Plains Art Museum

Plains Art Museum Plains Art Museum is a nonprofit, regional fine arts museum located in downtown Fargo, N.D. and accredited by the American Association of Museums.
The largest and only accredited art museum in North Dakota.
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Plains Art Museum, a nonprofit, regional fine arts museum accredited by the American Association of Museums, offers approximately 12 special exhibitions along with smaller exhibitions each year featuring area and national artists of the 20th and 21st centuries. The main museum has galleries on three floors, with a breath-taking open atrium at the center. Also within the museum is Hannaher’s Inc. Print Studio, and The Store, a gift shop filled with unique and artful finds. Additional galleries are located within the Katherine Kilbourne Burgum Center for Creativity, a multipurpose arts facility attached to the museum via a skybridge. The Center for Creativity provides art classes and studios, and houses the region’s premier ceramics facilities. The Museum is also an exciting venue for weddings, meetings, and special events. To visit our wedding page, go to https://www.facebook.com/pages/Plains-Art-Museum-Events-and-Weddings/944401148933286

And that’s a wrap for another season of Kid Quest. But don’t worry, Kid Quest will be back in October. Thank you to ...
04/07/2019
KVRR News

And that’s a wrap for another season of Kid Quest. But don’t worry, Kid Quest will be back in October. Thank you to our gracious sponsors: Xcel Energy, Kiwanis Club of Fargo, and Minnesota Public Radio.

Fargo Families Make Pinwheels at Plains Art Museum’s Kidquest

Last Kid Quest of the season is this Saturday (4.6, 1-4 p)! View art that embraces the natural elements of our surroundi...
04/05/2019

Last Kid Quest of the season is this Saturday (4.6, 1-4 p)! View art that embraces the natural elements of our surroundings, & meet artist Zoran Mojsilov. Move into the studio to create a project that utilizes the winds of North Dakota. Free! Register at plainsart.org/create.

04/05/2019
04/04/2019
Coversation with @zoranmojsilov is happening right now!
04/04/2019

Coversation with @zoranmojsilov is happening right now!

04/04/2019
Friday, April 5, 6pm What is your time machine? Create a small assemblage sculpture reflecting your past, present, & fut...
04/04/2019

Friday, April 5, 6pm What is your time machine? Create a small assemblage sculpture reflecting your past, present, & future. Starting with a tour of Zoran Mojsilov: Time Machine, participants will discover how symbols translate across cultures & time. For children ages 8+ & their adult(s). There is still 'time' to register at plainsart.org/create

Spring Gala: Time Machine! Tickets: plainsart.org
04/04/2019

Spring Gala: Time Machine! Tickets: plainsart.org

Spring Gala: Time Machine! Tickets: plainsart.org
04/04/2019

Spring Gala: Time Machine! Tickets: plainsart.org

Spring Gala: Time Machine! Friday, May 3. Tickets at: plainsart.org
04/04/2019

Spring Gala: Time Machine! Friday, May 3. Tickets at: plainsart.org

Thurs. (3.4) 6p. Stop by to hear Zoran Mojsilov discuss work in the Time Machine exhibition & beyond with Curator Tasha ...
04/04/2019

Thurs. (3.4) 6p. Stop by to hear Zoran Mojsilov discuss work in the Time Machine exhibition & beyond with Curator Tasha Kubesh. This gallery program will highlight Zoran’s various influences & career-long concern for humankind, nature, love, & war. Free.

