National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter

National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter California Chapter of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame. The State Chapter program was started in

09/01/2022

2022 NWHOF-CA
BANQUET

October 15, 2022
Saturday
Laguna Hills
Community Center
Laguna Hills, CA

$75.00 Guests
$50.00
Former Inductees

INFORMATION:
Dale Deffner
714-791-4003
Lifetime Service to Wrestling

Arsen Aleksanyab
Dwayne Buth
Teresa Coffey
Pete Grisafi
Frank Hankin
Mike Provenzo
Stan Roberts
Jack Schwartz
Vince Silva
Lenny Zalesky
Ron Wilson

10/31/2021
The California Chapter of the National Wrestling Hall of fame will be  hosting its annual induction banquet in Fresno on...
04/01/2021

The California Chapter of the National Wrestling Hall of fame will be hosting its annual induction banquet in Fresno on Sunday, October 24, 2021. This year’s group was intended to be honored in 2020, but the event was postponed due to the pandemic shutdown.

This year’s honorees include one for “Outstanding American,” DeWayne Zinkin, and nine for “Lifetime Service”: Joe Dansby, Bill Kalivas, Jamill Kelly, Paul Keysaw, Rick McKinney, Joe Seay, Steve Tirapelle, Gregory Zavala and Edward Zuckerman.

07/22/2020

By Wayne Baughman

The wrestling family is going through
some bad, sad and trying times as the
NCAA Championships and the 2020

Olympics were either canceled or postpont-
ed. I have to admit this has been a stressful

time for me and I’m afraid it’s not over yet.
To compound my problems, about six weeks
ago, I slipped and fell on black ice going for
my morning “waddle.” I fractured three ribs,
my pelvis and coccyx/tailbone.
I’ll quit whining and move on to some
humorous and maybe more somewhat
inspiring stories. A friend sent me an article
from the Oklahoman newspaper featuring an
old football player, Chuck Bowman. He was

from the days when the University of Okla-
homa set the record of 47 straight wins; still

the national record for continuous football
victories.
I remembered him but I didn’t know he
was from Ponca City, Okla., or a wrestler. In

the column, he made the comment, “Wres-
tling probably taught me more about myself

than any sport. The joy of it all however was
being on a team where two of our guys went

on to win gold medals in the 1960 Olym-
pics: Doug Blubaugh and Shelby Wilson.

I enjoy stories where football players
express their respect, admiration and fear
of wrestlers/wrestling. Most people think
of football as the toughest sport. As I’ve
mentioned before, it is a fun sport. You have
10 people helping you, you get to wear pads
and a helmet, it doesn’t take any real skill or
condition and you get to hit people.
What can be more fun than that?
Also actual playing time for an entire
game is only 11 minutes. I got to know J.D.
Roberts, another football player from the
OU glory days. He told me the same story
every time I saw him and I always enjoyed
it. When J.D. came to OU, he weighed 220
pounds. He was an offensive and defensive
lineman. Everyone played both ways back
then and freshmen weren’t eligible.
Famous coaches Bud Wilkinson and
Gomer Jones made their players cut weight

and forbid weightlifting. They wanted
their football players quick and in superior
condition. After J.D.’s freshman fall season,
they told him he had to get down to 200 or
he would be cut from spring practice. They
sent him to Port Roberson, who was head
freshman football coach as well as head
wrestling coach.

“Everyday Port would make me work-
out with 123-pounder Billy Boarders and

that little animal would beat the crap out of
me every day,” J.D. told me. “I decided to
get the weight off quick to get away from

Billy, and I did. Port came up and said con-
gratulations on getting the weight off so now

you have to keep it off.
“Port went on to tell me that he would
weigh me in every Monday at noon and that
if I was overweight I’d be back with Billy. I
decided right then I was never going back.
When I won the Outland Trophy as Lineman
of the Year in 1953 I weighed 184.”
J.D. was a believer and made both of his
sons wrestle. By the way, Billy Borders was
an NCAA champion, 1952 Olympian and
later an attorney.
Wally Curtis was a wrestler at a rival
high school but was two years ahead of me.
The first time I saw him was at the YMCA
lifting weights. He was a 105-pounder and
was doing a military press with 120 pounds.
I stood well outside the wrestling room
and watched him beat guys several pounds
heavier. The next time I saw him I was on
our football team bus, which was behind the
opposing team’s bus.
We were stopped waiting for the fans
to depart the stadium after the game. There
at the door of the front bus was the little guy
from the “Y” yelling derogatory comments
at that team. Finally a big football player
charged out the door. Wally grabbed the guy
by the front of his shoulder pads and crotch
and dumped him on his head.

