John Philip Falter Museum

John Philip Falter Museum Call Dobey to schedule a visit: 402.450.3724 Currently on Display: February - April Saturday Evening Post covers

John Philip Falter was born on February 28th, 1910 in Plattsmouth Nebraska. In 1916, his family moved to Falls City where his father opened the Falter Clothing Store. While attending Falls City High School, he created the comic strip, "Down thru the Ages," which was published in the Falls City Journal. After graduating in 1928, John studied at the Kansas City Art Institute and won a scholarship to the Art Students League in New York City. He eventually opened a studio in Rochelle, N.Y., where he met other illustrators, including Frederic Remington and Norman Rockwell. In 1933, Falter received a major break with his first commission to do three illustrations a week for Liberty Magazine. By 1938, he had acquired several advertising clients including Gulf Oil, Four Roses Whiskey, Arrow Shirts, and Pall Mall, and his ads appeared in several major national magazines. In 1943, he enlisted in the Navy where he designed over 300 recruiting posters for the American war effort. Falter's first Saturday Evening Post cover, a portrait of the magazine's founder, Benjamin Franklin, is dated September 1, 1943. That cover began a 25-year relationship with the magazine until it ceased publication in 1969. Perhaps his most endearing Post cover was for December 21,1946 which depicted downtown Falls City decorated for the Christmas season. Falter also did illustrations for Good Housekeeping, Ladies Home Journal, Cosmopolitan, McCall's, Life and Look. He illustrated over forty books, and one of his favorite projects was illustrating a special edition of Carl Sandburg's Abraham Lincoln - The Prairie Years. An excellent portrait painter, Falter had Clark Gable, James Cagney, Olivia de Haviland and Admiral Halsey among his sitters. Falter completed over 200 paintings in the field of western art, with emphasis on the westward migration of 1843 to 1880 from the Missouri River to the Rocky Mountains. He was honored by his peers with election to the Illustrators Hall of Fame in 1976, and with membership in the National Academy of Western Art in June of 1978. John Philip Falter died in Philadelphia in May, 1982.

It was awesome having Jessica Santo Photography and her campers in the Museum yesterday!
06/22/2019

It was awesome having Jessica Santo Photography and her campers in the Museum yesterday!

We ended our Summer Camp with a visit to the John Falter Gallery. Dobey Haws gave us a private tour and was so great to our campers.

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE."Steam Engine Al...
06/19/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE.

"Steam Engine Along the Missouri"
Adopted By: John Morehouse
In Memory of Arthur & Lulu Morehouse

You are looking across one of the great rivers of American--the Missouri--in this week's addition to our regional paintings. You are in Kansas, gazing across into Missouri. The town in the distance is Armour Junction. Those flat fields across the way are likely to disappear when the Missouri gets one of its expansive moods. John Falter painted the scene when he visited a farm his father had just bought--painted it, in fact, from a bedroom window in the farmhouse. He had paints and brushes, but not canvas, so painted this one over an old picture which came with the house. The tag-along lad bringing up the rear of the little expedition--Lewis and Clark used the same route--is Falter's nephew.

June 22, 1946

We hope all of our Falter Fans are having a great Sunday celebrating all the special Dads out there!In need of a last mi...
06/16/2019

We hope all of our Falter Fans are having a great Sunday celebrating all the special Dads out there!

In need of a last minute gift? The Museum is open today from 1PM - 4PM. Click the link below to all of the items we have available for purchase

https://bit.ly/31FtGaX

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum."Republican Convention"Adopted By:...
06/12/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum.

"Republican Convention"
Adopted By: Richard & Esther Halbert
In Tribute to Gov. Dave Heineman

This is John Falter's preview of next week's Republican convention, with a demonstration going on for someone. But you'll notice Falter made it impossible to read the names on the placards, nor is the candidate's face recognizable as that of any of the leading Republican hopefuls. But the enthusiasm shows one thing--he is clearly the man of the hour, the people's choice, the plumed knight. So it's easy to guess which man Falter had in mind--your man, of course. The white-coated gentleman in the lower right-hand corner will be easier to recognize, especially where the Republicans are making big medicine. He is Clarence Budington Kelland, whose stories are so familiar to readers of this magazine and who has long been a party leader.

June 19, 1948

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE."Evening Picnic"...
06/05/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE.