Tired of standing in line for tickets? Plains Art Museum is offering Spring Gala: Time Machine early bird tickets throug...
04/03/2019

Tired of standing in line for tickets? Plains Art Museum is offering Spring Gala: Time Machine early bird tickets through April 15. Get your tickets here: http://ow.ly/u0wO30ojfua #springgala2019

Plains Art Museum is saddened to hear of the passing of Truman Lowe. Truman Lowe was a sculptor and installation artist ...
04/02/2019

Plains Art Museum is saddened to hear of the passing of Truman Lowe. Truman Lowe was a sculptor and installation artist from the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, professor emeritus of art at the University of Wisconsin and a former curator of contemporary art for the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian. Mr. Lowe joined Plains Art Museum in February 2017 for the exhibition “Cultural Confluences,” which was installed for most of that year. With a modernist sensibility, his work explored the stories and experiences of Native peoples – embracing historically traditional works and addressing the disappearance of cultures. Mr. Lowe’s legacy and art will ensure the past is present and Native perspective is vital to where we are today. Plains Art Museum extends its deepest condolences to Mr. Lowe’s family and its deepest gratitude to Mr. Lowe for sharing with all of us his unique and wonderful vision.

Ruth Bernhard (1905–2006), “Star Shell,” 1943. Ruth Bernhard was an American photographer known for her exploratio...
03/21/2019

Ruth Bernhard (1905–2006), “Star Shell,” 1943.

Ruth Bernhard was an American photographer known for her exploration of subjects, most notably black-and-white fe­male nudes. While living in Sanibel, Florida, Bernhard developed a specialty for photographing seashells. In her work Star Shell, Bernhard referenced a star through the use of light and the shape of a seashell. An allusion of water comes through the variation in light. Bernhard reveals the empty space where a few missing spikes had once been. This subtle detail balances the composition and maintains the focal point, the seashell.

Bernhard’s work often juxtaposes natural and artificial elements. The work Star Shell displays the natural object of the seashell against artificial lights. Her female nudes consist of women posed against man-made objects, such as cardboard boxes, or curled up in a large glass bowl. Through this approach, Bernhard created works of art that are timeless formal studies. The beauty of nature is revered by many viewers, yet we are immersed in a world of the artificial. – Emma Wiitamaki

Can you name #5WomenArtists? Throughout the month of March, we will share excerpts from the project “Out of Storage: Selections of Work by Women Artists from the Collection at the Plains Art Museum,” created by students in the Women Artists Seminar @msumoorhead, along with images of works from our collection.

#WomensHistoryMonth #PlainsArtMuseum #RuthBernhard

Ellen B. Olson (1929-present), Bandolier Bag, 1991-92.Ellen B. Olson is an Ojibwe artist from Grand Portage, Minnesota w...
03/18/2019

Ellen B. Olson (1929-present), Bandolier Bag, 1991-92.

Ellen B. Olson is an Ojibwe artist from Grand Portage, Minnesota who specializes in beadwork. Olson has exhibited her work at multiple exhibitions, markets, and galleries across the country. Olson has also been commissioned to create work for a variety of entities, including Minnesota Representative Jim Ober­star and Augsburg College, and the National Museum of American Indian (NMAI) in New York commissioned Olson to produce a bandolier bag for their 1994 opening. Outside of the national art scene, Olson has spent eighteen years as a cultural demonstrator for the National Parks Service (her home being in close proximity to Voyageurs National Park in Northern Minnesota.) She has also spent much of her time as a community arts teacher, often holding classes in her home. - Nolan Kern

Can you name #5WomenArtists? Throughout the month of March, we will share excerpts from the project “Out of Storage: Selections of Work by Women Artists from the Collection at the Plains Art Museum,” created by students in the @msumoorhead Curatorial Projects Seminar taught by @arnaranna, along with images of works from our collection.

#WomensHistoryMonth #PlainsArtMuseum #EllenBOlson

Mary Cassatt (1844–1926), “Margot with Bonnet,” c.1900.Mary Cassatt is widely known as one of the most influen­ti...
03/16/2019

Mary Cassatt (1844–1926), “Margot with Bonnet,” c.1900.

Mary Cassatt is widely known as one of the most influen­tial women painters in modern history. Her works were influenced by the Impressionist movement in France and are still highly regarded around the world. At the age of fif­teen, she started studying at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, despite her family’s disapproval. During her time at the Academy, she grew tired of the slow pace of the courses and the criticism from her male instructors. In 1866 she moved to Paris to study at her own pace.

