Mānoa Heritage Center

Mānoa Heritage Center Inspiring people to be thoughtful stewards of their heritage. A non-profit organization dedicated to promoting an understanding of the natural and cultural heritage of Hawaiʻi by caring for and sharing a cultural landscape centered on the sacred Kūkaʻōʻō Heiau, Native Hawaiian gardens and historic Kūaliʻi home and collections.

Operating as usual

🌴Happy Aloha Friday! 🌺This is the indigenous shrub ʻuhaloa that lives in our lāʻau lapaʻau (traditional Hawaiian herbal ...
09/03/2021

🌴Happy Aloha Friday! 🌺

This is the indigenous shrub ʻuhaloa that lives in our lāʻau lapaʻau (traditional Hawaiian herbal medicine and healing) garden.

Found on all the main Hawaiian islands, ʻuhaloa has tiny yellow flowers that bloom year round and resemble a mini hibiscus or ʻilima.

ʻUhaloa is a beautiful plant and has many uses in lāʻau lapaʻau. Here are some of them:

- Sore throat relief (chew root bark, tea from root bark or leaves, gargle from leaves + stems + root bark)

- Has antifungal & anti-inflammatory properties

- Bitter roots were used like aspirin is today

- Mixed with other plants and used for chest pain, congestion, bronchial infections, asthma, neuralgia and blood cleansing

- Tea brewed from leaves to help with arthritis

☀️ Have a safe and fun long weekend!

#ManoaHeritageCenter #ManoaValley #NativeHawaiianPlants #IndigenousHawaiianPlants #Uhaloa #WaltheriaIndica #LāauLapaauPlants #LāauLapaauGarden #LāauLapaau #FridayFlora #FloraFriday #FloraAndFaunaOfHawaii

It’s September and MHC is once again participating in Foodland’s Annual Community Matching Gifts Programs, “Give Aloha.”...
09/01/2021

It’s September and MHC is once again participating in Foodland’s Annual Community Matching Gifts Programs, “Give Aloha.” 🌺This program honors Foodland founder Maurice “Sully” Sullivan’s legacy of giving back to the community.

Make a donation to MHC when you shop at @foodlandhi, @foodlandfarms or Sack N Save.

🌿When: Sept 1 - Sept 30
🌿Show your Maikaʻi card or become a Maikaʻi member (it’s free!) when you checkout
🌿Give the cashier our organization code (78217) and a donation amount (up to $249)
🌿Review your receipt to confirm org name and donation amount

You can also use our organization code when shopping online at shop.foodland.com

Mahalo nui loa! 💙We appreciate your support!

#ManoaHeritageCenter #FoodlandGiveAloha #FoodlandGiveAloha2021

It’s September and MHC is once again participating in Foodland’s Annual Community Matching Gifts Programs, “Give Aloha.” 🌺This program honors Foodland founder Maurice “Sully” Sullivan’s legacy of giving back to the community.

Make a donation to MHC when you shop at @foodlandhi, @foodlandfarms or Sack N Save.

🌿When: Sept 1 - Sept 30
🌿Show your Maikaʻi card or become a Maikaʻi member (it’s free!) when you checkout
🌿Give the cashier our organization code (78217) and a donation amount (up to $249)
🌿Review your receipt to confirm org name and donation amount

You can also use our organization code when shopping online at shop.foodland.com

Mahalo nui loa! 💙We appreciate your support!

#ManoaHeritageCenter #FoodlandGiveAloha #FoodlandGiveAloha2021

We can’t believe it’s already September! If you shop at Foodland, Foodland Farms, Sack N Save, or shop.foodland.com plea...
09/01/2021

We can’t believe it’s already September!

If you shop at Foodland, Foodland Farms, Sack N Save, or shop.foodland.com please consider supporting MHC and use our organization code when you check out in-person or online.

Mahalo nui loa!💚

#ManoaHeritageCenter #FoodlandGiveAloha #foodlandgivealoha2021

We can’t believe it’s already September!

If you shop at Foodland, Foodland Farms, Sack N Save, or shop.foodland.com please consider supporting MHC and use our organization code when you check out in-person or online.

