Whittier Birthplace

Whittier Birthplace The Whittier Birthplace was organized in Dec. 1892 to preserve the historic landscape, house, and ot
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We may be closed for the winter, you can still take a virtual tour of the c.1688 Whittier Homestead thanks to our friend...
01/09/2024

We may be closed for the winter, you can still take a virtual tour of the c.1688 Whittier Homestead thanks to our friends at HC Media

  Three Part Virtual Tour of the Whittier BirthplaceThanks to our friends at HC Media for filming this three part virtual tour and discussion between HC Media host Jay Cleary and the Birthplace’s former curator Gus Reusch.   Part One Part TwoPart Three

Join us from the comfort of your own home for our virtual lecture series. Whittier Birthplace Virtual Lectures will take...
01/03/2024

Join us from the comfort of your own home for our virtual lecture series. Whittier Birthplace Virtual Lectures will take place over Zoom. Prior registration is required. Sign up here: https://www.whittierbirthplace.org/events

Thursday, January 25th at 7pm

Speakers: Roberta Roffo and Shannon Hewey of the East Parish Meeting House

Topic: Just down Middle Road from the Whittier Birthplace stands the East Parish Meeting House. Learn about this historic church, connections to the Whittier family, its architecture, and more during this month’s virtual lecture.

Portrait of John Greenleaf Whittier by Deacon Robert Peckham (1785-1877)Born in Petersham, MA, Deacon Robert Peckham was...
12/28/2023

Portrait of John Greenleaf Whittier by Deacon Robert Peckham (1785-1877)

Born in Petersham, MA, Deacon Robert Peckham was an artist and an abolitionist active in Bolton, MA and later Westminster, where his home, a stop on the Underground Railroad, still stands.

Peckham was appointed Deacon of the Westminster First Congregational Church in 1828. Prior to that, he seems to have been active as a house and ornamental painter. After 1828 he concentrated on portraiture, which in his use of outlining and decorative patterning shows the strong influence of his early training in trade. His work is also characterized by precise attention to details of dress, artifacts, and setting. Among his portraits were many children. Peckham may have studied with Ethan Allen Greenwood (1779-1856) of Hubbardston, MA.

The original copy of this portrait, which is owned by the Whittier Birthplace is currently on loan to the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. A reproduction hangs in the Birthplace.

John Greenleaf Whittier was born on this day, December 17, in 1807 in the southwest Parlor of the Whittier Birthplace, w...
12/17/2023

John Greenleaf Whittier was born on this day, December 17, in 1807 in the southwest Parlor of the Whittier Birthplace, was the first son and second child of John and Abigail (Hussey) Whittier. He grew up on the farm in a household with his parents, a brother and two sisters, aunt and uncle, and a constant flow of visitors and hired hands for the farm.

Whittier’s first poem to be seen in print appeared in 1826 in the Newburyport Free Press, where the abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison was editor. Under Garrison’s encouragement Whittier actively joined the abolitionist cause and edited newspapers in Boston and Hartford. He was associated with the Atlantic Monthly Magazine from 1857 until his death. In 1831, he brought out a book of prose works, “Legends of New England,” and the next year returned to his native town to run the farm after his father’s death, and later moved to Amesbury.

Until the Civil War, he became increasingly involved in the abolitionist cause, serving in numerous capacities on the local, state and national levels. He was also involved in the formation of the Republican Party.

With the publication of Snow-Bound in 1866, Whittier finally enjoyed a relatively comfortable life from the profits of his published works. It is Snow-Bound for which he will always be best remembered as a poet. Nearly every volume of his verses published thereafter was truly a best seller.

Whittier died on September 7, 1892 at a friend’s home in Hampton Falls, NH, and was buried with the rest of his family in Amesbury.

On October 17, 1902, a fire tore through the Whittier Homestead. While we are uncertain how it began, we can assume it s...
12/13/2023

On October 17, 1902, a fire tore through the Whittier Homestead. While we are uncertain how it began, we can assume it started on the second floor in the caretaker’s apartment. The caretaker at the time, Mrs. J. M. Ela heroically saved all of the Whittier family artifacts at the expense of losing all of her own personal possessions. Burnt ceiling timbers in the entryway and watermarks on the floor of the dining room are still visible today.

