The Museum of Printing

The Museum of Printing The Museum of Printing holds the most extensive collection of printing materials and equipment in the United States. Explore it and see how printing has molded your life - from art and photography, to newspapers and books, to virtually anything you read.
The Museum of Printing was incorporated in 1978 to save printing equipment and library materials associated with arcane technologies. The Museum is home to many special collections and exhibits, and contains hundreds of antique printing, typesetting, and bindery machines, as well as a library of books and printing related documents.
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Printing has been the predecessor to advancements in civilization. Gutenberg's invention of movable type spread religion, improved printing press' fostered America's revolution and today's digital type creates the words on your computer and electronic table

Mission: The Museum of Printing is dedicated to preserving the history of the graphic arts, printing equipment and printing craftsmanship.

This photograph of two puppies entitled “Who Whistled?” is from the May 1906 issue of The Inland Printer. It is credited...
05/09/2020

This photograph of two puppies entitled “Who Whistled?” is from the May 1906 issue of The Inland Printer. It is credited to the Inland-Walton Engraving Company of Chicago.

For #ArtWeekatHome, the Museum of Printing is promoting something called “The Alphabet Factory At Home.” Just create you...
05/08/2020

For #ArtWeekatHome, the Museum of Printing is promoting something called “The Alphabet Factory At Home.” Just create your name with objects you have around the house and post it with the #ArtWeekatHome hashtag. This excellent kitchen-themed example comes from Mary Flanagan.

Below the Masthead
05/08/2020

Below the Masthead

Happy Friday Mastheaders! For fun this morning, I thought it would be fun to show some images of Boston from "Historical Collections" to take us into the weekend. Stay safe out there, and take care of each other.

👉 see the images and comment the name of a town in Massachusetts, and I'll show its image as it appears in this book. Let's have some fun with this.

This Digital Typeface Corporation (DTC) promotional poster entitled “Boost Your Creativity” showcases a collage of avail...
05/07/2020

This Digital Typeface Corporation (DTC) promotional poster entitled “Boost Your Creativity” showcases a collage of available fonts from DTC’s Masterworks Type Library. It dates to the late 1980s or early 1990s.

It is one of the more than 11,000 items in the Museum of Printing’s Schappler Typographic Ephemera collection.

For additional background on DTC, see Luc Devroye’s web site: http://luc.devroye.org/fonts-96689.html

This undated Linotype brochure from the Schappler Typographic Ephemera collection uses drawings of dogs to highlight the...
05/06/2020

This undated Linotype brochure from the Schappler Typographic Ephemera collection uses drawings of dogs to highlight the characteristics of popular typefaces. Entitled “A Handy Digest of Today’s Most Popular Body Faces” the brochure showcases Baskerville, Bodoni, Bookman, Caledonia, Caslon Old Face, Corona, Electra, Fairfield, Garamond No. 3, Janson, Memphis, Metro, Spartan, Textype, and Times Roman.

The text includes these lines: “Linotype is scrupulous in the avoidance of distracting mannerisms or false character...Linotype faces are sound and intransient, unaffected by changing foibles and fashions of a particular period.”

BERG INK LLC
05/05/2020

BERG INK LLC

The Museum of Printing gave us the challenge of writing our name using things lying around our house. C4 made his entirely out of legos because.... well he’s 6. I did my name and came up items that also started with that letter. Yes..... the O is Oregano! #artweekathome

The Museum of Printing is pleased to announce that it has received a grant from the Essex County Community Foundation (E...
05/05/2020

The Museum of Printing is pleased to announce that it has received a grant from the Essex County Community Foundation (ECCF). The award is part of the Essex County Creative Nonprofit Resiliency Grant program. For additional details, please see:
https://museumofprinting.org/news-and-events/eccf-grant/

For #ArtWeekatHome we are asking folks to try something we call “The Alphabet Factory At Home.” Just create your name wi...
05/05/2020

For #ArtWeekatHome we are asking folks to try something we call “The Alphabet Factory At Home.” Just create your name with some objects you have around the house and post it with the #ArtWeekatHome hashtag. This one is from our own Andy Volpe
https://www.facebook.com/AVArtHistory/

"Audax Press (@gwendolynium on Instagram) posted this remarkable #PrintingInPlace entry with the recommendation:“Remembe...
05/05/2020

"Audax Press (@gwendolynium on Instagram) posted this remarkable #PrintingInPlace entry with the recommendation:
“Remember to stop and smell the flowers.”

