Hurley Heritage Society

Hurley Heritage Society Museum open May through October Saturdays and Sundays 1:00PM - 4:00PM Admission free 52 Main Street Hurley, NY 12443
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HEADS UP HURLEY RESIDENTS! Donation drive ends May 14th.Please Help those most in need right now with donations of non-p...
05/12/2020

HEADS UP HURLEY RESIDENTS! Donation drive ends May 14th.
Please Help those most in need right now with donations of non-perishable foods - suggested items include: granola bars, canned pasta meals, 100% fruit juice boxes, fruit cups, applesauce, canned tune/chicken in water, canned fruit/veggies, tomato sauce, rice, pasta, rolled oats, peanut/nut butters, dried/canned beans, baby food and coffee/tea. All donations go to the People's Place.
Drop donations on the back porch of the Hurley Museum located at 52 Main Street.

“Path Through History” donated to HHS by local artist Judy Howard. Pastel painting 16” x 20”Can you guess where this is ...
05/07/2020

“Path Through History” donated to HHS by local artist Judy Howard. Pastel painting 16” x 20”
Can you guess where this is in Hurley?

Another great shot of the museum's tulips by Bentley Potter.
05/07/2020

Another great shot of the museum's tulips by Bentley Potter.

I always love seeing the tulips in front of the Hurley Heritage Society and Museum. The way they perfectly line the walkway is a pretty sight. As always, feel free to share.

Hurley Heritage Society's cover photo
05/04/2020

Hurley Heritage Society's cover photo

A DUTCH TEABesides Britain, Holland was the only West-European country to consume tea. Dutch ships competed with British...
04/27/2020
The Dutch East India Company was richer than Apple, Google and Facebook combined – DutchReview

A DUTCH TEA
Besides Britain, Holland was the only West-European country to consume tea. Dutch ships competed with British ships to bring tea most quickly from China to Europe in the 'Tea Race'.
This was not only important from the standpoint of sportsmanship, but for the quality of the tea. The longer it remained on the ship, the more likely it was to become spoiled. This led the British and Dutch to consider importing their ta by land across Russia. The Russian tariffs made tea too expensive however, and the scheme was abandoned.
The Dutch grew their own tea in Indonesia. By 1892, the majority of their tea was imported from Java. In 1926, J.I.L.L Jacobsen had smuggled tea out of China, and established it's cultivation in the Dutch East Indies. [BTW, the Dutch East India Company, that shipped tea, at one point was so large a company that it would DWARF Apple, Facebook, Google of today - interesting read: https://dutchreview.com/culture/history/how-rich-was-the-dutch-east-india-company/

How rich was the Dutch East India Company? This old Dutch company was the first ever to do business in a modern way and get filthy rich with it.

In bloom at the museum
04/25/2020

In bloom at the museum

Hurley Residents! Please Help those most in need right now with donations of non-perishable foods - suggested items incl...
04/23/2020

Hurley Residents! Please Help those most in need right now with donations of non-perishable foods - suggested items include: granola bars, canned pasta meals, 100% fruit juice boxes, fruit cups, applesauce, canned tune/chicken in water, canned fruit/veggies, tomato sauce, rice, pasta, rolled oats, peanut/nut butters, dried/canned beans, baby food and coffee/tea. All donations go to the People's Place.

Drop donations on the back porch of the Hurley Museum located at 52 Main Street.

Tulips almost out at the Hurley Heritage Society Museum
04/21/2020

Tulips almost out at the Hurley Heritage Society Museum

The Village of Hurley During the Revolutionary WarOctober 16, 1777 through December 18, 1777When the British forces unde...
04/21/2020

The Village of Hurley During the Revolutionary War
October 16, 1777 through December 18, 1777

When the British forces under General John Vaughan burned the village of Kingston on October 16,1777, they found the village vacated, with the exception of a few stragglers and the militia forces who were defending it. The residents of Kingston had fled southward, through the lower section of the Town of Hurley the evening before, and those who did not, did so the following morning when the artillery battle between the American and British ships began around 9:00a.m.

During the afternoon of the 17th, a party of British regulars had started down Hurley Avenue, burning houses and barns as they went. The last house they burned was the Schoepmoes house on the Town Line. At the time of the Revolution, that house was in plain sight of Hurley's Main Street (trees near homes had been cut for firewood). The billowing smoke from the burning buildings on Hurley Avenue would have been very noticeable in Hurley, and those who saw it would have fled in fear, knowing that they were next, as there were no forces to stop or slow the advance of the British.