A second player came out and got fire-
men’s on his head. Then the coach, who had

been in the driver’s seat, came out and got hit

with a firemen’s carry. By then whistles and
sirens were blowing and people were yelling
“the cops are coming.” Wally disappeared
into the crowd. He had a good chance of
winning state his senior year in high school.
However, the week of regionals he turned
a greased pig loose in the halls of his high
school. He was expelled and didn’t get to go
to regionals to qualify for state so he got no
scholarship offers.
The next time I saw Wally was as a
teammate my freshman year at Oklahoma.
Tommy Evans had just taken over as head
coach and had recruited Wally based on
the recommendation of Wally’s high school
coach. By then Wally was married, had a kid
and settled down. He didn’t know me but he
was my hero.
As we walked into the first night of
mandatory study hall, a freshman football
player was looking Wally over. With no
provocation, he said to Wally “You are the
ugliest little s--- I have ever seen.”
Wally replied, “There’s not much either
of us can do about it.”
The football player said, “Well I can.”
Wally replied, “Go ahead.”
The football player took a swing and
Wally firemen’s carried him into a plate
glass trophy case, which stuck an Orange
Bowl trophy in the guy’s side. The crash and
glass had Port Robertson there in a flash.
Everyone agreed the football player started
it so he went to get stitched up and study
hall began. About a week later, coming out
of study hall, five or so big lineman were
standing around the fishpond in front of the
stadium.
One yelled at Wally and said, “Hey
runt, mess with any more football players
and I’ll kick your butt myself.”
Wally turned toward him and said,
“Well, let’s get it over with.”
The football player was standing with
his back to the fishpond. Wally was barely
above the guy’s waist. As the guy cocked to

swing, Wally squatted, grabbed the guy be-
hind his knees and je**ed them straight up.

As the guy’s head hit the brick trim around
the pond, Wally flipped him face down into
the pond and walked off.
A few days later, Port and Wally were
called into athletic director Bud Wilkinson’s
office. Bud pointed at Wally and said, “Mr.
Curtis, if you beat up one more football
player, we’re going to jerk your scholarship.
Port said “Bud, it’s not going to look too
good when it hits the newspapers that you’re
jerking my 115-pounder’s scholarship for
beating up your players.”
Bud said, “Port, this guy’s dangerous,
he’s going to kill somebody.”
Port pointed to Wally and said, “Don’t
beat up any more football players.”
He turned to Bud and said, “Tell your
stupid football players not to mess with
Wally. Everyone got that, that’s the way
it’s going to be. Let’s go Wally.”
No one at OU ever challenged or
crossed Port Robertson.
(Wayne Baughman won an NCAA title
at Oklahoma, competed in three Olympics
— 1964, ’68 and ’72 — and eight World
Championships and coached for 27 years at
the Air Force Academy.

The ‘moral of the story’: don’t mess with a wrestler

06/19/2020

NCAA DIVISION I Council APPROVES Women's Wrestling As An Emerging Sport!

“The Council acknowledged the need to give maximum flexibility to schools as they make decisions surrounding sport sponsorship,” said Council chair M. Grace Calhoun, athletics director at Penn. “Acrobatics and tumbling and women’s wrestling have both done everything required to be named to the emerging sports for women list, and some schools may choose to augment their programs with these new sports.”
"An emerging sport is a women’s sport recognized by the NCAA that is intended to help schools provide more athletics opportunities for women and more sport-sponsorship options for the institutions, and also help that sport achieve NCAA championship status."

Special thank you to the Bennett Family Foundation, the Hyman Family Foundation and Ms. Kyra Barry for financially supporting the NCAA effort. As a sport united, we pursed our mission like an Olympic quest. The next step is getting 2 more NCAA institutions to sponsor a varsity women's wrestling program so we meet the criteria for NCAA Championship Status.

The time is NOW to get involved.

We COULD NOT have come this far without the financial investment of the donors and supporters who fund our work.

