Roger Brooke Taney House

Roger Brooke Taney House Highlights middle class life and the experiences of slaves in Frederick around 1815. Open seasonally

Conveniently located within walking distance of downtown Frederick, the Roger Brooke Taney House interprets a property owned by former Frederick attorney and fifth Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. The restored house has presented the legacy of Roger Brooke Taney to the public since 1930. The site, including the house, detached kitchen, root cellar, smokehouse and slaves quarters,

interprets the life of Taney and his wife Anne Key (sister of Francis Scott Key), as well as various aspects of life in early nineteenth century Frederick County. Through guided tours, exhibits, educational programs and special events, the lifestyle of Frederick’s “middling class” is presented.

06/01/2019

Did you know that there was no official design for the stars on the American flag until 1912?

On June 14, 1777, the date that Flag Day commemorates, the Second Continental Congress issued the Flag Resolution of 1777 to establish an official flag for the United Sates. The act stipulated that the “flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new Constellation.” However, the Continental Congress gave no specifications on the arrangement or shape of the stars. Although Betsy Ross’ pattern of the thirteen five-pointed stars arranged in a circle was certainly a very popular design of the time, there were many other patterns that were also produced that fit within the guidelines of the resolution. No one design became the sanctioned standard for the country. Throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth-centuries, the pattern of the stars continued to change along with their number, size, and shape. It was not until President Taft’s executive order in 1912 when the American flag became officially standardized with thirteen stripes with 48 stars positioned into six horizontal rows of eights, with each star pointing upward. This design would of course slightly change again in 1959 and 1960 when the pattern was altered to include two new stars to represent the states of Alaska and Hawaii.

The evolution of the American flag can also be exemplified by Frederick’s famous citizen, Francis Scott Key. The American flag that inspired Francis Scott Key to write the “Star Spangled-Banner” was the flag of 1795, which incorporated fifteen stripes and fifteen stars, which were arranged in off-set rows. This was the only flag that ever included fifteen stripes.

Pictured: WWI Bond Poster from the Heritage Frederick Collection.

10/18/2017
09/13/2017

Community bands were quite popular in Frederick County during the 19th and 20th centuries. The American band of Middletown is pictured here c. 1900 with their new new uniforms of green and gold trimming. They claimed that they had the finest bandwagon in the state after having it recently refurnished and painted by Hagan Brothers of Frederick.

08/16/2017

This portrait was taken by photographer Charles Byerly around 1902. Though we do not know the name of the man pictured there was a clue in a handwritten note where the glass negative was store. We believe that the man pictured is the photography assistant to Charles Byerly, a third generation photographer that kept a studio on N. Market Street.

*If you have any clues to the man's identity please let us know so that we can properly document him in history.

06/25/2017

The modern American conservationist movement was born in the late 19th century, popularized through the works of John Muir and President Theodore Roosevelt. Inspired by this movement, James H. Gambrill Jr. convinced several prominent local businessmen to purchase the land of Gambrill State Park and donate it to the Frederick County Government at the onset of the 20th century. Soon after, the Frederick Country Government granted the land to the state of Maryland. As a state owned park, most of Gambrill State Park’s trails and structures were built through the labor of the Civilian Conservation Corp, a major New Deal Program of the 1930s that was instituted to provide jobs and economic activity in the wake of the Great Depression. Gambrill often hiked in the Catoctin Mountain Range, and believed that those lands would benefit Frederick County’s residents most by remaining in their natural state.

05/22/2017

An annual cotillion was held by the Frontiers of America, an African-American service organization locally chartered in 1950. The pictured event was held at the Frederick Armory in April of 1960. Seventeen young ladies dressed in white danced the night away with their tuxedo-ed escorts. George P. Ambush was president of the organization and George E. Dredden acted as master of ceremonies for the evening. Bernice Monroe of Baltimore was the choreographer. Proceeds from the event benefited national health causes.

From 1942-1945 Richard Lebherz served in WWII. He entered as a private in the army, trained with the RAF in England as a...
12/04/2016

From 1942-1945 Richard Lebherz served in WWII. He entered as a private in the army, trained with the RAF in England as a cryptographer, and later transferred to the 9th Air Force in Germany as an official U.S Army Correspondent. During his time over-seas, he wrote often to his family and friends and they to him.