Note that this is the first #PrintingInPlace entry to replicate an advertisement from The Inland Printer rather than a cover, in this case, the ad is one from the Queen City Ink Company and the illustrator is Albert Loose. It appeared in the December 1910 issue of The Inland Printer.

Vintage Queen City Ink advertisements are a great inspiration, as are Ault & Wiborg ads. Both appeared regularly in The Inland Printer.

For more on #PrintingInPlace, see https://museumofprinting.org/news-and-events/printinginplace-strategies/

05/04/2020

Here again is the stop-motion thumbtack "MOP" alphabet factory entry from Mindy Mitrano

Here's another set of instructions from the New York Times, showing how to fold up a printer's hat, using the New York T...
05/04/2020

Here's another set of instructions from the New York Times, showing how to fold up a printer's hat, using the New York Times (feels like the Droste effect)

The International Printing Museum
05/03/2020

The International Printing Museum

“Ink is the Blood of the Printing Press” and it requires a blood sacrifice...

Check out this article by Terry Date from the Eagle-Tribune about a donation that the Museum of Printing received this w...
05/02/2020
Special delivery, from former deliverers

Check out this article by Terry Date from the Eagle-Tribune about a donation that the Museum of Printing received this week. It’s a bound book of Lawrence Evening Tribune pages from 1901. Here you can see Museum President Frank Romano receiving the donation from Becky Will of Haverhill who found it while cleaning out her parents home. Many thanks, Becky!

https://www.eagletribune.com/news/haverhill/special-delivery-from-former-deliverers/article_9d68938d-f0a1-5dda-b079-31d375142cd2.html

HAVERHILL — Becky Will was cleaning out her parents’ home last August after her father died when a huge hardbound book turned up under the bed.

For #ArtWeekatHome we are asking folks to try something we call “The Alphabet Factory At Home.” Just create your name wi...
05/02/2020

For #ArtWeekatHome we are asking folks to try something we call “The Alphabet Factory At Home.” Just create your name with some objects you have around the house (or in this case, garden) and post it with the #ArtWeekatHome hashtag. Many thanks to Mindy Mitrano for this delightful example!

For more details, see:
https://museumofprinting.org/news-and-events/artweekathome-launches-may-1/

Today is the first day of #ArtWeekatHome. Our angle on this is called The Alphabet Factory At Home. All you have to do i...
05/01/2020

Today is the first day of #ArtWeekatHome. Our angle on this is called The Alphabet Factory At Home. All you have to do is create your name with any objects you can find around the house. We chose thumbtacks to highlight our initials (MoP). Would you like to give it a try? Take a picture and share it with the hashtag #ArtWeekAtHome between now and May 10th. For more details, see:
https://museumofprinting.org/news-and-events/artweekathome-launches-may-1/

Thanks!
05/01/2020
My Town - Haverhill

Thanks!

This will be a great addition to the The Museum of Printing

On this last day of April, we tip our hats to Poetry Month with this selection from two books of poetry that reside in t...
04/30/2020

On this last day of April, we tip our hats to Poetry Month with this selection from two books of poetry that reside in the Museum’s Romano Library collection.

The first is “Poetic Printshop Past-Times: An Anthology of Printers’ Poetry 1883-1936” published by Graphic Crafts, Inc. This volume includes “A Printer's Tale by Anonymous” said to be a “specimen of typographical portraiture” that appeared in the German ‘Journal fur Buchdruckerkunst’ (the Journal of the Art of Book Printing). It closes with these memorable lines:

“Reader, now, my moral take ̶
Marriage is a great mistake;
But in death you may yet find
A corrector, not unkind.”

