Mānoa Heritage Center

Mānoa Heritage Center Inspiring people to be thoughtful stewards of their heritage.

A non-profit organization dedicated to promoting an understanding of the natural and cultural heritage of Hawaiʻi by caring for and sharing a cultural landscape centered on the sacred Kūkaʻōʻō Heiau, Native Hawaiian gardens and historic Kūaliʻi home and collections.

Mission: Mānoa Heritage Center is 3.5-acre living classroom dedicated to promoting an understanding of the cultural and natural heritage of Hawaiʻi.

Aloha kakahiaka and happy Wednesday! We hope everyone is doing well, staying healthy and safe. The MHC campus will reope...
06/03/2020

Aloha kakahiaka and happy Wednesday! We hope everyone is doing well, staying healthy and safe. The MHC campus will reopen in early July but in the meantime, we have created a way for you to enjoy the moʻolelo (stories) of our beautiful valley from the comfort of your own home.

We are excited to share the newest feature of our digital programming, [email protected] virtual tours. Using Prezi, an interactive presentation application, we are able to share images, stories, and audio about this special place with you.

Learn more about how to start your Mānoa adventure here: https://bit.ly/mhcblog10

#KaaipūKākouBlog #MHCatHome #VirtualTours #MuseumFromHome

#BlackoutTuesday
06/02/2020

#BlackoutTuesday

Hawai‘i is a special place with a unique and diverse flora that ancient Hawaiians were highly resourceful in utilizing. ...
05/27/2020

Hawai‘i is a special place with a unique and diverse flora that ancient Hawaiians were highly resourceful in utilizing. Many plants had multiple uses from medicinal to recreational and even food plants were used for more than just eating. But it is the ingenuity of the Hawaiian people in creating dyes and the techniques to make them that is so incredible. Traditional dye-making techniques often required an abundance of time, in addition to skill and knowledge. The process usually includes harvesting and preparing the plants (removing bark, drying, seed removal, etc.) before extracting the dye, which could be a process in itself.
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They learned that one plant could produce multiple colors from different parts and that the growing location, soil, and age of a plant can affect the pigment. Seeds, roots, leaves, flowers, fruits, and bark from a variety of plants produced a rainbow of colors from pastel to vibrant that were used to dye kapa (barkcloth), and for ‘ohe kapala (bamboo stamps) used to create patterns on kapa. Interestingly, when it came to naming dyes, it was often done according to its source rather than the actual color since it was easier to use a form of the plant name than to create a whole new name.
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Learn how to create your own dyes from native and canoe plants (‘olena, hau, koki‘o ‘ula, & ma‘o) with step-by-step instructions from Zoe Welch, daughter of our executive director. Based on her school assignment to create an ecology project that promoted awareness, appreciation, and knowledge of Hawai‘i, Zoe has graciously shared her findings with us so that we can have as much fun as she did experimenting with plants and creating dyes. Click the link to see the full post! https://bit.ly/mhcblog9

#HawaiianDyeMaking #NativeHawaiianPlants #CanoePlants #KaaipūKākouBlog #MHCatHome #AAPIHM #AsianAmericanPacificIslanderHeritageMonth #AAPIHM2020

‘Uala (sweet potato) was one of the most important plants in early Hawaiian culture along with kalo. Brought to the Isla...
05/20/2020

‘Uala (sweet potato) was one of the most important plants in early Hawaiian culture along with kalo. Brought to the Islands by Polynesian settlers, there were once up to 200 varieties of sweet potato grown here but only a few remain today. This drought-resistant vining plant can also be a nice ground cover with its purplish flowers and dark green leaves that vary in shape depending on the type.
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In addition to being a key food source, ‘uala was also used for rituals, some varieties were used medicinally, and it had many everyday uses such as feeding pigs and catching ‘ōpelu (a type of mackerel). Old vines and leaves were even used as padding under floors and mats of lau hala.
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Photos 2-7 show MHC’s māla ‘uala (‘uala garden) that has been a project of students from Mo‘O School, a small Montessori school in Mānoa, and Kapolei High School’s Ho‘ola Leadership Academy. The MoʻO kids propagated ʻuala and learned from the high schoolers who also built the māla based on traditional Hawaiian practices.
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This week on the Ka‘aipū Kākou blog, longtime MHC docent and friend Carmela Tafoya shares her love of ‘uala and shows you how to propagate your own 🌱 Read her stories and find some great recipes at https://bit.ly/mhcblog8 and feel free to share your own!

