Mānoa Heritage Center

Mānoa Heritage Center Inspiring people to be thoughtful stewards of their heritage. A non-profit organization dedicated to promoting an understanding of the natural and cultural heritage of Hawaiʻi by caring for and sharing a cultural landscape centered on the sacred Kūkaʻōʻō Heiau, Native Hawaiian gardens and historic Kūaliʻi home and collections.

Operating as usual

Thursday in the Garden! ☀️🌺🌱🌼- ʻŌhiʻa ʻai (Syzygium malaccense)- ʻŪlei (Ostemeles anthyllidifolia)- Alaheʻe (Psydrax odo...
06/03/2021

Thursday in the Garden! ☀️🌺🌱🌼

- ʻŌhiʻa ʻai (Syzygium malaccense)
- ʻŪlei (Ostemeles anthyllidifolia)
- Alaheʻe (Psydrax odorata)
- Pōhinahina (Vitex rotundifolia)
- ʻIlima (Sida fallax)
- ʻAʻaliʻi (Dodonea viscosa)
- Naupaka Kahakai (Scaevola taccada)
- Moa (Psilotum nudum)

#MānoaHeritageCenter #MānoaValley #NativeHawaiianPlants #ŌhiaAi #MountainApple #SyzygiumMalaccense #Ūlei #OstemelesAnthyllidifolia #Alahee #PsydraxOdorata #Pōhinahina #VitexRotundifolia #Ilima #SidaFallax #Aalii #DodoneaViscosa #NaupakaKahakai #ScaevolaTaccada #Moa #PsilotumNudum #NativeHawaiianGarden #IndigenousHawaiianPlants

Thursday in the Garden! ☀️🌺🌱🌼- ʻŌhiʻa ʻai (Syzygium malaccense)- ʻŪlei (Ostemeles anthyllidifolia)- Alaheʻe (Psydrax odo...
06/03/2021

Thursday in the Garden! ☀️🌺🌱🌼

- ʻŌhiʻa ʻai (Syzygium malaccense)
- ʻŪlei (Ostemeles anthyllidifolia)
- Alaheʻe (Psydrax odorata)
- Pōhinahina (Vitex rotundifolia)
- ʻIlima (Sida fallax)
- ʻAʻaliʻi (Dodonea viscosa)
- Naupaka Kahakai (Scaevola taccada)
- Moa (Psilotum nudum)

#MānoaHeritageCenter #MānoaValley #NativeHawaiianPlants #ŌhiaAi #MountainApple #SyzygiumMalaccense #Ūlei #OstemelesAnthyllidifolia #Alahee #PsydraxOdorata #Pōhinahina #VitexRotundifolia #Ilima #SidaFallax #Aalii #DodoneaViscosa #NaupakaKahakai #ScaevolaTaccada #Moa #PsilotumNudum #NativeHawaiianGarden #IndigenousHawaiianPlants

Mānoa Memories of Noboru Oda As part of MHC’s 2020 Docent Enrichment series, Board Member Helen Nakano chose to remember...
05/27/2021

Mānoa Memories of Noboru Oda

As part of MHC’s 2020 Docent Enrichment series, Board Member Helen Nakano chose to remember long-time Mānoa resident & community leader Noboru Oda by sharing some of his stories of growing up in Mānoa Valley.
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Noboru Oda's father was one of the early contract laborers who came from Fukuoka, Japan to work at the Hakalau Plantation on the Big Island. After completing his contract, he moved to Honolulu, near the old Dole Cannery. Noboru was the 2nd child of this marriage & the only son of 7 daughters. When he was 4 or 5, his family moved deep into Mānoa Valley where a few Chinese families farmed bananas & Japanese farmed vegetables. His father began farming dryland taro & sold it through an agent. It took 8 months of intensive labor and sometimes they didn't get paid if the taro rotted before it reached California. Auwe! They also raised vegetables for the local market.

His family had no car, no telephone, or electricity. They used an outdoor cesspool & a stove they fed with wood. There were lots of mosquitoes. His family of 8 children was evicted from the 2 to 3 acres of land they lived on 3 times. Because education was important, all the children were sent to both English & Japanese language school at age 6. When she was 12, Noboru's eldest sister went to work as a housemaid for a rich haole family down the valley. Noboru went to Washington Intermediate School until 9th grade when his father became too ill to work. By the age of 14, Noboru was driving the truckful of vegetables from Mānoa to River Street.