In Paris, Cassatt participated in the second Impressionist exhibition held in 1877. She quickly identified with the light brush strokes and emphasis of light that was embraced by members of the Impressionist movement. Edgar Degas became a close friend and mentor to Cassatt. Near the end of her life, the Impressionist movement had waned but her own work was still greatly sought after, her reputation solidified and largely based on the many works capturing the subject of mother and child. She was passionate about women’s rights and roles, and she painted female subjects because, in her words: “Women should be someone, not something.” - Morgan Newkirk

Can you name #5WomenArtists? Throughout the month of March, we will share excerpts from the project “Out of Storage: Selections of Work by Women Artists from the Collection at the Plains Art Museum,” created by students in the @msumoorhead Curatorial Projects Seminar taught by @arnaranna, along with images of works from our collection.

#WomensHistoryMonth #PlainsArtMuseum #MaryCassatt

Due to the never-ending winter, Plains Art Museum & The Center for Creativity will be closed Thursday, March 14. All pro...
03/14/2019

Due to the never-ending winter, Plains Art Museum & The Center for Creativity will be closed Thursday, March 14. All programs & classes are canceled. Stay safe & warm everyone!

Gail Kendall, “Relic Box for Land Things,” 1977.Gail Kendall was raised in a small lumber town on Sturgeon Bay in th...
03/13/2019

Gail Kendall, “Relic Box for Land Things,” 1977.

Gail Kendall was raised in a small lumber town on Sturgeon Bay in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. She received formal education at the University of Michigan (BSD) and Eastern Michigan University (MFA). After her studies, she spent ten years as a studio artist in St. Paul, Minnesota, where she had connections with WARM (Women’s Art Registry of Minnesota) and was included in their 1984 “Landmark Exhibition.” Kendall then became a professor at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in 1987 and retired as an Emeritus Professor of Art in 2011.

Kendall’s works are influenced by European earthenware pottery and porcelain from the 13th -18th centuries. “Peas­ant” and “palace” pots come together with reference to English slipware, Delftware, and Italian majolica. Kendall believes that we all have an innate voice that moves us. What she loves most about being a potter is that it involves the daily rituals of coffee, food; so much of what it means to be alive. - Jill Johnston

Can you name #5WomenArtists? Throughout the month of March, we will share excerpts from the project “Out of Storage: Selections of Work by Women Artists from the Collection at the Plains Art Museum,” created by students in the @msumoorhead Curatorial Projects Seminar taught by @arnaranna, along with images of works from our collection.

#WomensHistoryMonth #PlainsArtMuseum #GailKendall

Please join us Tues (3.12) at 7:30a for Art & Business Breakfast: The ARTrepreneurial Spirit. Faculty members from MSUM ...
03/11/2019

Please join us Tues (3.12) at 7:30a for Art & Business Breakfast: The ARTrepreneurial Spirit. Faculty members from MSUM will discuss how they help students make the transition from college to working artists in their respective fields. Coffee, juice, pastries & bagels served.

Käthe Kollwitz (1867–1945), “Woman with Bowed Head (Gesenkter Frauenkopf),” 1905. German printmaker, painter, and...
03/09/2019

Käthe Kollwitz (1867–1945), “Woman with Bowed Head (Gesenkter Frauenkopf),” 1905.

German printmaker, painter, and sculptor Käthe Kollwitz’s prints and sculptures confronted social injustice and suf­fering. Her powerful and emotional imagery was based on her personal experiences, including her interactions with the working class and her exposure to the horrors of both world wars. Kollwitz’s naturalistic style evolved dramatically throughout the early 20th century, reflecting the changing political landscape of Germany. As a pacifist, Kollwitz created significant graphic protest posters against war and poverty. Turning her attention to sculp­ture, she created several memorials that explored anti-war themes of mourning and suffering.