"Evening Picnic"
Dedicated to Merle & Trula Bachman

When John Falter was visiting his father in Atchison, Kansas, he phoned a neighbor who has a youngster in Atchison High School and said, "If we could persuade some of the boys and girls to go out by the river and look like a picnic, maybe they would all wind up on the cover of the Post." As the riverside rendezvous took place shortly after everybody had had the midday meal, Falter was astonished when the young folks turned up with several baskets, broke out a mountain of food and promptly ate it all up. Must be he doesn't know kids.
Falter made it an evening scene; that's the Missouri River shimmering in the moonlight, and the pleasant Missouri countryside beyond. It is not a very realistic painting, though. No ants in sight.

June 4, 1949

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This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover photo featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE."San Franc...
05/29/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover photo featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE.

"San Francisco Bay Boys"
Adopted By: Diane Collet
In Memory of Vince & Mary Lou Falter Langan

If a small boy, when at play, is not doing something perilous, he must be sick. So, regarding that lad who is aviating out over San Francisco Bay, let us rejoice that he is in good health, and close our eyes until he gets back. When John Falter was risking his boyhood, he used to take off on a bag swing from the roof of a shed, part of his joy being to see if he could avoid demolishing his bones against the shed on the way back.
Recently when Falter was strolling along Belvedere Island, admiring the grace of Golden Gate Bridge across the azure bay, he happily discovered that modern kids still relax in the mellow old hair-raising way. Falter's cliffside home is two blocks to the right of the painting, but he doesn't bag-swing from it. The poor fellow must be getting old.

May 26, 1956

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This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE."This Old House"...
05/22/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE.

"This Old House"
Adopted By: Butch & Dobey Haws
In Memory of John C. & Harriet Rudolph Falter

The remodeling of the hopeful young couple expect to do to the house on our cover is nothing compared to the reverse, or retrograde, remodeling the artist did to the same house. John Falter saw the house on a visit to his old home town, Atchison, Kansas.
Seventy-five years old, it would do nicely for a model, he thought, except for one little detail. The real house does not stand empty and is in the best of shape. It is occupied by the owner, Mr. Harry C. Fisher, a family friend. "I'd like to use the house in a painting." said Falter, "but I'll have to make a few changes." They were all to the bad: termites and twenty years of neglect couldn't do more harm than Falter did with his brush.

May 18, 1946

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This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE."Drive-In Movie ...
05/15/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE.

"Drive-In Movie in the Rain"
Adopted By: Merle & Sara Veigel

Artist John Falter depicts a soggy Saturday night at the local float-in, with scarcely room to drop anchor. The feature attraction of the evening is Two Senoritas From Sheboygan, filmed in Lack-0-Vision and Watercolor. Starring in this frenetic flick is Rita Redhead, shown here singing that old favorite, Let a Smile Be Your Umbrella. Her hero is the senor with the guitar. A more genuine hero, of course, is the stalwart customer with umbrella but without a smile, transporting two burgers, one dog and three shakes from the bar to car. The performance of this burger bearer is matched only by that of the manager of the place, whose motto, in the best tradition of the theater, is--be there snow, or rain, or gloom of night, or a short circuit in the popcorn machine, the show must go on.

May 13, 1961

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This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE."Birdhouse Build...
05/08/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE.

"Birdhouse Builder"
Adopted By: Cindy Glenn Gess

Bill, the Birdhouse Builder, lives and builds in Artist John Falter's home town, Atchison, Kansas, and his birdhouses must be famous from the rice fields of Louisiana, where the ricebirds congregate, to the snow fields, where the ptarmigans hang out. For he gives the birds a joint painted so bright they could see it through a London fog. Bill, who is more formally Mr. William Kloeper, is eighty, and has built enough birdhouses for about 1400 pairs of birds.
When the West was still frontier, Bill drove the stagecoach from Casper to Thermopolis, Wyoming, and served in two important public capacities in Thermopolis--as town marshal and bartender. But he told Falter that the Old West was safer and quieter than many a modern city.

May 8, 1948

www.johnphilipfaltermuseum.com
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Today is the day! Visit Nebraska Passport Program begins. Join us between 1 PM - 4 PM for our open hours. We will also b...
05/01/2019

Today is the day! Visit Nebraska Passport Program begins.

Join us between 1 PM - 4 PM for our open hours. We will also be partying from 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM to celebrate our 4th Anniversary of being in downtown Falls City.

We look forward to seeing everyone!

In case you missed the great news, our museum is being featured as part of the Visit Nebraska #PassportProgram starting May 1st!

