Frontier Army Museum

Frontier Army Museum Welcome to the official page of the Frontier Army Museum.
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The Frontier Army Museum holds almost 6500 objects in public trust. These objects are used to showcase the Frontier Army from the Exploration Expedition of Captain Lewis & Captain Clark to the Mexican Expedition to Capture Poncho Villa. The Museum also holds artifacts related to the history of Fort Leavenworth from its establishment in 1827 to modern day. The Fort Leavenworth Historical Society Gift Shop is located inside the Museum. Please contact the Visitor Control Center about visitation access to the post (913) 684-3600. To access the Wayside Historic Tour please call (913) 745-3222 and follow the prompts.

Mission: The Frontier Army Museum collects, preserves, and safeguards material culture associated with the United States Army of the 19th and early 20th centuries and uses its holdings to support Professional Military Education, promote collections-based research, develop educational materials, and educate the public concerning the history of the Frontier Army, the Combined Arms Center, and Fort Leavenworth. Additionally, the Frontier Army Museum uses its collection and facilities to promote the command’s recruiting and retention programs and provide a venue for educational and community outreach programs in support of the Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth.

April is month of the Military ChildOne of the earliest military children people may not think of is Jean Baptiste Charo...
04/30/2020

April is month of the Military Child
One of the earliest military children people may not think of is Jean Baptiste Charonneau who was the son of Sacagawea, the Native American member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Sacagawea was married to French-Canadian fur Trapper Toussaint Charbonneau who purchased her from Hidatsa kidnappers. Before her kidnapping Sacagawea was the daughter of a prominent Shoshone chief. Lewis and Clark hired Charbonneau as an interpreter for the expedition, but only if he brought along his wife to also serve as an interpreter. Sacagawea was pregnant while on the expedition and in 1805 gave birth to Jean Baptiste with the medical help of Meriweather Lewis. John Baptiste became the newest member of the expedition and accompanied his mother throughout the entire trip; she carried him on her back in an Indian cradleboard. Jean Bapstiste’s presence provided an unexpected usefulness to the expedition. The presence of a baby and mother helped convince Native Americans that the traveling party came in peace and meant well. Lewis and Clark both grew fond of the little boy. Clark later made Sacagawea a promise that after the expedition he would pay for Jean Baptiste’s education and upheld his word. Jean Baptiste attended a St. Louis Catholic academy and later learned French, German, and Spanish. He also traveled and hunted in Germany, explored Africa and later the American West. Born on a military expedition, it was almost as if he was meant to be an explorer himself.

For more information follow the link below
https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/sacagawea-gives-birth-to-pompey

Photo credit: http://www.sacagawea-biography.org/jean-baptiste-charbonneau-pomp/
#LewisandClark #militarychild #ArmyBrat #April #FrontierHistory #ArmyHistory #USArmy

‼️⚠️ We need your help! What kind of virtual programs would you like to see from the Frontier Army Museum? Let us know!☑...
04/27/2020
Home page

‼️⚠️ We need your help!

What kind of virtual programs would you like to see from the Frontier Army Museum? Let us know!

☑️Video content on the OnCell app
☑️Artifact images on the OnCell app
☑️More posts about artifacts in the collection
☑️Virtual education programs to do at home (age levels?)
☑️Give us your ideas!

We are limited in our current capacity since staff is working from home, but we will work hard to try and provide digital historic content to you!

Our current online education programs are available here:
https://history.army.mil/museums/TRADOC/frontier-army-museum/index.html#KidsResources

Our virtual OnCell tour is here:
https://frontierarmymuseum.oncell.com/en/index.html

Welcome to the Frontier Army Museum audio tour. To begin select "Begin Tour" and choose a stop from the site list to hear more about that topic.

