The Museum of Natural and Cultural History

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History Come and visit us! We're open 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday and until 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays.
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The Museum of Natural and Cultural History enhances knowledge of Earth's environments and cultures, inspiring stewardship of our collective past, present, and future. The MNCH, a public museum at the University of Oregon, is the largest natural history museum between Seattle and San Francisco, and a global center for archaeological and paleontological research. The museum headquarters and public spaces are housed in a distinctive building inspired by Pacific Northwest Native longhouse design. We are located near historic Hayward Field and next to the Knight Law Center on the east side of the UO campus.

#MuseumfromHome: Today we bring you our online Tapa Cloth gallery. Primarily recognized as a Polynesian craft, tapa is m...
04/14/2020

#MuseumfromHome: Today we bring you our online Tapa Cloth gallery. Primarily recognized as a Polynesian craft, tapa is made from the softened inner bark of trees or shrubs, painted with vegetable dyes of light brown, red, and black. They are traditionally used as room dividers, clothing, and floor mats, as well as for ceremonial uses in weddings and funerals. In the museum collection are about 40 tapas featuring bold geometric patterns and stylized floral motifs. https://mnch.uoregon.edu/collections-galleries/tapa-cloth

Repost from former student and museum volunteer Amy Atwater (@Mary_Annings_Revenge):-----------This is Paramylodon, an e...
04/13/2020

Repost from former student and museum volunteer Amy Atwater (@Mary_Annings_Revenge):
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This is Paramylodon, an extinct type of ground sloth that lived in North America during the Plio-Pleistocene (~5 mya to 11,000 years ago).

This specimen is on display in my hometown of Eugene, Oregon, in the University of Oregon’s Museum of Natural and Cultural History (@mnch_uo). This is the museum I visited all the time growing up, and then I volunteered here during high school and college. I doubt I would have ended up in the museum world without this incredible introduction. I encourage everyone to visit once it is safe to do so. This photo is from March of 2019 when I went home for a conference.

📍This specimen was discovered on the ancestral homelands of the Atfalati and Kalapuya peoples.

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Thanks for the shoutout, Amy! We are so happy that your time at the museum was so formative and inspiring. ❤#MuseumfromHome

#ArtifactFacts: Last fall at a Winchester, OR site, museum archaeologists uncovered dozens of glass bottles from a varie...
04/13/2020

#ArtifactFacts: Last fall at a Winchester, OR site, museum archaeologists uncovered dozens of glass bottles from a variety of time periods. The oldest dated to the late 1800s, around the time a hydroelectric dam was built across the North Umpqua River, effectively revitalizing the town. The majority of the bottles, however, date to the 1940s, 50s, and 60s, likely from a nearby gas station that sold bottled sodas. Pictured here are soda and liquor bottles recovered from the site, ranging in age from the 1930s to the 1970s.

#FossilFriday: The museum traces its lineage to Oregon's first state geologist, Thomas Condon, who was also  University ...
04/10/2020
Condon Collection | Museum of Natural and Cultural History

#FossilFriday: The museum traces its lineage to Oregon's first state geologist, Thomas Condon, who was also University of Oregon’s first-ever science professor. He moved to Eugene with his large #fossil collection, gathered with the intention of enhancing Oregonians' knowledge about the state's wonderful natural history. These fossils became the nucleus of the Condon Museum, which later became the Museum of Natural and Cultural History. Check out some of Condon’s amazing specimens in our online collections gallery: https://mnch.uoregon.edu/collections-galleries/condon-collection
#MuseumfromHome

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History traces its lineage to Oregon's first state geologist, Thomas Condon.

Explore the museum from home! We're posting new, family-friendly museum adventures each Friday, and you can enjoy them a...
04/10/2020

Explore the museum from home! We're posting new, family-friendly museum adventures each Friday, and you can enjoy them all from the comfort of home. This week, we bring you Ice Age Giants, with crafts and hands-on activities celebrating the big mammals of Oregon's deep past. Journey back thousands of years and meet mammoths, sabertooth cats, and more! https://qoo.ly/35dw26

04/09/2020

Did you know the Willamette River used to run north of Autzen Stadium? Museum #archaeologist Julia Knowles has been overlaying historic maps on aerial imagery for some projects with the City of Eugene Government, and the results are mesmerizing. A big thank you to University of Oregon Libraries and Lane County History Museum for the maps! #MuseumfromHome

You might already know that the museum is home to some of the world’s oldest shoes—but did you know we have an entire on...
04/08/2020
Great Basin Sandals | Museum of Natural and Cultural History

You might already know that the museum is home to some of the world’s oldest shoes—but did you know we have an entire online gallery devoted to footwear? Check out this stunning sampling of Oregon's ancient sandals and learn more about how they were made:

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History is famous for its remarkable collection of sandals recovered from dry cave sites in Oregon's Northern Great Basin.