Follow Wrestle Like A Girl on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn for updates!
Donate TODAY

The NWHOF - California Chapter 2020, May 9th Induction Banquet will be postponed. The California Department of Public He...
03/17/2020

The NWHOF - California Chapter 2020, May 9th Induction Banquet will be postponed.

The California Department of Public Health has determined that gatherings should be postponed or canceled across the state concerning the Coronavirus

By Mark PalmerSenior WriterInterMatBeing a Nike signature athlete is a unique honor/distinction bestowed on a select few...
02/18/2020

By Mark Palmer
Senior Writer
InterMat
Being a Nike signature athlete is a unique honor/distinction bestowed on a select few sports stars. Among the honorees: Bo Jackson, John McEnroe, Sheryl Swoopes. However, sports fanatics may be surprised to learn that Wayne Wells — 1972 Olympic gold medal-winning freestyle wrestler — was not only a Nike signature athlete … but the very first one.

When the National Wrestling Hall of Fame brought this distinction to this writer’s attention, I thought this story was too good NOT to share with the amateur wrestling community.

What is a Nike signature athlete?

Let’s go to the source. Here’s how Nike defines its signature athlete program at its website:

“Becoming a signature athlete at Nike is an honor reserved for few. In the company’s 42-year history, less than one percent of its endorsed athletes have been given a signature shoe.

“As members in one of the most exclusive clubs in all of sport, Nike signature athletes take pride in representing the brand and the prestige that comes with having a shoe made just for them. Through a highly collaborative process, Nike designers create footwear that is engineered to the exact specifications of the athlete’s physical needs and tailored to the demands of their specific sport. Fusing innovation with inspiration is essential.”

“Nike’s first signature athlete was welterweight wrestler, Wayne Wells. The 5′ 8″ Texas native had an accomplished career, winning a gold medal in Munich in 1972 while working closely with Nike footwear designers on his signature, high-top wresting boot. The Wrestling Hall of Fame inductee’s inner drive translated off the mat as well; he later became a practicing attorney.”

The Nike/Wayne Wells partnership

As the Nike website explains, the Oregon-based athletic shoe company targeted elite athletes that excelled at baseball, basketball, football, golf, running, soccer and tennis. However, in the first decade of Nike’s existence, Wells remained the only athlete with a signature shoe. (Now there are more than 30 Nike signature athletes.)

“I knew about the signature shoe program when I signed a contract with Nike in 1972,” Wells told InterMat. “They were just getting started.”

“Back then, there were few athletic shoes available. Nike wanted to get into all sports, including wrestling shoes. Nike designed the Wells wrestling shoe, as well as the Wells training shoe, which was designed for doing roadwork. I had told Nike they needed to come up with the training shoe.”

“After I won gold — the (Olympic) Games were over in September,” Wells continued. “I came back to Oklahoma where I got a job to practice law. (Wells had earned his law degree from University of Oklahoma.) I was also doing wrestling camps in 1973. A Nike salesman contacted me. He was a wrestling coach, and invited me to L.A. to put on a camp.”

“He wanted me to meet Phil Knight, the founder of Nike.”

As Wells explained, “Phil Knight was a track guy connected with the University of Oregon. They were developing a new track shoe without cleats. It had a waffle-type sole that was really comfortable, super-light. In fact, Knight’s wife used a waffle iron to make the first sole.”

“There hadn’t been a shoe named for a wrestler. I got some money for the deal. I had retired from wrestling, so that was fine with me.”

Wells and wrestling as they once were, now on display

Wayne Wells’ status as Nike’s first signature athlete is now a key part of an exhibit at the National Wrestling Hall of Fame in Stillwater, Okla. The display — titled “Evolution of the Sport” — features Wells’ actual Nike shoes, the original Nike poster and a photo of Wayne Wells in action on the mat … as well as other examples of wrestling gear, such as headgear and a previous-generation singlet worn by U.S. wrestlers in freestyle and Greco-Roman competition.

By Gary AbbottUSA WrestlingTwo different NCAA Divisions, NCAA Division II and NCAA Division III, voted to approve women’...
01/29/2020

By Gary Abbott
USA Wrestling

Two different NCAA Divisions, NCAA Division II and NCAA Division III, voted to approve women’s wrestling as an Emerging Sport during the NCAA Convention in Anaheim, California on Saturday.

The vote was the latest major step forward for women’s college wrestling, which is growing rapidly and gaining momentum all across the United States.