Hurley and it's grain crop was saved from destruction when the British soldiers on Hurley Avenue heard the "retreat" signal blown on a whistle and were called back to the Strand to board their ships. The other reason the British did not reach Hurley was the four hour artillery fight that had been made by the militia of the first Ulster regimen under Colonel Johannes Snyder and Major Adrian Wynkoop. This battle delayed the British from advancing on Kingston and Hurley. There is little doubt that General Vaughn had intended to destroy the granaries of Kingston and Hurley on his way to assist t general John Burgoyne in Saratoga. The loss of the entire fall crop at Kingston, Hurley and Marbletown, would have been a severe blow to the colony, New England and the war effort that winter of 1777.

General George Clinton had anticipated the British advance up the Hudson to Kingston, however, his Continental Army was in poor condition from the recent battle at Forts Montgomery and Clinton on October 6yh and could not move as fast as necessary. The Continental Army also ran into masses of people fleeing south from Kingston on the evening of October 16th and was further delayed while that traffic jam was sorted out.

The advance units of the Continental Army reached the outskirts of Kingston during the British withdrawal on the 17th but did not engage the enemy. General Clinton decided to encamp his troops at the village of Marbletown, from where he could watch the movements of the British and temporarily establish his headquarters at the Oliver House (on old 209). A reconnaissance of the Kingston area the following morning revealed that the British force had moved up the river. The need to be closer to Kingston and the Hudson River was recognized and general Clinton moved his command to the village of Hurley that day, however, the main body of the army remained at Marbletown.

Hurley village was an ideal location for a military outpost. Hurley avenue provided ready access to the village of Kingston and areas south. Dewitt mills road provided access to the strand an area on the Rondout Creek and the Hurley Mountain Road was the back road to Saugerties and Kaatsbaan to the north.

Hurley Main Street became a military outpost with guards stationed at all the roads leading into the village. There were also guards stationed at the A.B. Houghtaling home, the Wynkoop Inn and the Dumond (Guard) House. These guards, from Col Samuel Webbis Connecticut Regiment, were dressed in British uniforms - red with yellow facing. The uniforms were originally slated to be replacement uniforms for the regiments under British General John Burgoyne, but the ship carrying them to Montreal had been captured by the American navy.

For more information about Hurley history visit:
https://www.hurleyheritagesociety.org/library/

04/20/2020
Pick up your 2020 HHS rack card with information about events through this year. We installed a box with the cards in fr...
04/16/2020

Pick up your 2020 HHS rack card with information about events through this year. We installed a box with the cards in front of the museum on the map kiosk. Due to COVID-19, events in May have been cancelled and/or postponed. Check for event updates!

Hurley Heritage Society's cover photo
04/03/2020

Hurley Heritage Society's cover photo

Main Street HurleyThe Hurley Historic District encompasses the center of the hamlet of Hurley, the main settlement area ...
04/02/2020

Main Street Hurley
The Hurley Historic District encompasses the center of the hamlet of Hurley, the main settlement area of the town of Hurley, New York. Stretched along US 209, the hamlet includes one of the finest concentrations of colonial Dutch architecture in the United States. Settled by the Dutch in the 17th century, its architecture has retained the influence of that period. The village is also historically significant as a temporary home of the seat of New York government during the American Revolutionary War. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1961.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurley_Historic_District

03/24/2020

NOTICE TO HURLEY HERITAGE SOCIETY MEMEBERS AND COMMUNITY

COVID-19/Coronavirus has impacted all of us these last few weeks and continues to evolve and disrupt all of our lives. The Hurley Heritage Society, following recommendations of public and government health officials are making changes to our events schedule and operations.

The Hurley Heritage Society has cancelled or postponed all of April and early May events. The opening date of the museum for the season is also postponed until further notice. Our Prologue newsletter will be modified, and for now it will be online. It will keep you informed of any changes, updates and notices pertaining to HHS.

During this time of ‘social isolation’ and unexpected ‘downtime’, the HHS will share more interesting Hurley Heritage stories and images on our page.
All of us wish you well as we confront this challenge together.

Dale S. Bohan

"In early spring 1782, General George Washington arrived at the Hasbrouck House in Newburgh, New York for his longest st...
03/20/2020
General Washington in 1782: Traveling the Rondout Valley, Visiting Kingston - The New York History Blog

"In early spring 1782, General George Washington arrived at the Hasbrouck House in Newburgh, New York for his longest stay – 16-1/2 months. Washington’s time at the Hasbrouck House was one of watchful waiting, followed by a cessation of hostilities, and finally an end to the war.

From the Hasbrouck House Washington made a short trip through the scenic Roundout Valley, stopping at Stone Ridge (or Stoney Ridge), on his way to Kingston [and stop in Hurley], which the British had burned in 1777. En route to his destination, Washington stopped to dine and sleep at the home of Major Cornelius Evert Wynkoop."