The museum will be open Tuesday - Sunday from 1PM - 4PM starting May 1st.

If you have some extra time this summer and would like to volunteer to be a docent for the museum, please contact our curator:

Dobey Haws
[email protected]
402.450.3724

For additional details on the program, visit: http://nebraskapassport.com

Thanks for your continued support! We could not be more excited to represent our incredible state!

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE"Stan the Man"Ado...
05/01/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE

"Stan the Man"
Adopted By: John & Jean Metzger

Artist John Falter got two of those lads--Bill the Redhead Fassett and Michael the Plaidshirt Lane--excused from a St. Louis school to pose with baseballer Stan the man Musial. This upset the boys, as all boys hate to miss school. Thanks to artistic license, that lad getting the autograph is Red Fassett, a year older with black hair--a double-header pose. The lass is Patricia Wilson, and the boy with the ball and the leg without a boy are parts of Dave King; they are friends of Falter in Belvedere, California--where, by the way, Falter is building a new glass house on a cliff. Imagine how lucky those St. Louis models felt when they wound up with forty revered Musial autographs. "Wow!" one said in awe. "Will we clean up selling these at school!"

May 1, 1954

www.johnphilipfaltermuseum.com
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Thanks Falls City Chamber Main Street! We are so excited for the start of the Visit Nebraska Passport Program tomorrow, ...
04/30/2019

Thanks Falls City Chamber Main Street! We are so excited for the start of the Visit Nebraska Passport Program tomorrow, May 1st. We will officially be open from 1 PM- 4 PM followed by our 4th Anniversary celebration from 4:30 PM - 6 PM.

Thanks to all of our Falter Fans for your continued support - we look forward to celebrating with all of you!

The John Philip Falter Museum is celebrating their 4th Anniversary and for being named a 2019 Nebraska Passport Stop!! We are so lucky to have this beautiful museum in our community!! Stop by tomorrow evening!

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE."Central Park Ra...
04/24/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE.

"Central Park Rainbow"
Adopted By: Alyce Scott
In Memory of Carol L. Scott

When John Falter's cover painting was accepted, there was lightning trickling down the sky beside the rainbow. Presently the Art Department began to worry--do lightning and rainbows ever show up at the same time? The ever helpful Weather Bureau was asked to look at the Post's storm--which has just doused midtown New York and is rumbling away beyond Central Park's man-made ramparts. "Fair and cooler," was the comment. "But we never saw a streak of lightning in such bright daylight. Of course, where weather is concerned, anything can happen." So the picture was delightninged, leaving only that sign of clearing weather, a patch of blue sky large enough to make a sailor a pair of breeches.

April 30, 1949

www.johnphilipfaltermuseum.com
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It's been four years since the Falter Museum opened its doors!!!Come celebrate with us on Wednesday, May 1st!it just hap...
04/20/2019

It's been four years since the Falter Museum opened its doors!!!

Come celebrate with us on Wednesday, May 1st!

it just happens to be the first day of the Visit Nebraska #PassportProgram.

With so much happening, we hope you will find time to come by and join in the fun!

www.johnphilipfaltermuseum.com
[email protected]

In case you missed the great news, our museum is being featured as part of the Visit Nebraska #PassportProgram starting ...
04/19/2019

In case you missed the great news, our museum is being featured as part of the Visit Nebraska #PassportProgram starting May 1st!

The museum will be open Tuesday - Sunday from 1PM - 4PM starting May 1st.

If you have some extra time this summer and would like to volunteer to be a docent for the museum, please contact our curator:

Dobey Haws
[email protected]
402.450.3724

For additional details on the program, visit: http://nebraskapassport.com

Thanks for your continued support! We could not be more excited to represent our incredible state!

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE."Spring Storm Bl...
04/18/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE.

"Spring Storm Blowing In"
Adopted By: Ron & Gay Gibson Cima

John Falter, whose little boyhood was spent in the Midwest, claims that that region has the most hair-curling lightning and thunder in the U.S.A. Now an Easterner, he still, in retrospect, is so scared of those awful fireworks that he only recently got up the courage to paint this cover. Details from his horror memories are the way trees turn up the undersides of their leaves and look like phantoms, and the way dogs turn up their chins and wail. When we expressed surprise that somebody has remembered to close all those windows, Falter said he originally had a woman shutting one of them, but got mad at her face, and closed the window himself. One person in the picture is happy--the lad who now can quit spading.

April 26, 1952

www.johnphilipfaltermuseum.com
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This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE."Apartment Clari...
04/10/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE.

