Daughters of Hawaiʻi

Daughters of Hawaiʻi Daughters of Hawai‘i is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, membership society, founded in 1903, “to perpetuate the memory and spirit of old Hawai‘i and of historic facts, and to preserve the nomenclature and correct pronunciation of the Hawaiian language.”
Founded in 1903, the Daughters of Hawaiʻi is one of the oldest organizations in the state to recognize the critical connection between historic preservation and the preservation of culture and language. A Hawaiʻi-based, nonprofit organization with over 1,000 members spanning five countries, the Daughters manages and operates two historic residences of Hawaiʻi’s royal families, Hānaiakamalama on Oʻahu, more commonly known as Queen Emma Summer Palace, and Huliheʻe Palace on Hawaiʻi Island, and the birth site of Kamehameha III at Keauhou Bay on Hawaiʻi Island.
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The Daughters maintain and operate Queen Emma Summer Palace and Hulihe'e Palace to promote the history and culture of Hawai`i.

Mission: The Daughters of Hawai‘i was founded to perpetuate the memory and spirit of old Hawai‘i and of historic facts, and to preserve the nomenclature and correct pronunciation of the Hawaiian language.

Reminiscing and honoring Na Mele Hawaiʻi No Na Keiki
02/24/2020

Reminiscing and honoring Na Mele Hawaiʻi No Na Keiki

Na Mele No Na Keiki - 1965
https://territorialairwaves.com/index.php?page=30&id=469
In 1965, two cousins, Mary Kawena Pukui and Alice Namakelua, focused their talents for composing Hawaiian music, on songs specifically for children. The resulting Hawaiian language compositions for children were assembled in a memorable album by Hula Records called Na Mele Hawaii No Na Keiki. Featured vocalists were Nina, Lani, & Lahela, the Rodrigues Sisters. The Maile Serenaders, a studio group of musicians, backed them up. Benny Kalama on ukulele, Sonny Kamahele on guitar, Jimmy Kaopuiki on bass, and Eddie Pang on steel guitar. In this program, 50+ years later, we’ll share this memorable music.
This show's playlist:
1- Pi – A – Pa – Nina, Lani, & Lahela w/ Maile Serenaders
2- Ku’u Pupu Kau Pohaku - Nina, Lani, & Lahela w/ Maile Serenaders
3- Moa - Nina, Lani, & Lahela w/ Maile Serenaders
4- Ku’u Manu - Nina, Lani, & Lahela w/ Maile Serenaders
5- Lele Kowali - Nina, Lani, & Lahela w/ Maile Serenaders
6- No Tutu - Nina, Lani, & Lahela w/ Maile Serenaders
7- Kama’a Hou - Nina, Lani, & Lahela w/ Maile Serenaders
8- Ku’u Lupe - Nina, Lani, & Lahela w/ Maile Serenaders
9- He Mapala U’i Ka’u - Nina, Lani, & Lahela w/ Maile Serenaders
10- Na Hoe Wa’a - Nina, Lani, & Lahela w/ Maile Serenaders
11- Ku’u Wa’a - Nina, Lani, & Lahela w/ Maile Serenaders
12- Ku’u Papale U’i - Nina, Lani, & Lahela w/ Maile Serenaders
13- Ukulele Kani - Nina, Lani, & Lahela w/ Maile Serenaders
https://territorialairwaves.com/index.php?page=30&id=469
Length: 54:06
Released on: 11-02-2018
Artist/Compiled by: Nina, Lani, & Lahela

There are still tickets available for this Saturday! Get your tickets at  https://www.hiartslab.org/events/luminaria-cir...
01/29/2020

There are still tickets available for this Saturday!

Get your tickets at https://www.hiartslab.org/events/luminaria-circles-of-motion

Queen Emma was one heck of a human. This week, we explore some of the many tributes she left Hawai'i .

