Iolani Palace

Iolani Palace The official royal palace for the Kalakaua Dynasty, which ruled Hawaii from 1874 through 1893. We are located in downtown Honolulu. Iolani Palace is a Hawaiian and national treasure that depends on private support.

To assure its unique cultural, historical and spiritual qualities are maintained for future generations, please consider a gift to The Friends of Iolani Palace, a 501(c)(3) organization with the sole responsibility to serve as guardian and steward to preserve, restore, interpret, share, and celebrate Iolani Palace. To learn more, call (808) 522-0822, or go online at www.iolanipalace.org.

Operating as usual

#Onthisday in 1984, the newly restored Chamberlain’s office was blessed. The position of Chamberlain   was  created duri...
10/09/2021

#Onthisday in 1984, the newly restored Chamberlain’s office was blessed. The position of Chamberlain was created during the Reign of Kamehameha IV. David Kalakaua served as chamberlain for Kamehameha V.

During Kalakaua’s reign, the following men served as his chamberlain:
• William L. Moehonua (served for 6 months before being appointed as Minister of the Interior)
● Edwin H. Boyd (10 months)
● Frederick W. Beckley Sr. (1875-1878)
● Charles H. Judd (1878-1886)
● Edward W. Purvis (acting Chamberlain while Judd was on a trip)
● Curtis P. Iaukea (1886-1887)
● James William Robertson (Vice-Chamberlain - 1887)
● George W. Macfarlane (1888)

The photo of Kalakaua and men on the palace steps features four of the eight men who served as chamberlain. From left to right are James H. Boyd, Curtis P. Iaukea, Charles H. Judd, Edward W. Purvis, George W. Macfarlane, John O. Dominis, A. Burrel Hayley, John Dominis Holt II, and Antone Rosa.

PC: Hawaii State Archives

In the following images, Frederick W. Beckley (PC: Hawaii State Archives) is pictured wearing a bow tie, while the pencil drawing retrieved from Ancestry.com depicts Edwin H. Boyd. The sepia image is of William L. Mohoenua and the final image is of James W. Robertson holding a hat in his hand. (PC: Wikimediacommons)

Learn more about this important position during the Palace’s Chamberlain’s Tour.

https://www.iolanipalace.org/visit/tours-admission/chamberlains-tour/

On October 6 ,1881, Kalakaua attended a reception held in his honor at Cortland, the Omaha Nebraska, home of Mr. and Mrs...
10/06/2021

On October 6 ,1881, Kalakaua attended a reception held in his honor at Cortland, the Omaha Nebraska, home of Mr. and Mrs. J. M Woolworth. Mr. Woolworth had been admitted to the New York Bar Association in 1854, and in 1881 was one of Omaha's foremost citizens. His daughter had met Kalakaua when she visited Honolulu in 1880. This 1881 party was a very informal reception, which mostly consisted of Miss Woolworth’s young unmarried friends.

Image of Cortland and J. M. Woolworth

#Onthisday in 1881, the New York Times reported that King Kalakaua arrived in Cincinnati and then headed to Fairlawn Sto...
10/05/2021

#Onthisday in 1881, the New York Times reported that King Kalakaua arrived in Cincinnati and then headed to Fairlawn Stock Farm in Lexington, Kentucky to look at horses. In 1879, King Kalakaua had purchased seven high-bred trotters (horses) from General Withers, the owner of the world-renowned Fairlawn Stock Farm.

In a letter written from San Francisco on October 14, 1881, Kalakaua stated:

“Taking the train from Cincinnati we arrived the next day and (went) from there to Lexington Kentucky. General Withers was at the station to meet us and took us at once to his house. In the afternoon we went out to look at his fine stock of horses and in the evening, he had [a] reception of some of the most prominent citizens of Lexington [and] also several prominent Senators and Congressmen of the State. Mostly democratic members of the Southern States all of whom I conversed with…”

Kalakaua does not mention looking at any of the Withers horses.