Wrestle Like A Girl, on site at the NCAA Convention, reported this great news on its Twitter feed.

“This is another exciting and monumental step forward for women’s wrestling in America. This will indeed change the lives of many young people across the nation, and also impact the lives of generations of female wrestlers to come. We thank the tireless efforts of the vast coalition of organizations and leaders that have worked together to reach this great achievement. We look forward to continued growth and expanded opportunity for women in college wrestling,” said Rich Bender, Executive Director of USA Wrestling.

“Along with high school state sanctioning, nothing is more important than opening up more opportunity at the college levels. As a sport, we have been fighting for many years to create opportunity for girls and women to wrestle at all levels. For Team USA, this will help the United States be a perennial World power in the sport. With opportunity comes growth and with growth comes numbers. We are seeing now what opportunity can do to fuel growth. This decision gives complete legitimacy for the sport, and shows that women’s wrestling is a fully functioning sport in our nation,” said National Women’s Coach Terry Steiner.

NCAA Division I did not address the issue of Emerging Sport Status for women’s wrestling this week, and will vote on that proposal in a meeting later in the year.

The most recent sport which had been added to the list of NCAA emerging sports was Beach Volleyball in 2010.

The next milestone for the wrestling community will be reaching at least 40 NCAA-affiliated varsity women’s wrestling teams, which is required to achieve an official NCAA

Championships in the sport.

To date, five women’s sports have moved from NCAA Emerging Sports Status to Championship Status: rowing, ice hockey, water polo, bowling and beach volleyball

In June 2019, the NCAA’s Committee on Women’s Athletics (CWA) has “recommended that all three divisions of the NCAA governance structure add women’s wrestling as an NCAA emerging sport, effective August 1, 2020.”

Beginning in August 2017, a coalition of wrestling organizations, including USA Wrestling, Wrestle Like A Girl, the National Wrestling Coaches Association, the National Wrestling Hall of Fame, the U.S. Olympic Committee, and expanding to include the National Collegiate Wrestling Association, worked together to submit an application to the NCAA CWA for women’s wrestling to attain Emerging Sport Status.

This group has since formally created The Women’s Collegiate Wrestling Coalition (WCWA), which is working on supporting the Emerging Sport bid and building the NCAA women’s wrestling program moving forward. The WCWA is an ad-hoc committee of USA Wrestling.

One of the big projects of the coalition is the creation of the First Annual Cliff Keen National Collegiate Women’s Wrestling Championships (NCWWC), set for Adrian College in Adrian, Mich. on March 6-7,, 2020. All NCAA varsity women’s wrestling programs at the DI, DII, and DIII levels are eligible and welcome to enter. This will serve as the national championship event for NCAA-affiliated women’s wrestling programs until official NCAA Championship status is achieved.

Women’s college wrestling has existed since the early 1990’s, with the first varsity team created in 1993. There have been women’s college wrestling national championships, including institutions from all affiliations since 2004. This past year, the NAIA gave invitational sport status to women’s wrestling and held its first national invitational championships at Jamestown University in 2019.

Women’s wrestling has been an Olympic sport since 2004, and will be contested in its fifth Olympic Games in Tokyo in 2020. United World Wrestling has conducted Senior World Championships in women’s wrestling since 1987.v

01/23/2020
2020 INDUCTEES NWHOF-CALifetime Service to Wrestling Joe DansbyBill KalivasJamill KellyPaul KeysawRick McKinneyJoe SeayS...
11/26/2019

2020 INDUCTEES NWHOF-CA

Lifetime Service to Wrestling

Joe Dansby
Bill Kalivas
Jamill Kelly
Paul Keysaw
Rick McKinney
Joe Seay
Steve Tirapelle
Gregory Zavala
Edward Zuckerman


Outstanding American

Dewayne Zinkin

NWHOF- CAInductees Luncheon - Panini's in Fresno, CA
11/22/2019

NWHOF- CA
Inductees Luncheon - Panini's in Fresno, CA

Steiner believes it's time to give up folkstyle for freestyleTerry Steiner is well known as the successful USA Women's N...
11/20/2019

Steiner believes it's time to give up folkstyle for freestyle
Terry Steiner is well known as the successful USA Women's National Team Coach. But Steiner also enjoyed a highly-successful high school and college folkstyle wrestling career at Bismarck, N.D., and at the University of Iowa.
Steiner recently spoke to WIN columnist Kyle Klingman about how he believes the United States would do better on the international level if American high school and college wrestlers competed in freestyle instead of folkstyle.