#hiartslab #luminariasings #daughtersofhawaii #queenemmasummerpalace #breastcancerawareness #thinkpink

Join us at the Queen Emma Summer Palace on Feb. 1st for Luminaria’s Circles of Motion, a choral production honoring thos...
01/14/2020

Join us at the Queen Emma Summer Palace on Feb. 1st for Luminaria’s Circles of Motion, a choral production honoring those affected by breast cancer.

Pūpū and cocktails by Kalama's Kuisine

Shop at the Marketplace for Hope, with vendor booths benefiting the American Cancer Society's Hope Lodge. The Lodge provides free lodging for cancer treatment patients.

#breastcancerawareness #daughtersofhawaii #queenemmasummerpalace #hiartslab #luminaria #voicesthatilluminate #circlesofmotion #survivors

HI Arts Lab hopes to see you at the Queen Emma Summer Palace on the evening of the 1st. Our new ensemble sings about breast cancer and how it touches so many lives

#breastcancerawareness #daughtersofhawaii #queenemmasummerpalace #hiartslab #luminaria #voicesthatilluminate #circlesofmotion #survivors

Mahalo to everyone who came to the annual A Christmas Night at Hānaiakamalama! Special mahalo to the Sharene Tabs Harp S...
12/20/2019

Mahalo to everyone who came to the annual A Christmas Night at Hānaiakamalama! Special mahalo to the Sharene Tabs Harp Studio, the Emmalani Serenders, the hula students of Kumu Cathy Ostrem, and Maestro Felix Wesley for providing lovely entertainment throughout the evening!

Mahalo for everyone who stopped by our pop-up photo booth. We had Polaroid film and digital photos available, check these out!

Huliheʻe Palace
12/12/2019
Huliheʻe Palace

Huliheʻe Palace

One of our beloved curators, Aunty ʻIo.

Fun Fact:  Several of these women were Daughters of Hawaiʻi, not all of them noted in the article. Can you guess which o...
11/20/2019
HAWAII Magazine

Fun Fact: Several of these women were Daughters of Hawaiʻi, not all of them noted in the article. Can you guess which ones were Daughters?

Wahine movers and shakers.

Eō! Mahalo, mahalo, mahalo!
11/14/2019

Eō! Mahalo, mahalo, mahalo!

Auwē, what a weekend! Mahalo nui to everyone who came out to the Amy Hānaialiʻi Benefit Concert this past Saturday! We are deeply grateful for your support in the work we do for the preservation and maintenance of Huliheʻe Palace.

It was a beautiful evening celebrating Amy’s 15th album release of Kalawaiʻanui and the concert went off with rave reviews, creating a night to remember for all. Mahalo nunui to Kumu Micah Kamohoaliʻi, Hālau Nā Kīpuʻupuʻu, and of course Amy Hānaialiʻi herself. Special shoutouts to Desiree Cruz, Pōmaikaʻi Lyman, Darlene Ahuna, John Cruz, event sponsors, the team at Huliheʻe, and the Daughters of Hawaiʻi and Calabash Cousins!

Mahalo piha to everyone who made the benefit concert possible. It truly was a lovely evening of Hawaiian music!

Great article for tomorrow’s benefit concert—mahalo piha West Hawaii Today and Chelsea Jensen!
11/09/2019
West Hawaii Today

Great article for tomorrow’s benefit concert—mahalo piha West Hawaii Today and Chelsea Jensen!

Beloved Hawaiian vocalist and songwriter Amy Hanaialii will grace the stage this weekend at #Hulihee Palace. Saturday's concert benefits the preservation and maintenance of the royal palace in #Kona.

#BigIslandNews #HawaiiNews

This Saturday!! Come support Huliheʻe Palace by buying your tickets to Amy Hānaialiʻi’s Huliheʻe fundraiser cd release c...
11/06/2019
Hulihee Palace seawall work ahead; bigger revamp eyed next year

This Saturday!! Come support Huliheʻe Palace by buying your tickets to Amy Hānaialiʻi’s Huliheʻe fundraiser cd release concert this Saturday! All proceeds go to the Palace.

