The Museum of Teaching and Learning

The Museum of Teaching and Learning Learn about education at Museum of Teaching and Learning in Fullerton, California. We develop traveling exhibitions that promote awareness and inspire change in educational practices.
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The Museum of Teaching and Learning (MOTAL) is a spectacular, interactive world-class museum that explores the past, present, and future of learning throughout the world. It provides a common core of understandings about people, procedures, and events, highlighting details of public education in our democracy. Lively and memorable exhibits, touchable artifacts, and engaging activities educate and delight participants of all ages and capabilities. MOTAL is a unique, world-class museum in a nation devoted to education. Our museum will serve as a dynamic catalyst for students, parents, teachers, citizens and policymakers to see the roles that they play in making learning more effective for themselves and others.

The Museum of Teaching and Learning (MOTAL) is a spectacular, interactive world-class museum that explores the past, present, and future of learning throughout the world. It provides a common core of understandings about people, procedures, and events, highlighting details of public education in our democracy. Lively and memorable exhibits, touchable artifacts, and engaging activities educate and delight participants of all ages and capabilities. MOTAL is a unique, world-class museum in a nation devoted to education. Our museum will serve as a dynamic catalyst for students, parents, teachers, citizens and policymakers to see the roles that they play in making learning more effective for themselves and others.

Mission: We educate people about eduction

Operating as usual

From Our MOTAL Family to YOURSWe Wish you a Joyous Holiday Season Now more than EVER our thoughts are with you and yours...
12/24/2020

From Our MOTAL Family to YOURS

We Wish you a Joyous Holiday Season

Now more than EVER our thoughts are with you and yours to be safe, healthy, and happy. We have heard many creative ways to celebrate with family this year while being safe. We would love to hear your plans to share with others.

We have much to be grateful for here at MOTAL. When the pandemic hit, our strategies had to change but we have continued to educate people about education.

We cherish so many things:

Help from Cal Humanities and CARES grants;

Ability to change course and create articles about a wide variety of significant, education-related topics;

Our avid readers;

Our dedicated volunteers and workers;

New projects on the horizon including an exciting oral history project!

Our operational essentials will depend on the generosity of those we serve.

We continue to match all contributions up to $6,000. We are more than halfway there! Please consider making a donation. Any amount you can give, from $10 to $300 (or beyond), will help us achieve our mission. Thank you in advance!

Best wishes for a happy and healthy holiday season!

From all of us to you!
Greta, Mary, Eva, Cheryl, Norma, Tiffany

One in a Billion: One Man’s Remarkable Odyssey though Modern-Day China. About the author Nancy Pine holds a PhD in educa...
12/23/2020

One in a Billion: One Man’s Remarkable Odyssey though Modern-Day China.

About the author

Nancy Pine holds a PhD in education and has travelled and studied in rural China for decades. She is one of the leading American experts on Chinese early childhood education. She founded the Bridging Cultures US/China Program and has advised the administration and faculty on China at Mount Saint Mary’s University in Los Angeles. She was lead scholar for MOTAL’s Two Roads, One Journey development team.

Learn More About Nancy Pine: https://nancypine.info/

One of the publisher’s descriptions:

This heart-wrenching story immerses readers in the dramatic survival of one outspoken man, An Wei, who illuminates the souls of a billion ordinary Chinese citizens. His perseverance and ability to confront adversity combine with the dramatic events and upheavals in China’s modern history, inspiring a narrative that will keep readers enthralled.
Review:

“In One in a Billion, the complex history of a complex country unrolls with the ease of a deeply textured Chinese scroll. To read this book is to absorb Chinese history through one person’s unforgettable life story.”
Val Zavala, KCET award-winning journalist

Learn More About our Two Roads, One Journey Exhibition:https://www.motal.org/two-roads-one-journey.html

Read this article in full: https://motal.dm.networkforgood.com/emails/963019?recipient_id=cxMgHv-o7KIXXUMawCnZPw%7C%7CdGlmZmFueS5kYWN1eWN1eUBnbWFpbC5jb20=

Read More Articles: www.motal.org

A New Book by a MOTAL ScholarSubmitted by Nancy PineGreta Nagel called me one day to say she loved my first book, Educat...
12/22/2020

A New Book by a MOTAL Scholar
Submitted by Nancy Pine

Greta Nagel called me one day to say she loved my first book, Educating Young Giants: What Kids Learn (And Don’t Learn) in China and America. Would I consider working with MOTAL to create an exhibition based on it? I wasn’t quite sure what I was getting into, but I agreed to discuss it with her. I soon became the lead scholar for a remarkable developmental team, and two years later a magnificent traveling exhibition, Two Roads, One Journey, emerged that enthralled visitors as they followed the life of a Chinese and an American 4th grader through a regular school day. Learn about the exhibition! View the attachment to this email and visit www.motal.org.

