Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum

Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum Immerse yourself in Hawai‘i’s rich culture and heritage at the premier natural and cultural history museum in the state. Welcome to Hawai‘i’s Museum.
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The Official page of Bishop Museum

Mission: Our Mission: Bishop Museum inspires our community and visitors through the exploration and celebration of the extraordinary history, culture, and environment of Hawaiʻi and the Pacific.

Operating as usual

Happy #NaturalScienceSaturday! Curious of what you can do to create a more sustainable future? Want to learn more about ...
02/28/2021

Happy #NaturalScienceSaturday! Curious of what you can do to create a more sustainable future? Want to learn more about how to save our seas?

JOIN US for a day of safe and socially distanced activities for all ages at Bishop Museum’s Science & Sustainability Festival!

Saturday, March 20, 2021
9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Learn more:
BishopMuseum.org/Calendar/ScienceAndSustainabilityFestival2021.

This year’s theme, Sustainable Seas, will feature activities and programs throughout our 15-acre campus with our Natural Science research team and our community partners. Discover how you can support a more sustainable practice for your community, plus understand the connection between natural science and culture in Hawaiʻi.

Mahalo to our hospitality partner Outrigger Resorts.

#SustainablityFest21
#ScienceAndSustainabilityFestival
#BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum

Tier 3 update! As of today, Thursday, February 25, we're welcoming groups of up to 10 to reconnect, learn, and explore t...
02/26/2021

Tier 3 update! As of today, Thursday, February 25, we're welcoming groups of up to 10 to reconnect, learn, and explore throughout our 15-acre campus. We're excited to have you join us, and kindly ask for your continued support of our Safety Protocols:

- Temperature Checks before entry

- Social Distancing (6’ around you)

- Face Masks that cover mouth AND nose
(not allowed: face shields with no face mask, gaiters, face masks with vents)

- Observing Indoor Capacity Limits

Additionally, starting March 1, visitors are highly encouraged to pre-purchase hourly timed tickets online, which will be booked on the hour from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (arrive anytime during your check-in hour). Once checked-in, visitors are welcome to stay until 5 p.m. Some restrictions apply. Learn more at BishopMuseum.org/Tickets.

Mahalo for your support of #HawaiisMuseum and we hope to see you soon!

#BishopMuseum

The Duvauchelle family of Molokaʻi has a complex history, punctuated with admirable deeds as well as tragic accidents an...
02/24/2021

The Duvauchelle family of Molokaʻi has a complex history, punctuated with admirable deeds as well as tragic accidents and decisions. Established by a French national and a Native Hawaiian in the 1860s, this branch of the Duvauchelles had five children.

Learn more about the Duvauchelle family story and living legacy in our new, original exhibition, “(Re)Generations,” on view now through October 24, 2021.

“(Re)Generations” is a reflective exploration of Bishop Museum’s scientific, educational, and moral responsibilities in the 21st century. Bishop Museum, like other historic institutions, participated for decades in activities that would now be considered unacceptable. Here we uncover the troubled history of the Sullivan Collection, with origins rooted in race science and embedded in eugenics. We also acknowledge its transformation into one of the Museum’s primary sources for genealogical research, and a vehicle for rediscovering ancestors and genealogical connections.

The people depicted in this exhibit were primarily selected through collaboration with their living descendants. By sharing information about their lives and legacies—meaningful histories ignored by Louis R. Sullivan—we celebrate the reappropriation of ancestral presence by Kānaka Maoli (Native Hawaiian) descendants.

Image sharing on social media is welcome, however out of respect for those pictured and their living descendants we do ask that you share not only their images but their names and stories as well. For all other uses please contact [email protected].

Image 1: Edward Duvauchelle, age 52 (top), and his wife, Annie Wood Kakani Duvauchelle, age 38 (right), with her mother Puaala Williams (center), and her mother’s husband, Annie’s stepfather Henry Williams (left). The children and their approximate ages, clockwise from bottom left: August (6), Reiman (12), Mary (3), Anna (2), Daniel (7), and Eugene (9); Pūkoʻo, Molokaʻi. 1920–1921. Photo by Louis R. Sullivan. Bishop Museum Archives. SP 4971.

Image 2: Home of the Duvauchelle family, also used as a hotel, with guest rooms downstairs, while the family lived upstairs. Edward Duvauchelle ran a Post Office in the smaller part of house at left. Pūkoʻo, Molokaʻi, Hawaiʻi. 1915–1922. Bishop Museum Archives. SP 77548.

