James Whitcomb Riley Museum Home

James Whitcomb Riley Museum Home This Museum Home is a true preservation, not a restoration, of the Victorian home where James Whitcomb Riley spent the final 23 years of his life.

528 Lockerbie Street is a true preservation of the Victorian home the great Hoosier Poet, James Whitcomb Riley, resided in the last twenty-three years of his life. The James Whitcomb Riley Museum Home opened to the public in 1922, and has been offering a glimpse into the history of James Whitcomb Riley and his Victorian world for the last ninety-nine years. The home features the same furnishings a

528 Lockerbie Street is a true preservation of the Victorian home the great Hoosier Poet, James Whitcomb Riley, resided in the last twenty-three years of his life. The James Whitcomb Riley Museum Home opened to the public in 1922, and has been offering a glimpse into the history of James Whitcomb Riley and his Victorian world for the last ninety-nine years. The home features the same furnishings a

Operating as usual

Preparing for a Thanksgiving feast in the Victorian era would have been just as hectic as it is today. They decorated th...
11/22/2021

Preparing for a Thanksgiving feast in the Victorian era would have been just as hectic as it is today. They decorated their home with natural and seasonal items such as fallen leaves, chrysanthemums, palms, asters, dried grasses, grains, and ferns. The cook would be prepping foods like mincemeat pies, scalloped oysters, stuffing, clams, potatoes, fruits, pumpkin pie, turkey, boiled onions, etc… This meal was a time for family and friends to come together. In Riley’s day, Thanksgiving was a relatively new official holiday. President Lincoln declared Thanksgiving a national holiday in 1863. It had, of course, been celebrated unofficially for many years.

How are you preparing for your gathering?

Advertisement for Thurber & Co. roast turkey from the late 19th century, courtesy of the New York Historical Society.

Preparing for a Thanksgiving feast in the Victorian era would have been just as hectic as it is today. They decorated their home with natural and seasonal items such as fallen leaves, chrysanthemums, palms, asters, dried grasses, grains, and ferns. The cook would be prepping foods like mincemeat pies, scalloped oysters, stuffing, clams, potatoes, fruits, pumpkin pie, turkey, boiled onions, etc… This meal was a time for family and friends to come together. In Riley’s day, Thanksgiving was a relatively new official holiday. President Lincoln declared Thanksgiving a national holiday in 1863. It had, of course, been celebrated unofficially for many years.

How are you preparing for your gathering?

Advertisement for Thurber & Co. roast turkey from the late 19th century, courtesy of the New York Historical Society.

Today is National Toilet Day. In 1872, the Nickums had one of the first five toilets installed in the city. The base is ...
11/19/2021

Today is National Toilet Day. In 1872, the Nickums had one of the first five toilets installed in the city. The base is marble, the bowl porcelain, and they even added a crystal pull as the final touch. No more chamber pots or outhouses for this family. Almost 150 years later, the bathroom still looks ready for company.

Today is National Toilet Day. In 1872, the Nickums had one of the first five toilets installed in the city. The base is marble, the bowl porcelain, and they even added a crystal pull as the final touch. No more chamber pots or outhouses for this family. Almost 150 years later, the bathroom still looks ready for company.

Don't forget to join us on December 4th for our Holiday Open House. Walk through the Home for free and hear Christmas Ca...
11/19/2021

Don't forget to join us on December 4th for our Holiday Open House. Walk through the Home for free and hear Christmas Carols played on our 115 year old piano!

Follow the link below to make your reservation today!

https://jwrhomeholiday.eventbrite.com

Don't forget to join us on December 4th for our Holiday Open House. Walk through the Home for free and hear Christmas Carols played on our 115 year old piano!

Follow the link below to make your reservation today!

https://jwrhomeholiday.eventbrite.com

Today is National Take a Hike Day. We can celebrate this day by getting outside and appreciating the changing colors of ...
11/17/2021

Today is National Take a Hike Day. We can celebrate this day by getting outside and appreciating the changing colors of the leaves. Please enjoy this picturesque poem.

A Dream of Autumn

Mellow hazes, lowly trailing
Over wood and meadow, veiling
Somber skies, with wild fowl sailing
Sailor-like to foreign lands;
And the north-wind overleaping
Summer's brink, and floodlike sweeping
Wrecks of roses where the weeping
Willows wring their helpless hands.