Dearest Aunt Helen,
Your box for Christmas just arrived and I was very glad to get it. Yes, Everything was in perfect order, and I have already indulged in the chipped bags and fruit cake, both of which are delicious. I could see when I opened it that you had given very good thought to what I would enjoy. Me and the chipped bags. Oh! Boy! Here were the good ole days!...
Rich

Mom Dear,
…I have decorated my room with ribbons from your packages, and pasted your red bells on my windows…Intend to go to candlelight service here, and will no doubt, go home with tears in my eyes… You can bet I’ll be hoarse from singing my carols, as I love them so very much…
Rich

11/18/2016

We are excited to announce our rebranding of the Historical Society as Heritage Frederick.

11/11/2016

Happy Veteran's Day! Thank you to all that have served to protect our country.

On the 11th day of the 11th month at the 11th hour in 1918, after four years of war, Germany’s Kaiser Wilhelm relinquished and signed a treaty with the Allied countries, officially ending the war on the western front.

One year later, President Wilson and General Pershing addressed the country in a radio speech on November 10 declaring the 11th of November a day of commemoration “as long as America Lives”. The United States decided to make November 11th a day of observation by naming it Armistice Day. Armistice Day was celebrated all over the country, including here in Frederick Maryland. The celebration of Armistice Day included all of the normal events surrounding a holiday. In towns and cities there were parades, dinners and even a moment silence for 2 minutes at 11 am.

“...Promptly at noon, many merchants and manufacturers closed their places of business...the real celebration of Armistice Day had begun. More than 200 staffs bearing huge American flags erected along the side walks on the principal streets of the town…
Shortly after noon, pupils of Frederick city’s schools, both public and privates, Hood College, civil, patriotic and fraternal organizations service men and women, decorative floats emblematic of business conducted here, began moving in the direction of South Market street in which vicinity the mammoth parade in ten divisions was to form…
Upon the conclusion of the parade the throngs moved to Memorial
Ground formerly the old Reform graveyard property. It was here that Frederick city and county’s $15,000 memorial “Victory” awaited the formal dedicatory services.
The monument is octagonal in shape. On seven panels a bronze tablet containing a portion of the names of the 2,000 ex-service men and women of this country. But upon the front panel there are 83 names above which is this inscription: These died for their country. At the bottom this: At the going down of the sun and in the morning we shall remember.” (The News, November 11, 1924)

Pictured: WWI monument “Victory” at Memorial Park on the corner of Second and North Bentz streets before dedication. 1924

10/27/2016

From the Byerly Studios:

“TO MY PATRONS: The intention of this little book is to say a few words in a kindly way to those who have photographs taken, in order that the in*******se between them and their photographer may be pleasant, and result in the most successful pictures.” -John Davis Byerly

John Davis Byerly studied the photography trade under his father Jacob Byerly, who opened his studio in Frederick in 1842. John Davis later took over his father’s business and handed the studio down to his son Charles at the turn of the last century. After serving about twenty years at their location at the corner of Market and Patrick Streets, in 1862 the Byerlys relocated their studio to 29 North Market Street in Frederick. It was from this new location that John Davis Byerly gave a his words of wisdom to consider for the next time that one found himself in the photographer’s gallery:

“HOW TO COME: Never come in a hurry or a flurry.” Make sure that you are not overly stressed with work or other matters when going to the studio, as you do not want an unfavorable expression in your photo. John also suggested that ladies leave any of their shopping or other matters till after the photograph is taken.

“HOW TO DRESS: The photographer is very much tried by his patrons sometimes, who place upon their persons, when about to sit for a picture, all sorts of gewgaws and haberdasheries which they never wear when at home, or when mingling among their friends... Dress naturally, and think a little while you are about it.” John wrote at length about being wary of following current fashion trends in order to ensure that your picture will serve you for several years. Carefully choose the right colors to wear. Be aware that blue and yellow will show as a light gray, whereas light green and orange will come out as a very dark gray. Beware of hair styles, your face shape, and the length of your neck, for “a long neck becomes dreadfully stork-like when the hair is built up high.”

Pictured: Charles Byerly ( John Davis’ son) sitting in a chair in a behind-the-scenes image of the Byerly studio.

The Byerly-Rothwell Photography Contest winners did an amazing job this year. Congrats to the winners!
09/23/2016

The Byerly-Rothwell Photography Contest winners did an amazing job this year. Congrats to the winners!