FEEL GOOD STORYNorth Carolina Signs 7-Year-Old Battling LeukemiaIn what many are calling one of the biggest signings on ...
11/18/2019

FEEL GOOD STORY

North Carolina Signs 7-Year-Old Battling Leukemia

In what many are calling one of the biggest signings on commitment day, North Carolina wrestling signed 7-year-old Mason Fanning, who is battling leukemia.

11/18/2019

National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter

2020 Inductees:

Lifetime Service to Wrestling

Joe Dansby
Bill Kalivas
Jamill Kelly
Paul Keysaw
Rick McKinney
Joe Seay
Steve Tirapelle
Gregory Zavala
Edward Zuckerman

Outstanding American

Dewayne Zinkin

Banquet Information:

May 9th
Panini's
2257 W. Shaw
Fresno, CA 93711

Social Hour
4:30pm – 6:00pm
Dinner & Induction:
6:00pm – 9:00pm
Tickets: $70.00 (Prior NWHOF inductees' dinner fee is $45.00)

Checks:
Mail to:
Dale Deffner, 5921 Kenbrook Dr., Huntington Beach, CA 92648
Payable to: NWHOF.CA

11/16/2019

National Wrestling Hall of Fame – California Chapter

2020 Induction Ceremonies

Pardini’s

2257 W. Shaw

Fresno, CA 93711

11/06/2019
10/30/2019

Dan Gable University Will Launch Legends Series


By Mike Clayton
USA Wrestling National Coaches Education Program
USA Wrestling, in partnership with the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and the National Wrestling Hall of Fame Dan Gable Museum, is launching a new video experience called the Legends Series. The first video release on November 27 will feature Olympic gold medalist, world champion, two-time NCAA champion and Hall of Fame Distinguished Member Dan Gable.

The goal of the program is to help individuals, inside and outside of our wrestling community, learn more about the people who have helped forge the way for amateur wrestling in America and the world. The program will launch with the first video, featuring the legendary wrestler and coach. The series will be called Dan Gable University and we plan to launch access through our membership.

Each series is designed to have 25-30 video clips that range from 2-20 minutes each. The total program is currently more than two hours of Gable interviews, theories and stories with more being added daily.

USA Wrestling members can purchase the series from their online profile at USAWmembership.com. Click on "USAW Events" and then "Coaching Clinics" to access the Legends Series videos. Fans who are not USA Wrestling members can purchase the course for a slightly higher fee by creating a free profile in the membership system.

Our goal is to continually launch new videos with stories and lessons learned from the greatest athletes and coaches in our sport's storied history.

Costs for the course range from $24.95 for Wrestling Leader Members to $34.95 for non-USA Wrestling members.

Click to WATCH video for Dan Gable University

08/08/2019

NWHOF California Chapter
2020 Induction Banquet

May 9th, 2020

Pardini's
2257 W. Shaw
Fresno, CA 93711

Time: Social Hour 4:30pm – 6:00pm

Dinner & Induction: 6:00pm – 9:00pm

Tickets: $70.00 (Prior NWHOF inductees’ dinner fee is $45.00)

Checks: Mail to: Dale Deffner, 5921 Kenbrook Dr., Huntington Beach, CA 92648 Payable to: NWHOF.CA

You can also buy tickets through: Ticket Leap:ca-nwhof.ticketleap.com

Action shot by Tony Rotundo at the Beat the Streets - LA International Wrestling CompetitionFeaturing the India and U.S....
04/02/2019

Action shot by Tony Rotundo at the Beat the Streets - LA International Wrestling Competition
Featuring the India and U.S. Women’s Freestyle Wrestling Teams

03/19/2019

Hollywood Wrestles Bollywood
USA vs. India

Sunday, March 31st - 3-7pm @ Wiltern Theater, Los Angeles, CA

USA's Women's wrestling team takes on Team India
On Sunday, March 31, Beat the Streets Los Angeles will host the 5th Annual Benefit and International Competition featuring a match between the India and U.S. women’s freestyle wrestling teams.