Mahalo nui loa!💚

#ManoaHeritageCenter #FoodlandGiveAloha #foodlandgivealoha2021

The promised update of ʻōlena flowers! 😁Walking near ʻōlena you can smell the scent of flowery turmeric coming from the ...
08/31/2021

The promised update of ʻōlena flowers! 😁

Walking near ʻōlena you can smell the scent of flowery turmeric coming from the inflorescence (even through a mask) as you admire its beauty.💚

#ManoaHeritageCenter #ManoaValley #HawaiianCanoePlant #CanoePlants #CanoePlantsOfHawaii #Ōlena #CurcumaLonga #Turmeric #ŌlenaFlower #FloraAndFaunaOfHawaii

Our first bonamia fruit/seed! Our bonamia (Bonamia menziesii) has flourished under the tender loving care of the amazing...
08/27/2021

Our first bonamia fruit/seed! Our bonamia (Bonamia menziesii) has flourished under the tender loving care of the amazing @snaks__ 💚

Learn more about this federally listed endangered endemic vine at the post in our stories!

#ManoaHeritageCenter #ManoaValley #NativeHawaiianPlants #EndemicHawaiianPlants #EndemicPlants #EndangeredPlants #BonamiaMenziesii #FloraAndFaunaOfHawaii #FloraFriday #FridayFlora

ʻŌlena inflorescence! Beautiful as they are, these are not the actual flowers of the ʻōlena. The actual flowers (usually...
08/26/2021

ʻŌlena inflorescence! Beautiful as they are, these are not the actual flowers of the ʻōlena. The actual flowers (usually yellow) will peek out from the spaces in the inflorescence (if we can get pics of that we’ll definitely share them) 🌼

#ManoaHeritageCenter #ManoaValley #HawaiianCanoePlant #CanoePlants #CanoePlantsOfHawaii #Ōlena #CurcumaLonga #Turmeric #ŌlenaFlower #OlenaInflorescence #FloraAndFaunaOfHawaii

Here is another plant from our beach garden this Aloha Friday 🏝Endemic beach vine Pāʻū o Hiʻiaka lit. skirt/sarong of Hi...
08/20/2021

Here is another plant from our beach garden this Aloha Friday 🏝

Endemic beach vine Pāʻū o Hiʻiaka lit. skirt/sarong of Hiʻiaka

Scientific name: Jaquemontia sandwicensis

- Good for erosion control and ground cover
- Flowers: small white, light-blue or lavender - blooms year round but primarily Dec-July
- Best grown in full sun for max flower production
- Thrives in dry environments (too much water = plenty green but less flowers)

One of the moʻolelo behind its name tells of how Pele left a young Hiʻiaka on the beach during a long morning fishing trip. When Pele got back she found that nearby vines had draped over baby Hiʻiaka to protect her from the sun.

#ManoaHeritageCenter #ManoaValley #NativeHawaiianPlants #EndemicHawaiianPlants #EndemicPlants #PāūOHiiaka #JacquemontiaSandwicensis #FridayFlora #FloraFriday #EndemicSpecies #FloraAndFaunaOfHawaii #FlowerFriday #FridayFlower

Puʻukaʻa is one of the newer plants in our gardens. As you walk from Kūkaʻōʻō heiau down to the white garden you will se...
08/13/2021

Puʻukaʻa is one of the newer plants in our gardens. As you walk from Kūkaʻōʻō heiau down to the white garden you will see this native sedge to the right of the path, just before the halapepe.

Hawaiian names: Puʻukaʻa (Niʻihau) & Kaʻa (seldom used)
Scientific name: Cyperus trachysanthos
Common names: Sticky flatsedge & sticky galingale

Endemic
✨Federally Listed Endangered

Likes full sun + moist to wet soil - can be planted in water or areas that get periodic flooding.

Of the 14 species in the genus Cyperus native to the Hawaiian archipelago (8 of which are endemic) puʻukaʻa is one of the rarest.

A relative of papyrus (source of the Egyptian writing material) and piripiri/cañita (used in Mexico for plaiting)

When ʻahuʻawa was not available, puʻukaʻa fibers were used for straining kava.

Today flowering spikes are used in arrangements or in haku & wiliwili style lei

#ManoaHeritageCenter #ManoaValley #NativeHawaiianPlants #EndemicHawaiianPlants #EndemicPlants #FederallyListed #Puukaa #CyperusTrachysanthos #FridayFlora #FloraFriday #EndemicSpecies #FloraAndFaunaOfHawaii

This #FlowerFriday we have the beautiful Hinahina. You can find it at MHC in our new little beach plant area located on ...
08/07/2021

This #FlowerFriday we have the beautiful Hinahina. You can find it at MHC in our new little beach plant area located on the right of the path just after Kūkaʻōʻō Heiau and before the arbor.

