Iolani Palace

Iolani Palace The official royal palace for the Kalakaua Dynasty, which ruled Hawaii from 1874 through 1893. We are located in downtown Honolulu. Iolani Palace is a Hawaiian and national treasure that depends on private support.
(1847)

To assure its unique cultural, historical and spiritual qualities are maintained for future generations, please consider a gift to The Friends of Iolani Palace, a 501(c)(3) organization with the sole responsibility to serve as guardian and steward to preserve, restore, interpret, share, and celebrate Iolani Palace. To learn more, call (808) 522-0822, or go online at www.iolanipalace.org.

Operating as usual

#OnThisDay June 24, 1884, Prince Oscar (pictured), the second son of King Oscar II of Sweden and Norway, arrived on the ...
06/24/2021

#OnThisDay June 24, 1884, Prince Oscar (pictured), the second son of King Oscar II of Sweden and Norway, arrived on the Swedish frigate Vandis and that afternoon had an audience with King Kalakaua . Prince Oscar and the officers participated in a whirlwind of activities including a dance aboard a British naval ship, a dinner given in his honor by the British Consul, and a reception and ball hosted by the Consul for Sweden and Norway. He also attended a charity dance to benefit Queen Kapiolani’s fund to assist Hansen’s disease patients, and a concert under patronage of Princess Liliuokalani.

At a party hosted by Dowager Queen Emma in his honor, Prince Oscar and his crewmates were adorned in lei. The day before their departure, the officers of the Swedish ship hosted a party on board the ship, which His Majesty King Kalakaua, H.R.H. Princess Liliuokalani, and other government officials attended.

#OnThisDay June 24, 1884, Prince Oscar (pictured), the second son of King Oscar II of Sweden and Norway, arrived on the Swedish frigate Vandis and that afternoon had an audience with King Kalakaua . Prince Oscar and the officers participated in a whirlwind of activities including a dance aboard a British naval ship, a dinner given in his honor by the British Consul, and a reception and ball hosted by the Consul for Sweden and Norway. He also attended a charity dance to benefit Queen Kapiolani’s fund to assist Hansen’s disease patients, and a concert under patronage of Princess Liliuokalani.

At a party hosted by Dowager Queen Emma in his honor, Prince Oscar and his crewmates were adorned in lei. The day before their departure, the officers of the Swedish ship hosted a party on board the ship, which His Majesty King Kalakaua, H.R.H. Princess Liliuokalani, and other government officials attended.

On June 15, 1908, the remains of Queen Kapiolani’s nephew, Prince Kawananakoa, arrived in Honolulu. Escorted by a squad ...
06/21/2021

On June 15, 1908, the remains of Queen Kapiolani’s nephew, Prince Kawananakoa, arrived in Honolulu.

Escorted by a squad of police officers, his body was taken to his Pensacola Street residence. As was done with royal funerals in the 19th century, watchers sat by the casket with kahili, while chanters spoke about his ancestors. At midnight on June 19, his casket was taken to the Capitol building preceded by a squad of police and accompanied by kahili bearers and members of Hawaiian societies. The Iolani Palace exterior columns were wrapped with black and white bunting, the Throne Room was draped in black, and the placement of guards, mourners and kahili (up to 110 of them) were mapped out. At the head of the casket (pictured) was the puloulou that was used in his Uncle King Kalakaua’s coronation. This puloulou can be seen in the Throne Room today.

After the funeral service was conducted on #onthisday in 1908, Prince Kawananakoa was interred at the Royal Mausoleum Mauna Ala in Nuuanu.

PC: Hawaii State Archives and Honolulu Advertiser

On the morning of June 19, 1887, His Majesty attended a service at Kaumakapili Church, where Rev. John A. Waiamau addres...
06/20/2021

On the morning of June 19, 1887, His Majesty attended a service at Kaumakapili Church, where Rev. John A. Waiamau addressed the congregation.

“We must not forget that was during her reign, by her liberal spirit a compact was entered into between her government and that of France, and at the same time the United States of America, which declared our independence…At this time our Chiefs—Queen Kapiolani and the Heir Apparent—are joining hand in hand with the celebration of this day in England. Let us in our prayers remember that our beloved Chiefs are the guests of the great and good Queen whose Jubilee we celebrate.”