Image 3: Lameka Hoʻolapa, son of David Hoʻolapa. Photo by Louis R. Sullivan, 1920–1921. SP 4213. Annemarie Aweau Paikai, Lameka’s great-great-granddaughter. Photo by Sheika Alghezawi, 2021. Background image; Kahaluʻu, Kona, Hawaiʻi. Bishop Museum Archives. SP 203580.

#ReGenerationsHI
#BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum

Craving adventure? Look to the stars and voyage through the Hawaiian night sky with our Planetarium educators. This mont...
02/23/2021

Craving adventure? Look to the stars and voyage through the Hawaiian night sky with our Planetarium educators.

This month’s exploration will teach you how to find Mars, the Hawaiian Starline Ke Kā o Makaliʻi (also known as Orion and the Winter Circle), and Leo the lion. There'll also be a recap of last Thursday's landing of NASA’s Perseverance Mars Rover!

“Stars Tonight” Online
Saturday, March 6, 2021
7-8pm HST

$6 flat rate per login, Bishop Museum Members FREE
RSVP now at https://www.bishopmuseum.org/calendar/the-stars-tonight-7-2-2.

#JWatamullPlanetarium #Astronomy
#HawaiianNightSky #StarsTonight
#BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum

For the budding young scientist in your ʻohana.SAVE THE DATE for a safe and socially distanced day of activities for exp...
02/20/2021

For the budding young scientist in your ʻohana.

SAVE THE DATE for a safe and socially distanced day of activities for explorers of all ages, Bishop Museum's Science & Sustainability Festival!

Saturday, March 20, 2021
9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Learn more:
BishopMuseum.org/Calendar/ScienceAndSustainabilityFestival2021.

This year’s theme, Sustainable Seas, will feature safe and socially distanced activities, community partners, and Museum experts, utilizing our 15-acre campus. With the support of our partners throughout the state, Bishop Museum scientists and educators will not only explore the connectivity between science and culture but also challenge participants to think critically about how we can each do our part to contribute to a more resilient, sustainable island community.

#SustainabilityFest21
#ScienceAndSustainabilityFestival
#NaturalScienceSaturday
#BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum

This just in from our J. Watumull Planetarium: And they stuck the landing! 10/10! Yesterday, February 18th at 10:55 a.m....
02/19/2021

This just in from our J. Watumull Planetarium: And they stuck the landing! 10/10! Yesterday, February 18th at 10:55 a.m. HST, NASA confirmed that the Perseverance Mars Rover successfully and safely landed on the surface of Mars. Located at the Jezero Crater, Perseverance’s primary mission is to seek signs of ancient life and collect samples of rock and soil that will someday be collected and returned to Earth. These images are the first sent back and released to the public by NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Learn more about the Mars 2020 and Perseverance Mission: https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020.

Image 1: This was taken by the descent stage and shows Perseverance being lowered to the surface by cables in the “sky crane” maneuver. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Image 2: The first full-color image sent back just minutes after landing. Taken by the Hazcams (Hazard Cameras) on the underside of Perseverance. These cameras will take images as the rover moves on Mars, and will help avoid obstacles such as rocks and holes. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Image 3: This image was also taken by one of the Hazcams and shows one of Perseverance’s six big wheels. Each wheel is driven by its own motor and are 20.7 inches in diameter. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Image 4: This image was taken by the HiRISE Camera aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. You can see the descent stage of Perseverance attached to its parachute as well as the ancient river delta Perseverance will explore to the left of the image. The small circle is where Perseverance touched down. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

#JWatumullPlanetarium #Mars
#BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum

Pau Hana Time ... with just you, the sun, and the open sea.View historic and modern surfboards in our “Mai Kinohi Mai: S...
02/19/2021

Pau Hana Time ... with just you, the sun, and the open sea.

View historic and modern surfboards in our “Mai Kinohi Mai: Surfing in Hawaiʻi” exhibit, extended until March 28, 2021. To reserve your timed tickets online, visit: BishopMuseum.org/Tickets.

This exhibit is generously supported by Duke's Waikiki and the Duke's family of restaurants, and DAWSON Impact.

Contributing Sponsors: First Insurance Company of Hawaii, LTD, Subaru Hawaii, and Tommy Holmes Foundation.

Media Sponsor: Surf News Network.