Congratulations to the 2016 Contest Winners

09/15/2016

Elias Grove, a farmer living outside Frederick, decided to view for himself the scene of the battle that had raged just south of the city that July 1864. The fight that broke out on July 9th, brought the war literally crashing in on some of the residents of the rural farms that surrounded Frederick.
Curiosity brought civilians to the battlefields and a sense of the historical importance of the events of the day prompted them to gather souvenirs. Just as some who had traveled to Sharpsburg to view the destruction after the battle of Antietam in 1862, and others who ventured to view the fields of Gettysburg in 1863, brought home mementos, Elias Grove did the same. He picked up two violins from the Monocacy battlefield, one of them is pictured here. This important treasure is currently on display in the Local Voices, National Stories exhibit, please stop and see it.

09/15/2016

Children’s participation in World War II was surprisingly high for being on the home front. Children would collect scrap metal, plant gardens and buy savings stamps. Marie Castle (pictured) and the residents of the Loats Female Orphan Home were no different. The girls would accompany the home's cook to the Francis Scott Key Hotel to help the Red Cross roll bandages. They also helped with creating ration books at the North Market Street School where they were students. Back at the Loats Orphan Home the girls would use black out curtains during air raid drills. The girls also engaged in patriotic activities such as Glee Club performances of the Star Spangled Banner. When the war was over, they snuck into the streets and celebrated with Frederick and the nation.

08/19/2016

Did you know that August 18th is National Bad Poetry Day? It might surprise you to know who out of your favorite writers was at one time or another considered “bad” and John Greenleaf Whittier is one of those poets. Although a popular poet of his time, Whittier has often been criticized as possessing superficial literary skills. Nathaniel Hawthorne succinctly summarized this assessment with the statement that, "Whittier's book is poor stuff! I like the man, but have no high opinion either of his poetry or his prose."

Despite his questionable literary abilities, Whittier remains well known today in Frederick for his 1863 poem about our local heroine Barbara Fritchie. It was this poem Barbara Frietichie that actually garnered positive recognition from an unlikely source. While visiting Frederick on their way to Shangri-La, now known as Camp David, Winston Churchill and President Franklin Roosevelt visited the Barbara Fritchie House. Once there, Churchill supposedly began reciting from memory, "'Shoot, if you must, this old gray head, But spare your country's flag,' she said.” Apparently, not everyone thought Whittier was a bad poet!

Sunday, August 20, 1911 exciting news was wired to Frederick that unless prevented by unforeseen difficulties two army a...
08/12/2016

Sunday, August 20, 1911 exciting news was wired to Frederick that unless prevented by unforeseen difficulties two army aeroplanes will arrive at Camp Ordway between six thirty and seven o’clock Monday morning. For many residents of Frederick this would be their first view of an airplane and the first to fly and land in Frederick. The Frederick News helped to arrange the surrounding factories to blow their whistles when the planes came in sight. In the early hours of August 21, people crowded the streets and roof tops in hopes of securing a glimpse of the flying machine.
This first flight to Frederick would feature two Burgess-Wright biplanes from the Army Signal Corps Aviation School in College Park (established in June 23, 1911) and landing at Camp Ordway, Frederick Md. It was reported that the flight would be the longest continual flight made by the Aviation School.
As 7:00am arrived and disappeared residents began to worry that some ill fate kept the planes. At 7:15am word was finally received from Ijamsville that a plane was flying overhead. As the airplane came into sight of Frederick at 7:25am, cries of “There comes the plane!” filled the streets and few in disbelief exclaiming “That’s a buzzard!”. The Ox Fibre Brush factory was the first blow their whistle signaling the plane’s arrival. The plane traveled northward and when overhead of East Church Street made a turn towards Camp Ordway for a smooth landing. The Frederick News reported like a huge eagle the aeroplane glided over the southeastern part of the city. It appeared as though the aviators were trying to circle the city to go around to the camp. From the top of The News building the flight of the machine was plainly discernible. At an altitude of 1500 feet the aeroplane was only a small object but the moving propellers could be easily recognized. The occupants were in no way visible.
The plane was piloted by Capt. Charles Chandler and Lt. Henry Arnold, who were greeted with cheers and escorted to the mess-tent for breakfast. When asked if they utilized a compass to navigate their way to Frederick, Capt. Chandler stated we simply followed the Sugar Loaf Mountains. They guided us right in a straight line to Frederick.
Capt. Chandler reported that the second plane was delayed due some propeller troubles, but claimed that Lt. Kirkland is one of our best and most daring aviators and he will go through if it is possible to do so. Later word arrived that the second plane had abandoned the trip and landed in Kensington, Md.
That afternoon, Capt. Chandler and Lt. Arnold flew back to College Park in their record making journey of over 40 continuous miles and traveling at speeds of approximately one mile per minute. Frederick’s first flight was truly a landmark journey and an event to remember in Frederick County history.