Rhymed catalog of the family’s books read by John Greenleaf Whittier while he was a boy. The original manuscript is now ...
12/04/2023

Rhymed catalog of the family’s books read by John Greenleaf Whittier while he was a boy. The original manuscript is now held by Harvard University Library.

It was endorsed by the life-long friend of Whittier, Abijah W. Thayer, past editor of the Harvard Gazette, who wrote:
“This was deposited in my hands about 1828 by John G. Whittier, who assured me that it was hist first effort at versification. It was written in 1823 or 1824, when he was 15 or 16 years old.”

12/03/2023
Our Virtual Lecture Series is back this winter with three new programs! January 25th: discover the history of the East P...
12/01/2023

Our Virtual Lecture Series is back this winter with three new programs!

January 25th: discover the history of the East Parish Meeting House
February 22nd: learn about the Whittier Covered Bridge in Ossipee, NH
March 28th: explore the history of the Rocks Village neighborhood here in east Haverhill.

Each program begins at 7pm and is held over Zoom. For more information and to sign up visit:

Upcoming events. Jan 25 Virtual Lecture Series Thursday, January 25, 2024 7:00 PM 8:00 PM Virtual over Zoom (map) Google Calendar ICS Join us from the comfort of your own home for our virtual lecture series. Whittier Birthplace Virtual Lectures will take place over Zoom. Prior registration is requir...

The Last Walk In Autumn by John Greenleaf WhittierI.O'er the bare woods, whose outstretched handsPlead with the leaden h...
11/19/2023

The Last Walk In Autumn by John Greenleaf Whittier

I.
O'er the bare woods, whose outstretched hands
Plead with the leaden heavens in vain,
I see, beyond the valley lands,
The sea's long level dim with rain.
Around me all things, stark and dumb,
Seem praying for the snows to come,
And, for the summer bloom and greenness gone,
With winter's sunset lights and dazzling morn atone.

II.
Along the river's summer walk,
The withered tufts of asters nod;
And trembles on its arid stalk
The boar plume of the golden-rod.
And on a ground of sombre fir,
And azure-studded juniper,
The silver birch its buds of purple shows,
And scarlet berries tell where bloomed the sweet wild-rose!

III.
With mingled sound of horns and bells,
A far-heard clang, the wild geese fly,
Storm-sent, from Arctic moors and fells,
Like a great arrow through the sky,
Two dusky lines converged in one,
Chasing the southward-flying sun;
While the brave snow-bird and the hardy jay
Call to them from the pines, as if to bid them stay.

IV.
I passed this way a year ago
The wind blew south; the noon of day
Was warm as June's; and save that snow
Flecked the low mountains far away,
And that the vernal-seeming breeze
Mocked faded grass and leafless trees,
I might have dreamed of summer as I lay,
Watching the fallen leaves with the soft wind at play.

V.
Since then, the winter blasts have piled
The white pagodas of the snow
On these rough slopes, and, strong and wild,
Yon river, in its overflow
Of spring-time rain and sun, set free,
Crashed with its ices to the sea;
And over these gray fields, then green and gold,
The summer corn has waved, the thunder's organ rolled.

VI.
Rich gift of God! A year of time
What pomp of rise and shut of day,
What hues wherewith our Northern clime
Makes autumn's dropping woodlands gay,
What airs outblown from ferny dells,
And clover-bloom and sweetbrier smells,
What songs of brooks and birds, what fruits and flowers,
Green woods and moonlit snows, have in its round been ours!

VII.
I know not how, in other lands,
The changing seasons come and go;
What splendors fall on Syrian sands,
What purple lights on Alpine snow!
Nor how the pomp of sunrise waits
On Venice at her watery gates;
A dream alone to me is Arno's vale,
And the Alhambra's halls are but a traveller's tale.

VIII.
Yet, on life's current, he who drifts
Is one with him who rows or sails
And he who wanders widest lifts
No more of beauty's jealous veils
Than he who from his doorway sees
The miracle of flowers and trees,
Feels the warm Orient in the noonday air,
And from cloud minarets hears the sunset call to prayer!

IX.
The eye may well be glad that looks
Where Pharpar's fountains rise and fall;
But he who sees his native brooks
Laugh in the sun, has seen them all.
The marble palaces of Ind
Rise round him in the snow and wind;
From his lone sweetbrier Persian Hafiz smiles,
And Rome's cathedral awe is in his woodland aisles.