PC: General Withers from the Harness Museum website. (https://harnessmuseum.com/)

#Onthisday in 1881, the New York Times reported that King Kalakaua arrived in Cincinnati and then headed to Fairlawn Stock Farm in Lexington, Kentucky to look at horses. In 1879, King Kalakaua had purchased seven high-bred trotters (horses) from General Withers, the owner of the world-renowned Fairlawn Stock Farm.

In a letter written from San Francisco on October 14, 1881, Kalakaua stated:

“Taking the train from Cincinnati we arrived the next day and (went) from there to Lexington Kentucky. General Withers was at the station to meet us and took us at once to his house. In the afternoon we went out to look at his fine stock of horses and in the evening, he had [a] reception of some of the most prominent citizens of Lexington [and] also several prominent Senators and Congressmen of the State. Mostly democratic members of the Southern States all of whom I conversed with…”

Kalakaua does not mention looking at any of the Withers horses.

PC: General Withers from the Harness Museum website. (https://harnessmuseum.com/)

On October 3, 1976, Governor Ariyoshi declared October 3- 9, The Friends of Iolani Palace Week. This declaration was to ...
10/03/2021

On October 3, 1976, Governor Ariyoshi declared October 3- 9, The Friends of Iolani Palace Week. This declaration was to create public awareness of the Palace restoration efforts and to invite people to join The Friends of Iolani Palace.

During the week, thousands of people visited displays and enjoyed entertainment at Ala Moana Shopping Center, Kahala Mall, and Pearl Ridge Shopping Center. The display at these locations included photographs from the 19th century, a 22-minute film on the restoration and a dinner place setting. Featured entertainment included the Maile Aloha Singers, Keiki Music College, and Aloha Airlines Singers.

The Police reserve, retired officers, and members of The Royal Guard were at Ala Moana keeping an eye on one of the original beds made for the Palace by the A. H. Davenport Co. of Boston. In this image, the footboard of the bed can be seen.

After 45 years the sentiment on the sign pictured still rings true. “Join the Friends: The Palace Needs You.”

https://www.iolanipalace.org/donations-membership/

On October 3, 1976, Governor Ariyoshi declared October 3- 9, The Friends of Iolani Palace Week. This declaration was to create public awareness of the Palace restoration efforts and to invite people to join The Friends of Iolani Palace.

During the week, thousands of people visited displays and enjoyed entertainment at Ala Moana Shopping Center, Kahala Mall, and Pearl Ridge Shopping Center. The display at these locations included photographs from the 19th century, a 22-minute film on the restoration and a dinner place setting. Featured entertainment included the Maile Aloha Singers, Keiki Music College, and Aloha Airlines Singers.

The Police reserve, retired officers, and members of The Royal Guard were at Ala Moana keeping an eye on one of the original beds made for the Palace by the A. H. Davenport Co. of Boston. In this image, the footboard of the bed can be seen.

After 45 years the sentiment on the sign pictured still rings true. “Join the Friends: The Palace Needs You.”

https://www.iolanipalace.org/donations-membership/

#Onthisday in 1895, Queen Kapiolani’s sister, Princess Poomaikelani died shortly before 6 pm at the age of 59. According...
10/02/2021

#Onthisday in 1895, Queen Kapiolani’s sister, Princess Poomaikelani died shortly before 6 pm at the age of 59. According to a local newspaper, Poomaikelani was “...in good health and spirits up to a few minutes of her death. She was sitting in a chair when she felt pains in her chest. She was lifted into bed, where she died.”

Princess Poomaikelani was survived by her sister Kapiolani and her nephews, Kawananakoa and Kuhio Kalanianaole. Her funeral took place on October 3 at St. Andrew’s Cathedral, which was crowded with friends. Because she had been the Governor of Hawaii Island, the Royal Hawaiian band and an honor guard of police participated in her funeral. On October 5, the Pacific Commercial Advertiser reported that her estate was valued at $25,000. Monetary bequests were made to Iolani College, Hilo Boarding School, St. Andrew’s Cathedral, and Kapiolani Maternity home. Her sister Kapiolani received everything else.