Flared, like Titan torches flinging
Flakes of flame and embers, springing
From the vale the trees stand swinging
In the moaning atmosphere;
While in dead'ning-lands the lowing
Of the cattle, sadder growing,
Fills the sense to overflowing
With the sorrow of the year.

Sorrowfully, yet the sweeter
Sings the brook in rippled meter
Under boughs that lithely teeter
Lorn birds, answering from the shores
Through the viny, shady-shiny
Interspaces, shot with tiny
Flying motes that fleck the winy
Wave-engraven sycamores.

Fields of ragged stubble, wrangled
With rank weeds, and shocks of tangled
Corn, with crests like rent plumes dangled
Over Harvest's battle-plain;
And the sudden whir and whistle
Of the quail that, like a missile,
Whizzes over thorn and thistle,
And, a missile, drops again.

Muffled voices, hid in thickets
Where the redbird stops to stick its
Ruddy beak betwixt the pickets
Of the truant's rustic trap;
And the sound of laughter ringing
Where, within the wild-vine swinging,
Climb Bacchante's schoolmates, flinging
Purple clusters in her lap.

Rich as wine, the sunset flashes
Round the tilted world, and dashes
Up the sloping west and splashes
Red foam over sky and sea —
Till my dream of Autumn, paling
In the splendor all-prevailing,
Like a sallow leaf goes sailing
Down the silence solemnly.

Today is National Take a Hike Day. We can celebrate this day by getting outside and appreciating the changing colors of the leaves. Please enjoy this picturesque poem.

A Dream of Autumn

Mellow hazes, lowly trailing
Over wood and meadow, veiling
Somber skies, with wild fowl sailing
Sailor-like to foreign lands;
And the north-wind overleaping
Summer's brink, and floodlike sweeping
Wrecks of roses where the weeping
Willows wring their helpless hands.

Flared, like Titan torches flinging
Flakes of flame and embers, springing
From the vale the trees stand swinging
In the moaning atmosphere;
While in dead'ning-lands the lowing
Of the cattle, sadder growing,
Fills the sense to overflowing
With the sorrow of the year.

Sorrowfully, yet the sweeter
Sings the brook in rippled meter
Under boughs that lithely teeter
Lorn birds, answering from the shores
Through the viny, shady-shiny
Interspaces, shot with tiny
Flying motes that fleck the winy
Wave-engraven sycamores.

Fields of ragged stubble, wrangled
With rank weeds, and shocks of tangled
Corn, with crests like rent plumes dangled
Over Harvest's battle-plain;
And the sudden whir and whistle
Of the quail that, like a missile,
Whizzes over thorn and thistle,
And, a missile, drops again.

Muffled voices, hid in thickets
Where the redbird stops to stick its
Ruddy beak betwixt the pickets
Of the truant's rustic trap;
And the sound of laughter ringing
Where, within the wild-vine swinging,
Climb Bacchante's schoolmates, flinging
Purple clusters in her lap.

Rich as wine, the sunset flashes
Round the tilted world, and dashes
Up the sloping west and splashes
Red foam over sky and sea —
Till my dream of Autumn, paling
In the splendor all-prevailing,
Like a sallow leaf goes sailing
Down the silence solemnly.

Happy World Kindness Day! We do not need a day reminding us to be kind to others, but it is nice to have a day that hono...
11/14/2021

Happy World Kindness Day! We do not need a day reminding us to be kind to others, but it is nice to have a day that honors those who are kind to others. James Whitcomb Riley wrote the following poem after being inspired by someone who was kind.

Who inspires you to be kind today?

Our Kind of Man

1

The kind of a man for you and me!
He faces the world unflinchingly,
And smites, as long as the wrong resists,
With a knuckled faith and force like fists:
He lives the life he is preaching of,
And loves where most is the need of love;
His voice is clear to the deaf man's ears,
And his face sublime through the blind man's tears;
The light shines out where the clouds were dim,
And the widow's prayer goes up for him;
The latch is clicked at the hovel door
And the sick man sees the sun once more,
And out o'er the barren fields he sees
Springing blossoms and waving trees,
Feeling as only the dying may,
That God's own servant has come that way,
Smoothing the path as it still winds on
Through the golden gate where his loved have gone.

