John Philip Falter Museum

John Philip Falter Museum “To preserve and honor the legacy of illustrator, John Philip Falter, in his hometown while providing inspiration for generations to come.” Call Dobey to schedule a visit: 402.450.3724
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John Philip Falter was born on February 28th, 1910 in Plattsmouth Nebraska. In 1916, his family moved to Falls City where his father opened the Falter Clothing Store. While attending Falls City High School, he created the comic strip, "Down thru the Ages," which was published in the Falls City Journal. After graduating in 1928, John studied at the Kansas City Art Institute and won a scholarship to the Art Students League in New York City. He eventually opened a studio in Rochelle, N.Y., where he met other illustrators, including Frederic Remington and Norman Rockwell. In 1933, Falter received a major break with his first commission to do three illustrations a week for Liberty Magazine. By 1938, he had acquired several advertising clients including Gulf Oil, Four Roses Whiskey, Arrow Shirts, and Pall Mall, and his ads appeared in several major national magazines. In 1943, he enlisted in the Navy where he designed over 300 recruiting posters for the American war effort. Falter's first Saturday Evening Post cover, a portrait of the magazine's founder, Benjamin Franklin, is dated September 1, 1943. That cover began a 25-year relationship with the magazine until it ceased publication in 1969. Perhaps his most endearing Post cover was for December 21,1946 which depicted downtown Falls City decorated for the Christmas season. Falter also did illustrations for Good Housekeeping, Ladies Home Journal, Cosmopolitan, McCall's, Life and Look. He illustrated over forty books, and one of his favorite projects was illustrating a special edition of Carl Sandburg's Abraham Lincoln - The Prairie Years. An excellent portrait painter, Falter had Clark Gable, James Cagney, Olivia de Haviland and Admiral Halsey among his sitters. Falter completed over 200 paintings in the field of western art, with emphasis on the westward migration of 1843 to 1880 from the Missouri River to the Rocky Mountains. He was honored by his peers with election to the Illustrators Hall of Fame in 1976, and with membership in the National Academy of Western Art in June of 1978. John Philip Falter died in Philadelphia in May, 1982.

Operating as usual

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum located in historic downtown Falls...
10/04/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum located in historic downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published October 7, 1961.

"Commuters In The Rain"

Adopted by Bob & Jo Neman.

"Nineteen moist commuters. See how they run. Scarcely a word of complaint about how the rain in suburbia seems to fall mainly when they detrain. Artist John Falter can afford to laugh at these rush-hour scurriers. Falter's studio is in his home and he painted the railroad station at nearby Gwynedd Valley, Pa., in his own good time, when the sun was shining."

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in historic downtown Fall...
09/29/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in historic downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published September 30, 1944.

"Moving Day"

Adopted by Larry and Faye Darling.

"John said that he tried "to put down on canvas a piece of America, a stage set, a framework for the imagination to travel around in." His panoramic covers with long views of people were a major departure from the Post's customary close-up designs. In fact, Norman Rockwell himself adjusted to the newer style for a time, which he later referred to as his 'Falter Period.'"

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in historic downtown Fall...
09/21/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in historic downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published September 18, 1948.

"Cactus Theater"

Adopted by Brian Witt and Family

"Cover ideas are where you find them, and John Falter found this one last year while he was passing through the town of Pecos, which is deep in the Texas cow country. The movie house was getting a brisk play from the local cowboys and girls, and what should be luring them in but a cowboy picture. Falter quickly recognized that he had something, but it was January of this year before he could come back and go to work on it. In the finished painting, the Cactus Theater and the hatter's shop are real, the titles of the movies displayed on the marquee and on the billboards are fictitious. So are the customers: Falter hit Pecos during such a bad stretch of weather last January that movie-goers just weren't venturing out."

Thank you for your continued support!

Today's  The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, ...
09/12/2020

Today's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published September 15, 1962.

"Convertibles Take Cover in Rain"

Adopted by Sandra and Scott Volker.