Hinahina aka Hinahina kū kahakai or Nohonohopuʻuone (Niʻihau)
Scientific: Heliotropium anomalum

Endemic

A good ground cover or accent plant, Hinahina has pale purple to white fragrant flowers and leaves that range in color from gray or silverish to light green (varies based on where it lives). In the wild it will grow nearly to the waterline on beaches and can grow on lava flows as long as it is rooted in sand. Though the leaves may look like those of a succulent, they are actually more leathery than they are watery.

Early Hawaiians used both the flowers and leaves to create a long lasting lei. Medicinally, hinahina leaves were brewed as tea when koʻokoʻolau was not available and dried leaves were also used for treating diabetes. Hinahina stems, leaves, and flowers with naio leaves, flowers, & fruit, ʻuhaloa root bark, noni fruit, and kō kea (sugarcane variety) was used for nae ʻoikū (asthma) and womb/vaginal problems. Hinahina leaves and flowers plus ʻōhiʻa bark, kukui flowers and cooked fruit & kō ʻaina (a variety of sugarcane) was used to treat ʻea (thrush) and pāʻaoʻao (childhood disease with weakening).

#ManoaHeritageCenter #ManoaValley #NativeHawaiianPlants #EndemicHawaiianPlants #EndemicPlants #HinahinaKūKahakai #Nohonohopuuone #Hinahina #HeliotropiumAnomalum #FridayFlowers #FlowerFriday #FridayFlora #FloraFriday

Happy Aloha Friday from rainy Manoa Valley!! 🌦We hope you have a wonderful weekend!Today’s #FridayFlower is ʻawapuhi whi...
07/23/2021

Happy Aloha Friday from rainy Manoa Valley!! 🌦We hope you have a wonderful weekend!

Today’s #FridayFlower is ʻawapuhi which can be found in our Canoe Garden here at MHC.

ʻAwapuhi, ʻAwapuhi kuahiwi, ʻōpuhi
Shampoo ginger, Wild ginger
Zingiber zerumbet

Polynesian introduced/canoe plant

Perennial (dormant above ground in autumn-spring, plant grow anew in spring, flowers in summer)

Squeezing the inflorescence, the reddish/greenish pinecone shape where flowers appear, releases a lightly perfumed juice that early Hawaiians used as shampoo, conditioner, or body wash. They also drank this juice, more-so in times of need. Leaves and leaf stalks, surprisingly also fragrant, were used in imu to enhance the flavor of the cooking meat.

The rhizomes/roots had many uses. They were made into powder and used to perfume kapa; ground & mixed with ripe noni as a poultice for severe sprains; cooked & softened then pressed into the hollow of a tooth for cavities/toothaches; ground, strained, & mixed with water as a tonic to ease stomach aches; and mashed with salt & rubbed on the head for headaches

#ManoaHeritageCenter #ManoaValley #HawaiiCanoePlants #PolynesianIntroduced #Awapuhi #AwapuhiKuahiwi #Ōpuhi #ShampooGinger #WildGinger #ZingiberZerumbet #FridayhFlower #FloralFriday #AlohaFriday

Blooming in the garden! 🌺🌸Pōhuehue (Beach morning glory) in bloom on the back wall of Kūkaʻōʻō HeiauʻĀkulikuli (Sea purs...
07/15/2021

Blooming in the garden! 🌺🌸

Pōhuehue (Beach morning glory) in bloom on the back wall of Kūkaʻōʻō Heiau
ʻĀkulikuli (Sea purslane) blooming by the VEH mala ʻuala
Flowering Russian Comfrey in the lāʻau lapaʻau garden
Blooms on our many ʻAlaheʻe trees and ʻĀkia bushes

#ManoaHeritageCenter #ManoaValley #NativeHawaiianPlants #Pōhuehue #IpomoeaPesCapraes #Ākulikuli #Akulikuli #SesuviumPortulacastrum #Comfrey #RussianComfrey #LāauLapaauGarden #LāauLapaauPlants #HawaiianPlantMedicine #Alahee #PsydraxOdorata #Ākia #WikstroemiaSp #InBloom #BloomingInTheGarden #GreenThumbs

After taking a break for the month of June, MHC’s Kahaukani Conversations series is back with another intriguing online ...
06/29/2021

After taking a break for the month of June, MHC’s Kahaukani Conversations series is back with another intriguing online discussion!