2

The kind of a man for me and you!
However little of worth we do
He credits full, and abides in trust
That time will teach us how more is just.
He walks abroad, and he meets all kinds
Of querulous and uneasy minds,
And sympathizing, he shares the pain
Of the doubts that rack us, heart and brain;
And knowing this, as we grasp his hand
We are surely coming to understand!
He looks on sin with pitying eyes--
E'en as the Lord, since Paradise--,
Else, should we read, Though our sins should glow
As scarlet, they shall be white as snow--?
And feeling still, with a grief half glad,
That the bad are as good as the good are bad,
He strikes straight out for the Right-- and he
Is the kind of a man for you and me!

The photo, c. 1910, shows Riley and Lockerbie ready to walk abroad and "meet all kinds."

Happy World Kindness Day! We do not need a day reminding us to be kind to others, but it is nice to have a day that honors those who are kind to others. James Whitcomb Riley wrote the following poem after being inspired by someone who was kind.

Who inspires you to be kind today?

Our Kind of Man

1

The kind of a man for you and me!
He faces the world unflinchingly,
And smites, as long as the wrong resists,
With a knuckled faith and force like fists:
He lives the life he is preaching of,
And loves where most is the need of love;
His voice is clear to the deaf man's ears,
And his face sublime through the blind man's tears;
The light shines out where the clouds were dim,
And the widow's prayer goes up for him;
The latch is clicked at the hovel door
And the sick man sees the sun once more,
And out o'er the barren fields he sees
Springing blossoms and waving trees,
Feeling as only the dying may,
That God's own servant has come that way,
Smoothing the path as it still winds on
Through the golden gate where his loved have gone.

2

The kind of a man for me and you!
However little of worth we do
He credits full, and abides in trust
That time will teach us how more is just.
He walks abroad, and he meets all kinds
Of querulous and uneasy minds,
And sympathizing, he shares the pain
Of the doubts that rack us, heart and brain;
And knowing this, as we grasp his hand
We are surely coming to understand!
He looks on sin with pitying eyes--
E'en as the Lord, since Paradise--,
Else, should we read, Though our sins should glow
As scarlet, they shall be white as snow--?
And feeling still, with a grief half glad,
That the bad are as good as the good are bad,
He strikes straight out for the Right-- and he
Is the kind of a man for you and me!

The photo, c. 1910, shows Riley and Lockerbie ready to walk abroad and "meet all kinds."

Happy Veteran’s Day! We’d like to thank the many men and women who have served our country in the United States Armed Fo...
11/11/2021

Happy Veteran’s Day! We’d like to thank the many men and women who have served our country in the United States Armed Forces. James Whitcomb Riley wrote several poems honoring the dead and living veterans of previous wars. He, no doubt, knew many veterans from the Civil War like his father or great friend, Charles Holstein. He lived just long enough to see the beginning of the Great War in Europe. The following poem is an example of how he honored those who went to war for this nation with his writing. Its accompanied by an illustration by Howard Chandler Christy from the 1913 edition of “Goodbye Jim,” another poem about the Civil War and its personal cost.

SOLDIERS HERE TO-DAY

I

SOLDIERS and saviours of the homes we love;
Heroes and patriots who marched away,
And who marched back, and who marched on above—
All—all are here to-day!

By the dear cause you fought for—you are here;
At summons of bugle, and the drum
Whose palpitating syllables were ne'er
More musical, you come!

Here—by the stars that bloom in fields of blue,
And by the bird above with shielding wings;
And by the flag that floats out over you,
With silken beckonings—

Ay, here beneath its folds are gathered all
Who warred unscathed for blessings that it gave—
Still blessed its champion, though it but fall
A shadow on his grave!

II

We greet you, Victors, as in vast array
You gather from the scenes of strife and death—
From spectral fortress walls where curls away
The cannon's latest breath.

We greet you—from the crumbling battlements
Where once again the old flag feels the breeze
Stroke out its tattered stripes and smooth its rents
With rippling ecstasies.

From living tombs where every hope seemed lost—
With famine quarantined by bristling guns—
The prison pens—the guards—the "dead-line" crossed
By—riddled skeletons!

From furrowed plains, sown thick with bursting shells—
From mountain gorge, and toppling crags o'erhead—
From wards of pestilential hospitals,
And trenches of the dead.

III

In fancy all are here. The night is o'er,
And through dissolving mists the morning gleams;
And clustered round their hearths we see once more
The heroes of our dreams.

Strong, tawny faces, some, and some are fair,
And some are marked with age's latest prime,
And, seer-like, browed and aureoled with hair
As hoar as winter-time.