Hospitality Sponsor: Outrigger Resorts.

#MaiKinohiMai #SurfingInHawaii
#BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum

Imagine sailing away ... with just the stars in the night sky to guide you.There's still time! Catch our Planetarium's o...
02/17/2021

Imagine sailing away ... with just the stars in the night sky to guide you.

There's still time! Catch our Planetarium's online showing of "Navigating by the Stars" TONIGHT, Wednesday, February 17 from 7-8 p.m.:
www.BishopMuseum.org/Events.

Join Bishop Museum Planetarium educators and Hōkūleʻa navigator and Honolulu Community College Hoʻokele Instructor Kaʻiulani Murphy as they present an introduction to the night sky and celestial navigation, and feature the prominent Hawaiian star line this month.

Free for Bishop Museum Members, $6 flat rate per login for others -- registration required by all. See you soon!

#JWatumullPlanetarium
#BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum

Howard Hawila and Alice Wentworth Kaleohano were the parents of 15 children. They unfortunately lost four of their daugh...
02/16/2021

Howard Hawila and Alice Wentworth Kaleohano were the parents of 15 children. They unfortunately lost four of their daughters while still infants: Kaiapa Kaleohano (1909–1911), Koleka Kaleohano (1910–1912), Mary Kaleohano (1916–1917), and Rose Kaleohano (1920). Howard Hawila passed away on March 12, 1921. Their 11 remaining children went on to have children of their own resulting in a continuing legacy of 78 grandchildren and 283 great-grandchildren.

Learn more about the Kaleohano family story and living legacy in our new, original exhibition, “(Re)Generations: Challenging Scientific Racism in Hawaiʻi,” on view February 20 to October 24, 2021: https://www.bishopmuseum.org/regenerations.

“(Re)Generations” is a reflective exploration of Bishop Museum’s scientific, educational, and moral responsibilities in the 21st century. Bishop Museum, like other historic institutions, participated for decades in activities that would now be considered unacceptable. Here we uncover the troubled history of the Sullivan Collection, with origins rooted in race science and embedded in eugenics. We also acknowledge its transformation into one of the Museum’s primary sources for genealogical research, and a vehicle for rediscovering ancestors and genealogical connections.

The people depicted in this exhibit were primarily selected through collaboration with their living descendants. By sharing information about their lives and legacies—meaningful histories ignored by Louis R. Sullivan—we celebrate the reappropriation of ancestral presence by Kānaka Maoli (Native Hawaiian) descendants.

Image sharing on social media is welcome, however out of respect for those pictured and their living descendants we do ask that you share not only their image but their name and story. For all other uses please contact [email protected].

Image 1: Kaleohano family, from top, left to right: 1. Anne Kawailana Kaleohano, 2. Howard Hawila Kaleohano (father), 3. Alice Wentworth Kaleohano (mother), 4. Mary (Mele) H. Kaleohano, 5. Adeline Waioloe Kaleohano, 6. Sophia Kapono Kaleohano, 7. Smith Hawila Kaleohano, 8. Howard Hawila Kaleohano Jr.; Hoʻōpūloa, Kona, Hawaiʻi. 1920–1921. Photo by Louis R. Sullivan. Bishop Museum Archives. SP 4254.

Image 2: Lameka Hoʻolapa, son of David Hoʻolapa. Photo by Louis R. Sullivan, 1920-1921. SP 4213. Annemarie Aweau Paikai, Lamekaʻs great-great-granddaughter. Photo by Sheika Alghezawi, 2021. Background image; Kahaluʻu, Kona, Hawaiʻi. Bishop Museum Archives. SP 203580.

#ReGenerationsHI
#BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum

British explorer Captain James Cook met his demise at Kaʻawaloa, near Kealakekua Bay, Hawaiʻi on February 14, 1779. By t...
02/15/2021

British explorer Captain James Cook met his demise at Kaʻawaloa, near Kealakekua Bay, Hawaiʻi on February 14, 1779. By the time of Cook’s death, he already achieved legendary status in his native England for his lengthy explorations of the Pacific Ocean. Sensationalized accounts of his death, based on Western viewpoints, have spread far and wide, often resulting in the glorification of a beloved hero who died at the hands of “uncivilized natives.”

