The Museum of Printing

The Museum of Printing The Museum of Printing holds the most extensive collection of printing materials and equipment in the United States. Explore it and see how printing has molded your life - from art and photography, to newspapers and books, to virtually anything you read.
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The Museum of Printing was incorporated in 1978 to save printing equipment and library materials associated with arcane technologies. The Museum is home to many special collections and exhibits, and contains hundreds of antique printing, typesetting, and bindery machines, as well as a library of books and printing related documents.

The Museum of Printing was incorporated in 1978 to save printing equipment and library materials associated with arcane technologies. The Museum is home to many special collections and exhibits, and contains hundreds of antique printing, typesetting, and bindery machines, as well as a library of books and printing related documents.

Mission: The Museum of Printing is dedicated to preserving the history of the graphic arts, printing equipment and printing craftsmanship.

Operating as usual

Oil The Parts!
10/05/2020

Oil The Parts!

This chart is OIL you need to know about keeping your C & P lubricated (1 of 2)

Horton Hears a Who....Mitchel Moves a Mangle:A mangle (or wringer) is a mechanical laundry aid consisting of two rollers...
10/05/2020

Horton Hears a Who....Mitchel Moves a Mangle:
A mangle (or wringer) is a mechanical laundry aid consisting of two rollers in a sturdy frame, connected by cogs and powered by a hand crank or electricity. While the appliance was originally used to wring water from wet laundry, mangles are also used to press or flatten sheets, tablecloths, kitchen towels, or even paper. Pictured here, volunteer Mitch Ahern helps move the Museum’s ornate 1878 mangle.

In his most recent WhatTheyThink video, Frank Romano highlighted a newspaper called “The Transcontinental,” which was pr...
10/03/2020

In his most recent WhatTheyThink video, Frank Romano highlighted a newspaper called “The Transcontinental,” which was printed on a train using a Gordon platen press. In addition to several actual Gordon presses, the Museum also has the patent model that inventor George Phineas Gordon submitted for improvements to the operation of his press’s platen, grippers and ink distribution.

For more information, see https://www.museumofprinting.org/blog/george-phineas-gordon-platen-job-press/

Come by any Saturday from 10 am to 4 pm to see these and many other great items. If you can’t make it on a Saturday, contact us at [email protected] and we will arrange a special time for you to visit.

In his latest WhatTheyThink video, Museum President Frank Romano discusses “The Transcontinental,” a newspaper printed o...
10/02/2020
Frank's Training Video

In his latest WhatTheyThink video, Museum President Frank Romano discusses “The Transcontinental,” a newspaper printed on one of the first passenger trains to go from Boston to San Francisco in 1870. It was typeset in the baggage car and printed on a Gordon platen press installed on the train. Content for the 12 editions was essentially a travelogue, as the train stopped in various cities during its cross-country journey. The issue that Frank acquired for the Museum of Printing is the May 31, 1870 issue (#6), which was printed at the summit of the Sierra Nevada mountains.

https://whattheythink.com/video/102661-franks-training-video/

Frank's Training Video

https://whav.net/2020/10/01/museum-offers-rare-example-of-turn-of-the-century-art-nouveau-illustration-nov-21/
10/01/2020
Museum Offers Rare Example of Turn-of-the-Century Art Nouveau Illustration Nov. 21

https://whav.net/2020/10/01/museum-offers-rare-example-of-turn-of-the-century-art-nouveau-illustration-nov-21/

Haverhill’s Museum of Printing opens its new exhibit, “The Colorful World of Chromolithography,” next month. Described as “one of the most beautiful items in the Museum of Printing Romano Library” is the Album of contemporary celebrities, published by Lefevrè-Utile, Nantes, circa 1909. Th...

A new month has arrived and with it here’s a cover from the October 1906 edition of The Inland Printer. This is one of m...
10/01/2020

A new month has arrived and with it here’s a cover from the October 1906 edition of The Inland Printer. This is one of many covers included in the book “The Inland Printer: A Selection of Historic Covers,” which is available in our gift shop. Check it out this Saturday from 10 am to 4 pm!

