Grayslake Historical Society

Grayslake Historical Society The Grayslake Historical Society is located in the Grayslake Heritage Center. 164 Hawley Street, Grayslake Email: [email protected] 847-223-7663
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The Grayslake Historical Society was organized in 1976. The formation of the Society was the goal of the heritage committee of the Grayslake Bicentennial Commission. Since its founding, the group has been a viable part of the community

Operating as usual

The Annex has a grindstone on display.  I  don’t quite understand why it is called a grindstone as it sharpens not grind...
08/29/2020

The Annex has a grindstone on display. I don’t quite understand why it is called a grindstone as it sharpens not grinds. There are “stones” that grind (grain into meal) but this kind sharpens the blade of a sickles or a scythe or some other tool with a blade.. Our grindstone is manually operated with a crank. There are models that have pedals. Notice the can above the grindstone. It drips water so that the stone does not become too hot.
A sickle uses one hand to cut the grain while a scythe requires the use of two hands.
When visiting the Grayslake History Museum, ask to see the Annex so you can view the grindstone. There is a scythe on display in the second floor permanent gallery.

08/24/2020

Trivia Question:
Who is/was
Lawrence Forvor?

08/24/2020

Stories of Grayslake
$20.00
Postage & Handling
$8.00

Do you enjoy a glass of wine?  Did you ever think of the process of making it?  The Annex of the Grayslake Heritage Cent...
08/22/2020

Do you enjoy a glass of wine? Did you ever think of the process of making it? The Annex of the Grayslake Heritage Center and Museum displays a manually operated fruit press which could be used to press or squeeze the juice out of grapes. The juice would be processed into wine. Today commercial wineries have large machines to do the task. We could go back in time when the grapes would be placed in huge vats and humans would then with bare feet stomp the juice out of the grapes. Next time you visit the Annex, look for the fruit press and realize its part in the history of wine making. This item is from the collections of the Grayslake Historical Society.

Illinois State Historical Society
08/21/2020

Illinois State Historical Society

HISTORICAL HEADLINES

By Mark W. Sorensen

August 2020 marked the 100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution “giving” women the right to vote on all issues on the same basis as male citizens. However, Illinois in 1913 was the first state east of the Mississippi River to allow women to vote for president and even before that Illinois women could vote on a few other matters.

Because a “women’s sphere” was thought to be the home and children, in 1873 Illinois passed a statute which allowed any woman, "married or single," who possessed the qualification required of men, to be eligible to hold any school office in Illinois created by law and not the state constitution. Even though they couldn't vote for themselves, on November 4, 1873 ten women were elected as County Superintendents of Schools around the state. [To help find the names of women running for office in Illinois and other states before 1920 use the web site HER HAT WAS IN THE RING http://www.herhatwasinthering.org/.]

In 1891 the Illinois legislature passed a bill that entitled women to vote at any election held to elect school officials. Since these elections were often held at the same time and place as elections for other offices, women by law had to use separate ballots and separate ballot boxes. Starting in 1892 women voted in school elections around the state and by 1894 the law was interpreted to also allow for women both serving as and voting for University of Illinois Trustees. Thus that November, Chicago child-rights advocate Lucy Louisa Coues Flower became the first woman in Illinois elected to a state-wide office.

For the next ten years most women did not take advantage of these limited voting opportunities and this lack of participation was used as one argument against expanding their franchise. Not only were women suffragists opposed by men and the liquor lobby that did not like the female tendency towards favoring Temperance, they were also opposed by some of their “sisters” such as Chicago homemaker Caroline Fairfield Corbin who in 1897 founded the “Illinois Association Opposed to the Extension of Suffrage to Women.”

In the summer of 1910 the women’s suffrage movement in Illinois was reinvigorated by suffrage motor car tours around the state and in March 1911 Jane Addams lent her influence to the cause and introduced a dozen female advocates who each got to speak for three minutes in the State Capitol to a committee of the General Assembly. After years of work by Catharine Waugh McCulloch and new lobbying techniques by Grace Wilbur Trout, the Municipal Suffrage bill was passed by the Illinois G.A. in June 1913 and signed by Gov. Dunne. During the debate in the House, Rep. Browne said he “had too much respect for women to place the burden of the vote upon their shoulders” and would vote no because it would mean the “extermination of the old line parties, both Democrat and Republican and would put the Progressives in power.”