A fantastic Army University Press article on the importance of army historians and how the Army can utilize them to cont...
04/23/2020
Utilizing Army Historians in the Operational Force

A fantastic Army University Press article on the importance of army historians and how the Army can utilize them to contribute to the Army’s core mission - to fight and win our nation’s wars.

https://www.armyupress.army.mil/Journals/Military-Review/English-Edition-Archives/March-April-2020/Loveland-Historians/fbclid/IwAR25ANWr135XOhho90-RcyZV9g_RIGDVIHsMjoRAwtfc6gYOaDGuMWiBN9Y/

#USArmy #ArmyHistory #History #ArmyUPress #OperationalForce

The author asserts that most commanders and staff officers remain woefully ignorant regarding the operational role of historians. He explains how they can leverage the expertise of Army historians as part of everyday operations.

🌎🎉Today is the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day. “The Earth is what we all have in common.” - Wendell BerryToday in History...
04/22/2020

🌎🎉Today is the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day. “The Earth is what we all have in common.” - Wendell Berry

Today in History: The Oklahoma Land Rush of 1889.

The Indian Appropriation Bill of 1889 officially opened unassigned lands in the Oklahoma territory to white settlers as tenets under the Homestead Act. President Benjamin Harrison declared that on 22 April, 1889 at 12 o’clock noon, that the 1.9 million-acres would be open for settlement.

Seven weeks prior to the opening, thousands of Americans searching for a new life gathered around the borders of the territory, living in tent cities. Those who entered the land early and hid before the official legal entry time became known as “Sooners”. “Boomers” was a term given to those who campaigned for the lands to open. The University of Oklahoma's fight song, "Boomer Sooner", derives from these two names.

At noon on the 22nd of April, 50,000 people rushed on foot, horseback, bicycles, and in wagons to claim land for themselves. Women and children stayed behind the lines and cheered on the men as they raced forth. By the end of the day an estimated eleven thousand agricultural homesteads were claimed.

The influx of residents also founded many cities throughout the territory. Oklahoma City was founded on this day with nearly 10,000 residents. Harper’s Weekly reported “At twelve o'clock on Monday, April 22d, the resident population of Guthrie was nothing; before sundown it was at least ten thousand. In that time streets had been laid out, town lots staked off, and steps taken toward the formation of a municipal government.”

Image Courtesy of Library of Congress https://lccn.loc.gov/2014682280

For more information about the Oklahoma Rush, please visit: https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-oklahoma-land-rush-begins

For the history on Earth Day, please visit: https://www.earthday.org/history/

Army Earth Day Message: https://www.army.mil/article/234647/army_earth_day_message_2020

#EarthDay #West #WestwardExpansion #Oklahoma #LandRush

We are bringing the museum to you!Check out our updated audio tour. We've added pictures, additional content, and links ...
04/18/2020

We are bringing the museum to you!
Check out our updated audio tour. We've added pictures, additional content, and links for you to explore more of what we highlight and display at the museum.
https://frontierarmymuseum.oncell.com/en/index.html

#FrontierArmyMuseum #virtualtour #FortLeavenworth #ArmyHistory

04/17/2020
Friends of the Frontier Army Museum

🎉 Congratulations to the winners of the Friends of the Frontier Army Museum essay contest!

We are thrilled to announce the winners of our Annual FFAM Essay Contest....cue the drumroll....

🥇1st Place $1,000 winner is 9th grader, Denise Malberti

🥈2nd Place $500 winner is 12 grader, Cody Savage

🥉3rd Place $250 winner is 12 grader, Susanna Jones

Outstanding job Denise, Cody and Susanna!!!

From the Vault: Photograph of Grant Statue on Fort Leavenworth, 1945Located at Fort Leavenworth, on the corner of Grant ...
04/17/2020

From the Vault: Photograph of Grant Statue on Fort Leavenworth, 1945

Located at Fort Leavenworth, on the corner of Grant and Kearny, this bronze statue of General Ulysses S. Grant was erected in 1889. GEN Nelson A. Miles put forth the idea to create the memorial. Sculpted by Lorado Taft, the completed project cost $4,791.61, not including the rock formation and labor.

Grant passed away in 1885.