Life was survival in those days. Mr. Oda admitted that sometimes hidden among the daikon he delivered were a gallon or 2 of okolehao [Hawaiian moonshine made from the root of the tī plant] that they brewed in the forests. He delivered the contraband to Chinatown during the Prohibition Era [1920-33].

When asked about his childhood, he recalls not playing, only "tanomoshi", the forming of financial cooperatives based on a system of money pooling among friends & family. Always in debt, the farmers needed larger amounts to pay for the guano fertilizer, paying workers during harvest, & for misfortunes and illnesses. Tanomoshi was based on trust. Sometimes, if a friend you co-signed for didn't pay at the end, you ended up paying his debt to the others. But without a bank to borrow from, how could you survive?

In 1995, when he was recruited to serve on the board of local community organization Mālama o Mānoa (now known as Mālama Mānoa), Noboru not only owned his own home in Mānoa, he owned a wholesale vegetable business, & sent all 3 of his children to college. During his tenure at Mālama o Mānoa with Helen Nakano & Mary Cooke, he was always respectfully called “Mr. Oda,” and valued as a wise kupuna.

#MānoaMemories #MānoaHistory #HistoryOfHawaii #AAPIHeritageMonth #AAPIHeritageMonth2021 #AsianAmericanPacificIslanderHeritageMonth #AAPI #AAPIHM #FilipinoAmerican #JapaneseAmerican #APAHM #APAHM2021 #AsianPacificAmericanHeritage #AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth

Mānoa Memories of Noboru Oda

As part of MHC’s 2020 Docent Enrichment series, Board Member Helen Nakano chose to remember long-time Mānoa resident & community leader Noboru Oda by sharing some of his stories of growing up in Mānoa Valley.
.
.
Noboru Oda's father was one of the early contract laborers who came from Fukuoka, Japan to work at the Hakalau Plantation on the Big Island. After completing his contract, he moved to Honolulu, near the old Dole Cannery. Noboru was the 2nd child of this marriage & the only son of 7 daughters. When he was 4 or 5, his family moved deep into Mānoa Valley where a few Chinese families farmed bananas & Japanese farmed vegetables. His father began farming dryland taro & sold it through an agent. It took 8 months of intensive labor and sometimes they didn't get paid if the taro rotted before it reached California. Auwe! They also raised vegetables for the local market.

His family had no car, no telephone, or electricity. They used an outdoor cesspool & a stove they fed with wood. There were lots of mosquitoes. His family of 8 children was evicted from the 2 to 3 acres of land they lived on 3 times. Because education was important, all the children were sent to both English & Japanese language school at age 6. When she was 12, Noboru's eldest sister went to work as a housemaid for a rich haole family down the valley. Noboru went to Washington Intermediate School until 9th grade when his father became too ill to work. By the age of 14, Noboru was driving the truckful of vegetables from Mānoa to River Street.

Life was survival in those days. Mr. Oda admitted that sometimes hidden among the daikon he delivered were a gallon or 2 of okolehao [Hawaiian moonshine made from the root of the tī plant] that they brewed in the forests. He delivered the contraband to Chinatown during the Prohibition Era [1920-33].

When asked about his childhood, he recalls not playing, only "tanomoshi", the forming of financial cooperatives based on a system of money pooling among friends & family. Always in debt, the farmers needed larger amounts to pay for the guano fertilizer, paying workers during harvest, & for misfortunes and illnesses. Tanomoshi was based on trust. Sometimes, if a friend you co-signed for didn't pay at the end, you ended up paying his debt to the others. But without a bank to borrow from, how could you survive?

In 1995, when he was recruited to serve on the board of local community organization Mālama o Mānoa (now known as Mālama Mānoa), Noboru not only owned his own home in Mānoa, he owned a wholesale vegetable business, & sent all 3 of his children to college. During his tenure at Mālama o Mānoa with Helen Nakano & Mary Cooke, he was always respectfully called “Mr. Oda,” and valued as a wise kupuna.