The woman mentioned in the June 12 news headline who sent the “Letter Against Suffrage to Representatives” was Mrs. Mae Curran, wife of Progressive Party state representative John M. Curran who voted in favor of the bill. Mrs. Curran wrote to each representative explaining that she represented “the large, but silent, body of women … who see in such a bill only a burden to themselves and a menace to the state.” Rep. Curran said his wife “had a right to her convictions.” As is seen in the June 12 newspaper sidebar, Illinois women could now vote for president and some city and county officials, but not for any state officers or members of the General Assembly because these offices were specifically mentioned in the 1870 Illinois Constitution which was nearly impossible to amend.

For an update on Suffrage anniversary activities and information go to SUFFRAGE 2020 ILLINOIS online at https://suffrage2020illinois.org/

Mark W. Sorensen is a past president of the ISHS and the author of AHEAD OF THEIR TIME: A brief history of woman suffrage in Illinois found in the Nov/Dec 2004 edition Illinois Heritage Magazine.

Available online at https://www.lib.niu.edu/2004/ih110604half.html

08/19/2020

Tour the
Courtyard Gallery
at the
Museum

08/17/2020

Trivia Question:
What is/was
THE OASIS
in Grayslake?

08/15/2020

STORIES OF GRAYSLAKE
For Sale $20.00
at the Museum
Today 12:00 - 4:00

08/14/2020

Life Member
Joanne Lawrence
is asymptomatic for
COVID - 19

The Museum Annex has a small display of farm tools.  One of the items on the floor of the display is a corn sheller.  Wh...
08/13/2020

The Museum Annex has a small display of farm tools. One of the items on the floor of the display is a corn sheller. When I give tours to school groups, I ask them how do you eat corn on the cob? I then pretend to eat corn off a cob. At this time, I change into a lecture mode to explain the corn sheller. “This machine does the work for the cattle. It takes the kernels off the cob for them. However, we use field corn, not sweet corn. Ears of corn are directed into the machine very carefully so that the no one gets cut or even worse loses a finger. The hand crank is turned to move the gears. Inside the machine there is a metal plate with teeth, (points that protrude). These points take the kernels from the cob which are dropped into a container while the bare cob goes into a different container or drops to the floor. The kernels are fed to the cattle while the cobs are used for bedding or for kindling to start a fire. The cobs may be ground up and used for bedding for the farm animals. Some of the cobs may be used to start a fire in the cookstove in the kitchen. Occasionally they could be found being used in the outhouse. The sheller we see here is manually operated, which means “by hand”. Larger models could have a belt system powered by a small engine. What we see here is a floor model. There are smaller machines that are can be attached to a table. In the past students, like you, have been able to shell corn while visiting Farmers Market.”

Visit the Heritage Center and Historical Society booth at Farmers Market to receive a vintage toy for kids.  Then go to ...
08/12/2020

Visit the Heritage Center and Historical Society booth at Farmers Market to receive a vintage toy for kids. Then go to the Museum and purchase a copy of “Stories of Grayslake” or a gelatin t-shirt. The book has stories written by three Grayslake mayors and numerous past and present Grayslake residents. It tells about subdivisions, parks and businesses in the village. Above all it gives the feeling of community pride!

08/10/2020

Trivia Question:
Who were/What were the Scotch Lads?

08/10/2020

R I P
Life Member
Vivian Gwaltney

There are different kinds of forks in the domestic world: dinner forks, salad forks, shrimp forks.  There also different...
08/06/2020

There are different kinds of forks in the domestic world: dinner forks, salad forks, shrimp forks. There also different kinds of forks in the farmer’s world. The Museum Annex has a pitch fork with three tines also known as a hay fork. It is used to carry or toss hay. If a fork has many tines, it can handle heavier loads, such as manure. Farmers call them manure forks. A fork with wide tines is used for digging and is a spading fork. A potato fork is a spading fork. There are many more kinds of forks.

08/03/2020

Trivia Question:
Who is/was Warren Chard?