X.
And thus it is my fancy blends
The near at hand and far and rare;
And while the same horizon bends
Above the silver-sprinkled hair
Which flashed the light of morning skies
On childhood's wonder-lifted eyes,
Within its round of sea and sky and field,
Earth wheels with all her zones, the Kosmos stands revealed.

XI.
And thus the sick man on his bed,
The toiler to his task-work bound,
Behold their prison-walls outspread,
Their clipped horizon widen round!
While freedom-giving fancy waits,
Like Peter's angel at the gates,
The power is theirs to baffle care and pain,
To bring the lost world back, and make it theirs again!

XII.
What lack of goodly company,
When masters of the ancient lyre
Obey my call, and trace for me
Their words of mingled tears and fire!
I talk with Bacon, grave and wise,
I read the world with Pascal's eyes;
And priest and sage, with solemn brows austere,
And poets, garland-bound, the Lords of Thought, draw near.

XIII.
Methinks, O friend, I hear thee say,
"In vain the human heart we mock;
Bring living guests who love the day,
Not ghosts who fly at crow of c**k!
The herbs we share with flesh and blood
Are better than ambrosial food
With laurelled shades." I grant it, nothing loath,
But doubly blest is he who can partake of both.

XIV.
He who might Plato's banquet grace,
Have I not seen before me sit,
And watched his puritanic face,
With more than Eastern wisdom lit?
Shrewd mystic! who, upon the back
Of his Poor Richard's Almanac,
Writing the Sufi's song, the Gentoo's dream,
Links Manu's age of thought to Fulton's age of steam!

XV.
Here too, of answering love secure,
Have I not welcomed to my hearth
The gentle pilgrim troubadour,
Whose songs have girdled half the earth;
Whose pages, like the magic mat
Whereon the Eastern lover sat,
Have borne me over Rhine-land's purple vines,
And Nubia's tawny sands, and Phrygia's mountain pines!

XVI.
And he, who to the lettered wealth
Of ages adds the lore unpriced,
The wisdom and the moral health,
The ethics of the school of Christ;
The statesman to his holy trust,
As the Athenian archon, just,
Struck down, exiled like him for truth alone,
Has he not graced my home with beauty all his own?

XVII.
What greetings smile, what farewells wave,
What loved ones enter and depart!
The good, the beautiful, the brave,
The Heaven-lent treasures of the heart!
How conscious seems the frozen sod
And beechen slope whereon they trod
The oak-leaves rustle, and the dry grass bends
Beneath the shadowy feet of lost or absent friends.

XVIII.
Then ask not why to these bleak hills
I cling, as clings the tufted moss,
To bear the winter's lingering chills,
The mocking spring's perpetual loss.
I dream of lands where summer smiles,
And soft winds blow from spicy isles,
But scarce would Ceylon's breath of flowers be sweet,
Could I not feel thy soil, New England, at my feet!

XIX.
At times I long for gentler skies,
And bathe in dreams of softer air,
But homesick tears would fill the eyes
That saw the Cross without the Bear.
The pine must whisper to the palm,
The north-wind break the tropic calm;
And with the dreamy languor of the Line,
The North's keen virtue blend, and strength to beauty join.

XX.
Better to stem with heart and hand
The roaring tide of life, than lie,
Unmindful, on its flowery strand,
Of God's occasions drifting by
Better with naked nerve to bear
The needles of this goading air,
Than, in the lap of sensual ease, forego
The godlike power to do, the godlike aim to know.

XXI.
Home of my heart! to me more fair
Than gay Versailles or Windsor's halls,
The painted, shingly town-house where
The freeman's vote for Freedom falls!
The simple roof where prayer is made,
Than Gothic groin and colonnade;
The living temple of the heart of man,
Than Rome's sky-mocking vault, or many-spired Milan!

XXII.
More dear thy equal village schools,
Where rich and poor the Bible read,
Than classic halls where Priestcraft rules,
And Learning wears the chains of Creed;
Thy glad Thanksgiving, gathering in
The scattered sheaves of home and kin,
Than the mad license ushering Lenten pains,
Or holidays of slaves who laugh and dance in chains.

XXIII.
And sweet homes nestle in these dales,
And perch along these wooded swells;
And, blest beyond Arcadian vales,
They hear the sound of Sabbath bells!
Here dwells no perfect man sublime,
Nor woman winged before her time,
But with the faults and follies of the race,
Old home-bred virtues hold their not unhonored place.