Get your tickets at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/amy-hanaialii-album-release-party-kona-tickets-78562106375

KAILUA-KONA � Repairs to a seawall damaged by high surf this summer and site improvements are planned for Hulihee Palace in the heart of Kailua Village.

Join us again in celebration!
10/26/2019

Join us again in celebration!

Don’t miss the 183rd birthday celebration of King David #Kalakaua on Saturday, November 16!

Free and open to the public, the celebration will begin at 11:30 am on the Palace grounds. We look forward to celebrating the life of our beloved monarch with you all.

11:30 a.m. – Opening Remarks
11:45 a.m. – Royal Hawaiian Band performance
12:00 p.m. – Review of the Royal Guard
12:30 p.m. – Posting of the Royal Guard

For more information, visit bit.ly/KalakauaBirthday2019.

Hawaii's Agricultural Partnerships
10/14/2019

Hawaii's Agricultural Partnerships

Today we honor an inductee into the Paniolo Hall of Fame Class of 2003 - Barbara Kamilipua Nobriga. Here is her bio from that year ~

"They say she is one of the few women in Hawai`i who is capable of shoeing her own horse. As the owner and manager of her own ranch, Barbara’s capabilities go far beyond horse-shoeing. As a 4th generation family member to live, ranch and raise a family on the family land in Kona, Barbara, like her mother, Paniolo Hall of Fame member Kapua Heuer, carries a lifetime of paniolo culture and tradition, inherited and learned. Her exposure to ranching goes back to her grandmother, Noenoe Wall of Kawainui, North Kona, and she remains committed to preserving the paniolo heritage passed on to her.

Barbara has kept paniolo traditions alive by using the Hawaiian language and teaching the “old way” of making rawhide, tanning hides, braiding and caring for tack, livestock and the land. She also maintains efforts to preserve the historic cattle pen, Pa Nui, on lands adjoining hers, that was built by Kamehameha the Great. As a rancher, Barbara is also committed to her stewardship of the land. Over the past ten years she and her family have been fencing 20 – 50 acre plots on their land in an effort to promote re-growth of the native forest. For her conservation efforts, Barbara was recognized as Rancher of the Year by the Kona Soil and Water Conservation district in 1999.

Barbara says that “challenging” is a good word for ranching today, with weather being the number one hurdle. Her beloved Kona has been in perpetual drought. Undaunted, she is developing a drought-resistant strain of cattle. It’s this “can do” attitude as well as her capability, initiative and passion for the paniolo lifestyle she is perpetuating, that has earned Barbara the respect of her fellow paniolo."

Her oral interview provides some great insights into our paniolo heritage ~https://www.hicattle.org/Media/HICattle/Docs/oral-history-interview-barbara-kamilipua-nobriga.pdf

Help us celebrate Daughter Barbara Nobriga and her many accomplishments and contributions to our community—we are truly ...
08/31/2019
Paniolo Preservation Society at Pukalani Stables

Help us celebrate Daughter Barbara Nobriga and her many accomplishments and contributions to our community—we are truly honored and blessed to know her!

Barbara is a long standing member and currently serves as an advisor on our Board of Directors.

Our latest blog post is up! We are going to be honoring Barbara Nobriga at Old Hawaii on Horseback on September 14th from 10am to 1pm at Waikiʻi Ranch, click here to find out why... Have you bought your tickets yet? #oldhawaiionhorseback

08/17/2019
Kama'aina Termite and Pest Control

Mahalo nui to Mike and the team at Kamaʻāina!

Happy Admission Day! We recently fumigated historic Queen Emma Summer Palace in Nu'uanu. Check out the video.

#KamaainaTermite #kamaaina #HawaiiPestControl #fumigation #TermiteInspection #bedbugs #bugs #HawaiiRealtors #HiCentral #HiRealtors #RealEstateHawaii #oahurealestate #luckywelivehawaii #alohastate #fleasticks #homeshow #hawaiirealestate

Huliheʻe Palace
07/14/2019

Huliheʻe Palace

Mahalo piha to Kai ʻŌpua Canoe Club for coming out today to kōkua Kīʻope! ʻAʻohe hana nui ke alu ʻia.