#Onthisday in 1887, the morning began with royal salutes and the ringing of church bells to honor Queen Victoria’s Jubilee. King Kalakaua, Princess Poomaikelani, Prince Keliiahounui, Minister of Finance Paul Puhiulu Kanoa, and His Majesty’s Chamberlain, Antone Rosa, celebrated with a picnic at the old Royal Residence in Nuuanu, while the community participated in sporting contests and a public picnic in Kapiolani Park. Fireworks preceded a well-attended evening reception and ball at the British Legation.

The next day, June 21, Queen Kapiolani and Princess Liliuokalani were in attendance at Queen Victoria’s Westminster Abbey ceremony in London (pictured).

On the morning of June 19, 1887, His Majesty attended a service at Kaumakapili Church, where Rev. John A. Waiamau addressed the congregation.

“We must not forget that was during her reign, by her liberal spirit a compact was entered into between her government and that of France, and at the same time the United States of America, which declared our independence…At this time our Chiefs—Queen Kapiolani and the Heir Apparent—are joining hand in hand with the celebration of this day in England. Let us in our prayers remember that our beloved Chiefs are the guests of the great and good Queen whose Jubilee we celebrate.”

#Onthisday in 1887, the morning began with royal salutes and the ringing of church bells to honor Queen Victoria’s Jubilee. King Kalakaua, Princess Poomaikelani, Prince Keliiahounui, Minister of Finance Paul Puhiulu Kanoa, and His Majesty’s Chamberlain, Antone Rosa, celebrated with a picnic at the old Royal Residence in Nuuanu, while the community participated in sporting contests and a public picnic in Kapiolani Park. Fireworks preceded a well-attended evening reception and ball at the British Legation.

The next day, June 21, Queen Kapiolani and Princess Liliuokalani were in attendance at Queen Victoria’s Westminster Abbey ceremony in London (pictured).

#Onthisday in 1856, Emma Rooke and His Majesty King Kamehameha IV (pictured) were married at Kawaiahao Church, the large...
06/19/2021

#Onthisday in 1856, Emma Rooke and His Majesty King Kamehameha IV (pictured) were married at Kawaiahao Church, the largest building in town at the time.

The King and his brother, Lot Kamehameha, arrived at the church by carriage flanked by kahili. As the groom and his attendants entered, the band played God Save the King. Then the bride and her attendants, Princess Victoria Kaahumanu, the Hon. Miss Lydia Kamakaeha, and Miss Mary Pitman, took their places on the right side of the altar. The Episcopal marriage service was conducted by Reverend R. Armstrong in both Hawaiian and English. The Polynesian newspaper commented that this lengthened the ceremony and if anything, it rendered it more imposing with each promise being doubly made.

The bridal party returned to Iolani Palace to receive congratulations from the Diplomatic and Consular corps, the Privy Council, and the House of Nobles. A ball attended by 400 to 500 people was held that same evening. The newspaper praised Prince Kamehameha (later Kamehameha V) for organizing the whole affair.

PC: Library of Congress

#Onthisday in 1856, Emma Rooke and His Majesty King Kamehameha IV (pictured) were married at Kawaiahao Church, the largest building in town at the time.

The King and his brother, Lot Kamehameha, arrived at the church by carriage flanked by kahili. As the groom and his attendants entered, the band played God Save the King. Then the bride and her attendants, Princess Victoria Kaahumanu, the Hon. Miss Lydia Kamakaeha, and Miss Mary Pitman, took their places on the right side of the altar. The Episcopal marriage service was conducted by Reverend R. Armstrong in both Hawaiian and English. The Polynesian newspaper commented that this lengthened the ceremony and if anything, it rendered it more imposing with each promise being doubly made.

The bridal party returned to Iolani Palace to receive congratulations from the Diplomatic and Consular corps, the Privy Council, and the House of Nobles. A ball attended by 400 to 500 people was held that same evening. The newspaper praised Prince Kamehameha (later Kamehameha V) for organizing the whole affair.

PC: Library of Congress

Still searching for the perfect gift for your high school/college Grad or Dad? Look no further, and stop by the Palace S...
06/17/2021

Still searching for the perfect gift for your high school/college Grad or Dad? Look no further, and stop by the Palace Shop online or in-person to pick-up Palace exclusive Koa pens, weapons, carving tools and more!