And here we have Chase, feline officemate of museum educator Robyn. Chase likes to make regular appearances in museum Zo...
04/07/2020

And here we have Chase, feline officemate of museum educator Robyn. Chase likes to make regular appearances in museum Zoom meetings, where his input is always appreciated though frequently off topic. #museumfromhome #wfh #howwequarantine #quarankitties #rescuecatsofinstagram #catsofinstagram

Can you identify this #fossil? Join us for fossil-themed #TriviaTuesday on Instagram today, and test your knowledge of O...
04/07/2020

Can you identify this #fossil? Join us for fossil-themed #TriviaTuesday on Instagram today, and test your knowledge of Oregon's deep past. Hop on over to our Instagram Story to play!
https://qoo.ly/35bzfz
#MuseumfromHome

#ArtifactFacts: This Yup'ik humanoid mask was acquired in 1938 from southwestern Alaska, near the mouth of the Yukon Riv...
04/06/2020
Native American Masks of the Northwest Coast and Alaska | Museum of Natural and Cultural History

#ArtifactFacts: This Yup'ik humanoid mask was acquired in 1938 from southwestern Alaska, near the mouth of the Yukon River, and later donated to our ethnographic collections. In #Alaska, Yup’ik and Inupiaq peoples honor animals in a variety of ceremonies, most importantly the great midwinter hunting festivals. Historically, masks carved by shamans were donned for dances designed to please the spirits. As intermediaries between people and spirits, shamans learned the wishes of game animals from visions and trips to the spirit world. Masks could also represent the shaman’s spiritual helpers. Learn more about the #culturalhistory of Pacific Northwest Native American masks in our online collections gallery.

For Native peoples of the Pacific Northwest, winter is a time of dance and performance. Among Northwest Coast peoples, including the Kwakwaka’wakw, Makah, and Nuu-chah-nulth represented here,

Aurora, trusty sidekick to museum communications specialist Andrea, is doing her part to ensure that their household’s #...
04/03/2020

Aurora, trusty sidekick to museum communications specialist Andrea, is doing her part to ensure that their household’s #wfh routine involves occasional belly rubs. #howwequarantine #dogsofinstagram #doglife #quarantinelife #quarandoggo #thoseeyebrowsthough

#FossilFriday: Last fall, paleontology research fellow Elena Ghezzo snagged some sweet drone footage from Logan Butte in...
04/03/2020

#FossilFriday: Last fall, paleontology research fellow Elena Ghezzo snagged some sweet drone footage from Logan Butte in Eastern Oregon, where she and University of Oregon paleontologist Samantha Hopkins were searching for fossils exposed on the slopes of an Oligocene deposit. Elena is a research fellow from the Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics, and Statistics of Ca’ Foscari University in Venice, Italy, working in collaboration with the museum paleontology team. Her research focuses on using remote strategies for fossil finding, using high-resolution images and paleontological databases to find new fossils exposed on desert surfaces.

#womeninscience #fossils #paleontologist #fieldwork #naturalhistorymuseum #naturalhistory #drones #fossilhunting #MNCH

Good thing that Kristin, our communications director, has an eye for typos, because her buddy Otis really likes to sneak...
04/02/2020

Good thing that Kristin, our communications director, has an eye for typos, because her buddy Otis really likes to sneak in a few where he can. #museumfromhome #howwequarantine #remotework #catsofinstagram #quarankitties #rescuecatsofinstagram

04/02/2020
Fundamentals of island archaeology

The museum is a hotbed of archaeological research focused on islands, coastlines, and seafaring peoples. Join our associate director Scott Fitzpatrick, along with some of his students, for a glimpse into the archaeology of the Caribbean.