Hawaiʻi Island members participating in the 200th Commemoration of King Kamehameha.
05/17/2019

Hawaiʻi Island members participating in the 200th Commemoration of King Kamehameha.

What a beautiful morning on May 8 marking the 200th anniversary of the passing of King Kamehameha the Great. Mahalo to all those that came out and joined the procession so early that morning.

05/12/2019
Queen Emma Summer Palace

Queen Emma Summer Palace

Enjoy a fable of the mischievous Kōlea bird, the battle of Mokuʻōhai and uniting a kingdom!

Kauaʻi Daughters and Calabash Cousins join the Kauaʻi Museum at their Royal ʻAhaʻaina, celebrating the last rulers of Ka...
05/04/2019

Kauaʻi Daughters and Calabash Cousins join the Kauaʻi Museum at their Royal ʻAhaʻaina, celebrating the last rulers of Kauaʻi and Niʻihau, with the unveiling of Aliʻi ʻAimoku Kaumualiʻi and Mōʻī Wahine Kekaihaʻakūlou!

Mahalo to all who attended the birthday celebration for Kamehameha III at Keauhou Bay last Friday! Hawaii Tribune-Herald...
03/22/2019
Kamehameha III feted

Mahalo to all who attended the birthday celebration for Kamehameha III at Keauhou Bay last Friday! Hawaii Tribune-Herald and West Hawaii Today captured key moments of the ceremony and performances in photos.

Halau Ka‘eaikahelelani Kauikeaouli Kuleana dance Friday at Keauhou Bay during a celebration of the anniversary of the birth of Kamehameha III. The Daughters of Hawaii honored the king with a birthday celebration at the sight of his birth with song, hula, chants and hookupu. The Daughters of Hawaii...

Now you can support the Daughters of Hawaiʻi whenever you shop on Amazon! Simply go to smile.Amazon.com and select the D...
12/18/2018
Shop it forward with AmazonSmile

Now you can support the Daughters of Hawaiʻi whenever you shop on Amazon! Simply go to smile.Amazon.com and select the Daughters of Hawaiʻi as your favorite charity. Once you complete your purchase a portion will be donated.

To learn more about how AmazonSmile works, please visit the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page at smile.amazon.com/about. You can also follow our link for detailed instructions to select the Daughters as your charity of choice.

Mahalo for your aloha and amazing support!

The AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the price of your eligible AmazonSmile purchases to the Daughters of Hawaiʻi without any additional cost to you.

Congratulations to the Royal Order of Kamehameha I - Kaumualiʻi Chapter for joining the 100yrs club!
12/01/2018

Congratulations to the Royal Order of Kamehameha I - Kaumualiʻi Chapter for joining the 100yrs club!

10/11/2018

Visit the Daughters' booth and enjoy the free festival, celebrating beloved Queen Emma and her journey to Kauaʻi's Kōkeʻe uplands and Kilohana vista in 1871.

Daughters of Hawaiʻi's cover photo
08/28/2018

Daughters of Hawaiʻi's cover photo

With the passing of Hurricane Lane, Hulihe'e Palace and Queen Emma Summer Palace have re-opened and resumed normal busin...
08/27/2018
Palaces Re-Open and Resume Normal Business Hours

With the passing of Hurricane Lane, Hulihe'e Palace and Queen Emma Summer Palace have re-opened and resumed normal business hours. We look forward to seeing you at the Palaces soon!