During that adventure, I continued exploring young children’s learning in China and also interviewing An Wei, an outspoken Chinese man who began primary school in a poor village the first year of the People’s Republic of China. Driven to understand the complexities of modern China, especially from a rural perspective, I spent hours peppering An Wei with questions about the world he inhabited and the ways he coped. His perseverance and ability to overcome adversity and work toward audacious goals are at the core of my current book, One in a Billion: One Man’s Remarkable Odyssey though Modern-Day China.

Check back tomorrow to learn more about the author, Nancy Pine.

For more articles www.motal.org

This quote from the late Maya Angelou poem "Still I Rise" encourages us all rise each day just as the moon and sun shine...
12/22/2020

This quote from the late Maya Angelou poem "Still I Rise" encourages us all rise each day just as the moon and sun shine from above us. I hope that others find encouragement to take in the moon, stars, and sun and feel that they too can rise day by day.

Submitted by Caitlyn Spencer

To read "Motivational Quotes from MOTAL Staff" in full https://motal.dm.networkforgood.com/emails/motivational-quotes-from-motal-staff

To read more articles www.motal.org

#mondaymotivationalquote

Dreams DO Come True (part 2)Weeks rolled by and I realized that my good ideas and zeal may not have been enough to overs...
12/21/2020

Dreams DO Come True (part 2)

Weeks rolled by and I realized that my good ideas and zeal may not have been enough to overshadow the fact that my pockets were shallow—very shallow—in a world where philanthropists contribute much more than mere thousands of dollars. The new scuttlebutt around town reached me: a multi-millionaire had come to town with an idea that was gaining traction. It took a while to ask around and finally learn that Ann Friedman, daughter of multi-billionaire Matthew Bucksbaum and wife of Tom Friedman, author and New York Times columnist, had an idea with “a robust balance sheet” and she was also clearly well-connected. The final award of the project to her idea was made official a year later and now, three years after that, a wonderfully interactive and creative museum has opened its doors to small groups of masked visitors while the effects of Covid-19 continue to dampen other attendance dreams.

The new museum, “Planet Word,” is, indeed, schoolteacher Friedman’s dream come true. Although I have not been part of her team, I am on her side. Planet Word has filled Franklin School’s 50,000 square feet with opportunities to experience the thrill of words in all kinds of formats, both high-and low-tech, lively and quiet. It does my heart good to know that Planet Word addresses part of my original hopes. Franklin School has become a fine museum that is a tribute to learning. It isn’t exactly a museum about education, but it glorifies some of education’s most delightful and important content—Reading.

So my dream kinda-sorta came true for dear old Franklin School, and I will continue to educate people about education with a devoted band of friends and colleagues from our headquarters in California. In the meantime, the new leader (the secretary) of the Smithsonian is now Lonnie Bunch, the person who led the effort to make a museum about African-American history come true. Under Bunch, the Smithsonian hasn’t closed the door on new ideas after all. It took 100 years for the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAACH) to be realized, so I may die trying, but I haven’t given up the notion that one day there will be a national museum about education. Stay tuned for more about my obsession.

Full Article https://motal.dm.networkforgood.com/emails/952941?recipient_id=cxMgHv-o7KIXXUMawCnZPw%7C%7CdGlmZmFueS5kYWN1eWN1eUBnbWFpbC5jb20=

More Articles www.motal.org

Dreams DO Come True (Part 1)As we drove by the imposing brick building at 13th and K, I was instantly enchanted and I as...
12/18/2020

Dreams DO Come True (Part 1)

As we drove by the imposing brick building at 13th and K, I was instantly enchanted and I asked the taxi driver to go around the block so I could look at that big old school again. I rolled down the window to snap photos. What a perfect home for a national museum about education! The MOTAL board of directors had already agreed that Washington DC was the best city, for our nation’s capital would draw people already inclined to visit museums. I’d been on the lookout ever since and this was it!

This aging building needed some serious facelifting, but it had beautiful bones. Placed high above the second-floor entrance the words “Franklin School” were carved in stone. The broad structure took up a city block at a central location, just a short walk from The National Mall. Its five stories were topped by towers and minarets that wore decorative caps that looked like the metal covers on a lavish buffet table. Sidewalks and streets in that area were usually filled with traffic and passersby, no matter what the time of day or night. It would be a draw! I had to find out more.