Join us on Thursday, July 22 to hear special guest speaker Maya Saffery, Curriculum Specialist for Kawaihuelani Center for Hawaiian Language at UH Mānoa, who will be discussing how mele (songs, chants) composed in the Hawaiian language can become lenses to view how kūpuna (ancestors) might have explained contemporary practices.

Go to bit.ly/mhcmaya for more info and to register!

As always, this event is free to attend thanks to the generous support of the Atherton Family Foundation and #IslandInsuranceHawaii

#VirtualKahaukaniConversations #MānoaHeritageCenter #MHCatHome #KahaukaniConversations #MayaSaffery #HawaiianEpistemology

After taking a break for the month of June, MHC’s Kahaukani Conversations series is back with another intriguing online discussion!

Join us on Thursday, July 22 to hear special guest speaker Maya Saffery, Curriculum Specialist for Kawaihuelani Center for Hawaiian Language at UH Mānoa, who will be discussing how mele (songs, chants) composed in the Hawaiian language can become lenses to view how kūpuna (ancestors) might have explained contemporary practices.

Go to bit.ly/mhcmaya for more info and to register!

As always, this event is free to attend thanks to the generous support of the Atherton Family Foundation and #IslandInsuranceHawaii

#VirtualKahaukaniConversations #MānoaHeritageCenter #MHCatHome #KahaukaniConversations #MayaSaffery #HawaiianEpistemology

ʻŌhiʻa ʻai (Mountain Apple) season has officially come to MHC! All 3 trees (2 red & 1 white) are fruiting in abundance. ...
06/25/2021

ʻŌhiʻa ʻai (Mountain Apple) season has officially come to MHC! All 3 trees (2 red & 1 white) are fruiting in abundance. ⛰🍎

With a mild floral flavor and refreshing crunch, this fruit is great eaten fresh off the tree! Or you can add it to salads, poach them, bake with them (pies, crumbles, breads), or even make preserves.

ʻŌhiʻa ʻai goes by many names, some of which are: Malay apple, Otaheite apple (used in Jamaica), rose apple, water apple, and pomerac.

Img 1-4: Red Mountain Apple (Dark red when ripe)
Img 5-7: White Mountain Apple (has a light pink blush when ripe)

#MānoaHeritageCenter #CanoePlants #ŌhiaAi #MountainApple #SyzygiumMalaccense #FloraFriday #FridayFlora #FridayFruits #FruitFriday

Our ʻōhiʻa lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) have been going off! As a result we have been able to see all the stages of t...
06/12/2021

Our ʻōhiʻa lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) have been going off! As a result we have been able to see all the stages of the flower and fruit! So beautiful!

Learn more about ʻŌhiʻa with @ohialife and @ohialegacy

Info on ʻōhiʻa flower stages from @ohialife
Images of @manoaheritagecenter ʻōhiʻa

#MetrosiderosPolymorpha #ŌhiaLehua #ŌhiaMamo #RedŌhia #YellowŌhia #NativeHawaiianPlants #FlowerFriday #FridayFlowers

Thursday in the Garden! ☀️🌺🌱🌼- ʻŌhiʻa ʻai (Syzygium malaccense)- ʻŪlei (Ostemeles anthyllidifolia)- Alaheʻe (Psydrax odo...
06/03/2021

Thursday in the Garden! ☀️🌺🌱🌼

- ʻŌhiʻa ʻai (Syzygium malaccense)
- ʻŪlei (Ostemeles anthyllidifolia)
- Alaheʻe (Psydrax odorata)
- Pōhinahina (Vitex rotundifolia)
- ʻIlima (Sida fallax)
- ʻAʻaliʻi (Dodonea viscosa)
- Naupaka Kahakai (Scaevola taccada)
- Moa (Psilotum nudum)