#Uala #HawaiianSweetPotato #KaaipūKākouBlog #MHCatHome #AAPIHM #AsianAmericanPacificIslanderHeritageMonth #AAPIHM2020 @ Mānoa Heritage Center

Kōnane or Hawaiian checkers, is a game of strategy more complex than the checkers we know today. Played by both ali‘i an...
05/15/2020

Kōnane or Hawaiian checkers, is a game of strategy more complex than the checkers we know today. Played by both ali‘i and commoners, men and women, the carved stone and wood boards had shallow depressions for pieces but it was also played on flat surfaces such as lauhala mats. They playing pieces are pebbles called ‘ili‘ili, 32 each of black (traditionally lava rock) and white (traditionally coral).
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There are many ways to play but this is the way we were taught by Kumu Aloha Keikipi. Pieces are placed on the board alternating black and white. To start, one player picks up one white and one black piece from the board, holds them behind their back, mixes them between their hands, then presents their closed fists for the other person to pick. The stone picked determines the color they will play. These stones are then returned to the board. Black starts the game (always) by removing any black piece from the board, then white does the same with a white piece.
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Move pieces by jumping once, forward, back, left, or right. You cannot move in two directions in one turn or move diagonally. The aim is to jump your piece over an opponent’s piece and into an empty space. Then remove the opponent’s piece you just jumped over from the board. If you are the last to be able to make a move you win!

If the same 2 players choose to play again, switch colors, alternating with each game. This game is both fun and challenging to play!

#AAPIHM #AsianAmericanPacificIslanderHeritageMonth #Kōnane #HawaiianCheckers #AAPIHM2020 #MHCatHome @ Mānoa Heritage Center

Kalo or taro was an essential food source for early Hawaiians and remains an integral part of Hawaiian culture and ident...
05/13/2020

Kalo or taro was an essential food source for early Hawaiians and remains an integral part of Hawaiian culture and identity. Considered the older brother of man, according to Hawaiian mythology, kalo was once grown all over the Hawaiian islands. In fact, some valleys were filled with lo‘i (irrigated pond-fields) and dedicated to the cultivation of kalo, including Mānoa.
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A complex carbohydrate, kalo is one of the most nutritious & easily digestible foods. The corm is an excellent source of fiber & potassium while the leaves are excellent sources of vitamins and calcium. Almost the whole plant was eaten (usually minus the stems depending on the variety). Leaves were and are used for laulau or lu‘au & the corm used to make a variety of dishes from chips to kulolo and, of course, poi.
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Kalo was also used topically or mixed with other plants for a variety of medicinal uses, as well as for settling the stomach. Some varieties were used to create dyes and even glue kapa pieces together.
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Learn more about how kalo is making a comeback, where to find kalo/poi on O‘ahu, and find recipes utilizing this amazing plant by clicking here: https://bit.ly/mhcblog7

#AAPIHM #AsianPacificIslanderHeritageMonth #KaaipūKākouBlog #MHCatHome #Kalo #Taro #HawaiianCulture

Happy Aloha Friday 🌺 Niho ‘oki are traditional Hawaiian shark tooth knives. A utility knife, this tool had a variety of ...
05/08/2020