PC: Hawaii State Archives

#Onthisday in 1895, Queen Kapiolani’s sister, Princess Poomaikelani died shortly before 6 pm at the age of 59. According to a local newspaper, Poomaikelani was “...in good health and spirits up to a few minutes of her death. She was sitting in a chair when she felt pains in her chest. She was lifted into bed, where she died.”

Princess Poomaikelani was survived by her sister Kapiolani and her nephews, Kawananakoa and Kuhio Kalanianaole. Her funeral took place on October 3 at St. Andrew’s Cathedral, which was crowded with friends. Because she had been the Governor of Hawaii Island, the Royal Hawaiian band and an honor guard of police participated in her funeral. On October 5, the Pacific Commercial Advertiser reported that her estate was valued at $25,000. Monetary bequests were made to Iolani College, Hilo Boarding School, St. Andrew’s Cathedral, and Kapiolani Maternity home. Her sister Kapiolani received everything else.

PC: Hawaii State Archives

Help carry forward one of the most important legacies of the Hawaiian monarchy as a Member.As a Member you will receive:...
10/01/2021

Help carry forward one of the most important legacies of the Hawaiian monarchy as a Member.

As a Member you will receive:
- Free admission to Iolani Palace* and the Palace Galleries
- 20% discount on most items at the Palace Shop
- Subscription to The Friends of Iolani Palace newsletter
- Invitations and reserved seating for selected special events
- Invitations to the Annual Meeting and reception
- Invitations to exciting volunteer opportunities
- Additional benefits for gifts of $100 or more

*Does not include admission to the annual Queen Kapiolani Evening Tours in December.

Learn more, view information, and apply for membership on our website - https://www.iolanipalace.org/donations-membership/membership/. We hope you will consider becoming a member.

Help carry forward one of the most important legacies of the Hawaiian monarchy as a Member.

As a Member you will receive:
- Free admission to Iolani Palace* and the Palace Galleries
- 20% discount on most items at the Palace Shop
- Subscription to The Friends of Iolani Palace newsletter
- Invitations and reserved seating for selected special events
- Invitations to the Annual Meeting and reception
- Invitations to exciting volunteer opportunities
- Additional benefits for gifts of $100 or more

*Does not include admission to the annual Queen Kapiolani Evening Tours in December.

Learn more, view information, and apply for membership on our website - https://www.iolanipalace.org/donations-membership/membership/. We hope you will consider becoming a member.

09/29/2021

The final week of Hawaiian History Month 2021 focuses on how Native Hawaiians are using hana keaka—live theater—as an agent for change. Revealing and exploring how the past has shaped the present, theater also allows artists to speculate on possibilities for the future. Who were we, what did we do? What can/will we do next? In its varied forms, Hawaiian theater employs creativity, talent, and skill in what is at heart a life-affirming and political act. We are here.

On Wednesday, September 29, 10am-11:30am HST join us for "Pa‘a ke Kahua, Eia ke Kūkulu: Hawaiian Theatre at UH Mānoa" – an integrated mo‘olelo of the history and current practice of the Hawaiian Theatre Program at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. Dr. Haili‘ōpua Baker and her haumāna, Akea Kahikina, Hi‘ilani Kim-Dela Cruz Okimura, Iāsona Kaper, Kaipulaumakaniolono, and Kamoani‘ala Tavares, share the mo‘olelo, scholarship and creative contributions that they bring to the stage. This plenary presentation celebrates the establishment of a kahua for Hawaiian-medium theatre and looks to the current and future kūkulu.

On Friday, October 1, 6pm-7:30pm HST experience "Nā Huliau: Turning Points on Stage." For over a decade, the Hawai‘i Pono‘ī Coalition has produced living history plays by Victoria Nalani Kneubuhl. These three Hawaiian plays each examine a significant turning point of the late 19th century: the overthrow of the monarchy in 1893, the 1895 military tribunal following the unsuccessful effort to restore Queen Liliu‘okalani to the throne, and the Native Hawaiian struggle against the 1898 annexation of the so-called Republic of Hawai‘i to the United States.

