Hermantown Historical Society

Hermantown Historical Society The Hermantown Historical Society preserves the rich heritage of the area and its people. Our History Center enables us to share the information we have collected as well as artifacts. We also sponsor historical presentations.
(5)

08/25/2018

There will not be a Harvest Fest this year, unfortunately. The members of the historical society who have putting it on have had health issues and are wearing out. Sorry! The Spirit is willing but the flesh is weak.

07/18/2018
Hellfire in Hermantown

Hellfire in Hermantown

Come to Centricity Credit Union’s BBQ between 11 AM and 1:30 PM for good food and buy Hellfire inHermantown at the same time!

07/13/2018
Hellfire in Hermantown

Hellfire in Hermantown

Come this Monday, July 16th, to the Hermantown Farmer's Market, in the parking lot of Community Building, from 4 P.M. to 6:30 P.M.! At the same time you buy delicious products from local agriculturalists to feed your body, you can buy a copy of Hellfire in Hermantown to feed your mind! The History Center will also be open, so feel free to drop in!

And down comes Hermantown School!  (It was the middle school for a few years.)  Now the site will have a wellness center...
06/10/2018

And down comes Hermantown School! (It was the middle school for a few years.) Now the site will have a wellness center, by the YMCA and Essentia Health, I think.

Untitled Album
06/10/2018

Untitled Album

05/20/2018

From the Hermantown Star: "Harvest Fest is now History. Hermantown Harvest Fest has been going on now for the past 9 years. Due to the increasing age of our historical society members, intervening health issues, and the reduction of our core event workers, we have decided to end this popular event. The community of Hermantown as well as surrounding communities have come out strong lyto support our efforts over the many years. . .thank you! The time has come to take this annual event out of service--it's now history."

04/26/2018

Somebody had asked where the Sawmill Bar was located. If I remember correctly, it was across Haines Road from the Hondo Sales Center.

HarvestFest made the "Things to do this Weekend" in the Duluth News Tribune today.
09/11/2015

HarvestFest made the "Things to do this Weekend" in the Duluth News Tribune today.

09/11/2015

Tomorrow's THE day! HarvestFest! Nice weather forecast for tomorrow - "sunny and pleasant." Come one, come all!

Here's some info from the Hermantown Star of 9-10-15 about HarvestFest.
09/10/2015

Here's some info from the Hermantown Star of 9-10-15 about HarvestFest.

09/06/2015

Save next Saturday, the 12th of September, for HarvestFest! There will be a variety of musical groups all day, over 60 exhibitors of all types with items for sale, food to eat, activities for the kiddies, and the History Center will be open all day. It lasts from 9 to 3, and admission is still $2.00 for an adult. Come one, come all!

03/24/2015

Re: [Hermantown Historical Society] New message from Merri
Delaine Carlson
3/23/2015
To: Connie Jacobson
We have lots of Helmer’s and Olson’s so she needs to give a first name there.
Soderholm.....I know Joan...grad 1948,..... Gene ...grad 1950......David....grad..1951
Bengtson....on 1885 census ...Nicholaus Bengtson, 56 years old, from Sweden

Sally married a Helmer, ...lots of them around, and I bet they have a family tree.
Delaine

09/26/2014

An interesting "Bygones" item in today's Duluth News Tribune. "Hermantown officials testified yesterday to the Minnesota Municipal Commission about their wish to change from a township to a city. An estimated 700 residents cheered and applauded the testimony at the meeting in the Hermantown High School gymnasium."

While you're are Summerfest on Saturday, July 19th, stop by the History Center sometime between 9 and 3! See how work is...
07/15/2014

While you're are Summerfest on Saturday, July 19th, stop by the History Center sometime between 9 and 3! See how work is progressing on the book being written about the schools in the Township, and later, the city. Help us raise the necessary funds to publish a book on the history of the community's schools by participating in a raffle.