Happy Aloha Friday 🌺

Niho ‘oki are traditional Hawaiian shark tooth knives. A utility knife, this tool had a variety of uses that included wood carving, hair cutting, stripping bark for kapa, and food preparation. It was also used as a weapon by maka‘ainana (commoners).
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The handles were usually made from wood, carved and shaped to be comfortably held. Holes were drilled, traditionally, using a wili (pump drill) Then the two parts were lashed together using cordage made from plant fibers, possibly hau or olonā.
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Olonā is an endemic shrub that was once a vita resource in Hawai‘i and had many uses. Cordage made from olonā was lightweight and very strong and was used not just for niho ‘oki but also as the foundation for feather capes, helmets, and pā‘ū; lashing shark teeth on other weapons; creating nets to catch birds; as fishing line or kite strings; and even to tie the umbilical cord on newborn babies.

#AAPIHM #AsianPacificIslanderHeritageMonth #HawaiianTools #NihoOki #SharkToothKnife #MānoaHeritageCenter

05/05/2020
Knowledge is a Gift That Keeps on Giving

We are all born #blessed with the opportunity of learning from the greatest teacher, ʻĀINA. This ʻĀina encompasses nature (life+time). No other teacher is as graceful, compassionate, patient, honest, and humble, though, many good teachers resemble these qualities of the ʻĀina.

Learn about some inspiring teachers on today's blog at https://bit.ly/mhcblog6

#NationalTeacherDay #TeacherAppreciationWeek

Sending a virtual lei of aloha to all of you on this May Day🌺Lei Day! For all of us at MHC, the best lei are those made ...
05/01/2020

Sending a virtual lei of aloha to all of you on this May Day🌺Lei Day! For all of us at MHC, the best lei are those made and given with true affection.
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Photos: Fragrant lei puakenikeni made by @meleana_hawaii 🌺 Mary Moragne Cooke, 1950 Lihue Grammar School May Day Queen 🌺 ‘Anakala Bill Char 💖 spreading his lei magic 🌺 Family lei making with @artexplorium 🌺 The best part: giving a lei!

Adorable auntie ADELE enjoys showing haumāna Kamapua’a in the kukui leaf!.She is the first docent here on tour mornings,...
05/01/2020

Adorable auntie ADELE enjoys showing haumāna Kamapua’a in the kukui leaf!
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She is the first docent here on tour mornings, she loves learning, 📚 sharing, and has been taking this new slowed pace lifestyle to support local farmers and discover new veggies to cook with 🍅🥬🥕
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Adele Ming continues to share her compassion of learning with students by participating in the DOE mentorship program, which she often jets off to after an MHC tour
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#VolunteerMonth2020 #MHCohana #Mahalo

Surfer 🏄🏻‍♀️ gal docent, LOKE SIMON always reminds us to stop and smell the loke 🌹.☀️ "On occasion, my interactions with...
04/30/2020

Surfer 🏄🏻‍♀️ gal docent, LOKE SIMON always reminds us to stop and smell the loke 🌹
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☀️ "On occasion, my interactions with the children bring tears of joy." While Loke expresses that volunteering isn't always easy, and is busy with her big role at Hawaii State Art Museumʻs Art Bento, she invariably feels uplifted when she gives tours 🥰
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And we are uplifted when we see Loke's contagious smile! #VolunteerMonth2020 #MHCohana #Mahalo

Let’s propagate native plants! 🌱 It’s easy to do and an important part of ensuring that we will continue to have these i...
04/29/2020

Let’s propagate native plants! 🌱 It’s easy to do and an important part of ensuring that we will continue to have these important plants in the future. This is a great activity to do with your children or grandchildren.


