Evanston Women's History Project

Evanston Women's History Project The Evanston Women’s History Project documents and celebrates the significant contributions of Evanston women and women's organizations to the community.

Join us in commemorating the 100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment in 2020.

Operating as usual

Photos from National Women's History Alliance's post
06/01/2021

Photos from National Women's History Alliance's post

Join us!
06/01/2021

Join us!

Grace Venture Partners and the #Evanston Women's History Project at the Evanston History Center present: A special reception to celebrate tennis great Katrina Adams and the release of her new book, “Own The Arena.” The event takes place Wednesday, June 16, 2021, from 5:00 pm– 8:00pm, at the Evanston History Center. This is an invite-only event. Please RSVP as soon as possible. Limited space. Guests will receive a free copy of the book. Register here: https://bit.ly/3ierPEJ #ownthearena

Always includes some great women's history as well as honoring the mothers in your life - be sure to get your "ticket" s...
04/26/2021

Always includes some great women's history as well as honoring the mothers in your life - be sure to get your "ticket" soon!

It's fast approaching! The #Evanston History Center's 46th annual Mother’s Day House Walk-By! The walk will begin on Sunday, May 9, 2021, and, because it is "DIY," the walk continues every day thereafter! This year's walk-by (houses will not be open to visitors) tells the story of Evanston’s unique Prairie School architecture.Ticket holders can walk, ride or drive by to view the exterior of the houses while learning about Prairie School architecture in Evanston. You can experience the House Walk-By beginning on Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 9, 2021, or any day thereafter. Please support the Evanston History Center by purchasing a ticket. House Walk tickets ($30 each/$25 for EHC members) may be purchased by calling 847-475-3410 or by visiting www.evanstonhistorycenter.org. Ticket holders will receive a PDF version of the housewalk book via email by 11:00 am on Sunday, May 9. Hard copies of the book will be available after May 14, 2021, by request for a $10 additional fee.

Visit the Evanston History Center soon to see Evanston Women and the Fight for the Vote! Our 2020 exhibit in honor of th...
04/15/2021

Visit the Evanston History Center soon to see Evanston Women and the Fight for the Vote! Our 2020 exhibit in honor of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment closes May 9th. EHC is open for visitors Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 1-4 pm but reservations are required. You can make a reservation at www.evanstonhistorycenter.org.

Evanston women played a significant role in the woman’s suffrage movement. You don’t want to miss this chance to learn more of the story. We hope to see you soon!

Visit the Evanston History Center soon to see Evanston Women and the Fight for the Vote! Our 2020 exhibit in honor of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment closes May 9th. EHC is open for visitors Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 1-4 pm but reservations are required. You can make a reservation at www.evanstonhistorycenter.org.

Evanston women played a significant role in the woman’s suffrage movement. You don’t want to miss this chance to learn more of the story. We hope to see you soon!

In our final post for #womenshistorymonth featuring Evanston women who held elected office - we cannot fail to mention L...
03/29/2021

In our final post for #womenshistorymonth featuring Evanston women who held elected office - we cannot fail to mention Lorraine Morton. Morton was first elected as an Alderman for the 5th Ward in 1982 and held the post for two terms. She then ran for Mayor - becoming the first Black woman to serve - and the first Democrat. She served as Mayor from 1993-2009. Morton was a school teacher and administrator who broke through boundaries of race and gender throughout her life. She did it with an exuberant and graceful spirit that made her a beloved figure in Evanston. She died in 2018 just shy of her 100th birthday. More at https://evanstonwomen.org/2018/09/12/saying-goodbye/

In our final post for #womenshistorymonth featuring Evanston women who held elected office - we cannot fail to mention Lorraine Morton. Morton was first elected as an Alderman for the 5th Ward in 1982 and held the post for two terms. She then ran for Mayor - becoming the first Black woman to serve - and the first Democrat. She served as Mayor from 1993-2009. Morton was a school teacher and administrator who broke through boundaries of race and gender throughout her life. She did it with an exuberant and graceful spirit that made her a beloved figure in Evanston. She died in 2018 just shy of her 100th birthday. More at https://evanstonwomen.org/2018/09/12/saying-goodbye/