XXIV.
Here manhood struggles for the sake
Of mother, sister, daughter, wife,
The graces and the loves which make
The music of the march of life;
And woman, in her daily round
Of duty, walks on holy ground.
No unpaid menial tills the soil, nor here
Is the bad lesson learned at human rights to sneer.

XXV.
Then let the icy north-wind blow
The trumpets of the coming storm,
To arrowy sleet and blinding snow
Yon slanting lines of rain transform.
Young hearts shall hail the drifted cold,
As gayly as I did of old;
And I, who watch them through the frosty pane,
Unenvious, live in them my boyhood o'er again.

XXVI.
And I will trust that He who heeds
The life that hides in mead and wold,
Who hangs yon alder's crimson beads,
And stains these mosses green and gold,
Will still, as He hath done, incline
His gracious care to me and mine;
Grant what we ask aright, from wrong debar,
And, as the earth grows dark, make brighter every star!

XXVII.
I have not seen, I may not see,
My hopes for man take form in fact,
But God will give the victory
In due time; in that faith I act.
And lie who sees the future sure,
The baffling present may endure,
And bless, meanwhile, the unseen Hand that leads
The heart's desires beyond the halting step of deeds.

XXVIII.
And thou, my song, I send thee forth,
Where harsher songs of mine have flown;
Go, find a place at home and hearth
Where'er thy singer's name is known;
Revive for him the kindly thought
Of friends; and they who love him not,
Touched by some strain of thine, perchance may take
The hand he proffers all, and thank him for thy sake.

Portrait of John Greenleaf Whittier at age 50, painted by Joseph Linden Smith, whose mother was JGW’s cousin. Painting w...
11/16/2023

Portrait of John Greenleaf Whittier at age 50, painted by Joseph Linden Smith, whose mother was JGW’s cousin. Painting was done in 1935.

Joseph Linden Smith (1863-1950) was born in Pawtucket, RI. He went to Brown University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He studied art at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Smith traveled to Egypt, Japan, Korea, China, Cambodia, Indonesia, India, Honduras, Iran, and other countries to study and paint archaeological sites. He was the honorary curator of the Egyptian department at the MFA and he taught at both the museum school and at Harvard. In 1931 he was appointed president of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts.

11/14/2023

Located on the Exit 48 ramp of Route 495 south in Haverhill, Massachusetts, the Big Dog standing over the highway has captured the hearts and imagination of the thousands of travelers who often wonder about the story behind it. This book tells the story of met-al sculptor Dale Rogers and his memo...

The PumpkinBY JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIEROh, greenly and fair in the lands of the sun,The vines of the gourd and the rich me...
11/08/2023

The Pumpkin
BY JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER
Oh, greenly and fair in the lands of the sun,
The vines of the gourd and the rich melon run,
And the rock and the tree and the cottage enfold,
With broad leaves all greenness and blossoms all gold,
Like that which o'er Nineveh's prophet once grew,
While he waited to know that his warning was true,
And longed for the storm-cloud, and listened in vain
For the rush of the whirlwind and red fire-rain.

On the banks of the Xenil the dark Spanish maiden
Comes up with the fruit of the tangled vine laden;
And the Creole of Cuba laughs out to behold
Through orange-leaves shining the broad spheres of gold;
Yet with dearer delight from his home in the North,
On the fields of his harvest the Yankee looks forth,
Where crook-necks are coiling and yellow fruit shines,
And the sun of September melts down on his vines.

Ah! on Thanksgiving day, when from East and from West,
From North and from South come the pilgrim and guest,
When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board
The old broken links of affection restored,
When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before,
What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye?
What calls back the past, like the rich Pumpkin pie?

Oh, fruit loved of boyhood! the old days recalling,
When wood-grapes were purpling and brown nuts were falling!
When wild, ugly faces we carved in its skin,
Glaring out through the dark with a candle within!
When we laughed round the corn-heap, with hearts all in tune,
Our chair a broad pumpkin,—our lantern the moon,
Telling tales of the fairy who travelled like steam,
In a pumpkin-shell coach, with two rats for her team!