In early spring 1782, General George Washington arrived at the Hasbrouck House in Newburgh, New York for his longest stay – 16-1/2 months. Washington’s time at the Hasbrouck House was one of watchful waiting, followed by a cessation of hostilities, and finally an end to the war. From the Hasbrou...

Informative post on the "Spy House," one of Hurley's unique treasures with many names.
02/16/2020

Informative post on the "Spy House," one of Hurley's unique treasures with many names.

DuMond “Old Guard” House (Hurley, NY)
This house on Hurley’s Main Street was built prior to 1685 and gets its name from an event that happened during the Revolutionary War.
In 1777, Loyalist Daniel Taylor was carrying a message from British General Henry Clinton to General Burgoyne in Saratoga when he came upon a group of Americans dressed in stolen British uniforms. Thinking they were British, he gave himself away, but managed to swallow the message since it was hidden in a metal ball. A soldier noticed what he had done and threatened to disembowel him, so Taylor was given an emetic that quickly resulted in him regurgitating the secret message. As a result, Taylor was tried as a spy and sentenced to death.
Here, in the basement of the DuMond house, he was jailed until the day that he was taken down Schoolhouse Road and hanged from an apple tree.

Save the date - Oct. 18th! The run ends in Hurley where the Hurley Heritage Day event will take place!
02/05/2020
Burning of Kingston

Save the date - Oct. 18th! The run ends in Hurley where the Hurley Heritage Day event will take place!

The new Burning of Kingston Capital to Capital Run website is live! showing the planned route and additional details. More updates will be provided in the future.
The Capital to Capital event is presented by the Rotary Club of Kingston, with event organization support by the Shawangunk Runners! C2C is also supported by the Hurley Heritage Society and Friends of the Senate House as well as the City of Kingston and Town of Hurley.
Thank you!
http://burningofkingston.com/capitaltocapitalrun/

The Burning of Kingston Capital to Capital RunSunday October 18, 2020From Kingston to Hurley New York
01/13/2020

The Burning of Kingston Capital to Capital Run
Sunday October 18, 2020
From Kingston to Hurley New York

ANNOUNCING
The Burning of Kingston Capital to Capital Run
Sunday October 18, 2020
From Kingston to Hurley New York

The Burning of Kingston Capital to Capital Run is a commemorative 5k run between Kingston and the Village of Hurley, tracing the trail of colonial refugees fleeing the British soldiers who burned the city down during the American Revolutionary War in 1777. At the time the New York State Capital was moved from Kingston to Hurley. Starting at the Senate House (the first NYS capital) in Uptown Kingston and finishing at the Van Deusen House on Main Street in Hurley (where the capital was moved), the run is both a "fun run" as well as timed for running enthusiasts. Runners will be greeted in Hurley with the annual Hurley Heritage Day.

More details to come.

Great presentation and turnout tonight for "Winslow Homer in the 1870s – The Hurley Years" by guest speaker by Reilly Rh...
01/09/2020

Great presentation and turnout tonight for "Winslow Homer in the 1870s – The Hurley Years" by guest speaker by Reilly Rhodes.

Tonight!Special Lecture - Winslow Homer in the 1870s – The Hurley YearsWednesday, January 8, 2020 - 7pm Hurley Reformed ...
01/08/2020

Tonight!
Special Lecture - Winslow Homer in the 1870s – The Hurley Years
Wednesday, January 8, 2020 - 7pm
Hurley Reformed Church, 11 Main St., Hurley NY
Free Admission. Refreshments served
Many residents of Ulster County are aware that the world-renowned artist Winslow Homer spent time in Hurley and painted his famous Snap the Whip here. However, little was known about what else he might have painted here until about three years ago when author Reilly Rhodes started asking questions. Rhodes, who has studied and collected the early works of Homer for over 20 years, had a hunch that many other Homer paintings and wood engravings of the 1870s were scenes taken from the Hurley landscape. He worked with the Hurley historian, the Hurley Heritage Society, and other sources to collect vintage images and historical accounts supporting his case that more than 30 of Homer's works were inspired by Hurley. It is astounding that such a large trove of new details are being revealed about an artist who has been intensely studied by myriad scholars for over 100 years. Rhodes refers to Hurley as “ground zero” of his latest research. His 2017 book Winslow Homer: From Poetry to Fiction includes his Hurley research up to that time and was the inspiration for the Hurley Museum's 2019 Homer exhibit. This lecture is a rare opportunity to hear from the author himself about his journey of discovery which continues even now. Come and be treated to an artful panorama of American rural life in the mid-nineteenth century.
“... [This is] thorough and truly groundbreaking research [Rhodes has] done in documenting Homer’s activities—and his precise whereabouts—in the 1870s.” Franklin Kelly, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, National Gallery of Art, 11/13/2019
About Reilly Rhodes
Reilly Rhodes is an art historian, curator and author based in southern California who has studied and collected the works of Winslow Homer and published two books on the subject. Since the late 1960s, he has held top administrative positions at seven museums including the Seattle Museum of History and Industry, the Detroit Institute of Arts, and the Monterey Peninsula Museum of Art. In 1996, he founded Contemporary and Modern Print Exhibitions, a service that plans and organizes exhibitions of American and European art for museums. His research on the early work of Winslow Homer began more than twenty years ago with a touring exhibition sponsored by the IBM Corporation. Rhodes is the author of Winslow Homer from Poetry to Fiction, which was given a four out of four-star rating by the onlinebookclub in 2017.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEPublic Lecture on Hurley’s Influence on Famous American Artist Winslow HomerA special lecture about...
01/03/2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Public Lecture on Hurley’s Influence on Famous American
Artist Winslow Homer