Part of the fun of owning a sports car stems from coping with minor inconveniences such as having to put up your top in a sudden rainstorm. Artist John Falter approached this "fun" with feeling. Once he owned a sports car himself--a 1947 English Singer Drop-Head Coupe with Self-Canceling Trafficators. It wasn't waterproof.

Today's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in historic downtown Falls City, Ne...
09/04/2020

Today's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in historic downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published September 27, 1947.

"Apple Picking Time"

Adopted by Leon & Madaline Wilhelm

John Falter's scene for the harvest time painting is his native Midwest; he sketched those barns and the rail fence near Weston, Missouri. The farm, long owned by the Blythe family, is one of the oldest in Northwestern Missouri. Falter completed the painting when he got back to his home in Pennsylvania, and the trees, the apple pickers and the farm woman are done from memory. It wasn't hard to recall similar scenes from his own boyhood, although as he worked, the phase of apple picking Falter recalled most vividly was fresh apple pie. In a burst of nostalgia, he asked to have it for dinner. He enjoyed every bite, and it wasn't until later that it occurred to him the pie he had eaten with such pleasure was cherry.

This week's The Saturday Evening Post  featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebras...
09/02/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published September 5, 1959.

"Before, During, & After Picnic"

Adopted by Jay & Joy Callahan

"Away they go, whooshing toward someplace where there's lots of green land and a far-arching abundance of sky. All hands are sparkle-eyed with vigor and vim, even mother, although she had to start doing chores at six a.m. to get this show on the road by eight. (Ignore Spoteye, the dog, who is just taking a cat nap). In due time the food is eradicated, the gang's vigor is renewed, the dog takes a dog nap, and mother applies her vim---to doing chores. And by and by in artist John Falter's purple night everybody passes out except you know who, there at the wheel--and for heaven's sake, look who has come to in the back seat! Mother doesn't reflect that a woman's work is never done; what she does think is, 'They're my babies, including old batter-out here beside me, and I love taking care of them all.'"

#SaturdayEveningPost #americana #art #nebraska #arthistory #artmuseums #picnics #roadtrips #familytime #momlife

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebrask...
08/31/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published August 14, 1948.

Adopted by Kevin & Janet Finck Malone.

Artist John Falter's setting for his surf-bathing cover is Ogunquit, Maine. He made his first sketches while spending the summer in Maine, beating the heat, but didn't get around to painting until last winter. By that time the lucky lad was in Phoenix, Arizona, beating the cold. The hotter that Arizona sun got, the more fondly the artist thought of Maine's cool air and cool spray. So he hired a couple of pretty models for the girls in the lower right, and went to work on a picture of Maine as remembered in the Southwest. The pretty girl in the left foreground, just emerging and shaking out her hair, often appears in Falter's cover paintings, but doesn't get a model's pay for her work. She is Margaret Falter, John's wife.

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebrask...
08/24/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published August 13, 1949.

"Pier Fishing"

Adopted by Bob & Mary Ellen Glenn.

On the long fishing pier at Santa Monica, California, tourists from all over the United States stand packed together like sardines while they try to catch fish.

They are so grimly intent on their work or play or whatever it is that when a baited minnow smacks the water in all that silence, it makes quite a startling splash.

Many of the fishermen go through their routine calmly and expertly; occasionally a greenhorn flies into a tizzy, yelps for the landing net and hauls in a dwarf flounder or something else depressing. The kids have a swell time fussing with starfish or reading a wet comic page which was wrapped around a wad of bait. Artist John Falter was noncommittal about whether he caught anything-- besides a Post cover.

“EIGHTEENTH HOLE”This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Fa...
08/17/2020

“EIGHTEENTH HOLE”

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published August 6, 1955.

Adopted by Kathy Buchholz Martin, In Memory of John & Katie Buchholz

The charm of golf is its relaxing good-fellowship; see how relaxed, how in tune with the music of the spheres, half of those good fellows are. In case you don't comprehend golf, if that small, white sphere had dropped into the cavity, the relaxation would have been vice versa. Maybe it didn't drop because an ant, weary of being run over by golf balls, humped his back, then ran away squeaking with laughter; or maybe the contestant didn't strike the ball hard enough. Actually, a golfer should be madder about missing a putt by five feet than by one antmeter, but, happily for Mr. Falter, human nature is peculiar. Well, in time those sad fellows may see the humor of all this; you can bet their friends will do all they can to help.