"Apartment Clarinetist"
Adopted By: Rod, Donna & Jesse Rudolph

The day's toil is over; the quiet magic of approaching dusk offers peace to everyone; and from the heart and clarinet of a grateful soul come the limpid strains of an evensong. They come not from afar, but from anear, and all who hear them are stirred--some in favor, some against. Numerically, the nays have it, including that man who votes Please, which doesn't mean Please Play Louder, but Please Dry Up. The howling dog may think he is singing a tuneful duet with the clarinet or he may just be swearing at it; let's say he votes yes, for artist John Falter is pro-clarinet (he played one). Another way to count those votes is the way of the heart: only two people are on that cover, a boy and a girl, and to them everybody else is nowhere at all. The two are unanimous.

April 19, 1958

www.johnphilipfaltermuseum.com
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This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE."Future Engineer...
04/03/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE.

"Future Engineer"
Adopted By: The Rotary Club of Falls City

The breathless tension at a rocket-launching base just before a blast-off can't be much worse than the mass trance prevailing at this seat of learning. Even Miss Teacher, who will blast off soon, seems not unhopeful that that roll of masking tape will function successfully as the last stage of the lad's what-is-it. At least the goldfish seem relaxed; evidently they are convinced that the boy doesn't plan to place the fishbowl on top of the masking tape. Johnny Genius, whom artist John Falter has the temerity to call a well-balanced boy, doubtless faces a bright future in physics or architecture or tightrope walking. As for his uncertain present, will he, whatever happens, have the presence of mind to give both apples to his dear teacher with haste and affection?

April 4, 1959

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE."Fifth Avenue"Adopted ...
03/27/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE.

"Fifth Avenue"
Adopted By: Harold Boswell

Fifth Avenue--showcase of fashion, hub of big industry, parade ground for visiting celebrities, home to the very rich. In her 135 blocks between Greenwich Village and Harlem are such landmarks as the Empire State Building, Rockefeller Center, St. Patrick's Cathedral and the Metropolitan Museum of Art--but nowhere is she quite so magnificent and vivacious as here at Fifty-ninth Street, gateway to Central Park. Between the sun-splashed windows of Tiffany's (left center) and the forlorn figure of Eloise, gazing down from her perch at the Plaza (right), artist John Falter has captured a brilliant Saturday morning in April. (After studying our scene long enough to spot the pickpocket, turn to page 126.)

March 19, 1960

www.johnphilipfaltermuseum.com
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This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE"Flying Kites"Ado...
03/20/2019

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in Falls City, NE

"Flying Kites"
Adopted By: The Rotary Club of Falls City

This cover landed John Falter in his second childhood. A man can't paint kites unless he flies a few, can he? Falter bought some Navy target-gunnery jobs--double-string rudder-control affairs like the red and blue ones in the picture--and Mrs. Falter became a kite widow. Then Falter and friend Arthur Naul built an eight-foot box contraption. The leviathan flew too until eventually it crashed, and now it will never fly again. As time went on, people got to inquiring whether those old guys always out there playing with the kites were balmy or what.
Finally, when the Post phoned Falter and asked him where under the sun his kite painting was, he sadly wrenched himself back into this vale of labor, and started painting, fast.

March 18, 1950

www.johnphilipfaltermuseum.com
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🚨 🚨 EXCITING NEWS ALERT 🚨 🚨 Thanks for the shout-out, Falls City Chamber Main Street!
03/13/2019
Falls City Chamber Main Street

🚨 🚨 EXCITING NEWS ALERT 🚨 🚨

Thanks for the shout-out, Falls City Chamber Main Street!

A huge congratulations to the John Philip Falter Museum for being selected one of the stops on the 2019 Nebraska Passport!! Last year nearly 49,000 passport booklets were issued and 749 people hit every stop!!

Without Butch & Dobey Haws' tireless efforts to promote the museum, and Falls City overall, this would not be possible!!

We are so excited about the many visitors who will now come to our great city to see the museum and everything else we have to offer!!

Thank you Butch & Dobey!! #FallsCityProud #VisitNE #VisitSoutheastNebraska

Address

1622 Stone St PO Box 234
Falls City, NE
68355

Opening Hours

Tuesday 13:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 13:00 - 16:00
Thursday 13:00 - 16:00
Friday 13:00 - 16:00
Saturday 13:00 - 16:00
Sunday 13:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(402) 450-3724

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