Listen to UO Professor Scott Fitzpatrick discuss the fundamentals and challenges of island archeology. Using Curacao as an example, he also shows the ways humans…

Fisher the cat has a way of keeping Yousef, our business manager, on the edge of his seat. #howwequarantine #remotework ...
04/01/2020

Fisher the cat has a way of keeping Yousef, our business manager, on the edge of his seat. #howwequarantine #remotework #quarantinelife #museumfromhome #catsofinstagram #rescuecatsofinstagram #backseatdriver

Trilobites! Few fossils are as fascinating as trilobites, an extinct order of arthropods common in marine rocks from the...
04/01/2020
Trilobites | Museum of Natural and Cultural History

Trilobites! Few fossils are as fascinating as trilobites, an extinct order of arthropods common in marine rocks from the Cambrian to Permian periods, between about 542 and 251 million years old. Check out our trilobite collections gallery to explore the vast variety of these ancient arthropods: https://mnch.uoregon.edu/collections-galleries/trilobites
#MuseumfromHome

Few fossils are as fascinating as trilobites, an extinct order of arthropods common in marine rocks from the Cambrian to Permian geological periods, between about 542 and 251 million years old.

Laptop? Um...no. Kylo Ren is museum educator Mia’s cat, and he knows there are better uses for laps. #museumfromhome #wf...
04/01/2020

Laptop? Um...no. Kylo Ren is museum educator Mia’s cat, and he knows there are better uses for laps. #museumfromhome #wfh #howwequarantine #quarankitties #quarantinelife #starwars

#MuseumfromHome: Basketry is at the heart of the museum's Native American ethnographic collections. Today, we feature th...
03/31/2020
Tlingit Spruce Root Baskets | Museum of Natural and Cultural History

#MuseumfromHome: Basketry is at the heart of the museum's Native American ethnographic collections. Today, we feature the Tlingit Spruce Root Baskets gallery, highlighting examples of Southeast Alaskan baskets traditionally used for collecting berries, roots, and shellfish. Learn about their geometric designs and motifs, and how the baskets have changed over time:

The Tlingit of southeast Alaska have produced some of the finest examples of two-strand twining; their spruce root baskets exhibit bold geometric designs in warm hues of red, orange, yellow, and br

The museum’s temporary #stayhome offices take a variety of forms, from visitor services coordinator Collin O’Coyne’s sun...
03/30/2020

The museum’s temporary #stayhome offices take a variety of forms, from visitor services coordinator Collin O’Coyne’s sunny spot to paleontologist Edward Davis’ sweet Zoom setup. What does your #wfh space look like? #howwequarantine #quarantine #quarantinelife #museumfromhome

#ArtifactFacts: Glass artifacts, like these uncovered near 6th Street in Eugene, often feature distinct mold lines and m...
03/30/2020

#ArtifactFacts: Glass artifacts, like these uncovered near 6th Street in Eugene, often feature distinct mold lines and manufacturer’s marks—making them especially revealing when it comes to time periods, origins, makers, and the ways that vessels were used. We’ll know more about these after they’re analyzed in our research #lab.

#historicalarchaeology #archaeologylab #culturalhistorymuseum #mnch #artifactsofinstagram

Quarantine fun: Play-doh stars become Play-doh flowers in the capable hand of young Vladimir, son of museum folklorist E...
03/29/2020

Quarantine fun: Play-doh stars become Play-doh flowers in the capable hand of young Vladimir, son of museum folklorist Emily. #howwequarantine #quarankiddos #quarantine #quarantinelife #familyfun #museum

03/28/2020
11 Mammoth

Missing our mammoths? We are, too. Make an origami mammoth for your #wfh desk, share a pic of the finished masterpiece, and tag us!

Never one for social distancing, Zara the dog is sticking close to her human, museum archaeologist Andrew Boehm, during ...
03/27/2020

Never one for social distancing, Zara the dog is sticking close to her human, museum archaeologist Andrew Boehm, during these quarantine days. #howwequarantine #archaeology #museumfromhome #uoregon #quarandoggo #quarantinelife #quarantine2020

There are coaches, and then there are Super Coaches. Bev Smith took the helm of the Ducks women’s basketball program in ...
03/27/2020

There are coaches, and then there are Super Coaches. Bev Smith took the helm of the Ducks women’s basketball program in 2001, guiding University of Oregon to a 22-13 record, a semifinal finish in the inaugural Pac-10 Tournament, and five wins in the Women’s National Invitation Tournament—all during her first season as head coach. At the outset of that season she said, “we’re not going to be the tallest team in the league, we’re not going to be the biggest team in terms of pounds. But we’re going to play it very tall and we’re going to have to play it very big.” Mission accomplished, we’d say.