So began six months of living on the opposite side of our nation from my permanent residence in Southern California, enjoying life in a brownstone neighborhood with walk-out-the-door adventures in DC. Museums and national headquarters of key organizations were easily accessible by foot or by bus. I probed records, made human and scholarly connections, and read and heard stories about that magnificent Franklin School. Everything I learned made the Franklin site more appealing for our dream museum.

During a cluster of years around 1870 an architect of international prominence, Adolf Cluss, designed and oversaw the construction of imposing “modern Renaissance” buildings for the DC schools. Two were very similar in design; Cluss knew that they were to be equal in function and capability. However, their clientele would be different; Franklin School was intended to serve white students and just a few blocks north was Sumner School that was to serve Black students.

My enthusiasm grew as I learned that Sumner was already a museum! It was beautifully refurbished and housed the archives, artifacts, and exhibitions of the DC Public Schools. I made many visits to that site, learning about the history of the two companion buildings and becoming friends with the director, a friendly and highly accomplished woman. The Sumner archives provided photos and materials for a small exhibit that revealed details of the building I had fallen for. This school marked a transition to classes set up by individual grades with age-based curriculum in classrooms that were entered through their individual cloakrooms.

The calendar flipped to January and 2016 turned out to be a bonus year for my outreach. Both the American Educational Research Association and the American Alliance of Museums had their national conferences in DC, drawing people from across the nation and abroad. Thanks to those conferences and memberships in three DC organizations, I had the opportunity to gather several focus groups of people to hear me spin ideas about a national museum that would share education’s practices, hot topics, and struggles (the good, the bad, and the ugly). Attendees included an array of educators, museum professionals, architects, business people, and lawyers who were intrigued and positive.

I was ready to visit Mayor Bowser’s office, armed with ideas: twenty-six key concepts and a score of exhibition descriptions that would be interactive, informative, and fun. I had proposals for collaborations of key people and organizations that could work with the city to make this dream come true. So one chilly day I went off to an appointment with two men who were charged with the city’s hunt for a project that would finally take over the Franklin site. Other ideas had been spun and one had even been accepted, only to be shunned when the new mayor came along. I stressed the importance of using the school for a purpose related to its original function, but it in a new, creative fashion. They listened and nodded their heads in agreement with my education pitch. They said they would be in touch...

Stay Tuned to see what happens in Part 2!

To read this article in full: https://motal.dm.networkforgood.com/emails/952941?recipient_id=cxMgHv-o7KIXXUMawCnZPw%7C%7CdGlmZmFueS5kYWN1eWN1eUBnbWFpbC5jb20=

For more articles: www.motal.org

SOME MUSINGS ON LIFELONG LEARNING IN LATER LIFEBy Cheryl Ahern-Lehmann“Aging is not lost youth but a new stage of opport...
12/15/2020

SOME MUSINGS ON LIFELONG LEARNING IN LATER LIFE
By Cheryl Ahern-Lehmann

“Aging is not lost youth but a new stage of opportunity and strength.” …. BettyFriedan

We sometimes think learning throughout our lives is supposed to be of our own choosing, when we want it, and should be interesting, even fun. As we age, however, we discover that some learning is absolutely necessary, even though it may be difficult and unwanted.

The learning I am talking about takes courage, honesty, diligence, intention, patience, persistence, and a willingness to adapt and change in the face of challenges and fears. It requires thinking creatively, asking questions, and learning from others and our own mistakes. It often requires humility, asking for help, depending on others, and the ability to laugh at, applaud, or cry for one’s self. Doesn’t all learning? For some of us, this learning can eventually engender empathy, resilience, wisdom, and redefinition's of our personal, social, and functional identities; for others, depression and withdrawal from life and relationships can occur.

I have always believed, espoused, and been committed to the idea that most of us can, and do, learn throughout our lives, continuously gaining in knowledge, experience, and insights that can enrich us if we let them. I still do. But I realize now (at age 76) that I underestimated the learning curves that confront many of us as our bodies and minds age, and/or if (at any age) we become limited or debilitated by illness or life circumstances that we didn’t foresee. Later life can hold challenges for many of us, but I admit that I didn’t fully consider the demands of those challenges when I pondered my own learning and life goals (despite being a nurse practitioner and educator with a Ph.D.). Many of us don’t. But this learning is important, often necessary, and should not (or cannot) be overlooked, ignored, or “hidden” because of pride or shame.