The goal is to bring the wrestling community together, promote girl's and women’s wrestling, and raise funds to support Beat the Streets' mission of empowering and transforming the lives of youth through the sport of wrestling.

Meet Olympic Champion Helen Maroulis
USA's first ever Olympic gold medalist for women's wrestling, will host a 'Meet and Greet' for fans prior to & after the event.

Come be part of this special event! Individual tickets are available here.

Group Discounts are Available
E-mail us at [email protected] with inquiries, and we will get you set-up with a discount code to bring your group at a reduced price.

Address

Huntington Beach, CA
92648

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter:

Share

Category


Other Museums in Huntington Beach

Show All

Comments

Alan Clinton received the Lifetime Service to Wrestling award from our National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter in 2016.

READ more about Alan -> https://bit.ly/3w3l0uG



You can be whatever you desire in this sport because wrestling truly is for everyone!
Congratulations to the members of the inaugural Bakersfield High Wrestling Hall of Fame.

Nathan Morgan and Darrell Vasquez are winners of our Dave Schultz High School Excellence Award while Olan Polite received the Lifetime Service to Wrestling award from our National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter.



You can be whatever you desire in this sport because wrestling truly is for everyone!
Oklahoma State Wrestling NCAA champion Stephen Barrett received the Lifetime Service to Wrestling award from our National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter in 2019.

READ more about Stephen -> https://bit.ly/3IMwOpY



Athletes in Action Wrestling
Fred Burri received the Lifetime Service to Wrestling award from our National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter in 1998 while Larry Watanabe received it in 2010.

READ more:

Fred -> https://bit.ly/3dWKxNu

Larry -> https://bit.ly/3EZ8eRb

You can be whatever you desire in this sport because wrestling truly is for everyone!

🇺🇸
Coach JD
“Stay Gold!”

Those who know, know…

You are loved!!!
__
Posted



Jerry Dervon Hawkins 🙏🏻
National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter
Congratulations to former CSU Bakersfield Athletics wrestling alumni William Kalivas and Paul Keysaw and coaches Rick McKinney and Joe Seay on receiving the Lifetime Service to Wrestling award from our National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter.

READ more about William -> https://bit.ly/3ByPmWW

READ more about Paul -> https://bit.ly/3BzmRbm

READ more about Rick -> https://bit.ly/3BxyMGL

READ more about Joe, also a Distinguished Member inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame in -> https://bit.ly/3ABbfVg



You can be whatever you desire in this sport because wrestling truly is for everyone!
We are so happy that Athletes in Action Wrestling was able to visit us while in Stillwater for their AIA Wrestling Training Camp.

Enjoyed visiting with everyone, including John Peterson, a Distinguished Member inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame in 1986; Stephen Barrett, Lifetime Service to Wrestling recipient from our National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter in 2019 and a four-time Big Eight champion and NCAA champion for Oklahoma State Wrestling; and Joey Lavallee, the Nevada winner of our Dave Schultz High School Excellence Award in 2013.



You can be whatever you desire in this sport because wrestling truly is for everyone!
We're saddened to hear of the passing of Jay Roelen, who was honored as a Meritorious Official by the National Wrestling Hall of Fame in 2003 and who received the Lifetime Service to Wrestling award from our National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter in 2000.

READ more about Jay -> https://bit.ly/3xSXFL4 and https://legcy.co/3iM6XUZ



You can be whatever you desire in this sport because wrestling truly is for everyone!
Since the Fresno State Wrestling team was reinstated in 2016, 72% of the wrestlers have been minorities and 47% have been first-generation college-bound students.

Across all three NCAA Divisions, men’s wrestling has the second largest percentage of first-time college students. A wrestling program is an opportunity that everyone can access.

According to the NCAA, men’s wrestling has the second largest percentage of LatinX student athletes and fifth largest percentage of Black student athletes.

Dennis DeLiddo received the Lifetime Service to Wrestling award from our National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter in 2015 and he coached Stephen Abas, a Distinguished Member inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame in 2018.

READ more about Coach DeLiddo -> https://bit.ly/3jrwDqz



You can be whatever you desire in this sport because wrestling truly is for everyone!
Celebrate Women’s History Month by recognizing some of the many females who have excelled in wrestling, including Nancy Schultz Vitangeli, recipient of our Order of Merit award in 2018 and a member of our Board of Governors.