Koa wood is native to Hawaii and known for its rich colors and varied grain pattern. In the past it was so highly regarded that it was kapu for anyone to possess it except the Hawaiian monarchs. Treat your Dad or Grad like royalty this Summer.

The Palace Shop located in Hale Koa (the Barracks building) is open through Saturday, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Browse our online shop at www.iolanipalace.org/shop.

06/12/2021

Pulama the Palace premieres tonight at 6 p.m.! Here's a preview of Kuana Torres Kahele performing in the Throne Room of Iolani Palace.

The concert celebrating The Friends of Iolani Palace's 55th anniversary will also feature some of Hawaii’s top musical artists, including Robert Cazimero, Amy Hanaialii, Natalie Ai Kamauu, Marlene Sai, and the Royal Hawaiian Band performing throughout the Palace and grounds.

On-demand access to the concert is $55 and can be purchased at https://iolanipalace.uscreen.io/pages/pulamathepalace.

If you already have a ticket, sign in at 6 p.m. or later to watch the concert at any time: https://iolanipalace.uscreen.io/sign_in

There's still time to bid on fabulous items in our online auction! Choose from neighbor island adventures, Palace experi...
06/10/2021

There's still time to bid on fabulous items in our online auction! Choose from neighbor island adventures, Palace experiences, artwork by Hawaii’s premier Native Hawaiian artisans, an exclusive dining experience that echoes King Kalakaua’s trip around the world, and more.

Check out these new items and more that were recently added to the auction. Browse and bid now — the auction closes this Sunday, June 13 at 12 p.m. HST: www.32auctions.com/foip55anniversary

06/10/2021

Have you purchased your ticket to Pulama the Palace? Natalie Ai Kamauu and ohana will be performing beautiful mele and hula in the Grand Hall of Iolani Palace during the virtual concert that premieres this Saturday, June 12 at 6 p.m. HST.

The concert celebrating The Friends of Iolani Palace's 55th anniversary will also feature some of Hawaii’s top musical artists, including Robert Cazimero, Kuana Torres Kahele, Amy Hanaialii, Marlene Sai, and the Royal Hawaiian Band performing throughout the Palace and grounds.

On-demand access to the concert is $55 and can be purchased at https://iolanipalace.uscreen.io/pages/pulamathepalace.

Learn more about other anniversary celebration events at www.iolanipalace.org/55anniversary.

#OnThisDay June 7, 1966, Liliuokalani K. Morris (pictured), Wilmer C. Morris, and Barbara F. Mills signed the document t...
06/07/2021

#OnThisDay June 7, 1966, Liliuokalani K. Morris (pictured), Wilmer C. Morris, and Barbara F. Mills signed the document that incorporated The Friends of Iolani Palace as a non-profit corporation. The articles of incorporation were drawn up by then-State Senator and future Governor George Ariyoshi.

This year, we celebrate the 55th anniversary of The Friends with a week-long hoolaulea which includes an online auction, virtual film screening and discussions surrounding the Palace restoration, and a virtual concert, Pulama the Palace!

𝑺𝒄𝒓𝒆𝒆𝒏𝒊𝒏𝒈 𝒐𝒇 𝑰𝒐𝒍𝒂𝒏𝒊 𝑷𝒂𝒍𝒂𝒄𝒆 𝑹𝒆𝒔𝒕𝒐𝒓𝒂𝒕𝒊𝒐𝒏 & 𝑳𝒊𝒗𝒆 𝑫𝒊𝒔𝒄𝒖𝒔𝒔𝒊𝒐𝒏 | Wednesday, June 9 at 12 p.m.
www.eventbrite.com/e/157178901325

𝑷𝒖𝒍𝒂𝒎𝒂 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝑷𝒂𝒍𝒂𝒄𝒆 𝑽𝒊𝒓𝒕𝒖𝒂𝒍 𝑪𝒐𝒏𝒄𝒆𝒓𝒕 | Premieres Saturday, June 12 at 6 p.m. (can be re-watched with on-demand access)
https://iolanipalace.uscreen.io/pages/pulamathepalace

𝑶𝒏𝒍𝒊𝒏𝒆 𝑨𝒖𝒄𝒕𝒊𝒐𝒏 | Closes on Sunday, June 13 at 6 p.m.
www.32auctions.com/foip55anniversary

Visit iolanipalace.org/55anniversary for more details about the Friends of Iolani Palace 55th anniversary hoolaulea. We can't wait to celebrate with you!