Following monologs from the three plays performed by actors John Wat, Wil Kahele, Mathias Maas, Craig Howes, Lala Buzzell, and Maki‘ilei Ishihara, a panel of Native Hawaiian scholars representing three generations of scholarship—Kawēlauokealoha Wright, Kealani Cook, and Noenoe K. Silva—offer responses to the theatrical presentation, and reflect on what can be learned from the past, as Hawai‘i nears potential turning points now.

We will be hosting all of these programs on Facebook at Hawaiʻi Ponoʻī Coalition and on hawaiianhistorymonth.org, with replays on 'Ōlelo Community Media Channel 53. #hawaiianhistorymonth #hawaiianhistorymonth2021 #mahinamoaukalahawaii

#Onthisday in 1881, King Kalakaua visited Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, which was founded in 1868 by Samuel...
09/29/2021

#Onthisday in 1881, King Kalakaua visited Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, which was founded in 1868 by Samuel C. Armstrong, a former Hawaii resident and schoolmate of Kalakaua in Honolulu.

Samuel was a younger brother of William N. Armstrong who traveled with the King. The sons of American missionaries, Samuel and William’s father, Richard, served as the Hawaiian Kingdom’s Minister of Public Instruction from 1846 until his death in 1860.

Samuel, a Punahou graduate, was attending college in Massachusetts when the civil war began. He joined the Union army and became the commander of an African American unit. After the war, he worked for the Freedman’s Bureau and realized the dire need for educational opportunities for newly freed slaves. Supported by the American Missionary Society and philanthropists, he founded Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in 1868.

By the time King Kalakaua visited in 1881, the institute was also educating Native Americans. Kalakaua did not get to reconnect with his former schoolmate because General Samuel Armstrong had left for the Dakotas, escorting recent graduates to their first teaching assignments.

Now known as Hampton University, the institution continues its mission. On its website, it states: “Over 150 years after its inception, Hampton University continues to break new ground in academic achievement, staying true to General Armstrong's original promise of The Standard of Excellence, An Education for Life.”

#Onthisday in 1881, King Kalakaua visited Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, which was founded in 1868 by Samuel C. Armstrong, a former Hawaii resident and schoolmate of Kalakaua in Honolulu.

Samuel was a younger brother of William N. Armstrong who traveled with the King. The sons of American missionaries, Samuel and William’s father, Richard, served as the Hawaiian Kingdom’s Minister of Public Instruction from 1846 until his death in 1860.

Samuel, a Punahou graduate, was attending college in Massachusetts when the civil war began. He joined the Union army and became the commander of an African American unit. After the war, he worked for the Freedman’s Bureau and realized the dire need for educational opportunities for newly freed slaves. Supported by the American Missionary Society and philanthropists, he founded Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in 1868.

By the time King Kalakaua visited in 1881, the institute was also educating Native Americans. Kalakaua did not get to reconnect with his former schoolmate because General Samuel Armstrong had left for the Dakotas, escorting recent graduates to their first teaching assignments.

Now known as Hampton University, the institution continues its mission. On its website, it states: “Over 150 years after its inception, Hampton University continues to break new ground in academic achievement, staying true to General Armstrong's original promise of The Standard of Excellence, An Education for Life.”

At noon #onthisday in 1881, King Kalakaua arrived at the White House accompanied by Assistant Secretary of State Robert ...
09/28/2021

At noon #onthisday in 1881, King Kalakaua arrived at the White House accompanied by Assistant Secretary of State Robert R. Hitt and was introduced to President Chester A. Arthur (pictured). The visit lasted for about twenty minutes and the President left for New York a mere two hours later.

The Washington, D. C. paper commented that Kalakaua’s visit was purely social and that he left Washington in the early evening.

On September 26, 1881, Kalakaua left New York City headed to Baltimore to catch a steamer traveling to Fortress Monroe (...
09/26/2021

On September 26, 1881, Kalakaua left New York City headed to Baltimore to catch a steamer traveling to Fortress Monroe (pictured).