Have you signed up yet for a table at our Printers' Flea Market coming up on Saturday October 24th from 10 am to 4 pm? S...
10/01/2020

Have you signed up yet for a table at our Printers' Flea Market coming up on Saturday October 24th from 10 am to 4 pm? Send us an e-mail at [email protected] to reserve. It’s only $30 and you can pay the day of the event. Full Covid precautions will be in effect.

Artist & master printer Carolyn Muskat of Muskat Studios https://www.facebook.com/muskatstudios/ is on the Museum's boar...
09/30/2020

Artist & master printer Carolyn Muskat of Muskat Studios https://www.facebook.com/muskatstudios/ is on the Museum's board and is responsible for our membership efforts. She has also taught workshops at the Museum including one on the art of stone lithographic printing. Many thanks Carolyn!

#VolunteersAtWorkWednesday

American Antiquarian Society
09/29/2020

American Antiquarian Society

We love images that depict the interiors of printing offices! Today's blog post takes a look at a recently acquired photograph by C. P. Michael that shows an unidentified Nebraska printing office. Find out more at https://bit.ly/30eX2xD

Coming up on Saturday November 21st the Museum of Printing will unveil a new exhibit entitled “The Colorful World of Chr...
09/29/2020

Coming up on Saturday November 21st the Museum of Printing will unveil a new exhibit entitled “The Colorful World of Chromolithography.” Everyone who comes on the opening day of the exhibit will receive a copy of the famous 1909 Lefevrè-Utile album (one page of which is shown here). Don’t miss this once-in-a-lifetime chance!

We had some turkeys visit the Museum on Saturday (thankfully not the human kind). We already had some turkey images as p...
09/28/2020

We had some turkeys visit the Museum on Saturday (thankfully not the human kind). We already had some turkey images as part of our letterpress collection. They seem pretty accurate, don’t they?

One of the most beautiful items in the Museum of Printing Romano Library is the “Album des célébrités contemporaines, pu...
09/26/2020

One of the most beautiful items in the Museum of Printing Romano Library is the “Album des célébrités contemporaines, publié par Lefevrè-Utile” (Nantes, circa 1909). It is a masterpiece of chromolithography. There are only five of these 24-page albums in America and the Museum has one of them.

Mark your calendars now for a special exhibit called “The Colorful World of Chromolithography” that we will be kicking off on Saturday, November 21st. In addition to the Lefevrè-Utile book (examples shown here), you will also see original examples of the work of Louis Prang, the father of the American Christmas card.

Museum of Printing volunteer Bill Soucy is a fan of printing presses, big and small. For almost two decades he has volun...
09/23/2020

Museum of Printing volunteer Bill Soucy is a fan of printing presses, big and small. For almost two decades he has volunteered at the Museum of Printing and recently donated a number of “toy” presses to the Museum. They will become part of the “Steve Olin Collection of Small Presses.” #volunteersatworkwednesday The Museum of Printing

The Museum of Printing social media team is proud of its work in raising the profile of our collection. Did you know tha...
09/22/2020

The Museum of Printing social media team is proud of its work in raising the profile of our collection. Did you know that in addition to Facebook we are also on Instagram and Twitter. Check us out there as well!

On Facebook, around 3,600 people ‘like’ us and more than 4,000 follow us (https://facebook.com/themuseumofprinting)
We recently passed the landmark number of 5,000 Twitter followers (http://instagram.com/museumofprinting/)
We’re approaching 4,000 followers on Instagram (https://twitter.com/MOPrinting)

Museum of Printing volunteers John Rogers and Steve Ryan are shown here re-installing a key part of our Acorn Handpress....
09/22/2020

Museum of Printing volunteers John Rogers and Steve Ryan are shown here re-installing a key part of our Acorn Handpress. Why was it removed? To help fabricate a part for another press that was sold at the Museum Garage Sale last month. The beat goes on!