Don't miss the re-scheduled discussion about the Skyline Drive In Theater!  It will be held Thursday evening, May 8, 201...
05/07/2014

Don't miss the re-scheduled discussion about the Skyline Drive In Theater! It will be held Thursday evening, May 8, 2014, at 6:30 P.M. at the Hermantown Community Building.

04/24/2014

The author of the excellent article on the Skyline Drive-In Theatre is Scott Reinke, Class of '81, Hermantown High School.

04/23/2014

“See a Movie under the Stars”

Written by Sandy Reinke's son

At one time there were almost 90 drive-in theatres operating in Minnesota and we had one of our own in Duluth, the Skyline Drive-in Theatre. Since there is minimal factual history available regarding the theatre, and even less physical evidence that remains, we are hoping to accumulate an oral history of our shared memories. Perhaps the best way to remember the past of a venue of this type is through the stories that we can tell.

The Skyline Drive-in Theatre was established on September 11, 1948 and closed August 27, 1986. Originally built and operated by Ted Mann, of “Mann Theatres” fame, it was situated at 4954 Miller Trunk Highway, where the Bullyan’s Recreation Center is now located.

When it opened in 1948, the 40 ft. X 50 ft. giant tilted screen made it possible to get a clear view of the picture from any location, so that patrons could enjoy a motion picture from the comfort of their own car. There were wide roadways and aisles between the ramps in order to alleviate traffic and parking problems. Twenty boys from the area were employed to park cars and show people how to operate the volume-controlled individual “In-Car Speakers”. Six girls were employed to sell tickets and sell concessions. About 654 cars could be parked at one time, and a concession stand was located in the center of the theater. Free bottle warmers were available for the youngest guests.

“Bring the kids! Bring the Shut-Ins!” “See movies under the stars!” was the headline in the newspaper that advertised the opening day. The first movie shown was “April Showers” starring Jack Carson and Ann Sothern, and included a Bugs Bunny cartoon along with the latest news. Show times were 7:30 and 9:30 - rain or clear – and children under 12 got in for free. The ad promised there would be no traffic or parking problems, no dress-up obligations, and all your baby-sitter problems were solved.

“Here is Duluth’s newest entertainment center! The Skyline Drive-In Theatre, where you’ll enjoy motion pictures from the comfort of your own car…
The family together enjoying the privacy of chatting, smoking, eating popcorn, etc., without fear of annoying neighbors. The little children can now attend the evening shows, thus eliminating baby-sitters! Each car is furnished with an In-Car Speaker… with volume control. Here is a most delightful way to enjoy good movies! It’s a pleasant ride to Skyline Drive-In Movie Theatre. Refreshments can be obtained inside the theatre area… a good time is assured.”

From its beginnings as a family-friendly venue to its later years as more of a teen hangout, each generation that attended movies at Skyline will have memories unique to their age. The theatre was open for 38 years, nearly four decades, and as everyone knows, there were dramatic changes in our culture, technology, and in the movies themselves during those times.
The Skyline in the fifties seemed to be directed towards more family-oriented movie fare. Many of us remember viewing a movie from the back seat of the family car while snuggled together wearing only pajamas, or frolicking in the playground at the front of the screen during the intermissions. There was the excitement of driving by the big screen and familiar marquee on the side of the highway, always just past the equally distinctive sign for the Airliner Motel with its fighter jet outlined in neon lights, and trying to see what was playing, or perhaps just catch a glimpse of a scene on the screen and trying to guess the name of the movie as we passed by.

In the late-sixties and seventies the drive-in venue began to incorporate the counterculture of the time with the intention of drawing an expanding teenaged audience. Hollywood produced a variety of movies that were meant to be appreciated only in a drive-in setting. The Dusk to Dawn movie-marathons of the seventies and eighties were particularly memorable to anyone that attended. Usually held on a Sunday night at the beginning and end of the summer, they were an exciting rite of passage for the youth of that time.