Our online auction is now open! In celebration of The Friends of Iolani Palace 55th anniversary, the online auction supp...
06/06/2021

Our online auction is now open! In celebration of The Friends of Iolani Palace 55th anniversary, the online auction supporting the Palace features an assortment of items including neighbor island adventures, hotel stays, one-of-a-kind arts and crafts from native Hawaiian artisans and cultural practitioners, Palace exclusive experiences, and more. Browse items and bid through Sunday, June 13 at 12 p.m. at https://www.32auctions.com/foip55anniversary.

Our online auction is now open! In celebration of The Friends of Iolani Palace 55th anniversary, the online auction supporting the Palace features an assortment of items including neighbor island adventures, hotel stays, one-of-a-kind arts and crafts from native Hawaiian artisans and cultural practitioners, Palace exclusive experiences, and more. Browse items and bid through Sunday, June 13 at 12 p.m. at https://www.32auctions.com/foip55anniversary.

As part of our week-long celebration of the 55th anniversary of The Friends of Iolani Palace including a week-long virtu...
06/03/2021

As part of our week-long celebration of the 55th anniversary of The Friends of Iolani Palace including a week-long virtual hoolaulea from June 6 to 12, 2021, join us for two virtual screenings of documentaries directed by legendary film director George Tahara! Each film will conclude with a discussion about the Palace’s extensive restoration and The Friends of Iolani Palace’s continued preservation efforts.

𝑰𝒐𝒍𝒂𝒏𝒊 𝑷𝒂𝒍𝒂𝒄𝒆: 𝑯𝒂𝒘𝒂𝒊𝒊'𝒔 𝑷𝒂𝒔𝒕 𝑻𝒐𝒅𝒂𝒚 | June 7, 12 p.m.
This documentary takes a look at Hawaii’s Past by uncovering the rich history of Iolani Palace, its grounds, and surrounding buildings.
Register at www.eventbrite.com/e/157173595455.

𝑰𝒐𝒍𝒂𝒏𝒊 𝑷𝒂𝒍𝒂𝒄𝒆 𝑹𝒆𝒔𝒕𝒐𝒓𝒂𝒕𝒊𝒐𝒏 | June 9, 12 p.m.
This film documents the decade-long restoration of Iolani Palace from 1969 to 1979. Learn about the extensive historical research and archeological investigation needed before beginning the restoration project, and see actual footage of the restoration of the Palace and Barracks.
Register at www.eventbrite.com/e/157178901325.

The virtual screenings are complimentary for Friends of Iolani Palace members and $10 each for non-members. All registrants will have access to a video recording of the screening and discussion following the event.

As part of our week-long celebration of the 55th anniversary of The Friends of Iolani Palace including a week-long virtual hoolaulea from June 6 to 12, 2021, join us for two virtual screenings of documentaries directed by legendary film director George Tahara! Each film will conclude with a discussion about the Palace’s extensive restoration and The Friends of Iolani Palace’s continued preservation efforts.

𝑰𝒐𝒍𝒂𝒏𝒊 𝑷𝒂𝒍𝒂𝒄𝒆: 𝑯𝒂𝒘𝒂𝒊𝒊'𝒔 𝑷𝒂𝒔𝒕 𝑻𝒐𝒅𝒂𝒚 | June 7, 12 p.m.
This documentary takes a look at Hawaii’s Past by uncovering the rich history of Iolani Palace, its grounds, and surrounding buildings.
Register at www.eventbrite.com/e/157173595455.

𝑰𝒐𝒍𝒂𝒏𝒊 𝑷𝒂𝒍𝒂𝒄𝒆 𝑹𝒆𝒔𝒕𝒐𝒓𝒂𝒕𝒊𝒐𝒏 | June 9, 12 p.m.
This film documents the decade-long restoration of Iolani Palace from 1969 to 1979. Learn about the extensive historical research and archeological investigation needed before beginning the restoration project, and see actual footage of the restoration of the Palace and Barracks.
Register at www.eventbrite.com/e/157178901325.