Continuing our #WomensHistoryMonth focus on women who held elected office in Evanston. Mayme Finley Spencer was Evanston...
03/24/2021

Continuing our #WomensHistoryMonth focus on women who held elected office in Evanston. Mayme Finley Spencer was Evanston's first Black Female Alderman. She served the Fifth Ward from 1963-1968. Born in Milwaukee, Spencer moved to Evanston in 1957. She went to Law School in her late 30s. She practiced family and real estate law - and used her legal skills to fight for Evanston's 1968 Fair Housing Ordinance. Later she served on the Illinois Governor's Commission on Race Relations. Spencer died in 2011. More at https://evanstonwomen.org/woman/mayme-spencer/

Continuing our #WomensHistoryMonth focus on women who held elected office in Evanston. Mayme Finley Spencer was Evanston's first Black Female Alderman. She served the Fifth Ward from 1963-1968. Born in Milwaukee, Spencer moved to Evanston in 1957. She went to Law School in her late 30s. She practiced family and real estate law - and used her legal skills to fight for Evanston's 1968 Fair Housing Ordinance. Later she served on the Illinois Governor's Commission on Race Relations. Spencer died in 2011. More at https://evanstonwomen.org/woman/mayme-spencer/

03/23/2021

Tonight! March 23, 6:30-7:30 pm (CST) join us for a presentation by historian Ann Durkin Keating as she discusses her book, The World of Juliette Kinzie: Chicago before the Fire.
Keating examines one of #Chicago’s forgotten founders, Juliette Kinzie, who first came to Chicago in 1831. In the decades that followed, not only did Kinzie witness the city’s transformation into an industrial center, but she was also instrumental in the city’s development. While early Chicago is often presented as “a man’s city,” it was women like Juliette Kinzie, as Keating has so brilliantly shown, who worked to create an urban and urbane world, often within their own parlors. And so, with The World of Juliette Kinzie, we finally get to experience the rise of Chicago from the view of one of its most important founding mothers.

Admission: $10. EHC Members are free!
Registration is required: http://bit.ly/EHCKinzie
Admission can be paid online. https://bit.ly/EHCadmission
Consider joining EHC and attending this and other events for free. https://bit.ly/JoinEHC
Buy the book at Bookends & Beginnings: https://bit.ly/3tyNn0Z and support #Evanston's local bookstore! Image: Chicago, 1853

03/18/2021

Join us next Tuesday, March 23, 6:30-7:30 pm (CST) for a live, virtual presentation by historian Ann Durkin Keating as she discusses her book, The World of Juliette Kinzie: Chicago before the Fire. Admission: $10. EHC Members are free!
Registration is required: http://bit.ly/EHCKinzie
Admission can be paid online. https://bit.ly/EHCadmission

When Juliette Kinzie first visited Chicago in 1831, it was anything but a city. An outpost in the shadow of Fort Dearborn, it had no streets, no sidewalks, no schools, no river-spanning bridges. And with two hundred disconnected residents, it lacked any sense of community. In the decades that followed, not only did Juliette Kinzie witness the city’s transition from Indian country to industrial center, but she was instrumental in its development.

Kinzie is one of #Chicago’s forgotten founders. Early Chicago is often presented as “a man’s city,” but women like Juliette worked to create an urban and urbane world, often within their own parlors. With The World of Juliette Kinzie, we finally get to experience the rise of Chicago from the view of one of its most important founding mothers.

Ann Durkin Keating, one of the foremost experts on nineteenth-century Chicago, offers a moving portrait of a trailblazing and complicated woman. Keating is Dr. C. Frederick Toenniges Professor of History at North Central College in Naperville, Illinois. She is coeditor of The Encyclopedia of Chicago, the editor of Chicago Neighborhoods and Suburbs: A Historical Guide, and the author of Rising Up from Indian Country: The Battle of Fort Dearborn and the Birth of Chicago, all published by the University of Chicago Press.

Consider joining EHC and attending this and other events for free. https://bit.ly/JoinEHC

Buy the book at Bookends & Beginnings: https://bit.ly/3tyNn0Z and support #Evanston's local bookstore!