“Keiki at a young age are like sponges and soak up everything around them, even when you think they aren’t paying attention to you. Teaching Seraphina about our ʻāina and how to mālama it at such an early age is creating a fundamental foundation for her to understand and care for our natural world. This foundation that you create and foster for your keiki will last them a lifetime and has the potential to affect their decision making in ways we can’t predict. Already, she understands that seeing ʻopala (trash) on the ground is not pono (right) and that plants need sun, water, nutrients, and love to thrive. Setting these simple concepts into her mind and lifestyle right now will hopefully mold her into a good steward of the land and she, in turn, can share with others.” – Moani Hibbard of Ao Ola
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A good friend of MHC, Moani, with assistance from her daughter Seraphina, shares how to propagate ʻaʻaliʻi from seeds and pōhinahina from cuttings in today’s blog post. Visit our blog to find out how you can add native plants to your garden! 🌏 ❤️

https://www.manoaheritagecenter.org/2020/04/kaaipu-kakou-5/

#NativeHawaiianPlantMonth #NativeHawaiianPlantPropagation #KaʻaipūKākouBlog #MHCAtHome

Aloha Kakahiaka! ☀️ Good Morning! Today we feature Naupaka, a unique flower and favorite of MHC staff member Kelsey H. T...
04/27/2020

Aloha Kakahiaka! ☀️ Good Morning! Today we feature Naupaka, a unique flower and favorite of MHC staff member Kelsey H.

The legend of Naupaka and Kaui has many versions though all tell of star-crossed lovers destined to remain apart. In one common telling, Naupaka was a princess and sister of Pele who fell in love with Kaui, a fisherman. Naupaka asked Pele for permission to marry Kaui but Pele decided she wanted Kaui for herself. He turned Pele down and to escape her fury, Kaui fled to the mountains and Naupaka to the beach. In each of these places a plant with half of a flower grew. This legend was the inspiration for Kamea Hadarʻs mural on the SALT parking structure in Kaka‘ako (img.6-7)
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Naupaka Kuahiwi (mountain naupaka) is endemic to Hawai‘i and can range in size from a shrub to small tree. Between the 9 species flowers can be yellow or white with a light to moderate fragrance. The fruit were used to make a purplish-black dye and flowers used in lei. Image 3 shows what we believe to be a keiki naupaka kuahiwi growing near Kūka‘ō‘ō Heiau. 🌱
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Naupaka Kahakai (beach naupaka) is indigenous and widely used in local landscaping as it is low maintenance and hardy, tolerating drought, wind, salt spray, and heat. Excellent as ground cover or hedges, this native shrub is great for erosion control. It’s flowers are generally white/cream with purple streaks but can also be greenish-white, purple, or yellow. Traditionally, fruit was eaten during times of famine, flowers used in lei, and a mix of salt and bark used to treat wounds and cuts. Today, the fruits and flowers are used for lei and it is said that rubbing diving masks with naupaka leaves will prevent fogging! 🤿

#HINativeBouquet #Naupaka #NaupakaAndKaui #NaupakaKahakai #BeachNaupaka #NaupakaKuahiwi #MountainNaupaka #NativeHawaiianPlantMonth #MuseumBouquet

A little late but wanted to join the celebration for #‘Ōhi‘aLehuaDay!! ❤️What is your favorite thing about this beautifu...
04/26/2020

A little late but wanted to join the celebration for #‘Ōhi‘aLehuaDay!! ❤️What is your favorite thing about this beautiful tree? #ʻŌhiʻaLehuaDay #HINativeBouquet #MHCAtHome

As part of #HINativeBouquet that was inspired by the #MuseumBouquet created by Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden& Ne...
04/24/2020

