The Museum of Natural and Cultural History

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History Come and visit us! We're open 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday and until 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. The Museum of Natural and Cultural History enhances knowledge of Earth's environments and cultures, inspiring stewardship of our collective past, present, and future.
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The MNCH, a public museum at the University of Oregon, is the largest natural history museum between Seattle and San Francisco, and a global center for archaeological and paleontological research. The museum headquarters and public spaces are housed in a distinctive building inspired by Pacific Northwest Native longhouse design. We are located near historic Hayward Field and next to the Knight Law Center on the east side of the UO campus.

#ArtifactFacts: Oregon's ancient basketry was made using three basic techniques: twining, plaiting, or coiling. Twining,...
08/10/2020

#ArtifactFacts: Oregon's ancient basketry was made using three basic techniques: twining, plaiting, or coiling. Twining, in which a pair of weft elements is twisted (or twined) around opposing warp elements, is the most commonly found. This incredibly well-preserved tray from Connley Caves is one example of twined basketry, dating back 4,830 years.

Our "Racing to Change" exhibit has reopened. Come explore Eugene's legacies of racism and the unceasing efforts of its B...
08/07/2020

Our "Racing to Change" exhibit has reopened. Come explore Eugene's legacies of racism and the unceasing efforts of its Black communities to bring about change. Plan your visit at https://mnch.uoregon.edu/visit

We are delighted to hear that H’Klumaiyat Roberta Joy Kirk has won a 2020 Governor’s Arts Award! A member of the Confede...
08/06/2020

We are delighted to hear that H’Klumaiyat Roberta Joy Kirk has won a 2020 Governor’s Arts Award! A member of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon, Kirk is a master artist known for her beadwork, dentalium work, and Plateau dress-making. Tenino, Wasq'u on her mother’s side and Diné on her father’s side, she is a three-time Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program awardee through the museum's Oregon Folklife Network. We heartily congratulate her on this well-deserved award! #Nativearts #traditionalarts #folklife #beadwork #warmspringsreservation

Welcome back! We reopen to the public today with new, limited hours. Plan your visit at https://mnch.uoregon.edu/visit a...
08/05/2020

Welcome back! We reopen to the public today with new, limited hours. Plan your visit at https://mnch.uoregon.edu/visit and come explore Oregon's deep history.

The museum reopens its doors tomorrow, inviting you back to our exhibits exploring Black history, Indigenous cultures, c...
08/04/2020

The museum reopens its doors tomorrow, inviting you back to our exhibits exploring Black history, Indigenous cultures, climate, and justice in Oregon. Learn about the safety measures we have in place and plan your visit at https://mnch.uoregon.edu/visit

Did you know that Eugene was home to a Chinese apothecary during the early 20th century? Neither did we, until our archa...
08/03/2020

Did you know that Eugene was home to a Chinese apothecary during the early 20th century? Neither did we, until our archaeologists started uncovering artifacts like these at a low-income housing development site downtown. Clues from the artifacts, US Census records, and historic city directories tell us that there was a Chinese restaurant, tea room, and apothecary at the site between 1912 and 1925, owned by Kee and Mary Wing—but the details are sparse, probably owing to the overt racism, violence, and federal exclusion laws Chinese immigrants faced in the U.S. at the time. As with so many Oregon stories, historical archaeology is helping us piece together a more complete picture of the state's diverse heritage.

The honorable John Lewis urged us to "[n]ever, ever be afraid to make some noise and get in good trouble, necessary trou...
07/29/2020
Remembering Congressman John R. Lewis

The honorable John Lewis urged us to "[n]ever, ever be afraid to make some noise and get in good trouble, necessary trouble." Visit the Smithsonian's online tribute to Representative Lewis and explore the life and work of this extraordinary advocate for justice. ❤️

John Robert Lewis (February 21, 1940–July 17, 2020) was a giant in the civil rights movement whose wisdom, courage, and moral clarity earned him the nickname “the conscience of the Congress” during hi... Learn more

We're reopening with limited hours beginning Aug 5. Our reopening plan prioritizes visitors' health and safety while rec...
07/29/2020

We're reopening with limited hours beginning Aug 5. Our reopening plan prioritizes visitors' health and safety while recognizing the importance of community access to exhibits on Indigenous cultures, social justice, and environmental stewardship. Plan your visit: https://mnch.uoregon.edu/visit

Invest today in Black student success at the University of Oregon! Thanks to the Tarbell Family Foundation's recent gift...
07/23/2020
Advancing a Vision: Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center

Invest today in Black student success at the University of Oregon! Thanks to the Tarbell Family Foundation's recent gift in memory of George Floyd, all gifts in support of the Black Cultural Center made by August 5 will be matched up to a total of $20,000 💚💛

Help University of Oregon raise $20,000 for the project: Advancing a Vision: Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center. Your gift will make a difference!

#Preschool families: Have you checked out this month's Virtual Little Wonders yet? Head on over to our website to try ou...
07/22/2020

#Preschool families: Have you checked out this month's Virtual Little Wonders yet? Head on over to our website to try out some fun science experiments and crafts. Snap a photo and tag us on social media, and let us know how your experiments went! https://mnch.uoregon.edu/virtual-little-wonders

07/21/2020

This summer, we've assembled 3,000 home activity kits so families all around the state can delve into science and culture and celebrate the ingenuity of Northwest Native American engineers. Check with your local library to see if our hands-on kits are coming to your community!