#UlyssesGrant #USArmy #FortLeavenworth #statue #History

Hey Fort Leavenworth! Looking for something to do? Check out this article form the Fort Leavenworth Lamp on local activi...
04/16/2020
Local activities available while staying home - Fort Leavenworth Lamp

Hey Fort Leavenworth! Looking for something to do? Check out this article form the Fort Leavenworth Lamp on local activities available while staying home. Check out the museum' education activities along with some fabulous other resources!

https://www.ftleavenworthlamp.com/community/2020/04/16/local-activities-available-while-staying-home/

#Stayathome #StayHomestaySafe #Bored #COVID #FortLeavenworth

Katie Peterson | Staff Writer Though many businesses on post have closed and events have been canceled because of COVID19, several are offering activities for families to do online while the stay-at-home order is in place. Survive to Thrive April is the Month of the Military Child, and though tradit...

April is the month of the Military Child and today we highlight children on the Frontier. So what did kids do on the Wes...
04/13/2020

April is the month of the Military Child and today we highlight children on the Frontier.

So what did kids do on the Western Frontier?

During the mid 1800s, many families moved West in search of free land and new opportunities. The day would begin at first light. Just like their parents, children had many responsibilities and chores to perform. Fetching firewood, boiling water, milking cows, collecting eggs and more.

Children also attended school. Schooling included a one room schoolhouse taught by one teacher. Students would attend during the winter and summer, and would help out on the farm during the fall and spring months.

It was not all hard work and chores, children also played on the frontier. Toys however were expensive and hard to come by. Many would use their imaginations to create games. Read about what games children would play on the frontier: https://www.nps.gov/fosc/learn/education/childrengame.htm

Photo courtesy of The Library of Congress

Butcher, Solomon D, photographer. William Moore and family, Sargent, Custer County, Nebraska. Nebraska Sargent, 1886. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2005693386/.

Today in History: 1805 - Corps of Discovery Expedition, also known as the Lewis and Clark Expedition, leave Fort Mandan,...
04/07/2020

Today in History: 1805 - Corps of Discovery Expedition, also known as the Lewis and Clark Expedition, leave Fort Mandan, beginning their journey to the Pacific Ocean.

The fort served as a wintering encampment so the Corps could prepare for travel in the spring. The Corps made clothing, dried meats, repaired equipment, and other necessary preparations.

The encampment was located on the Missouri River, near present-day Washburn, North Dakota. The exact location is unknown, it is believed to be lost under the river.

For more information about wintering over Fort Mandan, please visit: http://www.lewis-clark.org/article/1463 & https://www.history.nd.gov/exhibits/lewisclark/weather.html

Illustration of Fort Mandan by Ralph Waldo Smith (SHSND 11550)

Did You Know?Did you know there was a bridge that once crossed over to Missouri from Fort Leavenworth? It was constructe...
04/03/2020

Did You Know?

Did you know there was a bridge that once crossed over to Missouri from Fort Leavenworth? It was constructed from 1869-1871 and was officially named the Kansas and Missouri Bridge, but was more widely known as the Whiskey River Bridge. The Whiskey River Bridge got its unofficial name because it allowed access from Kansas, a “dry” state to Missouri a “wet” state before and after the Prohibition period (1919-1933) when liquor was an option by county in Kansas. The bridge was first a railroad bridge during its first year and then opened to both rail and wagon traffic. A fire caused damage to the bridge in 1914 that deemed it unsafe to use, but the U.S. Government purchased it in 1920 and repaired it for vehicle and foot traffic use in 1926. In 1955 the Whiskey River Bridge was replaced with the Centennial Bridge that connects Metropolitan Ave. with Missouri Route 92 and was demolished in 1964. The Whiskey River Bridge is gone but is still present in Fort Leavenworth’s history, it played a big role in various forms of traffic and logistics for Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and Missouri.

The images here are from the Frontier Army Museum. The image to the left is a sketch of the bridge from 1872 and the image to the right is from 1890.