#MānoaHeritageCenter #MānoaValley #NativeHawaiianPlants #ŌhiaAi #MountainApple #SyzygiumMalaccense #Ūlei #OstemelesAnthyllidifolia #Alahee #PsydraxOdorata #Pōhinahina #VitexRotundifolia #Ilima #SidaFallax #Aalii #DodoneaViscosa #NaupakaKahakai #ScaevolaTaccada #Moa #PsilotumNudum #NativeHawaiianGarden #IndigenousHawaiianPlants

Thursday in the Garden! ☀️🌺🌱🌼- ʻŌhiʻa ʻai (Syzygium malaccense)- ʻŪlei (Ostemeles anthyllidifolia)- Alaheʻe (Psydrax odo...
06/03/2021

Thursday in the Garden! ☀️🌺🌱🌼

- ʻŌhiʻa ʻai (Syzygium malaccense)
- ʻŪlei (Ostemeles anthyllidifolia)
- Alaheʻe (Psydrax odorata)
- Pōhinahina (Vitex rotundifolia)
- ʻIlima (Sida fallax)
- ʻAʻaliʻi (Dodonea viscosa)
- Naupaka Kahakai (Scaevola taccada)
- Moa (Psilotum nudum)

#MānoaHeritageCenter #MānoaValley #NativeHawaiianPlants #ŌhiaAi #MountainApple #SyzygiumMalaccense #Ūlei #OstemelesAnthyllidifolia #Alahee #PsydraxOdorata #Pōhinahina #VitexRotundifolia #Ilima #SidaFallax #Aalii #DodoneaViscosa #NaupakaKahakai #ScaevolaTaccada #Moa #PsilotumNudum #NativeHawaiianGarden #IndigenousHawaiianPlants

Mānoa Memories of Noboru Oda As part of MHC’s 2020 Docent Enrichment series, Board Member Helen Nakano chose to remember...
05/27/2021

Mānoa Memories of Noboru Oda

As part of MHC’s 2020 Docent Enrichment series, Board Member Helen Nakano chose to remember long-time Mānoa resident & community leader Noboru Oda by sharing some of his stories of growing up in Mānoa Valley.
.
.
Noboru Oda's father was one of the early contract laborers who came from Fukuoka, Japan to work at the Hakalau Plantation on the Big Island. After completing his contract, he moved to Honolulu, near the old Dole Cannery. Noboru was the 2nd child of this marriage & the only son of 7 daughters. When he was 4 or 5, his family moved deep into Mānoa Valley where a few Chinese families farmed bananas & Japanese farmed vegetables. His father began farming dryland taro & sold it through an agent. It took 8 months of intensive labor and sometimes they didn't get paid if the taro rotted before it reached California. Auwe! They also raised vegetables for the local market.

His family had no car, no telephone, or electricity. They used an outdoor cesspool & a stove they fed with wood. There were lots of mosquitoes. His family of 8 children was evicted from the 2 to 3 acres of land they lived on 3 times. Because education was important, all the children were sent to both English & Japanese language school at age 6. When she was 12, Noboru's eldest sister went to work as a housemaid for a rich haole family down the valley. Noboru went to Washington Intermediate School until 9th grade when his father became too ill to work. By the age of 14, Noboru was driving the truckful of vegetables from Mānoa to River Street.

Life was survival in those days. Mr. Oda admitted that sometimes hidden among the daikon he delivered were a gallon or 2 of okolehao [Hawaiian moonshine made from the root of the tī plant] that they brewed in the forests. He delivered the contraband to Chinatown during the Prohibition Era [1920-33].

When asked about his childhood, he recalls not playing, only "tanomoshi", the forming of financial cooperatives based on a system of money pooling among friends & family. Always in debt, the farmers needed larger amounts to pay for the guano fertilizer, paying workers during harvest, & for misfortunes and illnesses. Tanomoshi was based on trust. Sometimes, if a friend you co-signed for didn't pay at the end, you ended up paying his debt to the others. But without a bank to borrow from, how could you survive?

In 1995, when he was recruited to serve on the board of local community organization Mālama o Mānoa (now known as Mālama Mānoa), Noboru not only owned his own home in Mānoa, he owned a wholesale vegetable business, & sent all 3 of his children to college. During his tenure at Mālama o Mānoa with Helen Nakano & Mary Cooke, he was always respectfully called “Mr. Oda,” and valued as a wise kupuna.