With the passing of Hurricane Lane, Huliheʻe Palace on Hawaiʻi Island and Queen Emma Summer Palace on Oʻahu re-opened on …

Due to Hurricane Lane, Queen Emma Summer Palace on Oʻahu and Hulihe‘e Palace on Hawaiʻi Island will be closed beginning ...
08/24/2018
Palaces Closed Due to Hurricane Lane - The Daughters of Hawai‘i

Due to Hurricane Lane, Queen Emma Summer Palace on Oʻahu and Hulihe‘e Palace on Hawaiʻi Island will be closed beginning Thursday, August 23 until further notice. All programs and classes at the museums are canceled during this time.

The museum team will continue to monitor the progress of the storm and reschedule programs and classes once the storm passes. Please check back or visit the website for updates on reopening the museums.

For more information about Queen Emma Summer Palace and Huilheʻe Palace closings, please email [email protected] or call (808) 595-6291 on Oʻahu.

Please all, take care and be safe!

Queen Emma Summer Palace on Oʻahu and Huliheʻe Palace on Hawaiʻi Island will be closed beginning Thursday, August 23 until …

A flashback from the not too distant past, this story featuring a beautifully serene Hānaiakamalama originally appeared ...
05/04/2018
HAWAII Magazine

A flashback from the not too distant past, this story featuring a beautifully serene Hānaiakamalama originally appeared in the October 2011 print edition of HAWAII Magazine. Recently, the magazine re posted the article to their website and page.

Please share with all your Facebook friends!

A royal escape.

Thank you so very much to all the incredible volunteers for their help  at Day at Huliheʻe Palace this past weekend! Bec...
03/28/2018
Huliheʻe Palace

Thank you so very much to all the incredible volunteers for their help at Day at Huliheʻe Palace this past weekend! Because of their commitment of time and energy and hard work, it was a wonderful success. Mahalo!

Mahalo nui loa to everyone who came to support us despite the rain at the 37th annual Day at Huliheʻe Palace festival and fundraiser! For those who couldn't attend, West Hawaii Today captured the event in pictures and words.

Today (Jan 31) in 1835, we celebrate the birth of King William Charles Lunalilo, 6th monarch and first elected of the Ha...
02/01/2018

Today (Jan 31) in 1835, we celebrate the birth of King William Charles Lunalilo, 6th monarch and first elected of the Hawaiian Kingdom.

High Chiefess Miriam ʻAuhea Kekāuluohi (Kuhina Nui of the Hawaiian Kingdom and niece of Kamehameha I) and High Chief Charles Kana‘ina were his parents. High Chiefess Kalākua (Queen Ka‘ahumanu’s sister) and High Chief Kalaʻimamahū (half brother of Kamehameha I) were his grandparents, and his great grandfather was High Chief Keōuakupupāikalaninui (father of King Kamehameha I).

Lunalilo was one of the first students to enroll in the Chief’s Children’s School. Known for his scholarly ability, poetic talents, and amazing memory for details, he loved to write from a young age, and his favorite subjects were literature and music.

On Sunday at Aliʻi Sunday service at Kawaiaha’o Church, Dr. Diane Paloma of Lunalilo Home shared a story of how Lunalilo quickly composed a mele for a contest that became Hawai‘i’s first national anthem, E Ola Ke Ali‘i Ke Akua. Afterwards, Kahu Merseberg shared a story about Lunalilo’s servant Hepa who was being unjustly jailed and punished. At the tender age of 6, Lunalilo convinced his kahu John Papa ʻIʻi and others of the wrongdoing and Hepa was freed. This compassion and kindness toward others remained a steadfast trait throughout his life. As such, he was commonly referred to as Lokomaikaʻi (generous) and later as the People’s King. In the Constitutional Convention of 1864, he strongly supported the cause of the people against unnecessary interference by any ruler and he also supported the proposal for a more democratic government with two houses of the legislature, a House of Nobles and a House of Representatives. He desired a constitution that favored the people and gave less power to the king.

Despite being of highest aliʻi status, Lunalilo wanted the people to decide their next ruler in a democratic manner and, therefore, a plebiscite was held to on New Year’s Day 1873. Prince David Kalākaua and others not in the Kamehameha lineage chose to run against Lunalilo. On every island, the people unanimously chose Lunalilo as their King. Then on January 8, 1873, the Legislature also unanimously elected as Lunalilo as King. His coronation occurred the next day at Kawaiaha’o Church and his was the shortest reign (1 year and 25 days). He succumbed to pulmonary tuberculosis on February 3, 1874.