As part of #HINativeBouquet that was inspired by the #MuseumBouquet created by Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden& New-York Historical Society, here is an endemic (unique to Hawai‘i) Hawaiian tree for National Arbor Day: loulu palm, a favorite of MHC staff member, Emily Fay.
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Loulu palm (Pritchardia) is the only palm that is native to Hawai‘i, which is surprising when you look at how many kinds of palm we have on our islands now. It is a beautiful fan palm & according to the 'Amy Greenwell Ethnobotanical Guide to Native Plants,' there are 19 Hawaiian species of loulu, 9 of which are endangered or threatened.
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To Emily, this palm symbolizes how drastic the human impact on our islands has been. Author & professor Patrick Kirch cites research that loulu forests grew everywhere in Hawai‘i before humans arrived. She hopes to plant at least one in her small garden to help this native tree regain a small foothold. ( they are sometimes available at Koolau Farmers but call first)
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When leading MHC tours, she points out the loulu palms planted over 100 years ago by the Cooke family as part of their palm garden, shares how the tree symbolizes the impact we’ve had on Hawai‘i’s natural environment and some of the uses that Hawaiians, who wouldn’t have encountered this unique tree elsewhere, had for it. The trunks were used for construction and making spears, the fruits were eaten, and the leaves were used for thatching houses in rainy areas and making fans, umbrellas, hats, and baskets. In fact, the world loulu can mean ‘umbrella’ because of how the leaves were often used. Emily states, “To me, this shows the ingenuity of ancient Hawaiians as they figured out so many uses for every new plant they encountered.”

#NationalArborDay #ArborDay2020 #NativeHawaiianPlantMonth #LouluPalm #HINativeBouquet #MuseumBouquet #NativeHawaiianPlants

April is #volunteerappreciationmonth!...Today we celebrate longtime @manoaheritagecenter friend and volunteer Aloha McGu...
04/23/2020

April is #volunteerappreciationmonth!
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Today we celebrate longtime @manoaheritagecenter friend and volunteer Aloha McGuffie. Aloha shares her enthusiasm for Hawaiian culture, her love of hula, and appreciation of native plants with kindness and grace.
1) How long have you volunteered @manoaheritagecenter?
🌱I have been a volunteer for 10 years
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2) Why do you like volunteering at MHC?
🌱 I have learned so much from the people of MHC over the years and enjoy sharing the historical, cultural, and natural richness of this important place.
3) What is your favorite plant in the MHC garden?
🌱 ‘A’a’li’i, when in bloom, it reminds me of my hairpiece when I married Maikalani 🥰
4) What are some of the silver linings you have discovered during this time at home?
🌱 This time-out has allowed me to PAUSE to enjoy nature from our lanai, walk along the beach (😷), listen to music, learn new recipes, and connecting with family and friends more frequently (via cell, FaceTime, Zoom, WeChat, WhatsApp, Facebook, Instagram and email)😊
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Swipe to see the a’a’li’i in bloom @manoaheritagecenter. #MHCatHOME #MHCohana @ Mānoa Heritage Center

E kuahui like i ka hana 🌱Let everybody pitch in and work together 🌱ʻŌlelo Noʻeau No. 323...It's the 50th anniversary of ...
04/22/2020

E kuahui like i ka hana 🌱
Let everybody pitch in and work together 🌱
ʻŌlelo Noʻeau No. 323
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It's the 50th anniversary of Lā Honua🌏!
Swipe through the images for some ideas to celebrate Mother Earth.
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For additional resources and activities, check out our website: https://www.manoaheritagecenter.org/2020/04/resources-to-celebrate-la-honua-2020-earth-day/
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"We are each made for goodness, love, and compassion. Our lives are transformed as much as the world is when we live these truths."
- Archbishop Desmond Mpilo Tutu

#LāHonua #EarthDay2020 #EarthDayEveryDay

Address

2856 Oahu Ave
Honolulu, HI
96822

For Bus directions visit https://www.manoaheritagecenter.org/directions/

General information

Tours by reservation only. See available dates and time on our website

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 16:00
Thursday 09:00 - 16:00
Friday 09:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(808) 988-1287

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A non-profit organization dedicated to promoting an understanding of the natural and cultural heritage of Hawaiʻi by caring for and sharing a cultural landscape centered on sacred Kūkaʻōʻō Heiau, Native Hawaiian gardens and historic Kūaliʻi home and collections.

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See below, about the Cooke Family:
#GIVINGTUESDAY Manoa Heritage Center !!!