Coming up in October is your next opportunity for a fun Museum of Printing sale. Don't miss out on our Printers' Flea Market on Saturday October 24th from 10 am to 4 pm.

Beautifully designed endpapers are a nice addition to any book. Here are two examples from books in the Museum’s Romano ...
09/21/2020

Beautifully designed endpapers are a nice addition to any book.

Here are two examples from books in the Museum’s Romano Library. The marbled endpaper is from the 1920 book “Two Centuries of Typefounding” by John F. McRae (full title: Two Centuries of Typefounding: Annals of The Letter Foundry established by William Caslon in Chiswell Street, London, in the Year 1720).

The red and green floral endpaper is from: “The Life and Work of Dard Hunter (Volume II)” by Dard Hunter II (full title: “The Life and Work of Dard Hunter (Volume II): A Progressive Illustrated Assemblage of His Works as Artist, Craftsman, Author, Papermaker, and Printer by Dard Hunter II, This book was published by Mountain House Press, Chillicothe, Ohio in 1983.

At the Museum of Printing, we are committed to preserving the legacy of the Linotype for future generations. The materia...
09/19/2020

At the Museum of Printing, we are committed to preserving the legacy of the Linotype for future generations. The materials in our collection stretch from the 1883 Second Band Machine to the 1972 Linotype Elektron II, the last version manufactured. You can see them at the Museum this or any Saturday from 10 to 4, or other days by appointment. To arrange an appointment, just send a note to [email protected].

And if you are so inclined, please consider a donation to our Linotype Legacy Fund. For more information, see:
https://museumofprinting.org/news-and-events/help-save-the-linotype/

The International Printing Museum
09/18/2020

The International Printing Museum

Happy #typehighday! The standardized height for wood and metal type is .918 inches so 9/18 is the perfect day to celebrate letterpress

Preserving printing tech and prints themselves, yeah we're all about that
09/17/2020

Preserving printing tech and prints themselves, yeah we're all about that

In 1913 Scientific American asked for essays on the 10 greatest inventions of our time (“our time” being 1888 to 1913). Coming in at no. 9 was none other than the revolutionary Linotype Machine. According to contest winners William I. Wyman (who worked at the US Patent & Trademark Office) the Linotype “was an advance as large as the invention of the printing press itself was over the painstaking handwritten scrolls before it. Pretty soon we won’t be using paper for writing and reading, so the history of printing will be forgotten anyway.” Although you’re reading this on a screen, the history of printing will never be forgotten, not if we have anything to say about it!

We’re sure by now that you’ve learned of the marriage proposal that took place recently at the Museum of Printing. John ...
09/17/2020
‘Print is alive, and so is love:’ How the old art of typography led to happily ever after - The Boston Globe

We’re sure by now that you’ve learned of the marriage proposal that took place recently at the Museum of Printing. John Adriance asked his girlfriend Daniela if she would marry him. And she said yes! Both are lovers of typography, and as it turns out, a lot of people loved this story. You can get the full details in many places, but below are links to the stories that appeared in the Boston Globe, Merrimack Valley Life, and Leslie University’s News. This was the first time that the Museum of Printing has been used for such a romantic purpose, but we hope it won’t be the last!



Print Is Alive and So Is Love (Boston Globe, August 28, 2020

https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/08/27/metro/print-is-alive-so-is-love-how-old-art-typography-led-happily-ever-after/



For the Love of…Typography (Merrimack Valley Life, September 1, 2020)

https://www.merrimackvalleylife.com/articles/for-the-love-of-typography/



Finding the Right Type of Guy (Leslie University News, September 8, 2020)

https://lesley.edu/news/finding-the-right-type-of-guy

John Adriance proposed to his typography-loving girlfriend, Daniela German-George, after concocting the perfect plan to surprise her with help from the Museum of Printing in Haverhill.