Then thanks for thy present! none sweeter or better
E'er smoked from an oven or circled a platter!
Fairer hands never wrought at a pastry more fine,
Brighter eyes never watched o'er its baking, than thine!
And the prayer, which my mouth is too full to express,
Swells my heart that thy shadow may never be less,
That the days of thy lot may be lengthened below,
And the fame of thy worth like a pumpkin-vine grow,
And thy life be as sweet, and its last sunset sky
Golden-tinted and fair as thy own Pumpkin pie!

Our Little Free Library currently has kids’ chapter books, cookbooks, poetry collections, educational DVDs, and more. Co...
11/02/2023

Our Little Free Library currently has kids’ chapter books, cookbooks, poetry collections, educational DVDs, and more. Come check it out! It’s free for anyone to take or leave books.

10/30/2023
Many thanks to all who helped make the Big Dog Show fundraiser benefiting the Whittier Birthplace a success.Especially: ...
10/30/2023

Many thanks to all who helped make the Big Dog Show fundraiser benefiting the Whittier Birthplace a success.

Especially:
Dale Rogers Studio
All of our sponsors, including lead sponsor Pentucket Bank
Our volunteers, and
everyone who came out to support us this past weekend !

10/29/2023
If you missed us yesterday, you can still visit all the decorated Big Dogs on the Bradford Common all day today!(Sponsor...
10/29/2023

If you missed us yesterday, you can still visit all the decorated Big Dogs on the Bradford Common all day today!

(Sponsors will take down their decorations on Monday and the Dogs will be picked up by Dale Rogers Studio team on Tuesday).

And the winners are…By popular vote, this year’s Best Dressed Big Dog is the Van Gogh Dog by Bradford Elementary School!...
10/28/2023

And the winners are…

By popular vote, this year’s Best Dressed Big Dog is the Van Gogh Dog by Bradford Elementary School!

Second place: Hunking School Bobcat Dog
Third place: Haverhill Fire Department

Congratulations!

Join us on the Bradford Common today from 9am-3pm for the Big Dog Show!
10/28/2023

Join us on the Bradford Common today from 9am-3pm for the Big Dog Show!

HAVERHILL — The Big Dog Show to benefit the John Greenleaf Whittier Birthplace is coming to Bradford Common this weekend.

We can’t wait for you to join us!
10/25/2023

We can’t wait for you to join us!

Making preparations for the Big Dog Show in Bradford Common this weekend! Hope to see you there!

Dale Rogers Studio 's Big Dog Show will be open on the Bradford Common all weekend, but the best time to visit will be o...
10/24/2023

Dale Rogers Studio 's Big Dog Show will be open on the Bradford Common all weekend, but the best time to visit will be on Saturday.

9am-1pm, we'll be joined by the Haverhill Farmers' Market

Shortly after 1pm teams from the HPD, HFD, and DPW will compete in the City Workers Relay in historic games. Can the Haverhill Fire Department win a second year in a row?

The Pet Parade kicks off at 2pm. Sign up between 9am and 1:45pm at the gazebo to enter this costume contest. Any leashed or carried pet is eligible, not just dogs.

9am-3pm at the gazebo, vote for the Best Dressed Big Dog and check out the art show of works featuring the Whittier Birthplace.

Our 2023 tour season is coming to an end. There are only two more weeks until we close for the season at the end of Octo...
10/18/2023

Our 2023 tour season is coming to an end. There are only two more weeks until we close for the season at the end of October.

Make a tour reservation at https://www.whittierbirthplace.org/tours

There's still room to join our Homeschool Program next Thursday morning....Homeschooling families are invited to a progr...
10/05/2023

There's still room to join our Homeschool Program next Thursday morning....

Homeschooling families are invited to a program on the legacy of John Greenleaf Whittier on Thursday, October 12th from 10am-noon.

Suggested ages: 6-12

Suggested donation: $10

Theme: The Freeman Memorial Trail

This month we’re taking a short hike along the Freeman Memorial Trail, through the woods and fields around the Whittier Birthplace. At each of the 13 stops along this approximately 1/2 mile trail, we will take turns reading a short section of Whittier’s poetry that describes the scenery. Along the way participants will get to collect leaves and other natural items for the craft at the end of the hike. Please come dressed for the weather and with sturdy shoes for walking over uneven ground. We’ll have sun block and insect repellant available.

Skills practiced in this program: reading, hiking, arts & crafts.