With a lack of unbiased first-hand accounts, much has been speculated about the events surrounding his death. It is commonly now understood that Captain Cook attempted to hold Kalaniʻōpuʻu, an aliʻi nui of Hawaiʻi Island hostage in exchange for a stolen boat. In an attempt to stop the abduction, Cook and his men were confronted, resulting in injuries and deaths on both sides.

Image: Death of Captain James Cook. ca. 1783. Oil on canvas. Painting by George Carter, Bishop Museum Archives. SXC 76865.

Image sharing on social media is welcome: for all other uses, please contact [email protected].

#TodayInHistory #BishopMuseumLA
#BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum

We love our online audiences, and especially our Bishop Museum Members! Mahalo to all of you who joined our recent "Mai ...
02/14/2021

We love our online audiences, and especially our Bishop Museum Members! Mahalo to all of you who joined our recent "Mai Kinohi Mai: Surfing in Hawaiʻi" Livestream & Talk Story, with exhibit curator DeSoto Brown, exhibit designer Michael Wilson, and surf historian John Clark!

As a bonus treat, view our new blog post featuring a behind-the-scenes look at the presentation and walkthrough of the exhibit, and some surfing facts and stories shared by DeSoto, Michael, and John:
https://blog.bishopmuseum.org/member-spotlight/mai-kinohi-mai-livestream-talk-story.

Bishop Museum Members receive FREE access to these exclusive presentations -- learn more!
BishopMuseum.org/Membership.

#BishopMuseumMembers
#BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum

Feb. 12, 1874 -- A Royal Election was held on February 12, 1874 following the death of King William Charles Lunalilo on ...
02/13/2021

Feb. 12, 1874 -- A Royal Election was held on February 12, 1874 following the death of King William Charles Lunalilo on the 3rd of that month. Lunalilo had passed away childless, unmarried, and without naming a successor. According to Article 22 of the Constitution of 1864, if such a vacancy should occur, the Legislative Assembly would be called to hold a ballot election and name an aliʻi of the kingdom to succeed the throne. Three candidates were put forth: David Kalākaua, the Dowager Queen Emma, and Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Pauahi had previously declined the throne prior to the death of Kamehameha V in 1872, and again she urged against her consideration in this election.

A heated race ensued, fueled by sociopolitical and genealogical divisions. Queen Emma, widow of Kamehameha IV, was said to have been the late King’s favorite choice and the popular choice among the Hawaiian people. Kalākaua was favored in the legislature and was elected by a margin of 39 to 6.

Unhappy with these results, a large group of Queen Emma’s supporters made their disapproval known. Ascending on the Honolulu Courthouse, they targeted Kalākaua’s legislative supporters. Many were injured, including 13 legislators who voted for Kalākaua. One later died from his injuries. Unable to quell the mob due to the lack of a Kingdom army or sufficient police force, aid from American and British military forces that were currently docked in the harbor was requested. In an effort to solidify the throne and quiet any disapproval, Kalākaua took the oath the following day.

Image 1: A souvenir display of ballots cast by the Hawaiian Legislature in the election between King Kalākaua and Queen Emma. Samuel G. Wilder collected and assembled the ballots and presented them to King Kalākaua, the winner, on March 14, 1874. The arrangement of ballots, with those cast for Kalākaua in the shape of a crown, and the six ballots cast for Dowager Queen Emma below at right and left, was originally encased in a frame of Hawaiian woods—koa, kou, and sandalwood; Hawaiʻi. Photo by Charles Myers, ©2008 Bishop Museum. QM 204345.

Image 2: Mr. T. Martin (left) and Governor (William Luther) Moehonua (right). Moehonua was injured in the riots following the ballot count for the 1874 election. Photo by M. Dickson, Bishop Museum Archives. SP 41673.

Image 3: British or American Marines at the Honolulu Courthouse during the time of the Queen Emma and Kalākaua election; Honolulu, Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi. February 1874. Photo by H. L. Chase, Bishop Museum Archives. SP 205092.
#TodayInHistory #BishopMuseumLA
#BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum

Lunar New Year, marked by the first new moon of the lunisolar calendar, typically falls between January 21st and Februar...
02/12/2021

Lunar New Year, marked by the first new moon of the lunisolar calendar, typically falls between January 21st and February 20th. This year we welcome the Year of the Ox on February 12, 2021. Wishing you peace, good fortune, prosperity, and a safe celebration!

Photo: Lion dance; Hawaiʻi. ca.1970. Photo by Joe Carini, Bishop Museum Archives. SP 101830.