What do we remember? The most common memory seems to involve trying to sneak past the ticket booth with our friends in the trunk of the car. There were “Car Load” nights for $5.00 a car, “Buck night” where it cost a dollar for as many kids that could be crammed into one vehicle. Another common thread is the memories that we’re not willing to share, the back row memories, that usually involve restless youth and young romance. We might not remember the movies that we saw, but quite vividly can recall the actual experience of being there.

There was the noise and revelry of the early arrivals before the summer sun had set, the unpredictable window speakers - or trying to tune the radio to the proper station – giant bags of popcorn, movies no one seems to remember, and the red-flare flashlights of the parking guides that glowed in the dust that rose from the gravel roads in the evenings as we left.

The Hermantown Historical Society was in the "Eh" column today - the middle one. Here it is, cropped out.
04/19/2014

The Hermantown Historical Society was in the "Eh" column today - the middle one. Here it is, cropped out.

Here's the article from the Hermantown Star with a photo. . .written by Sandy Reinke.
04/18/2014

Here's the article from the Hermantown Star with a photo. . .written by Sandy Reinke.

04/18/2014

Remembering the Skyline Drive-In Theater in Hermantown

The Hermantown Historical Society will meet on Thursday, April 24, at 6:30 in the Community Building on Maple Grove Road. The meeting will begin with coffee and conversation. Then after a brief organizational report, those in attendance will have time to share their memories of the Skyline Drive-In Theater. Did you know that the site of the Hermantown Skyline Drive-In Theater is where Bullyan’s Recreation Center is now located? The construction of the theater, on the Miller Trunk Highway, began in the summer of 1948, and it opened on September 11th. The outdoor entertainment center was owned by Ted Mann’s company in Minneapolis, and was the seventh theater they had built. They operated in Hermantown for over twenty years. The giant tilted screen, 40 ft. X 50 ft., made it possible to get a clear view of the picture from any location, and patrons could enjoy a motion picture from the comfort of their own car. There were wide roadways and aisles between the ramps which eliminated traffic and parking problems. Twenty boys, from the area, were employed to park cars, and show people how to operate the volume controlled individual “In-Car Speakers”. Six girls were employed to sell tickets. About 654 cars could be parked at one time, and a concession stand was located in the center of the theater for the convenience of those attending the movies. They offered free bottle warmers for the youngest guests in the car. There was a playground for entertaining children prior to the movies which began at dusk. If you have questions about the event, or memories, photos, and memorabilia about the Drive-In theater, call 624-3040 or 729-8058. (By Sandy Reinke)

A view of the display at the book presentation 3-20-2014; Editor, Dave Pagel, speaking about the book during his Power P...
03/30/2014

A view of the display at the book presentation 3-20-2014; Editor, Dave Pagel, speaking about the book during his Power Point presentation; highlight on front page of Hermantown Star. All photos from Hermantown Star, and taken by Jason Wilcox.