To sign up, email [email protected] at least one week prior to the program. Please include the ages and first names of participating kids as well as any relevant allergies or other special considerations we should know in advance.

WHITTIER BIRTHPLACE TO HOST BIG DOG SHOWThe Whittier Birthplace will host the “Big Dog Show” on the Bradford Common over...
10/04/2023

WHITTIER BIRTHPLACE TO HOST BIG DOG SHOW

The Whittier Birthplace will host the “Big Dog Show” on the Bradford Common over Halloween weekend thanks to support from Pentucket Bank and Dale Rogers Studio.

The Big Dog Show is the signature public art exhibition of Haverhill-based artist, Dale Rogers. Twenty of Dale Rogers’ “American Dogs” will be assembled on the Bradford Common from Friday, October 27 through Monday, October 30, 2023. Event sponsors and their community partners (such as schools and local nonprofits) will have the opportunity to decorate one of the American Dogs for the viewing pleasure of the greater Haverhill community. In addition to decorated Dogs, there will be a number of other activities for the public to enjoy on Saturday, October 28. These include a pet parade, a chance to vote on the best dressed Big Dog, and more. The Haverhill Farmers Market will also be set up on Bradford Common on Saturday, October 28. This will be a fun weekend for pet-owners and the community at large!

Limited sponsorship opportunities are still available for businesses and organizations interested in decorating a Big Dog or for sponsoring one of the other activities such as the pet pageant. For more information, please email Kaleigh Paré Shaughnessy, Executive Director of the Whittier Birthplace at [email protected].

The Whittier Birthplace was organized in April 1893 to preserve the historic landscape, house, and other buildings as nearly as may be, in the same condition as when John Greenleaf Whittier lived on the farmstead and to provide public access to the property so that the legacy of Whittier’s literary and abolition works may be remembered. To learn more about other events or to book a tour, please visit whittierbirthplace.org.

The HAPN (Historical and Art Preservation Network) will debut their first exhibition with the HAPN Haunted Verses Trail ...
10/02/2023

The HAPN (Historical and Art Preservation Network) will debut their first exhibition with the HAPN Haunted Verses Trail this Saturday, October 7th at the John Greenleaf Whittier Birthplace in Haverhill, MA from 12 -4 p.m.

This inaugural event will feature family friendly haunted and spooky tales ranging from classic literature, theater, traditional folklore and original works, all performed by local actors and storytellers. Each outdoor station at the Whittier Birthplace will feature a different performer. In the event of poor weather, the event will be held in the Gus Reusch Welcome Center at the Whittier Birthplace.

HAPN is a pending-nonprofit created in 2023 in order to help facilitate the utilization of historic spaces for arts and performances.

This is a free event, open to all ages. Registration is not required to attend.

Homeschooling families are invited to a program on the legacy of John Greenleaf Whittier on Thursday, October 12th from ...
09/28/2023

Homeschooling families are invited to a program on the legacy of John Greenleaf Whittier on Thursday, October 12th from 10am-noon.

Suggested ages: 6-12

Suggested donation: $10

Theme: The Freeman Memorial Trail

This month we’re taking a short hike along the Freeman Memorial Trail, through the woods and fields around the Whittier Birthplace. At each of the 13 stops along this approximately 1/2 mile trail, we will take turns reading a short section of Whittier’s poetry that describes the scenery. Along the way participants will get to collect leaves and other natural items for the craft at the end of the hike. Please come dressed for the weather and with sturdy shoes for walking over uneven ground. We’ll have sun block and insect repellant available.

Skills practiced in this program: reading, hiking, arts & crafts.

Email [email protected] to sign up, at least one week prior to the program. Please include the ages and first names of participating kids as well as any relevant allergies or other special considerations we should know in advance.

Trails & Sails Open House Weekend starts today!Join us today (Friday) from 10am-4pm for free tours of the c.1688 Whittie...
09/22/2023

Trails & Sails Open House Weekend starts today!

Join us today (Friday) from 10am-4pm for free tours of the c.1688 Whittier Homestead. Explore the Freeman Memorial Trail. Say hi to Mindy the horse.

Tomorrow (Saturday) join us 10am-4pm for all the above, plus plein air artists and folk dancers.

Finally, on Sunday 1-4pm we'll wrap up the weekend with free tours in the afternoon.

Address

305 Whittier Road
Haverhill, MA
01830

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