Buttonwoods Museum

Buttonwoods Museum The Buttonwoods tells the story of life in the Merrimack Valley. Visit the John Ward House, the Duncan House and the Daniel Hunkins Shoe Shop.
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Experience our hands-on education and outreach programs that make this unique history come alive. Winter Hours (November 1 to April 30): Closed for tours. Open for special events, programs, and by appointment. Visitor Center open Wednesday-Saturday, 10 AM-5 PM. Summer Hours (May 1 to October 31): Tuesday-Saturday, 10AM-5PM, Sundays 12-5PM

Operating as usual

Did you notice that our sign at the bottom of our driveway was down for part of the year?It fell over in the late winter...
10/14/2020

Did you notice that our sign at the bottom of our driveway was down for part of the year?

It fell over in the late winter, but this summer it was restored by Zachary Seymour for his Eagle Scout project!

We're so glad to have our sign back up. It even has a spotlight for visibility at night, too!

Thank you, Zachary! And thank you to Lindsay Reilly Bradley and Eamonn Bradley for sharing these photos with us 🙂

Bradford College, originally known as Bradford Academy, is a legacy of the Bradford/Haverhill community. It helped pave ...
10/09/2020

Bradford College, originally known as Bradford Academy, is a legacy of the Bradford/Haverhill community. It helped pave the way for the future as one of the first institutions to actively support women’s education in the United States.

Its doors first opened in June of 1803 as it welcomed 51 students, the majority of which were girls. The Academy was originally opened as a way for providing continuing education for young people who had exhausted all the educational resources in the area. While it started as a co-ed school, male enrollment declined and in 1836 they made the decision to turn it into a women’s school which would go on to offer college level courses.

Several high-profile missionaries from the United States went to school here, such as Ann Hasseltine Judson, along with other notable people like Portia Marshall Washington Pittman, Esther Louise Forbes, and Andre Dubus III.

While the college closed in 2000, we work to recognize its rich history. This post is the first in a mini-series that will highlight a few important figures associated with Bradford College over its nearly two centuries of operation. Follow along as we explore some of the rich and historic background of Bradford College!

This series was created by Rachelle Doane, Digital Content Intern.

Image: Postcard circa 1905 of Bradford Academy. Courtesy of Wikipedia.

The answer key for our Essex National Heritage Area Trails & Sails scavenger hunt is now available in the comments. Let ...
09/29/2020

The answer key for our Essex National Heritage Area Trails & Sails scavenger hunt is now available in the comments. Let us know how you did! What is your favorite building in the Washington Street Shoe District?

How well do you know the historic Washington Street area? Test yourself with this Architectural Scavenger Hunt of the Washington Street Shoe District 🕵️‍♀️

This family-friendly scavenger hunt is part of the Essex National Heritage Area Trails & Sails event!

Walk Washington Street and Wingate Street looking for the picture and text clues. You’ll be an expert in industrial-style Queen Anne architecture by the end of your journey.

The Answer Key will be posted here on Facebook at the end of the 10-days of Trails & Sails event. Don't want to wait to check your answers? Email [email protected] and we'll send it to you early 😄

How well do you know the historic Washington Street area? Test yourself with this Architectural Scavenger Hunt of the Wa...
09/18/2020

How well do you know the historic Washington Street area? Test yourself with this Architectural Scavenger Hunt of the Washington Street Shoe District 🕵️‍♀️

This family-friendly scavenger hunt is part of the Essex National Heritage Area Trails & Sails event!

Walk Washington Street and Wingate Street looking for the picture and text clues. You’ll be an expert in industrial-style Queen Anne architecture by the end of your journey.

The Answer Key will be posted here on Facebook at the end of the 10-days of Trails & Sails event. Don't want to wait to check your answers? Email [email protected] and we'll send it to you early 😄

Virtual Book Club is Back in October!Meetings will be held on Tues, Oct 13 and Tues, Oct 27, both at 1:30pm on Zoom.How ...
09/17/2020

Virtual Book Club is Back in October!

Meetings will be held on Tues, Oct 13 and Tues, Oct 27, both at 1:30pm on Zoom.

How To Participate:
1. Email [email protected] to register. Registration deadline for the Program and Book option is September 30 at 5pm.
2. Submit your program fee. $10/participant (Program Only) or $20/participant (Program and Book)
3. Pick up the book at the Museum on Tuesday, October 6 from 1-4pm OR source your own copy.
4. Book club members read at home and join us for discussions on October 13 and 27!