WATCH Nancy's Hall of Fame video from 2018 -> https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=10155767422524601

Nancy has been involved in wresting since meeting Dave Schultz when the two were attending the University of Oklahoma. They were married in 1982 and were together until 1996 when the Olympic and World champion was murdered.

Following Dave’s death, Nancy founded the Dave Schultz Wrestling Club which sponsored 20 displaced athletes from Team Foxcatcher, providing them with training and coaching resources through the 1996 Olympics. The Dave Schultz Wrestling Club continued until 2005 and trained athletes in men’s and women’s freestyle and Greco-Roman, including Olympic gold medalists and Distinguished Members Kurt Angle and Brandon Slay, Olympic bronze medalist Patricia Miranda, and two-time NCAA Champion, World Champion and Distinguished Member Stephen Neal.

Nancy helped begin the Dave Schultz Memorial Tournament, which annually hosts elite international athletes. She also helped create the Dave Schultz High School Excellence Award in 1996, an award that is presented annually by the National Wrestling Hall of Fame to top high school wrestlers based on wrestling, scholastic achievement and citizenship.

She was named Woman of the Year by USA Wrestling in 1998 and was co-chair of USA Wrestling’s Foundation Gala in 2016. She was inducted into the California Wrestling Hall of Fame in 2006 and received the Lifetime Service to Wrestling award from the National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter in 2013.

She served as executive producer for Team Foxcatcher, an Emmy Award-nominated documentary that premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival and became one of Netflix’s most popular selections. She also was a consultant on the Oscar-nominated major motion picture Foxcatcher.



You can be whatever you desire in this sport because wrestling truly is for everyone!
It was great to have Ned Blass and J Robinson visit the museum while in town for Ned to receive the Gallagher Award from Oklahoma State Wrestling.

A two-time NCAA champion who helped Oklahoma State win the national team title in 1954, Ned coached J, who also attended Oklahoma State, in high school in California.

Ned received the Lifetime Service to Wrestling award from our National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter in 1997 while J was inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame as a Distinguished Member in 2005.

READ more about Ned -> http://bit.ly/386WWvJ

READ more about J -> http://bit.ly/2kFgt0R



You can be whatever you desire in this sport because wrestling truly is for everyone!

Minnesota Wrestling
Congratulations to Ned Blass, who received the Lifetime Service to Wrestling award from our National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter in 1997.



You can be whatever you desire in this sport because wrestling truly is for everyone!
Happy Birthday to the chairman of our Board of Governors and Penn State Nittany Lion Wrestling alum Tom Slowey.

READ about the impact that wrestling played in his life and success and why he is involved with the Hall of Fame -> http://bit.ly/2p0cOJL

Tom is shaking hands with Jim Keen, who served as chairman from 2004-13, in front of the Distinguished Member plaque of Jim's father, Cliff Keen, who served on our board from 1982-91.



You can be whatever you desire in this sport because wrestling truly is for everyone!

National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter Penn State Penn State Alumni Association
“I am who I am today because of the things that I had to go through."

Paul Garcia's high school coach, Paul Clementi, received the Lifetime Service to Wrestling award from our National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter in 2012.



You can be whatever you desire in this sport because wrestling truly is for everyone!
Tom Slowey, who is chairman of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame Board of Governors, talks about “Day of Giving: Help Your Hall,” scheduled for Wednesday, October 28.

Tom wrestled for Penn State Nittany Lion Wrestling and was honored as an Outstanding American by our National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter in 2018.

READ more about “Day of Giving: Help Your Hall” -> https://bit.ly/34bXS0x

THANK YOU for supporting your Hall of Fame!

READ about how wrestling impacted Tom’s life and success -> http://bit.ly/2p0cOJL
Happy Birthday to former high school wrestler Mario Lopez, who competed in real life at Chula Vista High School in California and on television’s Saved By The Bell at Bayside High School.

Recognized as an Outstanding American by our National Wrestling Hall of Fame - California Chapter, Mario was a state place winner in one-class California in 1991 for Chula Vista High School.

LISTEN to Mario’s interview in 2015 with Jason Bryant on Mat Talk Podcast Network -> http://bit.ly/33y2Q55



READ more about Hispanic wrestlers -> https://bit.ly/35X2okP

You can be whatever you desire in this sport because wrestling truly is for everyone!