Last Wednesday was a productive one thanks to our crew of volunteers:• We rented a forklift to load the Heidelberg Windm...
09/16/2020

Last Wednesday was a productive one thanks to our crew of volunteers:
• We rented a forklift to load the Heidelberg Windmill on a truck heading for South Carolina
• We picked up a donated Pearl 3 press near Boston and Mitch started working on it
• The rollers came in for the refurbished Pearl 11, which will be installed and the press will picked up in a week
• John used the forklift to get at a platen press in the back of the storage container for a possible customer
• Barry started to clean up a Lowe “cone” table-top press for display
• Andy helped with videos and then with inputting books into our library database
• And Steve was cataloging our collection of Communication Arts magazine
A great day! Many thanks to our fabulous volunteers!
#VolunteersAtWorkWednesday

There’s an interesting cut of a typewriter with a curved keyboard in the Robinson-Pforzheimer Typographical Collection a...
09/14/2020

There’s an interesting cut of a typewriter with a curved keyboard in the Robinson-Pforzheimer Typographical Collection at the New York Public Library. Upon close examination it appears to be modeled on a Hammond 2 typewriter from the earliest years of the 20th century (circa 1908). We have a Hammond typewriter at the Museum, but by that point in their product development they had straightened out their keyboard.

In addition to the Ludlow we posted about earlier, our friend and supporter John Falstrom has a Hohner parallel platen p...
09/13/2020

In addition to the Ludlow we posted about earlier, our friend and supporter John Falstrom has a Hohner parallel platen press that his is looking to sell. If you are interested, please contact him directly (contact information below).

About the press:
Hohner parallel platen 10x15 press (the only known example of this exact model in the country)
This is one of the finest hand-feed presses available and it is in excellent condition
Works on the same principal as the Colts Armory. The platen is always parallel with the bed.
Fine German engineering: John says that it is one of the last presses of its kind to be manufactured (1979)
Rollers are excellent: This press never fails to produce perfect prints
Press has guard safety system that stops the press instantly
Full disclosure: The press was damaged in shipment years ago but it was mechanically repaired recessing the cracked cast iron with steel plate by a very talented and fussy machinist (it is stronger than new and the repair is completely invisible)
This press has had the equivalent of blueprinting an automobile engine: Every part’s alignment and tolerances have been checked and adjusted more accurately than the factory did originally
The press has both mechanical and electronic speed control (the motor is almost silent, as is the press when it is running)
And finally, it is beautiful and spotlessly clean (some say I don't own any ink)
The press is located in a garage with easy access. The price is $4,000. If you are interest, write or call John at:

John Falstrom
343 Hamburg Road
Lyme, CT 06371
860-434-3194

The Museum does not usually do this, but our friend John Falstrom has been a long-time supporter of the Museum of Printi...
09/13/2020

The Museum does not usually do this, but our friend John Falstrom has been a long-time supporter of the Museum of Printing and he has some great equipment that deserves a good home. If you are interested, please contact him directly (contact information below).

The first item is an electric Ludlow that produces excellent slugs. It is serial number 12944 from 1962. According to Jim Parrish, this is the period of Ludlow production that is the most recommended and reliable. The sale includes:
Ludlow type L
Plus 2 cabinets filled with matrix plus extra not in cabinet
House font is Caslon light from 8-48pt regular and italic. Many other desirable fonts.
Ample type metal and plus metal
The original and matching serial number
Manual of instruction presented when the machine was installed.
James Parrish trouble shooting guide and Ludlow systems book as well as other typeface guides
Complete cleaning system tools
Many spare parts, felts, soluble oil, and molds
Self-centering stick and others on rarely seen Ludlow original stick holder
This works as it should and was well cared for and used recently. Easy garage access. The price is $500/

If you are interested, write or call John at:

John Falstrom
343 Hamburg Road
Lyme, CT 06371
860-434-3194

This little cherub is hard at work, but you can see the love of the craft in that impish smile. This Saturday (from 10-4...
09/13/2020

This little cherub is hard at work, but you can see the love of the craft in that impish smile. This Saturday (from 10-4) come see why we love print so much.