The virtual screenings are complimentary for Friends of Iolani Palace members and $10 each for non-members. All registrants will have access to a video recording of the screening and discussion following the event.

#OnThisDay June 2, 1908, Prince David Kawananakoa died of pneumonia in San Francisco. He was survived by his widow Abiga...
06/02/2021

#OnThisDay June 2, 1908, Prince David Kawananakoa died of pneumonia in San Francisco. He was survived by his widow Abigail Campbell Kawananakoa, and three children, Abigail Kapiolani, David Kalakaua, and Lydia Liliuokalani (pictured in the second photo). His youngest daughter, Lydia Liliuokalani, was a founder of the Friends of Iolani Palace and served as its first board president.

David Kawananakoa was Queen Kapiolani’s oldest nephew. He and his brothers lived in a room on the 2nd floor of the Palace when they were home from school. They attended St. Matthews Hall in California and the Royal Agricultural College in England. After returning from England, David was appointed to the Privy Council, a position he held until the overthrow of the monarchy. On February 1, 1893, after the overthrow, he and Paul Neumann traveled to Washington D.C. to present Liliuokalani’s case to the U.S. government. Their efforts caused President Cleveland to send a special commissioner (Col. Blount) to investigate and determine who the U.S. should be dealing with on a diplomatic level.

In 1895 when the counterrevolution occurred, Prince Kawananakoa was arrested for knowing about the plots, but was released without being put on trial.

In 1900, he was an unsuccessful democratic candidate for Delegate to Congress. Two years later he married Abigail Campbell.

In 1908, Prince Kuhio Kalanianaole accompanied his brother’s body home. They arrived in Honolulu on June 15th.

PC: Pacific Commercial Advertiser (June 1908)

06/01/2021

Enjoy beautiful mele from Amy Hanaialii during Pulama the Palace premiering on Saturday, June 12 at 6 p.m. HST.

The virtual concert celebrating The Friends of Iolani Palace's 55th anniversary will also feature some of Hawaii’s top musical artists, including Robert Cazimero, Kuana Torres Kahele, Natalie Ai Kamauu, Marlene Sai, and the Royal Hawaiian Band performing throughout the Palace and grounds.

Access to the concert is $55 and can be purchased at https://iolanipalace.uscreen.io/pages/pulamathepalace.

Learn more about other anniversary celebration events at www.iolanipalace.org/55anniversary.

Address

PO Box 2259
Honolulu, HI
96813

Travel to the Palace on The Bus. From Waikiki: Board bus number *2* (School Street-Middle Street) or *13* (Liliha-Puunui Avenue) on Kuhio Avenue heading away from Diamond Head. Ride to the intersection of Hotel and Alakea streets and walk to the palace grounds. To return to Waikiki: Walk toward the ocean to King Street at Punchbowl Street and take the *2* (Waikiki-Kapiolani Park), *13* (Waikiki-Campbell Avenue) or *Route B - City Express!* (Waikiki). You may also take the *19*,* 20* or *42* Waikiki Beach and Hotels at the same stop. Buses run about 10 minutes apart. Check www.thebus.org for updates or for directions from elsewhere.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 09:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 21:00
Thursday 09:00 - 16:00
Friday 09:00 - 16:00
Saturday 09:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(808) 522-0822

Alerts

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Iolani Palace is a Hawaiian and national treasure that depends on private support. To assure its unique cultural, historical and spiritual qualities are maintained for future generations, please consider a gift to The Friends of Iolani Palace, a 501(c)(3) organization with the sole responsibility to serve as guardian and steward to preserve, restore, interpret, share, and celebrate Iolani Palace. To learn more, call 808.522.0822, or go online at www.iolanipalace.org. ADMISSION: Docent Guided Tour--> Adults $21.75* Children (5-12) $6 Children (under 5) Free (Tuesday - Thursday 9:00am -10:00am) (Friday - Saturday 9:00am -11:15am) Audio Tour--> Adults $14.75 Children (5-12) $6 Children (under 5) Free (Monday 9:00am - 4:00pm, Tuesday - Thursday 10:30am - 4:00pm, Friday - Saturday 12:00pm - 4:00pm)) Gallery Admission only--> Adults $7 Children (5-12) $3 Children (under 5) Free (9:30am – 4:00pm) *A Kama'aina and military rate of $15 is offered for the docent-guided tour. State ID or military ID is required for discounted rate. Admission is FREE for members of the Friends of Iolani Palace. Holiday hours: Closed Monday, February 15, 2016 Closed Monday, May 30, 2016 Closed Monday, July 4, 2016 Closed Monday, September 5, 2016