April is the month of the Military ChildChildren have been a part of the U.S. Army story for a long time. Just like toda...
04/01/2020

April is the month of the Military Child

Children have been a part of the U.S. Army story for a long time. Just like today, soldiers moved frequently on the frontier. Some families, especially those of officers, were able to accompany them on post. However, not all families were given permission or could afford to do so. Travel on the frontier was tough. For those who did take the journey to follow their soldiers, it was a rough one.

An example of one military family that traveled great distances was Harriet Lovejoy and her daughter. Harriet was the third wife of Lieutenant Colonel Henry Leavenworth. In 1816, Harriet and their young daughter, decided to join Leavenworth at his post on the Wisconsin River. They traveled from New York by boat to New Orleans and then to St. Louis. From there fourteen “polite and obliging” Native Americans carried them on a palanquin, over 700 miles. The trip totalled 34-days through the wilderness.

Image: Painting of Harriet Lovejoy, part of the Frontier Army Museum collection

#militarychild #history #ArmyBrat #April #travel #USArmy #ArmyHistory #FortLeavenworth

From the Vault: Reception Center Postcard, 1942The card reads:3-29-425:15 p.m.Dear Frances:-Here’s a card for your colle...
03/29/2020

From the Vault: Reception Center Postcard, 1942

The card reads:

3-29-42
5:15 p.m.
Dear Frances:-
Here’s a card for your collection, this is the type we are staying in. Took my shots today & feel swell. Was issued uniform so my clothes are on the way home. Will write later.
Love, Pvt. Anderson
9.8.37155162

✏️📚Teach your kids all about the Oregon Trail with the museum's new Pack Your Wagon activity! Venture back to the 1840s ...
03/27/2020
Frontier Army Museum - U.S. Army Center of Military History

✏️📚Teach your kids all about the Oregon Trail with the museum's new Pack Your Wagon activity! Venture back to the 1840s and prepare your wagon for the long journey ahead!

Students will need to use their critical thinking skills to decide what to pack to survive. Want more of a challenge? Try to pack your wagon while adhering to strict weight restrictions!

The activity has two versions available (K-2 and 3-12) and follows the Kansas State Standards.

The free download is available here:
https://history.army.mil/museums/TRADOC/frontier-army-museum/index.html#KidsResources

Enter Fort Leavenworth through the Grant Gate at the intersection of Metropolitan and 7th Street. Continue north on Grant Avenue to Reynolds Avenue. Turn right, the museum is on the left. Park in the circle drive.

My Shoes Tell A Story- What moccasins can tell usHere at the museum we are trying to learn more about the moccasins we h...
03/27/2020

My Shoes Tell A Story- What moccasins can tell us
Here at the museum we are trying to learn more about the moccasins we have in our collection. What we’ve learned is that moccasins can tell stories, they can reveal the tribe they belong to and what that tribe represents. The moccasins pictured here are currently in our collection and are Sioux with colorful glass beads and geometric designs. The Denver Art Museum has some great information about not only Sioux moccasins but the topic in general. They also have some great resources and activities for kids, families, and adults who are stuck at home. So check it out here!
https://denverartmuseum.org/edu/alh-object/sioux-moccasins

#NativeAmericanHistory #Sioux #FrontierHistory #FortLeavenworth

March is Women's History MonthEdith Ayres & Helen WoodFirst enlisted women to perish in the line of dutyEdith Work Ayres...
03/25/2020

March is Women's History Month
Edith Ayres & Helen Wood
First enlisted women to perish in the line of duty

Edith Work Ayres was born in 1880 in Attica, Ohio. Her husband died in1906 and she went to Chicago to become a nurse. She graduated from the Illinois training School for nurses in 1913. She volunteered with the Red Cross in 1917 and was assigned to France.

Helen Burent Wood was born in Portobello, Scotland in 1888. She came to the US and studied nursing in Evanston, IL. She volunteered with the U.S. Army base Hospital No. 23.