03/24/2014

If you were in the audience in the Hermantown High School’s Media Resource Room at 6:30 March 20th, 2014, you were treated to a fascinating peek into the first two chapters of the Hermantown Historical Society’s future book on the schools in Hermantown. Sandy Reinke, chairwoman of the Historical Society, introduced Editor David Pagel, as well as the four dedicated members of the committee who have been tirelessly researching and working on the early history of the schools: Bette (Davis) Grussendorf; Mary (Olson) Milbrath; Carol (Stebner) Smith; and Delaine (Johnson) Carlson. (Another person who has been, and continues to be, providing valuable research assistance is Bob Silverness, who collaborated with Bette Grussendorf on researching information on-line.
Also on display were numerous photos and documentary records of the schools, for the audience members to view before and after the presentation. Obtaining quite a few of these documented proofs was due to Dave Pagel’s relentless pursuit of accuracy. As Delaine wrote in an e-mail, “Dave was the instrument that made us dig for all the details of proof . . . abstracts, etc.”
The audience paid rapt attention to Dave Pagel’s Power Point presentation outlining the first parts of the book, covering the time period from 1875 to 1918. The first chapter is entitled, “Education Takes Root,” and is comprised of three subsections: “From Settlement to 1877 - the First School;” “A Schoolhouse for Every Point on the Compass,” 1878 to 1893; and, “Models of Propriety,” 1894 to 1900. In addition to factual information and documentation thereof, there are anecdotes gleaned from early newspapers. A particularly startling and amusing tale published in a Duluth newspaper of the time was related by Mr. Pagel about the less than proper decorum of a school teacher and a married resident. As you can surmise, the third subsection deals with teachers of the era – their lives and what was expected of these young ladies.
When Dave asked if the audience wanted to take a break and stretch after he spoke about the first chapter, people asked him to keep on going. They wanted to hear and see more!
Chapter two is called, “Schools for a New Century,” and likewise is composed of three subsections: “A Litany of Presidents,” from 1900 to 1911; “Room to Grow,” from 1912 to 1917; and, “Disaster,” 1918. The catchy title of the first section referred to the naming of the schools and the progression from names such as “school number 1” and “Five Corners School” to presidential names – Lincoln, McKinley, Jackson, Washington, Garfield, and Roosevelt Schools. Detailed in the second subsection were the expansions on the two-room school houses. Anybody who had relatives living in the larger Duluth-Cloquet-Moose Lake area had an idea of what the third section, “Disaster” covered. But even for those who know something about the deadly and disastrous Fires of October 12, 1918, there was a lot of information presented. Three of the schools – McKinley, Lincoln, and Roosevelt – in the western parts of the township burned in the Fires. However, although buildings burned and fire raged around the other three schools in the eastern part of the township – Jackson, Garfield, and Washington – those structures remained intact.
Dave concluded the presentation of the first two chapters leaving the audience wanting to hear and see more. There’s a high degree of eager anticipation to see the finished product – a published book about the schools of the Township of Herman, from the beginning to the present time.
Work continues on gathering information, photos, and personal stories and anecdotes about the schools. After a question and answer session, Sandy Reinke urged those in attendance to contact the Hermantown Historical Society with information, first hand stories, stories passed down from elder residents, and photos of the schools and classes. Please check the Website as well as the Hermantown Historical Society’s page for further information about the status of the book as it becomes available.
Cjj 3-21-2014

03/10/2014

Save the date! Thursday, March 20th, 2014, at 6:30 P.M. at the Hermantown High School Media Center the first reading of "The History of the One-Room Schools" will be given. Editor, Dave Pagel, will read the 1st two chapters he has written from the info gathered by researchers Mary Milbrath, Carol Smith, Delaine Carlson, and Bette Grussendorf. For several years people have been working on the history of the Town of Herman's early schools. The committee is excited to showcase the first two chapters about the schools that children attended from 1875 to 1938.
AND - there is something, besides attending, that YOU can do! A forthcoming book will be published on the history of the schools in Hermantown. The committee would LOVE to see (copy) your photos and stories, memories, and anecdotes, that have been passed down by grandparents and relatives who attended the one and two room schools: Garfield, Washington, Jackson, McKinley, and Roosevelt Schools.

Esko History Book Project
01/09/2014

Esko History Book Project

Press release (courtesy of Davis Helberg) in today's Pine Journal. I personally have the book in my "hot little hands," so to speak, and all 3 pounds and 12 ounces of it look very professional! Clear vintage photos, excellent professionally done maps - thanks to geophysicist Rodney Ikola - interesting, well researched, informative articles. What's more, there is an index and resource listing that is certain to endear the book to future and current historians. But most of all, it's very readable, attractive, and user friendly!

01/03/2014
Esko History Book Project

Esko History Book Project

The from below has the correct amounts of shipping and handling. Unbeknownst to us, there is sales tax on shipping and handling - who'd have 'thunk' that, eh? Please be patient with us since we're all volunteers without the experience and knowledge of the pros like amazon.com, etc.

Address

Hermantown Community Building-5255 Maple Grove Rd
Hermantown, MN
55811

Telephone

(218) 624-3040

Website

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Hermantown Historical Society posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Hermantown Historical Society:

Category

Nearby museums