In 1919, Kollwitz became the first woman to be elected to the Prussian Academy and received the title of professor, and in 1928, she became director of graphic arts in the Academy. However, as Adolf Hitler rose to power in 1933, Kollwitz was forced to resign from the Academy because of her support of socialism. In 1936, as avant-garde art was declared “degenerate” by the German government, she was banned from exhibit­ing her work, and in the following year her works were removed from public collections. In 1943, a Berlin air raid destroyed much of her life’s work. Kollwitz’s died in Mori­tzburg in 1945, a few days before the end of the Second World War. The Diary and Letters of Käthe Kollwitz was published in 1988. - Stephanie Ehlers

Can you name #5WomenArtists? Throughout the month of March, we will share excerpts from the project “Out of Storage: Selections of Work by Women Artists from the Collection at the Plains Art Museum,” created by students in the @msumoorhead Curatorial Projects Seminar taught by @arnaranna, along with images of works from our collection.

#WomensHistoryMonth #PlainsArtMuseum #KätheKollwitz #internationalwomensday

Artists Kent Kapplinger and Anna Johnson brought a full house to Plains Art Museum tonight. Here is Kapplinger discussin...
03/08/2019

Artists Kent Kapplinger and Anna Johnson brought a full house to Plains Art Museum tonight. Here is Kapplinger discussing his collaborative artwork with his father-in-law, a retired farmer.

Betty Woodman (1930–2018), “Pompeian Garden,” 1992.In 1988, artist Betty Woodman conceived an idea for an exhibiti...
03/07/2019

Betty Woodman (1930–2018), “Pompeian Garden,” 1992.

In 1988, artist Betty Woodman conceived an idea for an exhibition: to replace some of the flower vases and other ceramic vessels from the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art with her own unique ceramic pieces. Presenting the museum with her idea in 2005, they simply told her: “Don’t be silly.” Woodman was known for pushing to get what she wanted. One year later, she became the first living female artist to have a retrospective exhibition at the museum, with an estimated seventy artworks displayed.

Woodman began her career as a traditional potter, but in the early 1980s her work began to take the form of experimental non-functional vessels. Woodman also dabbled in printmaking, collaborating with printer Bud Shark starting in 1985. The prints that she created were lithographs and woodcuts depicting interior spaces with pots, similar to the scenes she created through her ceramic installation work. Before her death in January of 2018, Woodman was featured in many significant exhibitions, and she won numerous prestigious awards such as the American Craft Council Gold Medal in 2014. - Elijah Morman

Can you name #5WomenArtists? Throughout the month of March, we will share excerpts from the project “Out of Storage: Selections of Work by Women Artists from the Collection at the Plains Art Museum,” created by students in the @msumoorhead Curatorial Projects Seminar taught by @arnaranna, along with images of works from our collection.

#WomensHistoryMonth #PlainsArtMuseum #BettyWoodman #internationalwomensday

TONIGHT! (3.7, 6p) You're invited to an Artist Talk with Kent Kapplinger & Anna Johnson. Kent is a Professor of Art in p...
03/07/2019

TONIGHT! (3.7, 6p) You're invited to an Artist Talk with Kent Kapplinger & Anna Johnson. Kent is a Professor of Art in printmaking & drawing at NDSU. Anna received her BFA from NDSU in 2010, where she was a student of Kapplinger’s. Free & open to the public.

The 2019 Scholastic Art & Writing exhibition closes soon! Stop by to see work by North Dakota art and writing award winn...
03/06/2019

The 2019 Scholastic Art & Writing exhibition closes soon! Stop by to see work by North Dakota art and writing award winners. Exhibition closes Saturday, March 9, following our annual ceremony.