07/31/2020

After lunch downtown, visit the Musem & Annex.
Open today
Noon to 4:00

On the tool display wall of the Museum’s Annex is an interesting bowl-shaped wire object. It is a muzzle.  The word muzz...
07/30/2020

On the tool display wall of the Museum’s Annex is an interesting bowl-shaped wire object. It is a muzzle. The word muzzle can have different meanings: part of the face, censorship, object to prevent biting. Often dog owners put a muzzle on their dogs to prevent it from biting people. Horse owners put a muzzle on horses to prevent biting, but not from biting people but from biting (eating) food. In years past, horses would be used in the fields. While the farmer is picking corn in the field, the horse could nibble on corn laying on the ground or still on the stalk. When a horse eats too much corn, it causes founder, an inflammation of the hoof.
Today people are wearing masks to prevent the transmitting of COVID - 19.

07/27/2020

Trivia Question:
Who developed West Trail ?

Do you remember the old full length screen door?  It was completely made of screening.  The bottom half of the door was ...
07/23/2020

Do you remember the old full length screen door? It was completely made of screening. The bottom half of the door was divided into four squares. The handle was a half rectangle made of metal. The door closed by its self because of a wire spring. The lock was a simple hook and eye. The screen door was important as it kept flies out and let fresh air in. Ofter the screen would get a hole in it. Perhaps the family dog clawed at it to get out or in too many times. The hole would be patched with a small piece of screening which the woman of the house would sew over the hole.
The Museum Annex has a screen door between the kitchen and tool display. It came from a one hundred year-old house in Grayslake.
The Museum and its Annex are open Wednesday through Saturday noon to four

The collections of the Grayslake Historical Society are being moved across the street to a different storage area.  Memb...
07/21/2020

The collections of the Grayslake Historical Society are being moved across the street to a different storage area. Members of the Village of Grayslake public works crew and Heritage Center staff helped to move the loom and other artifacts.

07/20/2020

Trivia Question:
What G L disaster happened in October 1978?

Meet Fred.  He and his team of horses are pictured in the opening panel of the farm exhibit in the Museum Annex.     Fre...
07/16/2020

Meet Fred. He and his team of horses are pictured in the opening panel of the farm exhibit in the Museum Annex. Fred was born in a small village in northern Germany, along the Weser River, in 1863 and immigrated to the United Stated with his family four years later. The family stayed with relatives in Half Day, Illinois, until they purchased ten acres in Ela Township. Fred was in his early teens when his father died. Fred worked on other farms to help the family financially. Fred’s mother remarried and Fred married Lottie in 1889. About 1893 Fred and Lottie bought a farm on Midlothian Road (Today the farm is Ambria subdivision, about a block south of Grayslake’s southern boundary.) Fred sold the farm when the younger of his two daughters married in 1920. He said that he lost his “best hand”. Fred and Lottie moved to a house they bought on Lake Street/Route 45 in what is now known as Mundelein. Although retired, he carried mail between the train station and the local post office. Fred kept a large garden and often walked to the woods outside of town to gather walnuts and wild berries. He died in 1952, a week before his eighty-ninth birthday.

07/13/2020

Trivia Question:
Who was/is Sonny?

I am just a milk can to you but I have a story.  Let me start with the farmer pouring the milk from a pail (he had just ...
07/09/2020

I am just a milk can to you but I have a story. Let me start with the farmer pouring the milk from a pail (he had just milked a cow) into me. When I got full the farmer put a cover on me and carried me to the milk house. In the milk house, he put me into a large tank of cold water. I stayed in the tank with other milk cans until a truck came to pick me up and took me to a dairy. At the dairy my milk was combined with milk from other farms and pasteurized. I was then rinsed and returned by truck to my farmer. He, too, washed me, before using me. Do you know how I got back to my correct farm. I had a number painted on me. Ever milk can on my farm had the same number. Some farmers had a metal tag adhered to their can.

Here is some before and after to my story. Around 1900 the farmer would haul his cans by wagon to a milk platform. A milk platform could be called a railroad station for milk cans. There was a milk platform near Rollins Road, north of Grayslake, and one south of Grayslake. The one south, I think, was called Hendee platform.

I became obsolete when farmers started using milking machines which were attached to a pipe line by each cow. The pipe line lead to a big tank in the milk house. Now a tanker truck would come and get the raw milk. The milk was transferred from the milk house tank to the truck tank via a hose.

Times have changed. I am now an artifact in a museum. One thing has not changed. Milk still comes from a cow.

Come to the Heritage Center and ask to go to the Annex to see.

07/06/2020

Trivia Question:
Who was killed instantly in February of 1944?