The faces of fond lovers, glorified—
The faces of the husband and the wife—
The babe's face nestled at the mother's side,
And smiling back at life;

A bloom of happiness in every cheek—
A thrill of tingling joy in every vein—
In every soul a rapture they will seek
In Heaven, and find again!

IV

'Tis not a vision only—we who pay
But the poor tribute of our praises here
Are equal sharers in the guerdon they
Purchased at price so dear.

The angel, Peace, o'er all uplifts her hand,
Waving the olive, and with heavenly eyes
Shedding a light of love o'er sea and land
As sunshine from the skies—

Her figure pedestalled on Freedom's soil—
Her sandals kissed with seas of golden grain—
Queen of a realm of joy-requited toil
That glories in her reign.

O blessed land of labor and reward!

Happy Veteran’s Day! We’d like to thank the many men and women who have served our country in the United States Armed Forces. James Whitcomb Riley wrote several poems honoring the dead and living veterans of previous wars. He, no doubt, knew many veterans from the Civil War like his father or great friend, Charles Holstein. He lived just long enough to see the beginning of the Great War in Europe. The following poem is an example of how he honored those who went to war for this nation with his writing. Its accompanied by an illustration by Howard Chandler Christy from the 1913 edition of “Goodbye Jim,” another poem about the Civil War and its personal cost.

SOLDIERS HERE TO-DAY

I

SOLDIERS and saviours of the homes we love;
Heroes and patriots who marched away,
And who marched back, and who marched on above—
All—all are here to-day!

By the dear cause you fought for—you are here;
At summons of bugle, and the drum
Whose palpitating syllables were ne'er
More musical, you come!

Here—by the stars that bloom in fields of blue,
And by the bird above with shielding wings;
And by the flag that floats out over you,
With silken beckonings—

Ay, here beneath its folds are gathered all
Who warred unscathed for blessings that it gave—
Still blessed its champion, though it but fall
A shadow on his grave!

II

We greet you, Victors, as in vast array
You gather from the scenes of strife and death—
From spectral fortress walls where curls away
The cannon's latest breath.

We greet you—from the crumbling battlements
Where once again the old flag feels the breeze
Stroke out its tattered stripes and smooth its rents
With rippling ecstasies.

From living tombs where every hope seemed lost—
With famine quarantined by bristling guns—
The prison pens—the guards—the "dead-line" crossed
By—riddled skeletons!

From furrowed plains, sown thick with bursting shells—
From mountain gorge, and toppling crags o'erhead—
From wards of pestilential hospitals,
And trenches of the dead.

III

In fancy all are here. The night is o'er,
And through dissolving mists the morning gleams;
And clustered round their hearths we see once more
The heroes of our dreams.

Strong, tawny faces, some, and some are fair,
And some are marked with age's latest prime,
And, seer-like, browed and aureoled with hair
As hoar as winter-time.

The faces of fond lovers, glorified—
The faces of the husband and the wife—
The babe's face nestled at the mother's side,
And smiling back at life;

A bloom of happiness in every cheek—
A thrill of tingling joy in every vein—
In every soul a rapture they will seek
In Heaven, and find again!

IV

'Tis not a vision only—we who pay
But the poor tribute of our praises here
Are equal sharers in the guerdon they
Purchased at price so dear.

The angel, Peace, o'er all uplifts her hand,
Waving the olive, and with heavenly eyes
Shedding a light of love o'er sea and land
As sunshine from the skies—

Her figure pedestalled on Freedom's soil—
Her sandals kissed with seas of golden grain—
Queen of a realm of joy-requited toil
That glories in her reign.

O blessed land of labor and reward!

It's official! The James Whitcomb Riley Museum will host our Holiday Open House this year. Enjoy a free walkthrough tour...
11/10/2021

It's official! The James Whitcomb Riley Museum will host our Holiday Open House this year. Enjoy a free walkthrough tour of our historic home decorated for holidays. You'll hear Christmas carols in the parlor and be able to visit with Mr. Riley himself, before heading over to meet Santa Claus in our Visitor Center!

The event is FREE but attendance is limited. Follow the link below for more information and reserve a time today!

https://jwrhomeholiday.eventbrite.com

#Christmas #christmasevent #indianápolis #familyfriendly

It's official! The James Whitcomb Riley Museum will host our Holiday Open House this year. Enjoy a free walkthrough tour of our historic home decorated for holidays. You'll hear Christmas carols in the parlor and be able to visit with Mr. Riley himself, before heading over to meet Santa Claus in our Visitor Center!

