishing characteristics. Visitors should come ready to see, feel, and be inspired. This is indeed a museum - but it's not the type of place that has everything in display cases or with signs that say "Do Not Touch." The Apron Museum's mission is connecting people with art, history, and each other through this unique garment.

Telephone

(662) 279-2390

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Comments

I found this man's apron very interesting. I loved how it buttons. He is a blacksmith. He was at the Rendezvous at Grand Portage National Monument. Grand Portage is in very northern Minnesota~about 6 miles from Canada.
The Apron Symposium was a heartwarming 2-day event filled with laughter, sharing, and inspiration. Words cannot adequately describe it. Here are some highlights for you.
this is an 1885 Norway print of the 10 Commandments and I believe the Lord's Prayer.
This is a apron I createded when fleshing out deer hides. I also use it when washing fresh vegetables. This morning it kept me dry and clean while cleaning crappie. Its made from 3.5 mil clear plastic.ha . scissors and strong for the tie strap.
Handworking hands need a break.
I did not know there was an Apron Museum. I don't own an apron but would like to visit this place.
Hello, I am trying to contact Executive Director, Group Tours Manager or Marketing Director for your exhibit. If you can have them email me ([email protected]) at their earliest convenience I would greatly appreciate it. Cheers! Chris
Awesome place for Apron history. Thank you Carolyn
A homestead in 1903
Hello, I am trying to contact Executive Director, Group Tours Manager or Marketing Director for your exhibit. If you can have them email me ([email protected]) at their earliest convenience I would greatly appreciate it. Cheers! Chris
We Love Aprons can't wait to see your remodled showroom!!