07/03/2020
Grayslake Heritage Center and Museum
07/02/2020

Grayslake Heritage Center and Museum

As part of Grayslake’s 125th anniversary, a new flag will be unveiled and you get to help select it! To see the flags and vote for your favorite design, click the link below. Votes will be accepted through Friday, July 31.
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ZDYBNQ9

#Grayslake125 #luvGrayslake
Village of Grayslake, IL | Visit Grayslake | Grayslake Arts Alliance | Grayslake Chamber of Commerce

This caldron of flowers is in the parking lot behind the Grayslake Museum, near the Annex.  This huge iron pot was donat...
07/02/2020

This caldron of flowers is in the parking lot behind the Grayslake Museum, near the Annex. This huge iron pot was donated by Dorcas Brausch many years ago. The Brauschs lived on Route 83 adjacent south of the railroad tracks where a building supply company is now. Around the caldron are rows of bricks. These bricks come from the silo which was on the farm which is now Central Park. As a fundraiser, Ray Rockenbach chiseled by hand names of people who donated money to the Grayslake Historical Society. The Village of Grayslake furnishes the flowers in the caldron.

06/30/2020

The Grayslake Museum opens tomorrow.
Trivia will now become a once a week activity.

We’re back!  The Grayslake Heritage Center & Museum reopens on Wednesday, July 1 with updated exhibits and a new Exhibit...
06/29/2020

We’re back! The Grayslake Heritage Center & Museum reopens on Wednesday, July 1 with updated exhibits and a new Exhibit Explorer Guide that will take the place of our hands-on play. Exhibits and public areas will be sanitized each morning and throughout the day for the safety of our visitors, volunteers, and staff. Per state guidelines, capacity will be limited and face coverings will be required. Avoid big crowds and visit your local museum to learn about Grayslake during the Prohibition era, how our town got its name, and more.

06/28/2020

Trivia Question:
Who is/was John Welte?

06/26/2020

Trivia Question:
Why does a building on Center Street say TIMES?

06/24/2020

Trivia Question:
What downtown building was once an one room frame school house?

We will miss you as our neighbor and wish you well in your new position.
06/24/2020

We will miss you as our neighbor and wish you well in your new position.

On Friday, June 26th, Fire Chief John Christian will walk away as a retired member of the Grayslake Fire Protection District which he has called home for more than 32 years.

Chief Christian is retiring from Grayslake Fire as he has accepted the position of Fire Chief with the Village of Barrington where he will begin on July 6th.

Chief Christian has served as Fire Chief for the District since 2009, and has served as past president of the Illinois Fire Chiefs Association, Metropolitan Fire Chiefs Association, Lake County Fire Chiefs Association and chairman of the Lake and McHenry Counties Specialized Response Teams.

During his tenure, Chief Christian has had a number of major accomplishments to include the addition of Fire Station #3 located in the southern portion of the District. The addition of Station #3 being one of his most satisfying accomplishments was beneficial to the District in that it significantly reduced response times. Chief Christian also collaborated with the College of Lake County to develop a first ever cooperative program where students become actual fire department members trained in state certified classes. This unprecedented program allows students to train, work and ride with the Grayslake Firefighters and has proven to be an overwhelming success.

The members of the Grayslake Fire Protection District would like to thank Fire Chief John Christian for his outstanding service to our District and the surrounding communities and wish him well in his new role. Deputy Chief Dan Pierre has been appointed as the Interim Fire Chief until the Grayslake Fire Protection Board of Trustees appoints a successor.

06/22/2020

Trivia Question:
What building was called the Opera House?

Address

164 Hawley Street, P O Box 185
Grayslake, IL
60030

General information

Museum hours: Wednesday - Sunday : noon to 4:00 PM Archives hours: Thursday : 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM Tours by appointment

Opening Hours

Wednesday 12:00 - 16:00
Thursday 12:00 - 16:00
Friday 12:00 - 16:00
Saturday 12:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(847) 223-7663

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Comments

Will the Grayslake Historical Society be collecting posters, pictures and articles from the BLM march?
Take a SAFE Virtual Tour of the Grayslake Heritage Center Museum. 3D VIRTUAL TOUR:
when was the Sears mansion/ Country Squire built?
Is this Wilbur?
1976.
Grayslake Central Honors World History students did some awesome work on this year's Curious Grayslake Project in conjunction with the Grayslake Historical Society. Thank you so much for your help with our students this year! The final project can be found here: