John Philip Falter Museum

John Philip Falter Museum “To preserve and honor the legacy of illustrator, John Philip Falter, in his hometown while providing inspiration for generations to come.” Call Dobey to schedule a visit: 402.450.3724
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John Philip Falter was born on February 28th, 1910 in Plattsmouth Nebraska. In 1916, his family moved to Falls City where his father opened the Falter Clothing Store. While attending Falls City High School, he created the comic strip, "Down thru the Ages," which was published in the Falls City Journal. After graduating in 1928, John studied at the Kansas City Art Institute and won a scholarship to the Art Students League in New York City. He eventually opened a studio in Rochelle, N.Y., where he met other illustrators, including Frederic Remington and Norman Rockwell. In 1933, Falter received a major break with his first commission to do three illustrations a week for Liberty Magazine. By 1938, he had acquired several advertising clients including Gulf Oil, Four Roses Whiskey, Arrow Shirts, and Pall Mall, and his ads appeared in several major national magazines. In 1943, he enlisted in the Navy where he designed over 300 recruiting posters for the American war effort. Falter's first Saturday Evening Post cover, a portrait of the magazine's founder, Benjamin Franklin, is dated September 1, 1943. That cover began a 25-year relationship with the magazine until it ceased publication in 1969. Perhaps his most endearing Post cover was for December 21,1946 which depicted downtown Falls City decorated for the Christmas season. Falter also did illustrations for Good Housekeeping, Ladies Home Journal, Cosmopolitan, McCall's, Life and Look. He illustrated over forty books, and one of his favorite projects was illustrating a special edition of Carl Sandburg's Abraham Lincoln - The Prairie Years. An excellent portrait painter, Falter had Clark Gable, James Cagney, Olivia de Haviland and Admiral Halsey among his sitters. Falter completed over 200 paintings in the field of western art, with emphasis on the westward migration of 1843 to 1880 from the Missouri River to the Rocky Mountains. He was honored by his peers with election to the Illustrators Hall of Fame in 1976, and with membership in the National Academy of Western Art in June of 1978. John Philip Falter died in Philadelphia in May, 1982.

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska."...
06/04/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Last Day of School"
The Rotary Club of Falls City

It doesn't surprise us much to find an artist with his head in the clouds--we've always understood they
kept their ears swathed in the fleecy stuff--but we were startled when John Falter admitted that this
week's Last Day of School cover was painted from a nonexistent helicopter, 300 feet above the earth.
For the moment, Falter's helicopter is a nebulous as a rabbit named Harvey, although it is one of his
pet postwar dreams. To obtain this view of the grammar school in Blooming Glen, Pennsylvania, sans helicopter, Falter's imagination boosted him the necessary 300 feet. This same imagination made
some other changes in the name of art. Falter found it necessary to delete three city blocks, shift a grave-yard and omit the school playground altogether.

June 9, 1945

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska."...
05/28/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"San Francisco Bay Boys"
Adopted By: Diane Collet
In Memory of Vince & Mary Lou Falter Langan

If a small boy, when at play, is not doing something perilous, he must be sick. So, regarding that lad who is aviating out over San Francisco Bay, let us rejoice that he is in good health, and close our eyes until he gets back. When John Falter was risking his boyhood, he used to take off on a bag swing from the roof of a shed, part of his joy being to see if he could avoid demolishing his bones against the shed on the way back.
Recently when Falter was strolling along Belvedere Island, admiring the grace of Golden Gate Bridge across the azure bay, he happily discovered that modern kids still relax in the mellow old hair-raising way. Falter's cliffside home is two blocks to the right of the painting, but he doesn't bag-swing from it. The poor fellow must be getting old.

May 26, 1956

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska."...
05/21/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Drive-In Movie in the Rain"
Adopted By: Merle & Sara Veigel

Artist John Falter depicts a soggy Saturday night at the local float-in, with scarcely room to drop anchor. The feature attraction of the evening is Two Senoritas From Sheboygan, filmed in Lack-0-Vision and Watercolor. Starring in this frenetic flick is Rita Redhead, shown here singing that old favorite, Let a Smile Be Your Umbrella. Her hero is the senor with the guitar. A more genuine hero, of course, is the stalwart customer with umbrella but without a smile, transporting two burgers, one dog and three shakes from the bar to car. The performance of this burger bearer is matched only by that of the manager of the place, whose motto, in the best tradition of the theater, is--be there snow, or rain, or gloom of night, or a short circuit in the popcorn machine, the show must go on.

May 13, 1961

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska."...
05/13/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Father's Homework"
Adopted By: Michael & Brenda Garriott

"I was a real nothing in algebra," confesses artist John Falter, whose faltering fathers on our cover seem to prove that more than one pop has been lost in a forest of co-ordinate axes, cosines and polynomials. We could lecture for hours on the high price of fatherhood, and why Johnny will never learn to read if he lets someone else do his homework. Unfortunately, we must get on to the algebraic agony at hand. Question: If one furrow-browed father spends x hours failing to solve the quadratic equations of one boy, how long would it take two furrow-browed fathers to fail to solve the quadratic equations of two boys? Answer: x hours, plus however long the fathers talk on the telephone. It takes longer, of course, if one of the boys is wearing a smirk.

May 7, 1960

We have our Winners!!!Congrats to the following on winning a puzzle during 5th anniversary giveaway:Michigan Ave: Julie ...
05/09/2020

We have our Winners!!!

Congrats to the following on winning a puzzle during 5th anniversary giveaway:

Michigan Ave: Julie Frederick
Overflowing Tub: Jessica Santo
Driving Range: Chick James
Falls City at Christmas: Jennifer Giles James
Fifth Avenue: Emily Nussbaum

Thanks to everyone who took the time to answer the trivia questions and like our page.
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Trivia Answers:
Question 1: Where is Falter Park located?
26th & Chase Street, Falls City, Nebraska

Question 2: What is the address of Falter's childhood home?
2402 Chase Street, Falls City, Nebraska
Walnut Street, Plattsmouth, Nebraska

Question 3: What year did Falter's Clothing store in Falls City open?
Answer: 1916

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Puzzles are available to purchase by contacting us on Facebook or emailing [email protected]

Please consider making a donation to the John Philip Falter Museum at: https://www.johnphilipfaltermuseum.com/donatetoday

🚨 Last chance to win a Falter jigsaw puzzle. 🚨Contest ends at midnight tonight.Be sure to like our page and answer the q...
05/09/2020

🚨 Last chance to win a Falter jigsaw puzzle. 🚨

Contest ends at midnight tonight.

Be sure to like our page and answer the questions on our website

www.johnphilipfaltermuseum.com

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska."...
05/07/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Shaking Hands after the Fight"
Randy & Beth Sickel

Boys will be human beings and have differences of opinion. What a pity it is that all human differences, including international, can't be settled as illustrated--by a couple of stronger parties, who prefer peace to war, striding out of their living rooms in great annoyance and thundering, "You two fellows stop this nonsense and shake hands, or we'll tan both of you!"
John Falter's battle scene raises a nice question: if the lad in the red shirt started the fight by loyally proclaiming, "My pop can lick your pop," and if his father has just licked him with that switch, is this justice or rank ingratitude? That canine moaning in the background is evidently dismayed at the spectacle of human beings fighting like cats and dogs.

May 5, 1951

We turned ✋ on Friday, May 1st! We are so excited for the milestone, we are celebrating by giving away ✋ Falter jigsaw p...
05/04/2020

We turned ✋ on Friday, May 1st! We are so excited for the milestone, we are celebrating by giving away ✋ Falter jigsaw puzzles.

The lucky winners will be selected from anyone who likes our page 👍 and answers three trivia questions on our website by midnight on May 8.

https://www.johnphilipfaltermuseum.com/

Our Best Wishes to our thousands of museum visitors since our opening on May 1, 2015.

Stay well and be safe until we open our door to all again!

Hey Falter Fans 👋It's hard to believe that today we have been open for five years!  🎉To celebrate this special anniversa...
05/01/2020
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Hey Falter Fans 👋

It's hard to believe that today we have been open for five years! 🎉

To celebrate this special anniversary, we will be giving away five Falter jigsaw puzzles because we know puzzles have become a very popular hobby during these days of home isolating.
Five lucky winners will be selected to anyone who likes our page 👍 and answers three trivia questions on our website by midnight on May 8.

The winners will be announced on May 9.

Our Best Wishes to our thousands of museum visitors since our opening on May 1, 2015.

Stay well and be safe until we open our door to all again!
Dobey Falter Haws, Curator
Butch Haws, #1 Assistant
Glenda, Brenda, Gail, Liz, Doris, Pat, Denise, Lee, Cindy, Barb and Jonah (our wonderful docents)

Located in the heart of historic downtown Falls City, NE, The John Philip Falter Museum is a tribute to preserve and honor the legacy of Nebraska illustrator, John Philip Falter, in his hometown while providing inspiration for generations to come.

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum located in downtown Falls City, Ne...
04/29/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Yankee Stadium"
Adopted By: Cody and Sarah Langan Pope

And you're out, as out as the mighty Casey himself.
Even without the razor-blade-advertising signs, many baseball fans will know that John Falter made his cover sketches in Yankee Stadium, a pleasant research chore that forced him to see three or four very good ball games. Instead of the winning hit or a homer, Falter selected a big moment of another kind. His subject is the satisfying moment when the visitors are at bat in a tight game, the gent with the club has two strikes on him, the home-town pitcher comes through with a beauty, the batter swings and misses. The Boston Red Sox were in town when Falter did his sketching last July, and they were on their way to the pennant.

April 19, 1947

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum located in downtown Falls City, Ne...
04/22/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Mother's Little Helper"
Adopted By: The Rotary Club of Falls City

It is regrettable to note that Mrs. Homemaker is about to step on the apple, which is deadlier than a banana peel, and land upside down in the clothes basket. Following this routine domestic incident, how will she react to mother's little helpers? Any impulse to make gestures with a hairbrush will be frustrated by the thought that a helpful, creative impulse in children should not be frustrated.
If she employs the intellectual approach, she will expose herself to the comeback, "But, mother, when daddy puts on the chef's hat, the kitchen gets awfler than this." We guess Mrs. H., being human, will yell around for a minute, then repent, and in a loving, sobby way clean up, reflecting that it was all Mrs. Nextdoor's fault. Or John Falter's.

April 18, 1953

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum located in downtown Falls City, Ne...
04/15/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Paper Boy"
Dedicated to the Falls City Journal

Some newspaper pitchers have better control than others. We recall one young marksman who nine out of ten times could hit a front door, wham! These unexpected crashes were very startling to the people indoors, many of whom at that hour had not yet fortified their nerves with breakfast coffee. Eventually the sharpshooter was urged just to drop his wares quietly into a bush or flower bed, in the orthodox way—a request that baffled, him, for the poor lad was striving to please people. The boy in John Falter's scene merely aspires to his porches, and sometimes does. But let's not be critical. How would you like to arise at four A.M., deliver fifty papers--come heat, cold, sleet or simoon -- then really start the day's work, at school?

April 14, 1951

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum located in downtown Falls City, Ne...
04/08/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Hanging Clothes Out to Dry"
Adopted By: Norman Horn & Sharon Honea Horn
In Memory of John Honea & Leila Honea Peden

Just to show you how cover artists work, we asked John Falter to send us one of his early sketches for this week's cover, a painting made on the farm of Mr. Falter's next-door neighbor. Mr. Falter swears the ducks remained seated while he was painting and, when he was through, walked away in a body.

April 7, 1945

We miss baseball right now, St. Louis Cardinals!The Saturday Evening Post cover featured:"Stan the Man"Adopted By: John ...
04/06/2020

We miss baseball right now, St. Louis Cardinals!

The Saturday Evening Post cover featured:

"Stan the Man"
Adopted By: John & Jean Metzger

Artist John Falter got two of those lads--Bill the Redhead Fassett and Michael the Plaidshirt Lane--excused from a St. Louis school to pose with baseballer Stan the man Musial. This upset the boys, as all boys hate to miss school. Thanks to artistic license, that lad getting the autograph is Red Fassett, a year older with black hair--a double-header pose. The lass is Patricia Wilson, and the boy with the ball and the leg without a boy are parts of Dave King; they are friends of Falter in Belvedere, California--where, by the way, Falter is building a new glass house on a cliff. Imagine how lucky those St. Louis models felt when they wound up with forty revered Musial autographs. "Wow!" one said in awe. "Will we clean up selling these at school!"

May 1, 1954

While you're hanging out at home this weekend helping keep everyone safe, we thought you might enjoy some coloring time!...
04/03/2020

While you're hanging out at home this weekend helping keep everyone safe, we thought you might enjoy some coloring time! (And, because, who doesn't miss sports right now?)

The Saturday Evening Post covers featured:

"Learning to Fly"
Adopted By: Cindy Farmer
June 20, 1953

"Stan the Man"
Adopted By: John & Jean Metzger
May 1, 1954

Stay safe Falter Fans!

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska."...
04/01/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Rainy Wait for a Cab"
Adopted By: Larry Windrum

It is more than a spring downpour that John Falter records in this big-city scene; it is a phenomenon that weather experts keep still about, probably because they can't explain it, one of Nature's little practical jokes. The day will be beautiful from the time thousands of men and women settle down for the day's work until 4:55 in the afternoon; the sky smiling, not a cloud anywhere except a couple as innocent as cotton batting. But exactly at quitting time, at the moment best calculated to catch thousands between office and home, down comes the rain like a sack of water thrown from a hotel window or a pan rigged over the door on April Fools' Day. It quits just as punctually, when you reach home.

March 29, 1947

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska."...
03/26/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Spilled Purse on Steep Hill"
Dedicated to Dennis Sieh

How funny such an incident is. Provided it happens to somebody else. Actually, if Mrs. Scattergood had as keen a sense of humor as, say, Mark Twain, she could laugh heartily at this herself. She hasn't. Well, maybe there'll be a chain reaction which will cheer her up some; for instance, if that round man tips over and gets rolling, he will gather no moss to the bottom of the hill. How funny such an incident is. And if that round grapefruit rolls out of the market bag, and the Samaritan who is stopping items with his foot impulsively stomps on it, surely Mrs. S. will perceive the humor in that. By the way, it does seem as if painter John Falter could have had the compassion to make the poor lady's dog a retriever.

March 26, 1955

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska."...
03/18/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Spring Cleaning"
Adopted By: Richard & Vivian Hall

In this spring-house-cleaning scene by John Falter, one thing led to another. Take the man on the sidewalk. At first he was just passing by. Then Mr. Falter had him start poking through the trash. Then Falter had the lady of the house stop her rug cleaning to watch. If the nosy neighbor does find some unsuspected treasure in the rubbish, the lady will be down there to reclaim it faster than he can reach down to pick it up. You don't have to worry about the man wrestling that storm window down the ladder, either. Falter says he used to go through this routine with his father every spring. Invariably a sudden wind would come up at precisely the wrong moment, bending his father back at a perilous angle, but it never did topple him off.

March 26, 1949

Our thoughts are with all of our Falter Fans!
03/17/2020

Our thoughts are with all of our Falter Fans!

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska."...
03/11/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Windy City"
Adopted By: Rotary Club of Chicago-O'Hare

When business took Ken Stuart, the Post's Art Editor, to Chicago a year ago, he set out for the Art Institute, as an art editor should. But he never got there. On a Michigan Avenue corner near the Art Institute he saw a group of sailors gathered to observe the Chicago girls, as they battled for propriety against the famous Chicago winds. Mr. Stuart joined this gallery, and was so impressed with the scene that he mentioned it, as one wind lover to another, to John Falter, the artist. Falter went to Chicago to paint a typical windy day there, but found a corner he thought was far windier than it gets on Michigan Avenue. Falter chose a locality farther west--one corner of the Civic Opera House, where the wind howls down the Chicago River and gets a chance to work up real speed. Chicagoans probably will agree with Falter that it is windier where he was, but will agree with Stuart that the wind is prettier on Michigan Avenue.

March 23, 1946

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska."...
03/05/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Cowboy Hanging out his Laundry"
Norman Horn & Sharon Honea Horn

If the sunset and the mountains in John Falter's cowboy-laundry picture look familiar to residents of Phoenix, Arizona, that is because Falter made his sketches while in Phoenix last winter. Arizona patriots will be glad to hear that this cover is not merely a good portrait of a cowboy and some bowlegged drawers but is also a pictorial testimonial to Arizona's beneficial and medicinal climate. Falter went to Phoenix because he had contracted neuritis in his right, or painting, arm and couldn't finish a cover he had started. In the desert sunlight he recovered the use of his wing, finished the cover, and found material for this one. He liked Arizona so much that he returned this winter, although the neuritis didn't.

March 1, 1947

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1622 Stone St PO Box 234
Falls City, NE
68355

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Weird question... are dogs allowed inside