#womeninsports #womenshistorymonth #naturalathletes #goducks

Like many of us, museum educator Robyn A. is working from home for now. Fortunately her cat Charlie is there to oversee ...
03/26/2020

Like many of us, museum educator Robyn A. is working from home for now. Fortunately her cat Charlie is there to oversee things. Rescued as a tiny kitten one fall day twelve years ago, Charlie clearly keeps the temporary office running smoothly. #howwequarantine #museumfromhome #quarankitty #quarantinelife #rescuecatsofinstagram

It’s no secret that many prehistoric animals were bigger than their relatives today, and salmon were no exception. In fa...
03/26/2020
Spike-toothed Salmon | Museum of Natural and Cultural History

It’s no secret that many prehistoric animals were bigger than their relatives today, and salmon were no exception. In fact, Oregon's spike-toothed salmon (Oncorhynchus rastrosus) could measure over seven feet long. Imagine a fish that big jumping up a waterfall during the annual salmon run! 😮 Spike-toothed salmon lived from the Miocene to the Pliocene (13 to 4 million years ago), and probably used their spike-like fangs to fight with other salmon during spawning. Learn more about the mighty spike-toothed salmon on our online collections gallery at mnch.uoregon.edu/collections-galleries/spike-toothed-salmon

The spike-toothed salmon of the Miocene to Pliocene (13 to 4 million years ago) of the Pacific Northwest, known as Oncorhynchus (Smilodonichthys) rastrosus to paleontologists, wa

Here’s Link, current officemate of our trusty exhibitions designer, Liz. #howwequarantine #catsofinstagram #quarantineli...
03/25/2020

Here’s Link, current officemate of our trusty exhibitions designer, Liz. #howwequarantine #catsofinstagram #quarantinelife #quarankitties #museum #uoregon #dinosaurs #paleontology

03/25/2020
Racing to Change: Student Life in the 1960s with Herman Brame

Get a glimpse into Eugene's civil rights years with UO alumnus and historian Herman Brame, and explore some of the key drivers behind successful social movements:

An interview with Herman Brame about student life at the University of Oregon in the 1960s. This video is a part of the Racing to Change exhibit at the Museu...

Check out our newest online web gallery! The East Burma Collection, generously donated to the museum by the family of Dr...
03/24/2020
East Burma Collection | Museum of Natural and Cultural History

Check out our newest online web gallery! The East Burma Collection, generously donated to the museum by the family of Dr. Erik Hjalmar East, chronicles a time of profound cultural change at the turn of the twentieth century, when modern Myanmar was just beginning to westernize. Juxtaposing historic photographs with cultural objects, the gallery offers a unique glimpse into the past:

The Chin Hills of southwestern Myanmar border India to the north and west and Bangladesh to the south. With altitudes of 5,000 to 8,000 feet, the region is rugged and remote.

03/22/2020

Meet the 20 million year old oreodont, and watch how museum volunteer Pat Ward extracts the fossil from the rock in the museum's paleontology lab.

Title IX was passed in 1972 and prohibits sex discrimination in education—including college sports.  But let’s be real: ...
03/20/2020

Title IX was passed in 1972 and prohibits sex discrimination in education—including college sports. But let’s be real: According to AAUW, nationally female students continue to have fewer athletic opportunities than their male counterparts, women’s sports programs still receive less funding than men’s programs, and female athletes get fewer scholarships than male athletes. What’s up with that? What’s needed to make Title IX live up to its full promise?

#womeninsports #womenshistorymonth #naturalathletes #equity #museumsarenotneutral

The museum is closed to the public for now, but don't let that stop you from exploring our collections! Now's a great ti...
03/18/2020
Collections Galleries | Museum of Natural and Cultural History

The museum is closed to the public for now, but don't let that stop you from exploring our collections! Now's a great time to take a virtual trip around the world through our online galleries. You can explore Australian Aboriginal bark paintings, Navajo and Pueblo weavings, Ethiopian handicrafts, and baleen baskets from the Arctic, to name just a few. Take a gander, and tell us what you learned!

The museum is continually digitizing its collections and making them available to our online visitors around the world. Explore our collections galleries today, and stay tuned as we add more.