Libraries are wonderful treasure troves of information and historical tidbits. If you have not been to library lately ch...
07/31/2016

Libraries are wonderful treasure troves of information and historical tidbits. If you have not been to library lately check out what your local libraries and archives have to offer. You just might be surprise by what you discover.

Pictured is the C. Burr Artz Library in 1937

July 30, 1955 parade's through Brunswick celebrated the newly completed bridge connecting Brunwick to Loudoun County Cou...
07/27/2016

July 30, 1955 parade's through Brunswick celebrated the newly completed bridge connecting Brunwick to Loudoun County County Virginia. The bridge replaced a narrow connection built in 1930. Pictured is the Brunswick Lions Club float. JoAnn Calhoun, pictured in the center, helped to promote the successful cooperation between Maryland and Virginia.

07/22/2016

Can You Help to Solve a 263 Year Old Mystery?

We’ve all heard about sending a message in a bottle out to sea, but what about a message crossing the ocean in a bamboo tube…?

This hollow reed or bamboo container was owned by Theodorus Fidrich Haux, the grandfather of Jacob Engelbrecht. According to the note which is attached to the outside, Theodorus brought this container with him aboard the Patience on his voyage from Germany.

The Patience was a 200-ton ship with 8 guns, and a crew of 16 men. On average, each passenger would have had a 6 foot by 6 foot living space- that’s not much room! When the ship docked in Philadelphia on September 17, 1753, Theodorus disembarked along with 108 other passengers, including his wife Anna Marie Federhaff and his in-laws, to start their lives in the new world.
The note, written by Jacob Engelbrecht, states that, “This piece of reed was a part of…..” The next word is missing where part of the paper is torn away. What this interesting container “was a part of” or what it originally held remains a mystery…

Perhaps you hold the miss clue. What was this reed part of? If you have any thoughtful clues or documentation to this mystery please let us know.

Enjoy this sweet Then & NowLocated at 31 North Market Street in about 1910 this building was home to Dutrow's Sweet Shop...
07/16/2016

Enjoy this sweet Then & Now
Located at 31 North Market Street in about 1910 this building was home to Dutrow's Sweet Shop where Fredericktonians could find all kinds of treats. Now it is home to another kind of shop, Earthly Elements.
(Then photo from the collection of the Historical Society of Frederick County and Now photo from personal collection.)

07/03/2016

Meet Dr. George Snowball:
George Joseph Snowball was born September 29, 1878 in Kingston, Jamaica then part of the British West Indies. He spent the first few decades of his life there and starting a career as a teacher while saving money to attend medical school in America. Once he had earned enough he moved to the United States and began his medical education at Howard University, a historically black college in Washington D.C.
After his first year, he transferred to Meharry Medical School in Nashville, Tennessee because it offered even better chances for an aspiring black dental student, and in 1913 he graduated with his degree for Doctor of Dental Surgery. Before beginning practice, however, Snowball needed to take a state exam, and he chose to move back to Maryland to do so. Before even finishing the four-day examination, a member of the Board of Dental Examiners of the State of Maryland, Dr. D. G. Everhart of Frederick, told Dr. Snowball that he wanted to get Snowball started in Frederick.

After Dr. Snowball finished and passed, he agreed and opened shop at 5 W All Saints Streets with the help of Dr. Ulysses Grant Bourne Sr., another prominent member of Frederick’s black community as both a professional and aspiring politician. The two men became lifetime friends and both served the community honorably.