Another example from “Poetic Printshop Past-Times” is this anonymous 1911 punny ode to women:

“The sweetest Types upon earth,
The prettiest Forms, the fairest Faces,
The loveliest Flowers that e'er had birth,
That ever clung to a man's Em-braces.”

The second volume, “Flowers of Delight: An Agreeable Garland of Prose and Poetry 1765-1830,” includes selections by Leonard de Vries from the Osborne Collection of early Children's Books. This volume includes “Little Rhymes of Little Folks” with accompanying colorful illustrations. For example, here’s one called “The Windmill”:

“Blow, wind, blow ; and go, mill, go,
That the miller may grind his corn ;
That the baker may take it,
And into rolls make it,
And send us some hot in the morn.”

Museum of Printing board member Jim Hamilton takes another shot at the #PrintingInPlace challenge to replicate a cover d...
04/29/2020

Museum of Printing board member Jim Hamilton takes another shot at the #PrintingInPlace challenge to replicate a cover design from The Inland Printer (choosing, as it turns out, the same cover that Museum President Frank Romano recently lampooned).

Want to give the #PrintingInPlace challenge a try?

Check out our web site for details:
https://museumofprinting.org/news-and-events/printinginplace-strategies/

The Museum of Printing presents the Alphabet Factory At Home: "Print" your name with anything but paper and create your ...
04/29/2020

The Museum of Printing presents the Alphabet Factory At Home: "Print" your name with anything but paper and create your own typeface! From thumbtacks to daffodils, use what you have at home and shape it into your name. Take a pic and share it with Artweek and The Museum of Printing. May 1st - 10th, 2020 #ArtWeekAtHome @ArtWeekMa

04/27/2020
Presswork: A Documentary

Presswork: A Documentary

RBS presents Presswork: A Documentary, chronicling RBS’s commissioning of an eighteenth-century style wooden rolling press, and the program that ensued which...

Today for the #PrintingInPlace challenge we highlight this recreation of an Inland Printer cover from June of 1906. This...
04/27/2020

Today for the #PrintingInPlace challenge we highlight this recreation of an Inland Printer cover from June of 1906. This little flute-playing satyr comes to us from Mindy Mitrano!

Today, Museum President Frank Romano has taken on the #PrintingInPlace challenge and offers his replication of an Inland...
04/26/2020

Today, Museum President Frank Romano has taken on the #PrintingInPlace challenge and offers his replication of an Inland Printer cover from January of 1916.

04/25/2020

We here at the Museum of Printing hope everyone is doing as well as they can during the pandemic. Here’s our recent contribution of a “Virtual Museum Tour”, this “small” video featuring Museum of Printing’s Frank Romano looking at a number of small-sized books, including the Smallest Book in existence, it’s smaller than a tic-tac!

BERG INK LLC
04/23/2020

BERG INK LLC

A fun photo project recreating the covers of the Inland Printer covers. One of the premier printing magazines of its time.... thank toddle quarantine and thank you @museumofprinting for the fun idea! @ The Museum of Printing

BERG INK LLC
04/23/2020

BERG INK LLC

Another theme that we see running through the cover artwork of The Inland Printer is the frequent use of animals, and ca...
04/23/2020

Another theme that we see running through the cover artwork of The Inland Printer is the frequent use of animals, and cats in particular. Here we present a few cover examples with cats that could easily serve as inspiration for a #PrintingInPlace replication.

You devilish redheads with a black cat and a healthy supply of hair gel should be all set with the January 1917 cover.

The more theatrical (and flexible) among you may lean more toward the April 1916 cover (though it may help to have a bunny).

And then, of course, there are always black cats and witches at Halloween, as shown in this October 1901 cover.