Ayres and Wood died aboard the SS Mongolia on the way to France. One of the guns on the ship exploded during a practice drill. The shell fragments immediately killed both Ayres (37) and Wood (29) who were standing on deck. They became the first nurses to die during the service in WWI. Both Wood and Ayres were laid to rest with military funerals.

#Nurses #WomensHsitoryMonth #USArmy #USmilitsry #Armyhistory #WWI

The museum may be closed, but the learning doesn't have to stop! Check out these fun and educational resources all about...
03/23/2020
Frontier Army Museum - U.S. Army Center of Military History

The museum may be closed, but the learning doesn't have to stop!

Check out these fun and educational resources all about the West and the Lewis and Clark's Expedition!

Test your western history knowledge with Frontier History Flash cards!

The Lewis and Clark activity book explores the expedition in different ways. How did Lewis and Clark travel? What tools did they bring along? The book has been fun activities to help you learn while you play!

https://history.army.mil/museums/TRADOC/frontier-army-museum/index.html#KidsResources

Enter Fort Leavenworth through the Grant Gate at the intersection of Metropolitan and 7th Street. Continue north on Grant Avenue to Reynolds Avenue. Turn right, the museum is on the left. Park in the circle drive.

March is Women's history MonthSarah Rosetta WakemanThe secret soldierSarah Wakeman, who went by her middle name Rosetta,...
03/21/2020

March is Women's history Month
Sarah Rosetta Wakeman
The secret soldier

Sarah Wakeman, who went by her middle name Rosetta, was born 16 January 1843 in Bainbridge, New York. The eldest of nine children, her family was poor so she left home to earn money. She quickly learned that she could make more money as a man so she disguised herself and began working as a coal handler.

A military recruiter approached her and said she could earn $14/month plus a $152 bonus for signing up. In August of 1862 she changed her name to Lyons Wakeman and enlisted in H Company of the 153rd New York Infantry.

After serving on guard duty in Alexandria Virginia, her unit was transferred to Louisiana. The regiment marched through nearly 700 of miles or swamp and fought in several battles in the Red River Campaigns. Near the end of the campaign, Rosetta was stricken with dysentery. She died in the Marine Hospital of New Orleans in June 1864.

No one discovered her secret and she was buried at Chalmette National Cemetery near New Orleans in a grave marked Private Lyons Wakemen. In 1976, the family of Rosetta discovered sets of letters she sent home that detailed her service in the army. They were published in a book An Uncommon Soldier: The Civil War Letters of Sarah Rosetta Wakeman, alias Pvt. Lyons Wakeman, 153rd Regiment, New York State Volunteers, 1862-1864.

Image courtesy of American Battlefield Trust
https://www.battlefields.org/learn/biographies/sarah-rosetta-wakeman

#WomensHistoryMonth #CivilWar #Womeninthemilitary #USArmy #ArmyHistory #Union #USHistory

Address

100 Reynolds Ave
Fort Leavenworth, KS
66027

Enter post thru Main gate on Grant St.(7th St.) Head North on Grant. Make a right on Reynolds Ave. The museum is on the left park in the circle drive.

General information

While this is an open forum, we ask that you follow our guidelines here. If you don't comply, your message will be removed. We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit, or racial comments or submissions nor do we allow comments that are abusive, hateful, or intended to defame anyone or any organization. We do not allow solicitations or advertisements. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Similarly, we do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial, or non-governmental agency. We do not allow comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity. You participate at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username and any information provided. Also, the appearance of external links on this site does not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the Department of Defense. Admission is Free, donations are welcome

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The Frontier Army Museum holds almost 6500 objects in public trust. These objects are used to showcase the Frontier Army from the Exploration Expedition of Captain Lewis & Second Lieutenant Clark to the Mexican Expedition to Capture Poncho Villa. The Museum also holds artifacts related to the history of Fort Leavenworth from its establishment in 1827 to modern day. The Fort Leavenworth Historical Society Gift Shop is located inside the Museum. Please contact the Visitor Control Center about visitation access to the post (913) 684-3600.

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