Photo: Procession for Chinese New Year; Honolulu, Hawaiʻi. ca. 1910. Photo by Alonzo Gartley, Bishop Museum Archives. SP 200173.

Image sharing on social media is welcome: for all other uses, please contact [email protected].

#LunarNewYear #TodayInHistory #BishopMuseumLA
#BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum

02/10/2021

Join us at the Summit today!

We’re excited to partner with Hawaii Contemporary on their inaugural Art Summit 2021, a celebration of contemporary art and a dialogue around visual culture, presenting local and global voices to the Hawai‘i arts community, and a thematic precursor to the Hawai‘i Triennial 2022.

The Summit features renowned keynote speakers, artists, curators, and thinkers from Hawai‘i, the Pacific, and beyond. Registration is FREE – view the list of participants and schedule of events at hawaiicontemporary.org/art-summit.

Art Summit 2021
February 10-13, 2021

#ArtSummit2021 #HawaiiContemporary
#HawaiiArt #ContemporaryArt
#BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum

Address

1525 Bernice St
Honolulu, HI
96817

Bishop Museum is closed on THANKSGIVING and CHRISTMAS DAY 1. Get on the #2 or City Express B bus heading towards ‘School St./Middle St.' 2. Get off the bus at the intersection of School and Kapālama Streets.Cross School Street at the intersection and walk down Kapālama Street (you'll be headed toward the ocean, ‘makai’, though you can't see it). 3. At the intersection of Kapālama and Bernice Streets, turn right. You should see the museum grounds on the left hand side of Bernice Street and the entrance is about 200 feet up the street (on your left).

General information

Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas Bishop Museum reserves the right to moderate or remove posts or comments that are inappropriate, factually incorrect, or offensive.

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday 09:00 - 17:00
Sunday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(808) 847-3511

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Bishop Museum inspires our community and visitors through the exploration, celebration, and perpetuation of the extraordinary history, culture, and environment of Hawai‘i and the Pacific.

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You can still support and donate! We're keeping our online fundraiser's "E Ulu A Paʻa" page open until the end of September. Any donation would be appreciated, and we're grateful for your kōkua. Supporters donating $25.00 or more will receive a sticker created exclusively for "E Ulu A Paʻa" by local designer Kris Goto (Art of Goto) (U.S. mailing addresses only). Kris began her career as a muralist in 2013, and throughout the past several years has worked on murals in various locations throughout Oʻahu, including at Bishop Museum on our "Plastic Free Pipeline” installation. Visit www.BishopMuseum.cbo.io to get her sticker before we run out! #EUluAPaa #BishopMuseum #HawaiisMuseum
My Grandmother Alice Carr de Creeft did the sculpture of David and his dog, who I guess liked to surf as well! I was wondering if anyone has any idea as to what happened to the sculpture?
I'd like to try to identify a lizard/gecko that comes out every afternoon onto my lanai (between 2-4 p.m.). It's body is about 5 inches, the tail another 5, from my perspective. It is gray. No distinguishinging markings anywhere I can see. However, today, for the first time (it must feel comfortable on my lanai), it showed a large red, outlined with yellow maybe, throat "comb" that it expanded at will. I have photos of it sitting still, but was unable to get a video of the throat comb. Any idea how I can figure out what it is? By the way, my house has LOTS of geckos. We have to clean up after them ALOT. Thanks in advance.
Hi there! Very curious about the Kāneikokala statue that "refuses" to be moved. Is there any more information on it beyond what's on the placard?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Reed_Bishop I am related to her thru her marriage to my 10th cousin three times removed, Charles Reed Bishop. :)
...
Was the Moai monolith it the courtyard at the Bishop museum a replica or the real deal? What happened to it?
Beautiful day at Bishop Museum ❤
Today is my 7th Anniversary and one thing I like to do on special days is to see the historical events that happen on that day. I came across this and thought it was interesting 😊
Aloha! Yesterday I watched the full exhibit in Cascais, Portugal about their former ambassador visiting Japan where THEY called the Portugese for "barbarians". I thought that was interesting since the native Hawaiians were called the same by white visitors!
Aloha! Do you know if Princess Ka'iulani went to Portugal and stayed here too, besides to Britain? If so, when and where, and are there any notes about it that I could read in English?
Aloha! This conflict over building the telescope on Big Island, has been going on for a long time. Can you please point me to a source of reference about how it started and why the builders keep insisting when so many protest - why there?