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Aloha And Merry Christmas To At The Iolani Palace And A Happy 2021
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My wife and I took the splendid Chamberlain's Tour last Thursday. The "Assistant Chamberlain" Jeffrey gave an excellent presentation and we were thrilled to be able to go into areas not included in the public tours. Great work on providing some unique details about the functioning at the palace.
Aloha nui! I am trying to find out more information about Pekupekuiki a flagpole that was at ʻIolani Palace. Also trying to find out who or what is Kanikauwepa - perhaps that name of a monkeypod tree that was near the flagpole Mahalo!
I'll be there volunteering!
I name to mohd zainuddin bin mohamed(821126-03-5507)address me/desa sri kemunting A.K.A kampung beoh 16090 gunung bachok kota bharu kelantan darul naim
#OnThisDay The Passing of a Princess. From The Princess Ka'iulani Project From Princess Ka'iulani - Her Life and Times: March 6th, 1899 marked the end of an era; Hawaii's most beloved Hawaii/Scot, Princess Victoria Ka'iulani Cleghorn passed away. It was an unexpected shock for the entire Hawaiian nation, both native and foreign. Ka'iulani was a strong young woman who loved the outdoors, where she rode on horseback, surfed, paddled and sometimes swam out beyond the breakers. Although she became ill after encountering a storm at Waimea on the Island of Hawaii, no one thought it would lead to her death. It is likely that the stress Ka'iulani experienced throughout her life, was ultimately responsible for the onset of her illnesses. The New York Times read: "Princess Ka’iulani died March 6 of inflammatory rheumatism contracted several weeks ago while of a visit to the Island of Hawaii. The funeral of the Princess will occur on Sunday, March 12, from the old native church, and will be under the direction of the Government. The ceremonies will be on a scale befitting the rank of the young Princess. The body is lying in state at Ainahau, the Princess’s old home. Thousands of persons, both native and white, have gone out to the place, and the whole town is in mourning. Flags on the Government buildings are at half mast, as are those on the residences of the foreign Consuls..." The old native church, the Times refers to is Kawaiaha'o Church in Honolulu. Read more at http://princesskaiulaniproject.com/about_princess_kaiulani.… Iolani Palace #Kawananakoa #Kalakaua
Saya mohd zainuddin bin mohamed(821126-03-5507)
The Hawaiian royals were a fascinating group of individuals torn between their native liberal traditional ways and the new western ideals of Christianity and business commerce. They were friends with European royalty (attending such events as Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee) and led extravagant lifestyles in palaces and grand houses whilst also encouraging schemes like hospitals and schools, but, like their people, were to suffer from the excesses of alcohol, imported diseases and discrimination because of the colour of their skin. Kamehameha’s Crown is a history of the Hawaiian monarchy from 1810-1893 (and the years after) looking at the personalities and roles of each of the Hawaiian monarchs, and members of their families, from a personal, social, cultural and political aspect as they struggled to maintain the independence and integrity of their nation against the colonial aspirations of other countries, particularly the United States of America. The descendants of the Hawaiian royal families still play a significant role in Hawaiian social and political life, and are active in seeking to restore the position of the native Hawaiian in a culture and society that is now reclaiming its past in order to restore its future. Kamehameha’s Crown by Stephen Bunford is now available from Amazon at $14.34/£10.99
Great posts from the Friends of the Iolani Palace recently! Thank you so much!
Mohd zainuddin bin mohamed(821126-03-5507)address me to fb office company-desa sri kemunting A.K.A kampung beoh 16090 gunung bachok kota bharu kelantan darul naim
Saya mohd mohd zainuddin bin mohamed(821126-03-5507)address me to fb desa sri kemunting A. K.A kampung beoh 16090 gunung bachok kota bharu kelantan darul naim