Looking for reliable, evidence-based information about coronavirus? Science Magazine is maintaining a web page devoted t...
03/17/2020
Coronavirus: latest news

Looking for reliable, evidence-based information about coronavirus? Science Magazine is maintaining a web page devoted to all things COVID-19. It's a great resource, and it includes links to the latest in coronavirus research.

How researchers are fighting the spread of COVID-19

Can you imagine sliding into home base while wearing a skirt? For Lois Youngen and her fellow ballplayers, these things ...
03/17/2020

Can you imagine sliding into home base while wearing a skirt? For Lois Youngen and her fellow ballplayers, these things were a matter of course. In the 1950s, Youngen was a catcher and outfielder on the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, where players were expected to look like movie stars while playing like Joe DiMaggio. After a four-season career with AAGPBL and another year with the Allington All-Stars, Youngen joined the PE faculty at University of Oregon for what turned into a 36-year career, helping to pave the way for what would eventually become the Student Recreation Center.

#womeninsports #womenshistorymonth #naturalathletes #aleagueoftheirown #goducks

As many of you know, we've closed our exhibits and public spaces through Sunday, March 29. All museum events and tours, ...
03/16/2020
COVID-19 Updates | Museum of Natural and Cultural History

As many of you know, we've closed our exhibits and public spaces through Sunday, March 29. All museum events and tours, both onsite and offsite, have been canceled through Sunday, April 19. Our administrative offices remain open. Stay tuned to our COVID-19 Updates page for developing information about closures and future events. Be well, everyone ❤️

EXHIBITS CLOSED THROUGH MARCH 29 ALL EVENTS CANCELED THROUGH APRIL 19

03/12/2020

The University of Oregon is ramping up its proactive response to the coronavirus outbreak, and in accordance, we have decided to cancel tomorrow night's Women in Sports panel. Thank you for your understanding, and take good care!

Address

1680 East 15th Ave.
Eugene, OR
97403

Opening Hours

Tuesday 11:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 17:00
Thursday 11:00 - 20:00
Friday 11:00 - 17:00
Saturday 11:00 - 17:00
Sunday 11:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(541) 346-3024

Website

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Our Story

The museum is a place for making connections—to each other, to our past, and to our future. It's a place for digging into science, celebrating culture, and joining together to create a just and sustainable world.

Open to the public and known for our family-friendly science and culture exhibits, we’re the largest natural history museum between Seattle and San Francisco, and a global center for archaeological and paleontological research. Our mission is to enhance knowledge of Earth's environments and cultures, inspiring stewardship of our collective past, present, and future.

We are located near Hayward Field and next to the Knight Law Center on the east side of the University of Oregon campus.

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Comments

I found this in a creek bed, while out hiking in the woods, (Central Oregon). The first photo was taken while it was raining; the dark spots are rain drops. I also added a photo of a charcoal rub on paper, just for fun. I found some unusual petrified wood in the same creek also.
#likeachamp Fun at the opening Saturday
Thousands of artifacts have been found in the Willamette Valley for more than twenty years. They do not resemble any previously known pre-Columbian artifacts. Facebook.com/stonespeaker
It is fun, the exhibits while educational are not dry and many are quite moving.
With the UO cutting $225,000 from the MNCH budget, there's never been a better time to support the award-inning Museum of Natural & Cultural History! Go #DucksGive!
Study the evidence. The 'Phrygian Cap' appeared in Oregon long before its apparent Arrival in Anatolia. Over one thousand artifacts, collected in the Willamette Valley for twenty years have been posted.
I have my mother's old shoe, circa 1921? and one of my own, Only one of each. Would any museum be interested in putting them in a nursery setting? I hate the idea of throwing them away....
Here are two crabs prepared for the collection of the Museum of Natural and Cultural History at U of O. I’m showing them off before they go back into the drawers. These took a total of 22.5 hours to prepare and were done under the microscope in a couple of 30-minute segments each day. Orbitoplax weaveri crabs from the Lookingglass Fm. are roughly 50 MYO and part of the several thousand crabs donated by retired professor Eric Gustafson who volunteers at the museum to curate the collection. Eric says that Orbitoplax weaveri number more than any other taxon in the museum database.
I have posted hundreds of astonishing artifacts that were found in the Willamette Valley for over twenty years. Please study them carefully with both deductive and inductive reasoning. Facebook.com/stonespeaker
University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History was named a Most Astounding University Museum by EDsmart!
Over one thousand examples, collected for twenty years have been posted. Help from the University would be greatly appreciated. Thank You, Tom