A special lecture about famous American artist Winslow Homer will be presented by visiting art historian Reilly Rhodes on January 8th at 7pm at the Hurley Reformed Church at 11 Main Street in Hurley, NY. Hosted by the Hurley Heritage Society, this free and open to the public event will reveal new research into the life and work of one of America’s most celebrated 19th century artists, Winslow Homer, who spent time in Hurley during the 1870s.

Winslow Homer famous painting, Snap the Whip, is commonly known to be painted while in Hurley. However new research by Rhodes, some of which is included in his recently published book Winslow Homer: From Poetry to Fiction, reveals that Hurley inspired more than 30 works by the artist. This lecture is a rare opportunity to hear from the author himself about his 20-year journey of research and discovery of the artist.

Reilly Rhodes is an art historian, curator and author based in southern California who has studied and collected the works of Winslow Homer and published two books on the subject. Since the late 1960s, he has held top administrative positions at seven museums including the Seattle Museum of History and Industry, the Detroit Institute of Arts, and the Monterey Peninsula Museum of Art. In 1996, he founded Contemporary and Modern Print Exhibitions, a service that plans and organizes exhibitions of American and European art for museums. Rhodes is the author of Winslow Homer from Poetry to Fiction, which was given a four out of four-star rating by the Onlinebookclub in 2017.

"Despite the English conquest, the Dutch language continued to thrive in New York and northern New Jersey for generation...
12/19/2019
When Did New York Stop Speaking Dutch? - The New York History Blog

"Despite the English conquest, the Dutch language continued to thrive in New York and northern New Jersey for generations, persisting into the twentieth century in certain areas."

In the late summer of 1664, four English frigates arrived off shore New Amsterdam. Rather than resisting, Peter Stuyvesant surrendered to the English.

Address

52 Main St
Hurley, NY
12443

Opening Hours

Saturday 13:00 - 16:00
Sunday 13:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(845) 338-1661

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Comments

Sad news about Dolores McGoldrick. She was impassioned about education and brought that to her years on the Hurley Heritage board. After the move from our 1 room museum, she really contributed to raising the standards of the displays and also included educational tid- bits in the store. She had a great sense of humor and a real "let's get this moving" attitude.
Corn, Swallows and the beautiful Praymaher Creek. Hope we all are able to keep that Beautiful over 100 years old clean creek water safe for the trout who call it home and for the Esopus it joins in Hurley and for the little kids who swim in it in Saugerties, and on and on......
This historic cemetery in Hurley, New York is one of the oldest cemeteries in Ulster County. The local area was settled by the Dutch prior to 1660 and in this cemetery are many field stones, some of which are inscribed in Dutch with readable dates going back to the early 1700s. This photo was taken early in the a.m. as the sun was coming up
I’m in possession of a letter written by Peter Sinclair on 1990 regarding some Wolven Blue and White Sweet Corn. The letter is called, Field Notes of the Joy Farm Preservation Society. It is post marked West Hurley, 12491. The letter was found in my fathers papers. His name is Everett W. Rau. The packaged contained seeds of this very old corn variety. I’m trying to track down if the seed is still available. Thanks for your help.
I saw something about Winslow Homer's Hurley as I drove by - is that an exhibit, and when can it be seen?
Thank you to Ellen Richards for a lovely wreath class. A nice way to spend a Sunday afternoon. Hope to see more like this in the future.
Hurley's Ghost Walk takes place on the 27th! After the event, be sure to head to our site after your visit to leave a review to let them and other locals know all about your experience!
The 7:00 tour is closed already!!