Indeed, Dr. Snowball was dedicated to his clients and community, dedicating over fifty years from 1913 to 1969 and only retiring when his vision began to fail. Dr. Snowball stayed at All Saints Street during the entirety of his practice, though he and his wife May (who helped as his secretary) moved to another house at 28 All Saints St shortly after marrying. Once Dr. Snowball began working, he rarely stopped. The dentist held hours daily from 9 to 12, 1 to 5, and 7 until he finished. For fifty-six years, he served patients from all over the county as well as outside county lines.

His dedication did not stop inside of his office, however. Dr. Snowball was also a family man, with a daughter and three grandchildren, and a spiritual man, serving multiple positions within and often contributing sizable donations to his local Baptist church. As such, Dr. Snowball earned both a wonderful reputation as a professional and person and several awards during his lifetime. George Snowball passed away on May 23, 1984 at the impressive age of 105, leaving behind a lasting reputation as a hard worker and compassionate contributor to the black community of Frederick County.

Physically, Dr. Snowball left behind his medical kit, a well-worn case that reflects decades of work and commitment. As it is currently on display at the Museum of Frederick County History, one can easily examine the kit which stores various implements that Dr. Snowbell required for his work.

Even the Supreme Court stops for meal breaks. Check out BBC's article on the behind the scenes at the US Supreme Court. ...
06/24/2016

Even the Supreme Court stops for meal breaks. Check out BBC's article on the behind the scenes at the US Supreme Court. http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-36439148

Despite vastly different political leanings, the US Supreme Court has dined together since its inception in the 18th Century.

In honor of Fresh Fruit and Vegetable month our Then & Now for June is of the interior of Measell's Grocery which was lo...
06/18/2016

In honor of Fresh Fruit and Vegetable month our Then & Now for June is of the interior of Measell's Grocery which was located at 21 East Patrick Street as late as the 1920's. Unfortunately the building no longer stands and is now the alleyway you see here. (Then photo from the collection of the Historical Society of Frederick County and Now photo from personal collection.)

Congrats! To the high school student winners of the John J. Markell Art Contest.
06/11/2016

Congrats! To the high school student winners of the John J. Markell Art Contest.

Meet Nancy Tuttle:Nancy Tuttle was a slave belonging to John Dill, a tavern-keeper in Frederick.  Mr. Dill’s tavern was ...
06/05/2016

Meet Nancy Tuttle:
Nancy Tuttle was a slave belonging to John Dill, a tavern-keeper in Frederick. Mr. Dill’s tavern was located on the southeast corner of Church and Public Streets and is now a parking lot. When John died in 1851 his son William Joshua Dill inherited the tavern and possibly Nancy along with it
The tavern was known to be a popular meeting place for the residents of Frederick and important business often took place there including political nominations and important visitors passing through the city. Nancy recalled seeing the Revolutionary General, the Marquis de Lafayette when he came to Frederick in 1824. Nancy was also likely witness to many of these important political discussions but due to her race, gender and status as a slave would been excluded from voting.
When Nancy was finally freed in 1864 under the new Maryland Constitution she moved to Baltimore where she got a job as a cook for the family of Hazlett McKim who was a wealthy banker. Nancy was 58 years old before she saw her freedom.

Did you know that William Howard Taft is the only individual that has held both the position of U.S. President (1909-191...
05/27/2016

Did you know that William Howard Taft is the only individual that has held both the position of U.S. President (1909-1913) and U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice (1921-1930).

Then & Now135 South Market circa 1900 & 2016Now a residence, at the time of the first photo it was an Emergency Hospital...
05/21/2016

Then & Now
135 South Market circa 1900 & 2016
Now a residence, at the time of the first photo it was an Emergency Hospital in Frederick.
(Then photo from the collection of the Historical Society of Frederick County and the Now photo from personal collection)

05/20/2016

At around 10:00 a.m. of June 2, 1914, a fire broke out in Creagerstown, Maryland and quickly spun out of control. The fire started at the Creamery in the northwest section of town and, fanned by a high wind, burned directly to the middle of the community. In around four hours, a large part of the village was destroyed.

At the time, Creagerstown did not have a firefighting company. The blazing fire quickly became too hot for the townspeople carrying buckets of water to extinguish the flames. Because the town was only about fourteen miles north of the city of Frederick, the Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company attempted to help by getting the mayor of Frederick’s attention.

Mayor Lewis H. Fraley secured the Independent Hose Company’s steamer, which was rigged to a Hagerstown and Frederick Railway Company train. The train would then take the steamer to Thurmont, where four horses were waiting to haul it to Creagerstown. Unfortunately due to various delays, the steamer made it to Thurmont but was never unloaded. The fire eventually extinguished by 2 o’clock in the afternoon.