What Are We Reading?
In The Winter People, fourteen-year-old Saxso's village is attacked by the British. It’s 1759, and war is raging in the northeast between the British and the French, with the Abenaki people—Saxso’s people—by their side. Without enough warriors to defend their homes, Saxso’s village is burned to the ground. Many people are killed, but some, including Saxso’s mother and two sisters, are taken hostage. Now it’s up to Saxso, on his own, to track the raiders and bring his family back home . . . before it’s too late.

Author Joseph Bruchac is a highly acclaimed children’s book author, poet, novelist, and storyteller, as well as a scholar of Native American culture.The Winter People is a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year.

Our Essex National Heritage Area Visitor Center reopens this Wednesday! While at the Visitor Center, you can also check ...
09/14/2020

Our Essex National Heritage Area Visitor Center reopens this Wednesday! While at the Visitor Center, you can also check out the display "Rightfully Hers" in our lower gallery which celebrates the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment. A timeline details significant events that occurred in Haverhill and Massachusetts set against the backdrop of the national women's suffrage movement. Information from the US National Archives is on display as well as a poster exhibit entitled "Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence" from the Smithsonian Institute.

Visitor Center hours are Wed-Sat, 1-4pm. Please note that the historic buildings and exhibit hall remain closed for the season. Posted COVID-19 protocols must be followed to enter the Visitor Center.

Image is of a banner used by Haverhill's first club for women's suffrage.

The Essex National Heritage Area Visitor Center at the Buttonwoods Museum is reopening for travel and tourist informatio...
09/08/2020

The Essex National Heritage Area Visitor Center at the Buttonwoods Museum is reopening for travel and tourist information on Wed, Sept 16!

Now is a great time for closer-to-home regional tourism and for making plans to make the most of the the beautiful New England autumn.

Hours will be Wed-Sat, 1-4pm. Posted COVID-19 protocols must be followed to enter the Visitor Center.

We were sharing these countdown posts of #19SuffrageStories from the Smithsonian, US National Archives, and The Library ...
08/31/2020

We were sharing these countdown posts of #19SuffrageStories from the Smithsonian, US National Archives, and The Library of Congress in our stories all month, but if you missed any of them, they're all collected here!

August was the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment. The Amendment granted women the right to vote, but did not guarantee it - they simply could no longer be excluded based off of their sex alone. A diverse group of women all worked to reach this major milestone of woman's suffrage, but the work did not stop in 1920 and continued well into the 20th century. We encourage you to learn about some of these stories below.

One hundred years ago today, the 19th Amendment became law. With US National Archives and The Library of Congress, we’re sharing #19SuffrageStories of women who worked for the vote both before and after the amendment, because the fight for voting rights didn't end in 1920.

Our resident groundhogs provide us with regular entertainment 😂
08/19/2020

Our resident groundhogs provide us with regular entertainment 😂

It's time for another Critter Card and this week we are featuring the Woodchuck (Groundhog)! DID YOU KNOW that a Woodchuck actually gets their name from the Algonquin tribe of Native Americans, who originally called them “wuchak”, which roughly translates as "digger?" WERE YOU AWARE an adult Woodchuck can weigh 13 lbs. or twice the average weight of a newborn baby! HAVE YOU HEARD Woodchucks live in burrows where each chamber has a function, such as for nesting? The burrow even has separate “restrooms” for wastes!

There is so much about these “backyard visitors” that Mass Audubon would like to share with you! Please share your comments, questions, art work and photography below. Thank you!

Last call for registrations! Book box pickup is tomorrow!Do you have a middle schooler or preteen at home who enjoys rea...
08/06/2020

Last call for registrations! Book box pickup is tomorrow!

Do you have a middle schooler or preteen at home who enjoys reading? We'd love to have them join us! See details below ⬇️

When:
Friday, August 7, 1-5pm: Book Box Pickup
Monday, August 17, 1:30pm: Mid-Book Discussion
Monday, August 31, 1:30pm: Final Book Discussion

Where:
Online! Zoom meeting information will be emailed to participants the morning of each book club meeting.

How:
1) Email [email protected] to register. Book club is limited to 10 participants.
2) Pick up the book box at the Museum on Friday, August 7 from 1-5pm. Bring program fee of $10/participant to the pickup. Cash or check, exact change only.
3) Book club members read at home and join us via Zoom for discussions on August 17 and 31!