#MānoaMemories #MānoaHistory #HistoryOfHawaii #AAPIHeritageMonth #AAPIHeritageMonth2021 #AsianAmericanPacificIslanderHeritageMonth #AAPI #AAPIHM #FilipinoAmerican #JapaneseAmerican #APAHM #APAHM2021 #AsianPacificAmericanHeritage #AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth

Mānoa Memories - Rosie Acopan RamiroThe 7th of 8 children, long-time Mānoa resident Rosie Acopan Ramiro was raised on th...
05/21/2021

Mānoa Memories - Rosie Acopan Ramiro

The 7th of 8 children, long-time Mānoa resident Rosie Acopan Ramiro was raised on the Acopan family farm at the back of Mānoa, at the time the largest Filipino independent farm in the valley. MHC was fortunate to get to know Rosie when she gave a presentation called “Growing up Acopan – The Filipino Farmers of Mānoa” for our 2020 Docent Enrichment series. Here is a snippet of Rosie’s story.

“Until 2017, I was a Mānoa resident who enjoyed the frequent liquid sunshine in this beautiful valley. The first quarter of my life was spent on a banana and ti leaf farm way back in the valley across the river (Naniuapo Stream) from Paradise Park. My father, Elpidio Acopan, was a sakada, first-generation Filipino who was recruited to work the plantations on the Big Island. He came from Bacarra, Ilocos Norte, Philippines in 1926. Dad was illiterate but had a keen mathematical ability, a shrewd head for business, and a charismatic personality.

He married Nobuko Yamamoto, a neighboring vegetable farmer who had lived in Mānoa since the mid-1920’s. The Yamamotos emigrated from Hiroshima. Being of two ethnicities, my parents insisted we learn and appreciate both cultures. My seven siblings and I learned to be hardworking, honest, and kind.

We also knew how to play hard! With our Filipino cousins, we had a ready-made football team! We played jump rope, marbles, cards, jacks, hide-and-seek, arm wrestling, catching opai in the river, and our very favorite – rafting in the river on a huge truck innertube!

With our Japanese cousins, we enjoyed going to samurai movies at Toyo or Nippon theater. Growing up in Mānoa was amazing!”

Photo: Elpidio and Nobuko Acopan in 1942 (photo courtesy of the Acopan Family)

#MānoaMemories #MānoaHistory #HistoryOfHawaii #AAPIHeritageMonth #AAPIHeritageMonth2021 #AsianAmericanPacificIslanderHeritageMonth #AAPI #AAPIHM #FilipinoAmerican #JapaneseAmerican #FilipinoJapaneseAmerican #APAHM #APAHM2021 #AsianPacificAmericanHeritage #AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth

Mānoa Memories - Rosie Acopan Ramiro

The 7th of 8 children, long-time Mānoa resident Rosie Acopan Ramiro was raised on the Acopan family farm at the back of Mānoa, at the time the largest Filipino independent farm in the valley. MHC was fortunate to get to know Rosie when she gave a presentation called “Growing up Acopan – The Filipino Farmers of Mānoa” for our 2020 Docent Enrichment series. Here is a snippet of Rosie’s story.

“Until 2017, I was a Mānoa resident who enjoyed the frequent liquid sunshine in this beautiful valley. The first quarter of my life was spent on a banana and ti leaf farm way back in the valley across the river (Naniuapo Stream) from Paradise Park. My father, Elpidio Acopan, was a sakada, first-generation Filipino who was recruited to work the plantations on the Big Island. He came from Bacarra, Ilocos Norte, Philippines in 1926. Dad was illiterate but had a keen mathematical ability, a shrewd head for business, and a charismatic personality.

He married Nobuko Yamamoto, a neighboring vegetable farmer who had lived in Mānoa since the mid-1920’s. The Yamamotos emigrated from Hiroshima. Being of two ethnicities, my parents insisted we learn and appreciate both cultures. My seven siblings and I learned to be hardworking, honest, and kind.

We also knew how to play hard! With our Filipino cousins, we had a ready-made football team! We played jump rope, marbles, cards, jacks, hide-and-seek, arm wrestling, catching opai in the river, and our very favorite – rafting in the river on a huge truck innertube!

With our Japanese cousins, we enjoyed going to samurai movies at Toyo or Nippon theater. Growing up in Mānoa was amazing!”

Photo: Elpidio and Nobuko Acopan in 1942 (photo courtesy of the Acopan Family)

#MānoaMemories #MānoaHistory #HistoryOfHawaii #AAPIHeritageMonth #AAPIHeritageMonth2021 #AsianAmericanPacificIslanderHeritageMonth #AAPI #AAPIHM #FilipinoAmerican #JapaneseAmerican #FilipinoJapaneseAmerican #APAHM #APAHM2021 #AsianPacificAmericanHeritage #AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth

This is the last call for Summer Hula Camp with Kumu Kilohana Silve and we’ve got some updates!- Camp is now going to be...
05/19/2021

This is the last call for Summer Hula Camp with Kumu Kilohana Silve and we’ve got some updates!