For more information on #PrintingInPlace, see https://museumofprinting.org/news-and-events/printinginplace-strategies/

Inland Printer Challenge contribution from a MOP Instagram follower, 802fenton
04/22/2020

Inland Printer Challenge contribution from a MOP Instagram follower, 802fenton

It wasn’t only covers where you could find amazing artwork in The Inland Printer. Ink manufacturers like Ault & Wiborg a...
04/22/2020

It wasn’t only covers where you could find amazing artwork in The Inland Printer. Ink manufacturers like Ault & Wiborg and Queen City showed off their products with some fabulous illustrations.

So we’re wondering if anyone is inspired to take a #PrintingInPlace shot at replicating one of these beauties.

P.S. We’re hearing about folks who are working on some #PrintingInPlace replications and will have more to show you soon. For additional information on #PrintingInPlace, see https://museumofprinting.org/news-and-events/printinginplace-strategies/

You may know that The Inland Printer was the first American printing trade magazine. It is also known for being the firs...
04/21/2020

You may know that The Inland Printer was the first American printing trade magazine. It is also known for being the first magazine to change its cover on a monthly basis. Magazines typically kept a static cover design, and just changed the date and other details with each issue. The Inland Printer sought out illustrations and designs in a truly trendsetting manner.

With the thought in mind that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, the Museum of Printing is encouraging folks to replicate classic covers from The Inland Printer. Looking for inspiration? Here are two covers, one from November 1894 and one from January 1902 that have birds in common. Do you have Peeps left over from Easter? Do you own chickens? Have any pink flamingo lawn ornaments? If so, you are more than halfway there. Show us your creativity!

For more information on the Museum’s #PrintingInPlace initiative, see https://museumofprinting.org/news-and-events/printinginplace-strategies/

You many have seen images like this one on the Internet recently in which people are trying to recreate famous artworks ...
04/20/2020
The Museum of Printing Encourages Printers around the World to Share their #PrintinginPlace Strategies while Sheltering at Home

You many have seen images like this one on the Internet recently in which people are trying to recreate famous artworks using themselves and whatever they find around the house. The Museum of Printing is picking up on this and giving it a twist. Instead of a famous painting, we are asking our friends around the world to replicate a cover from the Inland Printer (or some other famous printing document). We present here, for your amusement, the first in what we hope will be a series. The Museum’s own Mindy Mitrano has recreated a Will Bradley cover from February of 1895. Nice going, Mindy!

Want to give it a try? We post here four Inland Printer covers that are ripe for recreation. We’d love to see what you can come up with! If you do, post it with the hashtag #PrintinginPlace. For more information, see https://museumofprinting.org/news-and-events/printinginplace-strategies/

From “Variations Typographiques” by Herman Zapf, this title page for a collection of Rainer Maria Rilke poemshighlights ...
04/17/2020

From “Variations Typographiques” by Herman Zapf, this title page for a collection of Rainer Maria Rilke poems
highlights the close relationship between typography and drawing. The copperplate engraving by August Rosenberger (from Zapf’s “Blumen-ABC”) pairs nicely with the script font.

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15 Thornton Ave.
Haverhill, MA
01832-3545

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(978) 372-0567

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Comments

My attempt is called "Seasonal Tree Droppings"
#ArtWeekAtHome
Operated one in Wakefield Voc in 70's Class of 75
I'd like to share this news article from my home province of Nova Scotia. Deep Hollow, btw, is not a "made up" name; there really is a Deep Hollow Road not far from my hometown and where Laura has her print shop.
Happy 98th Birthday Anna Hogan
I recently read a interesting blog post about a character I've not seen before. Three (or four) vertical dashes. See https://shadycharacters.co.uk/2016/02/typewriters-and-pilcrows/. Can you folks shed any light on this discussion?
Check this out for 100 free things to do with and without kids this summer in Massachusetts! The Museum of Printing is on the list for this week! https://www.facebook.com/musefulmom/posts/1836884646415137
To anyone I know in Boston, and friends of The Museum of Printing: this event is at Union Press tonight! If you miss it, don't worry, I'll be at Reflex Letterpress on Sunday and Bow and Arrow Press on Wednesday. https://www.facebook.com/events/420076512092156/
Nice little Press in Salem, Mass !! see below link Witch City Consignment & Thrift