What are we reading?
Lyddie by Newbery Medal award-winning author Katherine Paterson.
When Lyddie and her younger brother are hired out as servants to help pay off their family farm's debts, Lyddie is determined to find a way to reunite her family once again. Hearing about all the money a girl can make working in the textile mills in Lowell, Massachusetts, she makes her way there, only to find that her dreams of returning home may never come true.

#DidYouKnow that the junior prosecutor at Lizzie Borden's trial was William H. Moody? Moody had begun his practice of la...
08/04/2020

#DidYouKnow that the junior prosecutor at Lizzie Borden's trial was William H. Moody?

Moody had begun his practice of law in Haverhill after being admitted to the bar in 1878. At the time of the trial, he was the elected Essex County district attorney and this would be his first murder case. In his opening statement for the prosecution, he described the crime as follows:

"Upon the fourth day of August of the last year, an old man and woman, husband and wife, each without a known enemy in the world, in their own home, upon a frequented street in the most populous city in this County, under the light of day and in the midst of its activities, were, first one, then, after an interval of an hour, another, severally killed by unlawful human agency.”

Moody would finish out his career in law as a Supreme Court Justice, serving on the Court from 1906 to 1910.

For more information about Moody's role in the prosecution: http://lizzieandrewborden.com/HatchetOnline/the-extraordinary-career-of-william-moody.html

On this date in 1892, the murders of Andrew and Abby Borden rocked the town of Fall River, Massachusetts and led to one of the enduring mysteries of American true crime. Their daughter, Lizzie, was charged with the murders and acquitted, though she was convicted in the court of public opinion. No one else was ever charged with the crime. Various theories abound as to a possible motive, including anger towards her father's second wife, panic at being discovered in a same sex relationship with a family maid, and family tension over Andrew's sizable estate. Lizzie gave strange and contradictory explanations for what happened at the house on the day of the murders and seemed unable to give police information that would clear her. The police also conducted a slapdash investigation, failing to remove the suspected murder weapon from the house, not checking Lizzie's clothing for bloodstains, and allowing Lizzie, her sister, and uncle to remain in the house following the murder. All of this led to reasonable doubt during the trial, as did an assumption that the murders were simply too brutal to have been committed by a woman. It is generally accepted that Lizzie did murder her father and step mother, but other suspects included her sister Emma, their house maid Bridget Sullivan, and her uncle John Morse. The Bordens were a wealthy family and following her acquittal, Lizzie and her sister Emma inherited the bulk of her father's fortune. They moved to a large, modern home and remained in Fall River. Lizzie was essentially ostracized from society and considered guilty for the rest of her life. She died in 1927 with a personal worth of nearly $5 million in today's dollars.

Other sources:
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/why-19th-century-axe-murderer-lizzie-borden-was-found-not-guilty-180972707/
https://lizzie-borden.com/
https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-features/lizzie-borden-why-a-19th-century-axe-murder-still-fascinates-us-250467/

Virtual Book Club for Preteens and Middle Schoolers!When:Friday, August 7, 1-5pm: Book Box PickupMonday, August 17, 1:30...
08/02/2020

Virtual Book Club for Preteens and Middle Schoolers!

When:
Friday, August 7, 1-5pm: Book Box Pickup
Monday, August 17, 1:30pm: Mid-Book Discussion
Monday, August 31, 1:30pm: Final Book Discussion

Where:
Online! Zoom meeting information will be emailed to participants the morning of each book club meeting.

How:
1) Email [email protected] to register. Book club is limited to 10 participants.
2) Pick up the book box at the Museum on Friday, August 7 from 1-5pm. Bring program fee of $10/participant to the pickup. Cash or check, exact change only.
3) Book club members read at home and join us via Zoom for discussions on August 17 and 31!

What are we reading?
Lyddie by Newbery Medal award-winning author Katherine Paterson.
When Lyddie and her younger brother are hired out as servants to help pay off their family farm's debts, Lyddie is determined to find a way to reunite her family once again. Hearing about all the money a girl can make working in the textile mills in Lowell, Massachusetts, she makes her way there, only to find that her dreams of returning home may never come true. @ Haverhill, Massachusetts

This object is a celluloid Ladies List, likely from the 1880s or 1890s. The days of the week are printed on the edges of...
07/31/2020

This object is a celluloid Ladies List, likely from the 1880s or 1890s. The days of the week are printed on the edges of the "leaves" of the list. But notice that there are only six leaves! Sunday was purposefully left out, because it was assumed to be a day of rest. A woman would write her daily chores in pencil, and they could be easily erased for the next week.

What is your preferred way to keep on top of daily tasks?