03/16/2021

For #WomensHistoryMonth we are focusing on women who held elected office in Evanston. Daisy Sandidge was the first woman elected alderman. Born in Belton, Texas in 1877, Sandidge moved to Evanston in 1916 after working as a teacher in Ithaca, NY. Elected in 1932, Sandidge was active in the League of Women Voters and the Woman’s Club of Evanston. Sandidge made the case for her candidacy: ”I am asking my friends to support my candidacy, even though a woman candidate is something of an innovation. I intend to stand for political freedom for every individual." Sandidge was elected to serve the Fifth ward alongside Evanston's first Black alderman, Edwin B. Jourdain, and the two formed an "independent" block on the City Council. Here's what a news columnist said of the two of them: "the disposition of the two newly elected alderman...to do their own thinking and their own voting, and to speak their minds...is most encouraging."

This year for #WomensHistoryMonth we are focusing on Evanston women who served in elected office. Gaining the right to v...
03/11/2021

This year for #WomensHistoryMonth we are focusing on Evanston women who served in elected office. Gaining the right to vote was one thing - running for election and winning another. The first woman to hold elected office in Evanston was Louise Brockaway Stanwood who served as a member of the School Board from 1892 to 1907. The election in 1892 was the first time Evanston women could both run for office and vote, and they could only run and vote for school board. This new right was gained statewide in 1891. More at https://evanstonwomen.org/evanston-women-and-the-19th/evanston-women-and-the-fight-for-the-vote/

This year for #WomensHistoryMonth we are focusing on Evanston women who served in elected office. Gaining the right to vote was one thing - running for election and winning another. The first woman to hold elected office in Evanston was Louise Brockaway Stanwood who served as a member of the School Board from 1892 to 1907. The election in 1892 was the first time Evanston women could both run for office and vote, and they could only run and vote for school board. This new right was gained statewide in 1891. More at https://evanstonwomen.org/evanston-women-and-the-19th/evanston-women-and-the-fight-for-the-vote/

A great way to celebrate #WomensHistoryMonth is to visit EHC to see the exhibit Evanston Women and the Fight for the Vot...
03/08/2021

A great way to celebrate #WomensHistoryMonth is to visit EHC to see the exhibit Evanston Women and the Fight for the Vote. A year ago the exhibit opened for #InternationalWomensDay and then promptly closed with everything else. We decided to extend it through mid-May 2021 to give everyone a chance to see it. Now's the time to schedule your visit a www.evanstonhistorycenter.org. Hope to see you soon!

A great way to celebrate #WomensHistoryMonth is to visit EHC to see the exhibit Evanston Women and the Fight for the Vote. A year ago the exhibit opened for #InternationalWomensDay and then promptly closed with everything else. We decided to extend it through mid-May 2021 to give everyone a chance to see it. Now's the time to schedule your visit a www.evanstonhistorycenter.org. Hope to see you soon!

03/03/2021

World War II, #Evanston Township High School, 1944. In 1943, ETHS established a chapter of the “Victory Corps,” a national organization of female and male high school students who wished to take part in war-related activities. The chapter at ETHS was busy with numerous tasks, from collecting scrap metal to serving as junior air raid wardens. Female students also formed the “Cap and Cape Club” (for future nurses) and, in 1943, they launched the “Girls’ Drill Corps.” The corps took on a variety of duties and also drilled daily on the high school grounds. At its height the corps had 175 members, with Major Jane Denham serving as commanding officer. #womenshistorymonth #ETHS #evanstonhistorycenterpost

03/02/2021

On August 15, 1923, Anna Mitchell Beck was sworn into the #Evanston Police Department and thus became the first Black female police officer in Evanston. According to the press, she had been appointed especially to “look after the increased population of women and girls who [were] coming into the city with the general influx from the south.” Born in Palmyra, Missouri, in 1875, Beck had been teacher in Missouri. After moving to Evanston, she served as superintendent of the primary department of Ebenezer A.M.E. Church’s Sunday school for nearly a decade. For many years Beck and her family - husband Preston Beck, and their children, Walter, Clarence, Eugene, and Juanita - resided at 2018 Colfax. By 1930, the family had moved to 2010 Darrow. Beck’s son, Eugene Beck (1904-1969) went on to represent the city’s 5th ward as alderman. He served in that role for six terms, beginning in 1947. Anna Beck passed away in September 1939. #blackhistorymonth #trailblazers #womenshistory #evanstonhistorycenterpost