- Camp is now going to be taught in-person at MHC taking advantage of our outdoor spaces and open classroom
- Participation is limited to 15 people and everyone must wear a mask.
- All students will need to complete a mandatory COVID waiver and temperatures will be checked each day
- Registration closes on Friday, May 28

Again, the focus this year will be on Kamehameha I since camp ends on Kamehameha Day. In each session, keiki will learn Hawaiian history, moʻolelo, and a hula that honors Kamehameha. They will also make their own half shell kukui lei and sew kupeʻe (bracelets) for their wrists (see image 2). There will also be virtual excursions into the MHC gardens to see Kūkaʻōʻō heiau and learn about some of our native Hawaiian plants.

For more information and to register go to bit.ly/hulacamp21 ! We hope to see you there!

#MānoaHeritageCenter #MHCHulaCamp2021 #MHCHulaCamp #KingKamehamehaI #HawaiianHistory #Moolelo #KupeeMaking #KukuiLeiMaking #KūkaōōHeiau #NativeHawaiianPlants #MaKaHanaKaIke #LearnByDoing

Hawaiian Names: Lama, ĒlamaScientific Name: Diospyros hillebrandiiCommon names: Hillebrand’s Lama, Hillebrand’s Persimmo...
05/15/2021

Hawaiian Names: Lama, Ēlama
Scientific Name: Diospyros hillebrandii
Common names: Hillebrand’s Lama, Hillebrand’s Persimmon

Status: Endemic

- Found on Kauaʻi and Oʻahu

- Liko (new growth) are brightly colored in shades of red, magenta, pink, or orange

- Closely related to ebony (known for its prized black wood) & persimmons with their ʻono, sweet fruit

- Fossilized lama leaf impressions can be found in solidified volcanic ash from vents in Moanalua and Hālawa on Oʻahu

- In hālau hula, the altar, or kuahu, would have a block of lama wood on it that was representative of Laka, goddess of hula

#MānoaHeritageCenter #MānoaValley #NativeHawaiianPlants #EndemicHawaiianPlants #DiospyrosHillebrandii #Ēlama #FridayFlora #FloraFriday

Come and join us for Hula Camp with kumu hula Kilohana Silve this summer from June 7-11! This year’s camp will be a hybr...
05/11/2021

Come and join us for Hula Camp with kumu hula Kilohana Silve this summer from June 7-11! This year’s camp will be a hybrid of online (Zoom) & in-person (at MHC) sessions for keiki ages 9-12. We are also happy to say that due a generous donor, hula camp is once again complimentary.

The focus this year will be on Kamehameha I since camp ends on Kamehameha Day. In each session keiki will learn Hawaiian history and moʻolelo as well as a hula honoring Kamehameha. They will also make their own half shell kukui lei and kūpeʻe bracelets for their wrists (see image 2). There will also be virtual excursions into MHC’s gardens to see Kūkaʻōʻō Heiau and learn about some of our native Hawaiian plants.

For more information and register go to bit.ly/hulacamp21 🌺 We hope to see you there!

#MānoaHeritageCenter #MHCHulaCamp2021 #MHCHulaCamp #KingKamehamehaI #Kupee #HalfShellKukui #HawaiianHistory #Moolelo #KūkaōōHeiau #NativeHawaiianPlants #AAPIHeritage #AAPIHeritageMonth

Enjoy these blooming pua from our garden this Aloha Friday! 💕🌈🌺ʻIlima plus a friend, hinahina , pōpolo + baby berries, ʻ...
05/08/2021

Enjoy these blooming pua from our garden this Aloha Friday! 💕🌈🌺

ʻIlima plus a friend, hinahina , pōpolo + baby berries, ʻōhiʻa mamo, pāʻū o hiʻiaka, ʻōhiʻa ʻai, kokiʻo keʻokeʻo, and pōhinahina.