As a proponent of democracy, he too did not name a successor preferring the people elect their next monarch. His vast estate he placed in trust to care for the kūpuna.

His remains were temporarily housed at the Royal Mausoleum. And although he could have by birthright remained there, his desire was to be among his people. In 1875, his remains were moved to its permanent resting place along with his father in the Lunalilo Crypt on the grounds of Kawaiaha’o Church.

Yesterday, the Daughters of Hawai'i gathered at Mauna 'Ala to celebrate the birth of Charles Reed Bishop, Builder of the...
01/27/2018

Yesterday, the Daughters of Hawai'i gathered at Mauna 'Ala to celebrate the birth of Charles Reed Bishop, Builder of the State—Friend of Youth—Benefactor of Hawai‘i.

Charles Reed Bishop was born on January 25, 1822, in Glens Falls, New York. In 1846, he arrived in Hawai‘i with his friend William Little Lee. On February 27, 1849, Bishop signed an oath of allegiance to the Kingdom of Hawai‘i. The following year, he married Princess Bernice Pauahi Pākī – a marriage that lasted until her death 34 years later. Their Honolulu home, Haleakalā, was the hub of hospitality as they graciously entertained Hawaiian royalty and visiting dignitaries as well. They attended church regularly and engaged in civic activities such as organizing aid to the sick and destitute and also providing clothing to the poor.

Bishop served Kings Kamehameha IV, Kamehameha V, Lunalilo, and Kalākaua in a variety of positions such as foreign minister; president of the board of education; and chairman of the legislative finance committee and was also a lifetime member of the House of Nobles and appointed to the Privy Council. However, his financial acumen led him to found Bishop and Company, in 1858, which is now called First Hawaiian Bank. An astute financial businessman, he became one of the wealthiest men in the kingdom from banking, agriculture, real estate and other investments. As such, Bishop responded to his duty to the kingdom and community by participating on boards of many charities and donating generously to more than 30 Hawai‘i schools (such as Punahou, Mills Institute (now known as Mid–Pacific Institute), St. Andrew’s Priory, ‘Iolani, and Sacred Hearts Academy), hospitals, churches and social welfare organizations. His beneficiaries were numerous but included Queen's and Kapi‘olani Hospitals, Salvation Army, Hawaiian Historical Society, Young Men's Christian Association.

Bishop is best known for the founding of Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum and for his generous contributions to his wife’s legacy, Kamehameha Schools. The depths of his generosity is best understood as he is the only person to have included Mauna ‘Ala in his trust, which he established in 1895. He not only deeded back to his wife’s estate all the lands that she had bequeathed to him, he also instructed his trust to expend "Such sum as may be necessary for the care, repair, maintenance and improvement of the tomb, monument and grounds in Nu‘uanu, in said City of Honolulu, where are deposited the remains of my late wife and other Hawaiian Chiefs."

In 1894, Bishop relocated to San Francisco; however, he continued to communicate with Kamehameha trustees on the school’s policy, finance, admissions, Founder's Day and other matters until his death on June 7, 1915. In his eulogy, Reverend H.H. Parker shared that “the work for good that he did in life will abide with us. As a philanthropist, I have known none greater than he.” This sentiment is echoed in the etching of the Charles Reed Bishop Memorial erected at Mauna ‘Ala the following year: Builder of the State—Friend of Youth—Benefactor of Hawai‘i.