#MānoaMemories #MānoaHistory #HistoryOfHawaii #AAPIHeritageMonth #AAPIHeritageMonth2021 #AsianAmericanPacificIslanderHeritageMonth #AAPI #AAPIHM #FilipinoAmerican #JapaneseAmerican #APAHM #APAHM2021 #AsianPacificAmericanHeritage #AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth

Mānoa Memories of Noboru Oda

As part of MHC’s 2020 Docent Enrichment series, Board Member Helen Nakano chose to remember long-time Mānoa resident & community leader Noboru Oda by sharing some of his stories of growing up in Mānoa Valley.
.
.
Noboru Oda's father was one of the early contract laborers who came from Fukuoka, Japan to work at the Hakalau Plantation on the Big Island. After completing his contract, he moved to Honolulu, near the old Dole Cannery. Noboru was the 2nd child of this marriage & the only son of 7 daughters. When he was 4 or 5, his family moved deep into Mānoa Valley where a few Chinese families farmed bananas & Japanese farmed vegetables. His father began farming dryland taro & sold it through an agent. It took 8 months of intensive labor and sometimes they didn't get paid if the taro rotted before it reached California. Auwe! They also raised vegetables for the local market.

His family had no car, no telephone, or electricity. They used an outdoor cesspool & a stove they fed with wood. There were lots of mosquitoes. His family of 8 children was evicted from the 2 to 3 acres of land they lived on 3 times. Because education was important, all the children were sent to both English & Japanese language school at age 6. When she was 12, Noboru's eldest sister went to work as a housemaid for a rich haole family down the valley. Noboru went to Washington Intermediate School until 9th grade when his father became too ill to work. By the age of 14, Noboru was driving the truckful of vegetables from Mānoa to River Street.

Life was survival in those days. Mr. Oda admitted that sometimes hidden among the daikon he delivered were a gallon or 2 of okolehao [Hawaiian moonshine made from the root of the tī plant] that they brewed in the forests. He delivered the contraband to Chinatown during the Prohibition Era [1920-33].

When asked about his childhood, he recalls not playing, only "tanomoshi", the forming of financial cooperatives based on a system of money pooling among friends & family. Always in debt, the farmers needed larger amounts to pay for the guano fertilizer, paying workers during harvest, & for misfortunes and illnesses. Tanomoshi was based on trust. Sometimes, if a friend you co-signed for didn't pay at the end, you ended up paying his debt to the others. But without a bank to borrow from, how could you survive?

In 1995, when he was recruited to serve on the board of local community organization Mālama o Mānoa (now known as Mālama Mānoa), Noboru not only owned his own home in Mānoa, he owned a wholesale vegetable business, & sent all 3 of his children to college. During his tenure at Mālama o Mānoa with Helen Nakano & Mary Cooke, he was always respectfully called “Mr. Oda,” and valued as a wise kupuna.

#MānoaMemories #MānoaHistory #HistoryOfHawaii #AAPIHeritageMonth #AAPIHeritageMonth2021 #AsianAmericanPacificIslanderHeritageMonth #AAPI #AAPIHM #FilipinoAmerican #JapaneseAmerican #APAHM #APAHM2021 #AsianPacificAmericanHeritage #AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth

Address

2856 Oahu Ave
Honolulu, HI
96822

For Bus directions visit https://www.manoaheritagecenter.org/directions/

General information

Tours by reservation only. See available dates and time on our website

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 4pm
Tuesday 9am - 4pm
Wednesday 9am - 4pm
Thursday 9am - 4pm
Friday 9am - 4pm

Telephone

(808) 988-1287

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Mānoa Heritage Center posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Mānoa Heritage Center:

Videos

Category

Our Story

A non-profit organization dedicated to promoting an understanding of the natural and cultural heritage of Hawaiʻi by caring for and sharing a cultural landscape centered on sacred Kūkaʻōʻō Heiau, Native Hawaiian gardens and historic Kūaliʻi home and collections.

Nearby museums


Other Museums in Honolulu

Show All

Comments

Today we had our first 4th grade virtual field trip to the Manoa Heritage...It was wonderful to be out and about again even if it was virtual.. I could almost smell the fresh Manoa air through the screen and I learned so much about the history of this historical site. Thank you Mary and Sam Cooke for creating this amazing education center for our children and thank you Keala and Jenny for being the best hosts... :)The kids, parents and I loved it!!!
See below, about the Cooke Family:
#GIVINGTUESDAY Manoa Heritage Center !!!