The event is FREE but attendance is limited. Follow the link below for more information and reserve a time today!

https://jwrhomeholiday.eventbrite.com

#Christmas #christmasevent #indianápolis #familyfriendly

Address

528 Lockerbie St
Indianapolis, IN
46202

Opening Hours

Thursday 10am - 11am
11:30am - 12:30pm
Friday 10am - 3:30pm
Saturday 10am - 3:30pm

Telephone

(317) 631-5885

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Comments

We love James Whitcomb Riley Museum Home so very haunted and gorgeous. Open Thursday to Saturday!
We found four pixie houses after visiting the JW Riley boyhood home.
We successfully found four pixey houses after visiting the JW Riley home.
We had a great time at the ceremony to lay a wreath on Riley’s grave in Crown Hill Cemetery this morning! We even saw our good friend Chadwick Gillenwater! Thanks to James Whitcomb Riley Museum Home for inviting us to come.
"Tie My Shoes" was written with a pointer stick, one letter at a time, I did my best. Born with a twisted body from cerebral palsy I earned a Masters Degree with honors, married and I am a father and grandfather. But in grade school, I remember a medical doctor and educators told my mother and me that, "The ninth grade will be Lonnie's last year of school." Then at forty-two, I suffered a fractured neck from a fall off my crutches, I still succeeded and much, much more. Read about it in my book, "Tie My Shoes." Your book support would be appreciated, thank you. www.lshipebooks.com
"Tie My Shoes" was written with a pointer stick, one letter at a time, I did my best. Born with a twisted body from cerebral palsy I earned a Masters Degree with honors, married and I am a father and grandfather. But in grade school, I remember a medical doctor and educators told my mother and me that, "The ninth grade will be Lonnie's last year of school." Then at forty-two, I suffered a fractured neck from a fall off my crutches, I still succeeded and much, much more. Read about it in my book, "Tie My Shoes." Your book support would be appreciated, thank you. www.lshipebooks.com
"Tie My Shoes" was written with a pointer stick, one letter at a time, I did my best. Born with a twisted body from cerebral palsy I earned a Masters Degree with honors, married and I am a father and grandfather. But in grade school, I remember a medical doctor and educators told my mother and me that, "The ninth grade will be Lonnie's last year of school." Then at forty-two, I suffered a fractured neck from a fall off my crutches, I still succeeded and much, much more. Read about it in my book, "Tie My Shoes." Your book support would be appreciated, thank you. www.lshipebooks.com
Thank you Chris James Whitcomb Riley Museum Home for saving our tablet (and whoever dropped it off there) and for the great tour. Open Thu-Sat by appointment (check their page/site, goes thru Eventbrite - and they get busy, I was there less than an hour and they had three tours. On a Thursday!). Go visit! (Chris said I could post some pictures :-)
We love sharing this story we got from Crown Hill Heritage Foundation Tom Davis about James Whitcomb Riley Museum Home . What a day. More later, stay tuned.
"Tie My Shoes" was written with a pointer stick, one letter at a time, I did my best. Born with a twisted body from cerebral palsy I earned a Masters Degree with honors, married and I am a father and grandfather. But in grade school, I remember a medical doctor and educators told my mother and me that, "The ninth grade will be Lonnie's last year of school." Then at forty-two, I suffered a fractured neck from a fall off my crutches, I still succeeded and much, much more. Read about it in my book, "Tie My Shoes." Your order would be appreciated, thank you. www.lshipebooks.com
We are hiring an Event Sales Manager to advertise and sell third-party events at the James Whitcomb Riley Museum Home. To learn more about this position and apply please visit this link: https://bit.ly/RCFEventSales
"Tie My Shoes" was written with a pointer stick, one letter at a time. Written with the dream, hope and faith to help and inspire others, I did my best. Born with a twisted body from cerebral palsy I earned a Masters Degree with honors, married and I am a father and grandfather. But in grade school, I remember a medical doctor and educators told my mother and me that, "The ninth grade will be Lonnie's last year of school." Then at forty-two, I suffered a fractured neck from a fall off my crutches, I still succeeded and much, much more. Read about it in my book, "Tie My Shoes." To order please click on the link or the image below. Tie My Shoes, is also available online on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Walmart and Target. Your order would be appreciated, thank you.