More information at the Charles Reed Bishop Trust website: http://www.charlesreedbishop.org/charlesreedbishop/

Address

2913 Pali Hwy
Honolulu, HI
96817

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 16:00
Thursday 09:00 - 16:00
Friday 09:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(808) 595-6291

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About the Daughters

The Daughters of Hawai‘i was founded in 1903 by seven progressive women ahead of their time. Born in Hawai‘i, they were citizens of the Hawaiian Kingdom before annexation, and foresaw the inevitable loss of much of the Hawaiian culture. They founded the society “to perpetuate the memory and spirit of old Hawai‘i and of historic facts, and to preserve the nomenclature and correct pronunciation of the Hawaiian language.”

The Daughters of Hawai‘i is one of the first organizations in Hawai‘i to recognize the importance of historical preservation. Since the early 1900s the Daughters has been distinguished for preserving Hānaiakamalama in Nu‘uanu, commonly known as the Queen Emma Summer Palace, and Hulihe‘e Palace in Kailua-Kona, restoring them with original royal furnishings. The Daughters continue to operate and maintain these Palaces as their principal activity, and owns the birth site of Kamehameha III at Keauhou Bay in Kailua-Kona.

Today, the Daughters of Hawai‘i is a nonprofit corporation with a volunteer Board of Directors overseeing the management and operation of the two Palaces. Membership is open to any woman who is descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. In 1986, membership was expanded with the introduction of Calabash Cousins, to include any man or woman who is interested in furthering the purposes of the society.

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Comments

Peter and I so wish we could be there this Saturday ! Have a wonderful time
Aloha! Excited for Day at Queen Emma!!
Aloha, Ua haku au i kēia ʻōpaʻa haʻawina i mea kōkua i nā hoa aʻo ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi, keu hoʻi, no nā kahuaʻo, aʻoaʻo a me nā haumāna o Hālau ʻŌlelo. E ʻoluʻolu, e kāʻana aku, e hoʻoikaika mai, e hana, a e hōʻike mai i kou manaʻo ma ka leka uila iaʻu. I created this instructional aid to support Hawaiian language colleagues, especially, for the lead-mentors, student-mentors and students of Hālau ʻŌlelo. Please feel free to share, critique, complete, and share with me your thoughts via private message. Mahalo, B. Kainoa Embernate Founder & Kumu Hālau ʻŌlelo Eia ka loulou/Here is the link:
UHP BOOK RELEASE - preorder on Amazon! Light in the Queen's Garden ...offers for the first time a day-by-day accounting of the events surrounding the coup d’état as seen through the eyes of Pope’s young Hawaiian pupils. Author Sandra Bonura uses recently discovered primary sources to help enliven the historical account of the 1893 Hawaiian Revolution that happened literally outside the school’s windows. Queen Lili‘uokalani’s adopted daughter’s long-lost oral history recording, many of Pope’s teaching contemporaries’ unpublished diaries, letters, scrapbooks, and photos tell a story that has never been told before. Towering royal personages in Hawai‘i’s history—King Kalākaua, Queen Lili‘uokalani, Princess Ka‘iulani and others—appear in the book, as Ida Pope sheltered Hawai‘i’s daughters through the frightening and turbulent end of their sovereign nation. Pope was present during the life celebrations of the king, and then his sad death rituals. She had the extraordinary opportunity to travel with Lili‘uokalani on her controversial trip to Molokaʻi’s "leper colony” to visit Saint Marianne Cope and afflicted pupils. In 1894, with the endorsement of Lili‘uokalani and Charles Bishop, Pope helped to establish the Kamehameha School for Girls, funded by the estate of Princess Pauahi Bishop, and became its first principal. Inspired by John Dewey and others, she shaped and reshaped Kamehameha’s curriculum through a process of conflict and compromise. Fired up by the era’s doctrine of social and vocational relevance, she prepared her students for entry into meaningful careers. Lili‘uokalani’s daughter was placed in the school and Pope played a significant role in mothering and shaping her future, especially during the years the queen was fighting to restore her kingdom. As Hawai‘i moved into the twentieth century under a new flag, Pope tenaciously confronted the effects of industrialization, the growing concentration of outside economic power and worked tirelessly to attain social reforms to give Hawaiian women their rightful place in society.