August 6, 1955

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebrask...
08/05/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published August 2, 1947.

"Inn In Olgunquit"

Adopted by Mike Collet & Elaine Olinger Collet

When he decided to paint a characteristic New England summer-resort scene, John Falter chose Ogunquit, Maine, where he has spent his vacations for the last ten years.

The hotel is one the artist always thought typical, and he has drawn it very true to life. The ocean is behind; you can see a glimpse of that cold Maine water to the left of the inn. There is a summer theater in Ogunquit so, in painting the parade of vacationists on their way to the beach, Falter included a couple of figures he thought might represent the summer-theater staff. The skinny lad in shorts is Falter's unflattering idea of a playwright. The fat gent with the beard is Falter's friend and stand-by character, the radio actor, Jack Smart.

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebrask...
07/31/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published July 11, 1953.

"Boating In Central Park"

Adopted by Ed & Pat O'Grady

In New York's famous wilderness, Central Park, you can hike, boat, bicycle, ride horseback, woo a wife, climb small mountains, get lost in small woods, and on the zoo trails meet many wild animals including people who make faces at monkeys. If you don't think New Yorkers get more exercise than country people, buy some liniment and see how far you can trudge in the park without crying, "Help! Taxi!" To this resort go many sailors to take a vacation from water by rowing a boat weighted down by a girl--a curious phenomenon, as you would think the girl would row the sailor. That one soldier in the picture is not lost; he is following the girl. And that painter is not John Falter--John can paint without a beard.

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebrask...
07/24/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published July 10th, 1943, and was adopted by Dave and Thelma Lunsford.

"NEW NAVAL OFFICER"

The title of this cover says it all: "Promotion." In 1943, John enlisted in the Navy and was rapidly promoted from chief boatswain's mate to lieutenant on special assignment as an artist.

During his three-year stint, he produced over 300 war posters, several for the recruitment of women. They are now famous for the "loose-lips-sink-ships" theme.

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebrask...
07/16/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published July 3, 1948.

"SAND TRAP"

ADOPTED BY Rachel Postin Witt & Family

The men John Falter used as models for his golf painting will be surprised at what has happened to the course. The golfers were playing a course near Phoenix, Arizona. Falter added trees he thought would look more general.

The result is a Western course with Eastern trees, and it's a wonder anybody can win there. Falter thinks all the men he painted are giants of industry, and we would identify them but for the fact that Falter probably moved faces and figures around. The trouble with a picture like this is that it leaves everybody wondering if the sand-trapped gent got out. If an artist can take liberties with the scenery, then we can give you the ending. He laid that shot right into the cup, making the rest of them look like amateurs.

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebrask...
07/10/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published July 1, 1961.

"TIDY AND SLOPPY NEIGHBORS"

ADOPTED BY Bart & Gayle Christy Keller

John Falter's cover shows us that twin homes, like twin humans, usually dress differently as they get on in years. At the residence on our right we find a reclining retriever at the foot of the steps and an irretrievable recliner at the top of the steps, in an office chair. We deduce that both Red and his neighbor, Mr. Jones, seek relaxation in activities which provide a change of pace from their workaday pursuits. Red is a handyman who likes to assume the posture of an executive, and Mr. Jones is an executive who enjoys playing handyman. Red has no desire to keep up with the Joneses, for he has observed a danger of over grooming; Red's head of hair is a jungle, but it flourishes; whereas Mr. Jones's hair seems to have been combed and plastered to within a couple of inches of its life.

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebrask...
07/05/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published July 7, 1945.