The Hon. Elisha H. Allen, the Kingdom’s minister in Washington, told reporters that the King’s visit to Hampton was twofold: to visit General Samuel C. Armstrong (pictured), the president of the Normal and Agricultural College at Hampton; and to examine the workings of the school.

William N. Armstrong, Kalakaua’s attorney general and traveling companion, was Samuel C. Armstrong’s older brother.

When informed that U.S. President Chester Arthur was leaving Washington, D. C. on Thursday, September 28, Kalakaua delayed his Hampton stop to meet with the President. He went on to visit Hampton on September 29.

Pictured: Fortress Monroe and Samuel C. Armstrong

After the King’s traveling party arrived in New York City, William N. Armstrong, his traveling companion, was interviewe...
09/25/2021

After the King’s traveling party arrived in New York City, William N. Armstrong, his traveling companion, was interviewed by a New York Daily Tribune reporter. When asked about the county that impressed Kalakaua the most, Armstrong was quoted, “One of the sights that pleased him most was the Paris Electric Exhibition. We spent some time there. Kalakaua is going to introduce the electric light in his own kingdom and he examined the different lamps on that account with great interest.”

#Onthisday in 1881, Kalakaua visited Thomas Edison (pictured) in New York City at 65 5th Avenue. George Jones, the owner of the New York Times, whom Kalakaua had met in Vienna, facilitated the visit.

When introduced to Mr. Edison, his Majesty said, “I have heard about you, Mr. Edison, and I have wished to see you and your wonderful inventions.” While escorting him through the building, Mr. Edison explained the theoretical process of converting steam power into electricity.

The New York Tribune reported that, “Kalakaua was a good listener who asked practical and sensible questions. And that His Majesty appeared to be more than ordinarily familiar with the theoretical aspects of the subject.”

Pictured: King Kalakaua and Thomas Edison

Address

PO Box 2259
Honolulu, HI
96813

Travel to the Palace on The Bus. From Waikiki: Board bus number *2* (School Street-Middle Street) or *13* (Liliha-Puunui Avenue) on Kuhio Avenue heading away from Diamond Head. Ride to the intersection of Hotel and Alakea streets and walk to the palace grounds. To return to Waikiki: Walk toward the ocean to King Street at Punchbowl Street and take the *2* (Waikiki-Kapiolani Park), *13* (Waikiki-Campbell Avenue) or *Route B - City Express!* (Waikiki). You may also take the *19*,* 20* or *42* Waikiki Beach and Hotels at the same stop. Buses run about 10 minutes apart. Check www.thebus.org for updates or for directions from elsewhere.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 9am - 4pm
Wednesday 9am - 9pm
Thursday 9am - 4pm
Friday 9am - 4pm
Saturday 9am - 4pm

Telephone

(808) 522-0822

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Iolani Palace is a Hawaiian and national treasure that depends on private support. To assure its unique cultural, historical and spiritual qualities are maintained for future generations, please consider a gift to The Friends of Iolani Palace, a 501(c)(3) organization with the sole responsibility to serve as guardian and steward to preserve, restore, interpret, share, and celebrate Iolani Palace. To learn more, call 808.522.0822, or go online at www.iolanipalace.org. ADMISSION: Docent Guided Tour--> Adults $21.75* Children (5-12) $6 Children (under 5) Free (Tuesday - Thursday 9:00am -10:00am) (Friday - Saturday 9:00am -11:15am) Audio Tour--> Adults $14.75 Children (5-12) $6 Children (under 5) Free (Monday 9:00am - 4:00pm, Tuesday - Thursday 10:30am - 4:00pm, Friday - Saturday 12:00pm - 4:00pm)) Gallery Admission only--> Adults $7 Children (5-12) $3 Children (under 5) Free (9:30am – 4:00pm) *A Kama'aina and military rate of $15 is offered for the docent-guided tour. State ID or military ID is required for discounted rate. Admission is FREE for members of the Friends of Iolani Palace. Holiday hours: Closed Monday, February 15, 2016 Closed Monday, May 30, 2016 Closed Monday, July 4, 2016 Closed Monday, September 5, 2016