[images: The Outsiders by Jacob Bloomquist, Hand by Deanna Rose, Bracelets on the Bus by Fischer Ackerson, AristocRATS by Eva Sobak, Jamaica 2018 by Olivia Propeck]

#ScholasticArtAwards #plainsartmuseum @ Plains Art Museum

Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011), “Sanguine Moon,” 1971. Helen Frankenthaler is an enduring icon in American art. F...
03/05/2019

Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011), “Sanguine Moon,” 1971.

Helen Frankenthaler is an enduring icon in American art. Frankenthaler was a high-profile figure in the Abstract Expressionist movement and a con­temporary of figures such as Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko. Her paintings and prints are surreal and psychological, embracing the tenets of ab­stract expressionism and her unique approach of soaking and staining. Her forms are distinctly soft and fluid, often making use of diluted paints and softly curvilinear forms and she became associated with a movement referred to as “Color Field Painting.” This expansive, colorful and fluid work was often contrasted with the intense or physical markmaking of Abstract Expressionist painters such as Jackson Pollock. - Anna Godfrey

Can you name #5WomenArtists? Throughout the month of March, we will share excerpts from the project “Out of Storage: Selections of Work by Women Artists from the Collection at the Plains Art Museum,” created by students in the @msumoorhead Curatorial Projects Seminar taught by @arnaranna, along with images of works from our collection.

#WomensHistoryMonth #PlainsArtMuseum #helenfrankenthaler

Meet printmakers Anna Johnson and Kent Kapplinger this Thursday (3.7) at 6pm. Listen as they discuss process, inspiratio...
03/04/2019
The Arts Partnership

Meet printmakers Anna Johnson and Kent Kapplinger this Thursday (3.7) at 6pm. Listen as they discuss process, inspiration, and their work in the exhibitions Beautiful Recollections: The Changing Seasons and Northern Lights by Kent Kapplinger and Layer by Layer: Recent Works by Anna Johnson. Free!

Happy Monday! Our InForum feature this week highlights Partners and #TAPgrantees Anna and Matt Johnson, two sibling artists who support and inspire each other through their creative endeavors. Anna Johnson is a printmaker with her first exhibit on display at Plains Art Museum while Matt Johnson is the lead guitarist and vocalist in The Human Element. Read our story to learn more about how these talented siblings add vibrancy to our community through their art, both individually and collaboratively! #SupportLocalArt

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (b. 1940), “Ghost Dance Dress,” 2001.Jaune Quick-to-See Smith is one of the most recognized...
03/03/2019

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (b. 1940), “Ghost Dance Dress,” 2001.

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith is one of the most recognized Native American artists in the world. She has had over 100 solo exhibitions in the past forty years, has organized and curated over thirty exhibitions of Native American artwork, and has lectured all over the world at more than 200 universities, museums, and conferences.

Quick-to-See Smith is an enrolled Salish member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation. She sees text and imagery as having a symbiotic relationship, and in 1989 she began us­ing more text in her artwork because she felt that viewers often failed to understand what she was painting. She began to take text directly from newspapers pub­lished in the 1990s, as she felt that newspapers offered the most up-to-date view of modern Native American life. This intersection of language and the pictorial in a collage style is apparent in Quick-to-See Smith’s print “Ghost Dance Dress,” a seven-layer lithograph created in 2001 and purchased by Plains Art Museum that same year. – Rebecca Oehler
Ghost Dance Dress is currently on view in the exhibition “Waasamoo-Beshizi” at Plains Art Museum.

Can you name #5WomenAritsts? Throughout the month of March, we will share excerpts from the project “Out of Storage: Selections of Work by Women Artists from the Collection at the Plains Art Museum,” created by students in the @msumoorhead Curatorial Projects Seminar taught by @annarnar, along with images of works from our collection.

#WomensHistoryMonth #PlainsArtMuseum #JauneQuicktoSeeSmith

Address

704 1st Ave N
Fargo, ND
58102

Opening Hours

Tuesday 11:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 17:00
Thursday 11:00 - 21:00
Friday 11:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(701) 551-6100

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