“INDEPENDENCE PARADE”

ADOPTED BY THE ROTARY CLUB OF FALLS CITY

The gay crowds, brass band and holiday bunting on John Falter's Fourth of July cover can only give the people of Perkasie, Pennsylvania, a vicarious thrill because their parades have been discontinued for the duration. The townspeople haven't time for them anymore. They're busy writing letters to the girls and boys in service, mailing them vest-pocket copies of the News-Herald, their home-town newspaper, taking snapshots of places around town that maybe the kids are homesick for, and sending each one a dollar a month for pin money. We imagine that Perkasie folks will be sending this cover to their service men and women, too; so, for the record, the Moyer Building is still a hardware store and storage place--the professional men whose names appear on its windows are tenants installed by Mr. Falter to make the place look lived in.

John Philip Falter Museum
06/26/2020

John Philip Falter Museum

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published 60 years ago on June 25, 1960.

"Peachtree Street"
Adopted by: Darrel & Liz Huettner

For the second in our series of covers on illustrious American thoroughfares, artist John Falter has depicted Peachtree Street at the Harris Street intersection, looking south toward Five Points, Atlanta's hub. The gentleman on crutches at lower left is Ernest Rogers, Atlanta Journal columnist and the popular "Mayor of Peachtree Street." In the early 19th century this was a sinuous ridgetop trail leading to an Indian settlement known as The Standing Peachtree; today it's the main artery in the economic capital of the South. That towering tree in the foreground is an American elm. Our scene contains no peach trees--they don't thrive in downtown Atlanta--but there are numerous Georgia peaches in view, of the variety which doesn't grow on trees.

June 25, 1960

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebrask...
06/26/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum, located in downtown Falls City, Nebraska, was originally published 60 years ago on June 25, 1960.

"Peachtree Street"
Adopted by: Darrel & Liz Huettner

For the second in our series of covers on illustrious American thoroughfares, artist John Falter has depicted Peachtree Street at the Harris Street intersection, looking south toward Five Points, Atlanta's hub. The gentleman on crutches at lower left is Ernest Rogers, Atlanta Journal columnist and the popular "Mayor of Peachtree Street." In the early 19th century this was a sinuous ridgetop trail leading to an Indian settlement known as The Standing Peachtree; today it's the main artery in the economic capital of the South. That towering tree in the foreground is an American elm. Our scene contains no peach trees--they don't thrive in downtown Atlanta--but there are numerous Georgia peaches in view, of the variety which doesn't grow on trees.

June 25, 1960

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska."Backya...
06/19/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Backyard Wedding"
Adopted By: Dick & Jane Ann Hall

Congratulations to this happy bride and groom, and to all the Junetide grooms and brides they symbolize. Felicitations to the weatherman--at least to his deputy, John Falter--for not pelting the joyful hour with lightning, cloudbursts and hailstones. Condolences to bad wishes to the guy with his arms innocently folded; he acts like one of those dopes who attend weddings for the sole purpose of tying rubbish on honeymoon cars. As for the uninvited guest, whose wife has just sent him to the grocery store to buy stuff for supper--why, congratulations to you, sir! (It's probably his nineteenth wedding anniversary and he has just remembered it.) Condolences to the bride's mother--or is it the groom's mother?--as she drops the traditional tear. And all bad wishes.

June 24, 1950

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska."...
06/04/2020

This week's The Saturday Evening Post cover featured by the John Philip Falter Museum in downtown Falls City, Nebraska.

"Last Day of School"
The Rotary Club of Falls City

It doesn't surprise us much to find an artist with his head in the clouds--we've always understood they
kept their ears swathed in the fleecy stuff--but we were startled when John Falter admitted that this
week's Last Day of School cover was painted from a nonexistent helicopter, 300 feet above the earth.
For the moment, Falter's helicopter is a nebulous as a rabbit named Harvey, although it is one of his
pet postwar dreams. To obtain this view of the grammar school in Blooming Glen, Pennsylvania, sans helicopter, Falter's imagination boosted him the necessary 300 feet. This same imagination made
some other changes in the name of art. Falter found it necessary to delete three city blocks, shift a grave-yard and omit the school playground altogether.

June 9, 1945

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1622 Stone St PO Box 234
Falls City, NE
68355

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Weird question... are dogs allowed inside