The changes and situations that create some of our later-life learning challenges are often troubling, unexpected, and frustrating, and can lead to feelings of disappointment, anger, or embarrassment. “I didn’t want this to occur in my own life; I did all I knew to do to prevent it,” we say to ourselves in protest. In any case, these situations occur, and can force unanticipated shifts in our own self-perceptions and skills, and the roles, functions, and expectations of partners or family members, disrupting relationships and fostering feelings of guilt or failure in us. Activities and work capabilities that once gave us purpose and enjoyment may require change, become limited, or be no longer possible, creating a sense of loss and, sometimes, envy of others who are still vital and active. Our own realities and life circumstances may differ from current social beliefs that insist that we can all age gracefully, remain healthy and beautiful, active, and in control of our lives; If we cannot, feelings of inadequacy, self-blame and shame can develop.

I think we need to reframe later life as a period during which learning rich, interesting, and challenging events occur that require new ways of thinking and behaving. Consider just a few of the things many of us may have to learn: to walk again after hip or knee replacements or debilitating falls; to use tools such as wheelchairs, walkers, or canes: or to practice tai chi to help us regain our balance. We may find ourselves adjusting to using hearing aids or magnifying glasses for reading or craft projects. Machines (that may be unfamiliar to some of us who are older) such as cellular and adaptive phones, computers, and fax machines may complicate our communication with distant family, friends, or business associates, so we need to learn how to use them effectively. Researching treatments/solutions for problems of incontinence, thinning hair, and new hairstyles (if we can no longer reach the back of our head) may be necessary. We may find ourselves exploring how to garden from a stool, wheelchair or wheeled cart, or experimenting with how to cook from a chair or exercise without getting down on the ground. We may be required to stop driving, requiring us to identify alternative transportation resources in our community. Discovering, or rediscovering, how to live alone, if we have lost our partner, as well as how to identify volunteer work and/or social groupings that can provide support or joy may become important … and on and on.

The advanced years of life require incredible amounts of learning to accomplish, especially considering that adjustments often occur under duress or when we are not at our strongest. We certainly deserve respect, if not admiration, for attempting to learn all that is necessary to keep our lives as active, full, and rewarding as possible. Many people proclaim about aging: “It is clearly not for wimps.” Even so, if we are successful in adapting and meeting our own goals, we may be able to act as role models and share what we have learned with others in similar circumstances.

Submitted in November, 2020

A Brief Bio on Dr. Cheryl Ahern-Lehmann, PhD
Now retired, Cheryl Ahern-Lehmann worked as a nurse and Adult Nurse Practitioner in Internal Medicine, urgent care and psychiatry for over thirty years. Her Ph.D is in education and curriculum development. She taught nursing and nurse practitioner students at Boston University, Yale, San Diego State University and the University of San Diego, and was Director of Education for a hospice organization for several years.

To read more articles go to www.motal.org

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Join us today at 5 pm for a timely discussion with OC school board members of when and how our schools can re-open! OC Education Forum on Covid-19 Safety and Our Schools. Wednesday, August 12 at 5:00 PM. https://www.facebook.com/events/2628105860797409/
Revisit Your Favorite Articles! Check Out Some Great Articles You Missed The Museum of Teaching and Learning is pleased to provide another helpful list of posts we sent out since June 10, 2020. All you have to do is click on this link Revisit Your Favorite Articles! (2) then you will be able to click on any of the articles listed below to view and read. Relax and enjoy a variety of interesting subjects for the whole family. Remember to check out the links within some of our posts that you may have missed. We always love getting feedback to the posts we send out,email [email protected] to reply. Feel free to share with family and friends! Attitude Adjustment Good Job, MOTAL! The Developing Brain: Teen Edition Proceed With Great Caution Cooking with Kids During the Pandemic Teen Brains Need Sleep! The Next Normal—NOT 98.6 Have a Safe and Sane 4th of July PLEASE BECOME A MEMBER! We want to know what you think! Introducing Cardboard Art! Artifact of the Month: Chain Balance Scale Help Us Create a Time Capsule Collection Juneteenth Artifact of the Month June 2020 Your Opinion Matters! Be An Education Investigator! The Risks of Summer 2020 If you would like to be on our contact list to receive articles in the future, email [email protected]. We have a no spam policy. http://www.motal.org/ #museumofteachingandlearning #education
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thanks for inviting artist to share their work! I have an artist in the family & will invite her to like this page.