We hope you have a restful and rejuvenating weekend 🌼

#MānoaHeritageCenter #MānoaValley #NativeHawaiianPlants #Ilima #SidaFallax #Hinahina #Pōpolo #ŌhiaMamo #YellowŌhia #PāūOHiiaka #ŌhiaAi #MountainApple #KokioKeokeo #NativeWhiteHibiscus #Pōhinahina #AlohaFriday #FridayFlowers #PlantNativeSpecies #AlohaĀina

May the 4th be with you! ✨💚 Joey the Tortoise 🐢 We’ve been waiting share this picture of Joey in his Grogu cozy 😁 #Mānoa...
05/04/2021

May the 4th be with you! ✨

💚 Joey the Tortoise 🐢

We’ve been waiting share this picture of Joey in his Grogu cozy 😁

#MānoaHeritageCenter #MānoaValley #MayTheFourthBeWithYou #JoeyTheTortoise #BabyYoda #Grogu #TheChild #TortoiseCozy #CrochetTortoiseCozy

May the 4th be with you! ✨

💚 Joey the Tortoise 🐢

We’ve been waiting share this picture of Joey in his Grogu cozy 😁

#MānoaHeritageCenter #MānoaValley #MayTheFourthBeWithYou #JoeyTheTortoise #BabyYoda #Grogu #TheChild #TortoiseCozy #CrochetTortoiseCozy

Although we celebrate native Hawaiian plants everyday at MHC, today is the official last day of #NativeHawaiianPlantMont...
05/01/2021

Although we celebrate native Hawaiian plants everyday at MHC, today is the official last day of #NativeHawaiianPlantMonth so we thought we’d share one of the flowers you can often find blooming in abundance on our campus: Kokiʻo keʻokeʻo. Though most of our shrubs are of the species arnottianus we do have a few waimeae.

Kokiʻo keʻokeʻo flowers are unique with their bright white petals and red stamen (centers). Their leaves may have red veins and the flowers may turn pink, especially near the end of the day. Both white and red hibiscus were grown near hale (homes) in early Hawaiʻi primarily for their beautiful blooms.

🌺 FUN FACT: These species are the only 2 hibiscus in the world with fragrant flowers. Although their scent is strongest in the early morning or early evening, you are welcome to take a sniff on your next visit!

#NativeHawaiianPlantMonth #NativeHawaiianPlantMonth2021 #NativeHawaiianPlants #MānoaHeritageCenter #EarthMonth #EarthMonth2021 #EarthDayEveryday #MānoaValley #KokioKeokeo #HibiscusArnottianus #HibiscusWaimeae #WhiteHibiscus #OahuWhiteHibiscus #KauaiWhiteHibiscus #EndemicHawaiianPlants

Coming in May, Mānoa Heritage Center Kahaukani Conversations presents LomiLomi: A Healing Tradition. Learn about the fou...
04/27/2021

Coming in May, Mānoa Heritage Center Kahaukani Conversations presents LomiLomi: A Healing Tradition. Learn about the foundational principles and philosophy of the Hawaiian healing tradition of lomilomi from practitioner Kapono Aluli Souza. This discussion will hopefully inspire greater awareness and understanding of a holistic approach to self-care. Learn more about Kapono and register for this discussion at bit.ly/mhckaponos

Kapono will also be leading an in-person workshop at MHC. Along with a partner, learn and practice some of the techniques of lomilomi while getting a better understanding of its history and philosophy and learning about the role you play in your own health and well-being. Each pair will be socially distanced from the others and masks are mandatory. Register at bit.ly/mhcintrolomi

#VirtualKahaukaniConversations #MānoaHeritageCenter #MHCatHome #Lomilomi #HawaiianHealing #MaKaHanaKaIkeWorkshop #IntroToLomilomi #LomilomiHawaiianHealing

Address

2856 Oahu Ave
Honolulu, HI
96822

For Bus directions visit https://www.manoaheritagecenter.org/directions/

General information

Tours by reservation only. See available dates and time on our website

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 16:00
Thursday 09:00 - 16:00
Friday 09:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(808) 988-1287

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A non-profit organization dedicated to promoting an understanding of the natural and cultural heritage of Hawaiʻi by caring for and sharing a cultural landscape centered on sacred Kūkaʻōʻō Heiau, Native Hawaiian gardens and historic Kūaliʻi home and collections.

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Today we had our first 4th grade virtual field trip to the Manoa Heritage...It was wonderful to be out and about again even if it was virtual.. I could almost smell the fresh Manoa air through the screen and I learned so much about the history of this historical site. Thank you Mary and Sam Cooke for creating this amazing education center for our children and thank you Keala and Jenny for being the best hosts... :)The kids, parents and I loved it!!!
See below, about the Cooke Family:
#GIVINGTUESDAY Manoa Heritage Center !!!