#CollectionsSpotlight

Free outdoor tours are back next week!Tuesday, August 4 at 1pm: PENTUCKET BURIAL GROUNDWednesday, August 5 at 2pm: LINWO...
07/30/2020

Free outdoor tours are back next week!

Tuesday, August 4 at 1pm: PENTUCKET BURIAL GROUND

Wednesday, August 5 at 2pm: LINWOOD CEMETERY

Thursday, August 6 at 1pm: HISTORIC BRADFORD COMMON

Friday, August 7 at 1pm: BRADFORD BURIAL GROUND

Call the Museum at 978-374-4626 and leave a message or email [email protected] to reserve your spot today!

***Masks and social distancing will be required for the duration of the tour. Group size will be limited to 10 people.***

Image is of Kimball Tavern (c1690), featured on the Historic Bradford Common Tour.

07/29/2020
Virtual Book Club for Preteens and Middle Schoolers!

Virtual Book Club for Preteens and Middle Schoolers!

When:
Monday, August 17, 1:30pm (mid-book check-in)
Monday, August 31, 1:30pm (final book talk)

Where:
Online! Zoom meeting information will be emailed to participants the morning of each book club meeting.

How:
1) Email [email protected] to register. Book club is limited to 10 participants.
2) Pick up the book box at the Museum on Friday, August 7 from 1-5pm. Bring program fee of $10/participant to the pickup. Cash or check, exact change only.
3) Book club members read at home and join us for discussions on August 17 and 31!

What are we reading?
Lyddie by Newbery Medal award-winning author Katherine Paterson.
When Lyddie and her younger brother are hired out as servants to help pay off their family farm's debts, Lyddie is determined to find a way to reunite her family once again. Hearing about all the money a girl can make working in the textile mills in Lowell, Massachusetts, she makes her way there, only to find that her dreams of returning home may never come true.

07/24/2020
New Hampshire PBS

Check out this new documentary about the Merrimack River! It considers how the past and history of the river relates to the present, and what the future of the river might hold.

The Merrimack: River at Risk looks at one of the country's most threatened watersheds and the towns and cities that have relied on it throughout history.

Sponsored by:
Merrimack County Savings Bank (The Merrimack) The Norwin S. And Elizabeth N. Bean Foundation, BCM Environmental & Land Law, PLLC

Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests EcoPhotography, LLC
#RiveratRisk #NHPBS

Address

240 Water St
Haverhill, MA
01830

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As of March 2020, the Museum and Visitor Center are closed to the public until further notice due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Please check our pinned Facebook post for up-to-date information on our public program offerings. __________________________

Winter Hours (November 1 to April 30):

Open for special events, programs, and by appointment.

Closed for tours.

__________________________

Summer Hours (May 1 to October 31): Tuesday-Saturday, 10am-5pm, Sundays 12-5pm

Hours for Guided Tours:Tuesday through Friday 1 – 4pm or by appointment, Saturday 10am – 4pm, Sunday 12 – 4pm *Last Tours leave at 3:30pm

**We have a tiny staff so we must reserve the right to close without notice due to programs, events, illness, etc. Please check our website calendar for updates or call ahead. Thank you!

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Comments

Do you have any old quilts in the closet? Did you know they could be valuable. If you have one find out What It's Worth on Sat., Sept. 14 at the HC Media studio at Harbor Place as professional appraisers will be on hand to help evaluate your treasures. https://www.signupgenius.com/go/8050945afad2babf49-whats…
Slots for the antique appraisal event "What's it Worth' on September 14 are filling up. Reserve a spot to have your treasures appraised. https://www.signupgenius.com/go/8050945afad2babf49-whats
Are there any archaeological dig sites open to the public, or any events at Buttonwoods the first week of July? Thank you!
Do you know how Haverhill history ties to the Lizzie Borden trial?
Punctuate4 Productions was privileged to be able to take cast photos for Saltonstall at the John Ward House at the Buttonwoods Museum. Michael Cormier researched his original story at Buttonwoods and some of the play is set in this Haverhill treasure. John Ward will also come to life thru the talents of actor Les Tarmy. Buttonwoods members get a discount on tickets for the November 3 & 4, 3 p.m. shows.
Saltonstall: One man's stand against the Salem Witch Trial is a new play is based on the true story of Haverhill Judge Nathaniel Saltonstall. Set in Haverhill and Salem, this is a remarkable story that will debut on stage in Haverhill Nov. 1 -4. For details & tickets go to www.punctuate4.org