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Comments

We enjoyed the audio self led tour. Very informative and very impressed by the service of the monarchy to the people of Hawaii.
王宮当時の姿が美しく再現されています。 オーディオガイドは日本語にも対応していて詳しく歴史などを学べます。 ネットでの予約制で人数が制限されているので、ゆっくりと安全に見学が出来ます。
Aloha And Merry Christmas To At The Iolani Palace And A Happy 2021
RARE ANTIQUE 1825 KING KAMEHAMEHA III ROYAL HAWAII COAT BUTTON GILT GOLD FIRMIN https://www.ebay.com/itm/114573439148
My wife and I took the splendid Chamberlain's Tour last Thursday. The "Assistant Chamberlain" Jeffrey gave an excellent presentation and we were thrilled to be able to go into areas not included in the public tours. Great work on providing some unique details about the functioning at the palace.
Aloha nui! I am trying to find out more information about Pekupekuiki a flagpole that was at ʻIolani Palace. Also trying to find out who or what is Kanikauwepa - perhaps that name of a monkeypod tree that was near the flagpole Mahalo!
I'll be there volunteering!
I name to mohd zainuddin bin mohamed(821126-03-5507)address me/desa sri kemunting A.K.A kampung beoh 16090 gunung bachok kota bharu kelantan darul naim
#OnThisDay The Passing of a Princess. From The Princess Ka'iulani Project From Princess Ka'iulani - Her Life and Times: March 6th, 1899 marked the end of an era; Hawaii's most beloved Hawaii/Scot, Princess Victoria Ka'iulani Cleghorn passed away. It was an unexpected shock for the entire Hawaiian nation, both native and foreign. Ka'iulani was a strong young woman who loved the outdoors, where she rode on horseback, surfed, paddled and sometimes swam out beyond the breakers. Although she became ill after encountering a storm at Waimea on the Island of Hawaii, no one thought it would lead to her death. It is likely that the stress Ka'iulani experienced throughout her life, was ultimately responsible for the onset of her illnesses. The New York Times read: "Princess Ka’iulani died March 6 of inflammatory rheumatism contracted several weeks ago while of a visit to the Island of Hawaii. The funeral of the Princess will occur on Sunday, March 12, from the old native church, and will be under the direction of the Government. The ceremonies will be on a scale befitting the rank of the young Princess. The body is lying in state at Ainahau, the Princess’s old home. Thousands of persons, both native and white, have gone out to the place, and the whole town is in mourning. Flags on the Government buildings are at half mast, as are those on the residences of the foreign Consuls..." The old native church, the Times refers to is Kawaiaha'o Church in Honolulu. Read more at http://princesskaiulaniproject.com/about_princess_kaiulani.… Iolani Palace #Kawananakoa #Kalakaua
Saya mohd zainuddin bin mohamed(821126-03-5507)
The Hawaiian royals were a fascinating group of individuals torn between their native liberal traditional ways and the new western ideals of Christianity and business commerce. They were friends with European royalty (attending such events as Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee) and led extravagant lifestyles in palaces and grand houses whilst also encouraging schemes like hospitals and schools, but, like their people, were to suffer from the excesses of alcohol, imported diseases and discrimination because of the colour of their skin. Kamehameha’s Crown is a history of the Hawaiian monarchy from 1810-1893 (and the years after) looking at the personalities and roles of each of the Hawaiian monarchs, and members of their families, from a personal, social, cultural and political aspect as they struggled to maintain the independence and integrity of their nation against the colonial aspirations of other countries, particularly the United States of America. The descendants of the Hawaiian royal families still play a significant role in Hawaiian social and political life, and are active in seeking to restore the position of the native Hawaiian in a culture and society that is now reclaiming its past in order to restore its future. Kamehameha’s Crown by Stephen Bunford is now available from Amazon at $14.34/£10.99
Great posts from the Friends of the Iolani Palace recently! Thank you so much!