While the true cause of the fire was never known, luckily no one was injured because of the blaze. The fire damaged or completely destroyed many private residences, government buildings including the Town Hall, and two hotels. The loss was estimated at the time to cost between $60,000 and $70,000. This picture, taken the following day, part shows the devastation.

05/01/2016

Meet Otho Holland Williams Luckett:
Otho H. W. Luckett was born to Thomas Hussey and Elizabeth Noland Luckett not long after his father returned from his service during the Revolutionary War and in fact Otho was named for his father’s commanding officer Otho Holland Williams. After his father dies while Otho and his three brothers are still young his mother dotes on her children but not necessarily to their benefit.
As a young man Otho is able to attend Dickinson College in Pennsylvania but his predilection for gambling causes trouble for Otho and he is eventually expelled from the school. By 1802 Otho is in Frederick, MD and it seems his wild streak has continued since he left Dickinson. He and two other young men, one of whom is young Roger Brooke Taney, are arrested for “election hijinks” and fined $100 each. The exact nature of what they did is unclear but it probably involved the disruption of some campaign event but unfortunately Otho also assaults someone and is held for that as well.
This seems to be the beginning of a slew of legal trouble for Otho as he continues to make an appearance in the courtroom and extended stays in the jail for various reasons. But it seems even then girls liked the bad boys because Otho meets and marries Elizabeth Graham in 1805 and the couple would have a daughter.
Also at this time Otho and his family has moved into his mother’s small brick house which is now known as the Roger Brooke Taney House in Frederick, MD. Ironically Otho also runs for Sheriff during this time and while he doesn’t win no one can doubt his sense of humor.
After his mother sells the Frederick house and moves to Kentucky, Otho and his family also leave the area and eventually he ends up in Ross County, Ohio where he finally seems to settle down a bit. He even manages to get a civil service job and his daughter marries into a well to do family, the Marfields.
(We would like to thank Deborah Brower who has done the research into the Luckett family and found many fascinating stories about them.)

Ever wondered why the U.S. Supreme Court Justices wear black robes?The wearing of judicial robes is a custom adopted fro...
04/29/2016

Ever wondered why the U.S. Supreme Court Justices wear black robes?

The wearing of judicial robes is a custom adopted from England, to bring formality to the proceedings. During colonial rule many judges in America continued with this custom. However, the U.S. Supreme Court did not agree to wear robes or any other uniform till 1792. These early robes are believed to be black with a red and white trim on the sleeves. Only a few years later the robes changed to all black.

Pictured: Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney's judicial robe.

Then & NowCitizen's National Bank on the Southeast corner of Market & Patrick Streets circa 1889 and 2016.(Then photo fr...
04/16/2016

Then & Now
Citizen's National Bank on the Southeast corner of Market & Patrick Streets circa 1889 and 2016.
(Then photo from collection of Historical Society of Frederick County, Now photo from personal collection)

We are having a great time at Bell & History Day! I hope that you will be able to join us.
04/09/2016

We are having a great time at Bell & History Day! I hope that you will be able to join us.

Meet Fenton Jones:Fenton Jones was a Frederick County slave who was able to escape by crossing the Mason-Dixon Line into...
04/03/2016

Meet Fenton Jones:
Fenton Jones was a Frederick County slave who was able to escape by crossing the Mason-Dixon Line into Pennsylvania. He arrived in Ercildoun, PA some 15 miles north of the Maryland border and knew that he had to rest and try to earn some money to continue his journey north.
He had no intention of staying in Ercildoun as it was still too close to the slave state of Maryland and his concerns were proven just shortly after arriving. He was soon told that the slave catchers from Maryland had heard where he was and if he were caught they would return him to his slave master.
But Fenton was also given hope when he was told that the Vigilance Committee in Philadelphia would be able to help him escape even though he still had no money. He was able to get to Philadelphia and from there the Vigilance Committee helped Fenton continue north until he reached Canada where Fenton could be free of the worry of being sold back into slavery.

Address

121 S Bentz Street
Frederick, MD
21701

Opening Hours

Saturday 10am - 4pm
Sunday 1pm - 4pm

Telephone

(301) 663-8687

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