Wondering what the package marked “foolscap” is about? Before international paper size standards were adopted, Foolscap was a paper size used in Europe and the British Commonwealth.

From “Cuts, Borders, and Ornaments” in the Robinson-Pforzheimer Typographical Collection at the New York Public Library

A 2018 article from Volume 40, Issue 4 of the Museum of Printing newsletter describes how the screw mechanism of a print...
09/10/2020

A 2018 article from Volume 40, Issue 4 of the Museum of Printing newsletter describes how the screw mechanism of a printing press saved the Mayflower during its 1620 voyage to America. In the aftermath of a fierce storm, (Pilgrim) William Bradford wrote that “one of the main beams in the midships was bowed and cracked, which put them in fear that the ship…” would not be able to continue. Using “a great iron screw the passengers brought out of Holland” the carpenter and ship master were able to make a suitable repair. It is believed that the “great iron screw” was part of the printing press that the renegade William Brewster had used to print books critical of King James I of England. The screw was brought to the new world with the idea that it would be useful as a building tool, sometimes known as a “Jack-screw”, however it ended up saving the Mayflower and its passengers. The screw stayed with the Mayflower when it made the voyage back to England.

If this screw mechanism was indeed intended to be part of a printing press, it makes sense that it was obscured in the record, as this would cleverly avoid any unwanted Imperial attention.

The screw mechanism was likely was something similar to the screw on this Gutenberg press replica. The image of the Mayflower replica, the Mayflower II, is courtesy of Plimoth Plantation (soon to be renamed Plimoth Patuxet). Mayflower II recently returned to Plymouth after an extensive restoration at Mystic Seaport.



#Plymouth400 #Mayflower400

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15 Thornton Ave.
Haverhill, MA
01832-3545

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Saturday 10:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(978) 372-0567

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Comments

I BOUGHT A MARFUL IDENTIFICATION MODEL # 44 (ENLARGER). WHERE CAN I FIND MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS
In Greta Gerwig's new movie of "Little Women," there's a montage of book production near the end. It's not worth watching a two-hour movie for, but it's a good movie and one more reason to see it. Several any reviewers used the phrase “goes meta" for a part at the end. It was justified by the obvious similarity between fictional Jo March and real Louisa May Alcott. We see Alcott's publisher insisting that the book will be unsaleable, and he will not accept it, unless Jo gets married at the end of the book, so she agrees. What follows, for several minutes on screen, is a lovely montage of delicious shots of individual pieces of type being hand-set, hand-inked, paper being folded into signatures, bound, etc. According to https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/march-2020/emlittle-women/em-greta-gerwigs-love-letter-to-the-19th-century-novel "To ensure period accuracy, [Gerwig] enlisted the help of printer David Wolfe and binder Devon Eastland. They not only consulted on the film and sourced period-appropriate equipment, but appear as the printer and binder in the film (with Eastland costumed as a man)…. In fact, Eastland bought a defective copy of the novel’s second edition and disassembled it to learn precisely how it was bound."
I was watching Chronicle and saw the segment on the museum. Ive been in the printing industry for almost 40 years and the museum looks very interesting. I will be planning a visit in the future.
My attempt is called "Seasonal Tree Droppings"
#ArtWeekAtHome
Operated one in Wakefield Voc in 70's Class of 75
I'd like to share this news article from my home province of Nova Scotia. Deep Hollow, btw, is not a "made up" name; there really is a Deep Hollow Road not far from my hometown and where Laura has her print shop.
Happy 98th Birthday Anna Hogan
I recently read a interesting blog post about a character I've not seen before. Three (or four) vertical dashes. See https://shadycharacters.co.uk/2016/02/typewriters-and-pilcrows/. Can you folks shed any light on this discussion?