Celebrate International Women’s Day with the Evanston Women’s History Project and Piven Theater with a screening of the ...
02/25/2021
Piven Theatre & Evanston Women's History Project Present Nevertheless

Celebrate International Women’s Day with the Evanston Women’s History Project and Piven Theater with a screening of the film Nevertheless followed by a Q&A discussion with Director, Sarah Moshman, EWHP Director Lori Osborne, and mother and daughter, Juliet and Lilly Bond, who are featured in the film. The screening and discussion will take place online on Sunday March 7th, from 2-3:30 pm.

Taking a look behind the headlines of #MeToo and Time’s Up, NEVERTHELESS follows the intimate stories of 7 individuals who have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace or school context. From a writer's assistant on a top TV show to a Tech CEO and 911 dispatcher, the film shines a light on the ways in which we can shift our culture and rebuild.

Director Sarah Moshman grew up in Evanston, and the story of Lily and Juliet Bond highlights an issue that took place at Haven Middle School in Evanston, giving this national story a local angle for exploration.

Nevertheless Virtual Screening & Panel Hosted by Piven Theatre & Evanston Women's History Project

A new post on our blog shares the work we've done to add sites to the National Votes for Women Trail - and our recent wo...
02/17/2021
Votes for Women Trail – Evanston and Illinois

A new post on our blog shares the work we've done to add sites to the National Votes for Women Trail - and our recent work to ensure that the story of African American women's activism for suffrage in Illinois was included.

For the past few years, the Evanston Women’s History Project has been the home of research for the wider story of Illinois women in the women’s suffrage movement. EWHP staff, interns and volunteers…

Photos from Evanston History Center's post
02/16/2021

Photos from Evanston History Center's post

A little women's history for this snowy President's Day!
02/15/2021

A little women's history for this snowy President's Day!

The Evanston History Center has reopened for exhibits and tours as of February 4, 2021. The suffrage anniversary exhibit...
02/11/2021

The Evanston History Center has reopened for exhibits and tours as of February 4, 2021. The suffrage anniversary exhibit Evanston Women and the Fight for the Vote is now open as well. You can find out more about the reopening and procedures for arranging your visit www.evanstonhistorycenter.org.

Telling the story of Evanston women and their strategic and critical work for women’s suffrage, the exhibit features archival resources, artifacts and costumes from the EHC collection. The exhibit will be up through mid-May 2021.

The Evanston History Center is located at 225 Greenwood Street in Evanston. Regular admission is $10 (free for EHC members).

The Evanston History Center has reopened for exhibits and tours as of February 4, 2021. The suffrage anniversary exhibit Evanston Women and the Fight for the Vote is now open as well. You can find out more about the reopening and procedures for arranging your visit www.evanstonhistorycenter.org.

Telling the story of Evanston women and their strategic and critical work for women’s suffrage, the exhibit features archival resources, artifacts and costumes from the EHC collection. The exhibit will be up through mid-May 2021.

The Evanston History Center is located at 225 Greenwood Street in Evanston. Regular admission is $10 (free for EHC members).

Join us for some great local women's history in March and April!
02/08/2021
Great Women’s History Programs in March and April

Join us for some great local women's history in March and April!

The Evanston History Center – home of the Evanston Women’s History Project – has some great programs coming as part of its Winter/Spring 2021 Under the Buffalo Lecture series. Fir…

Evanston Women Elected to Serve - on this historic day see this new post on our blog - https://evanstonwomen.org/2021/01...
01/20/2021
Evanston Women Elected to Serve

Evanston Women Elected to Serve - on this historic day see this new post on our blog - https://evanstonwomen.org/2021/01/20/evanston-women-elected-to-serve/ You can find out more about Evanston women and the fight for women's right to vote and to run for elected office on our website.

On this historic day, we remember those Evanston women who served in elected office. We honor their pioneering efforts to make Evanston a place where women’s civic leadership is encouraged and acce…

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225 Greenwood Street
Evanston, IL
60201

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