Oregon Native Peoples have passed a rich basket-making tradition from generation to generation over thousands of years. ...
07/20/2020

Oregon Native Peoples have passed a rich basket-making tradition from generation to generation over thousands of years. Explore these living traditions through our family-friendly crafting activities! https://mnch.uoregon.edu/learn/oregon-basketry

In 2017, researchers from three European universities joined MNCH archaeologist Dennis Jenkins at Oregon's Paisley Caves...
07/17/2020
14,000-Year-Old Poop Found in Oregon Cave Turns Out to Be Human

In 2017, researchers from three European universities joined MNCH archaeologist Dennis Jenkins at Oregon's Paisley Caves. Their aim? To help resolve a longstanding debate about when people first came to the Americas. The results of the study are in, confirming Jenkins' finding that people were camping at Paisley Caves as early as 14,200 years ago.

For archaeologists, ancient bones and stone tools are important lines of evidence, but sometimes the answers to our past can be found in piles of human poop, as an important new analysis shows.

Calling all #preschoolers and their adults: Join us online for Virtual Little Wonders today! This month, we're celebrati...
07/17/2020

Calling all #preschoolers and their adults: Join us online for Virtual Little Wonders today! This month, we're celebrating the amazing world of science through a story, fun experiments, and science-y crafts. https://mnch.uoregon.edu/virtual-little-wonders

07/14/2020
Indigenizing Curatorial Practice

Through their exhibits, museums around the world tell stories of Native people’s cultures—but these stories are too often told by non-Native voices and presented on non-Native terms. How can we continue to move Indigenous methodologies to the center of the museum field, ensuring meaningful collaboration and cultural responsiveness? Indigenous anthropologist Deana Dartt (Chumash) has some answers. Check out her Evening Talk at the Museum to learn more.

On October 20, 2017, the Museum of Natural and Cultural History welcomed anthropologist, curator, and activist Deana Dartt (Chumash) as a part of our annual ...

Last week, U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement made the deeply troubling announcement that international students ...
07/13/2020
UO, 19 others file suit to block ICE international student rules

Last week, U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement made the deeply troubling announcement that international students will be required to leave the country if their universities move to exclusively online learning in the fall. Today, the University of Oregon filed as lead plaintiff in a lawsuit to prevent the proposed rule from taking effect. The museum applauds this move and stands with international students all across the nation, nearly 2000 of whom we are proud to call Ducks.

The suit challenges a change barring entry of those who take only online courses in fall

07/09/2020
Mic Crenshaw ft. Dead Prez - Superheroes

This week's spotlighted #OregonBlackArtist is Mic Crenshaw, who has much to teach us about the hip hop's African roots as well as its evolution over time and geography. Check out Superheroes, a musical collaboration with dead prez that celebrates the heroic in the everyday. [Parental Advisory at 1:54: "..surviving this sh*t."]

Legendary spoken word artist and socially conscious emcee Mic Crenshaw teamed up with Dead Prez for a classic tribute to everyday people. With a beat produce...

07/07/2020
Reflections on the Afrikan HipHop Caravan: Mic Crenshaw at TEDxConcordiaUPortland

This week, the museum's Oregon Folklife Network spotlights Portland-based MC, poet, activist, and educator Mic Crenshaw, an #OregonBlackArtist whose lyrics critically analyze race, class, and culture in modern society. Learn more about Mic and the Afrikan Hip Hop Caravan, an international organization for which he serves as Lead U.S. Organizer.

Chicago-born poet and emcee Michael (Mic) Crenshaw fell in love with music at a young age while living in Minneapolis. His teenage years were challenging as ...

We're celebrating our 2020 graduates! 🎓 These are just a few of the outstanding grads who worked at the museum during th...
07/02/2020

We're celebrating our 2020 graduates! 🎓 These are just a few of the outstanding grads who worked at the museum during the course of their @uoregon studies. It's bittersweet to see them go, but we're super excited to see where they’re headed. Congratulations to Abbey, Delaney, Emily, and all our other graduates! #GoDucks #duckgrad20

Durante miles de años, los nativos de Norteamérica han utilizado la ciencia y la ingeniería para crear herramientas, cas...
06/29/2020

Durante miles de años, los nativos de Norteamérica han utilizado la ciencia y la ingeniería para crear herramientas, casas, ropa, y más. Explora los utensilios que diseñaron los primeros ingenieros de Oregón ¡y prueba tus propias destrezas de ingeniería! https://mnch.uoregon.edu/learn/la-ingenieria-traves-del-tiempo

For thousands of years, Native Americans have used science and engineering to create tools, homes, clothing, and more. E...
06/29/2020

For thousands of years, Native Americans have used science and engineering to create tools, homes, clothing, and more. Explore artifacts designed by Oregon's first engineers, and try out your own engineering skills at https://mnch.uoregon.edu/learn/engineering-through-time

06/26/2020
The Museum of Natural and Cultural History

This Sunday marks the 51st anniversary of the #StonewallRiots, a series of protests against police harassment that sparked the contemporary LGBTQIA+ rights movement. Trans activists, drag performers, and community organizers were at the forefront of these acts of resistance in 1969, and many were people of color who've been left out of the historical narrative until recently—figures like Marsha P. Johnson, Sylvia Rivera, and Stormé DeLarverie, who are now increasingly recognized as movement heroes. Check out UO historian Ellen Herman's museum talk to learn more about Stonewall and the movement it helped birth:
https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?v=542974323111822

Happening now! University of Oregon history professor and vice provost Ellen Herman shares how the riots at the Stonewall Inn in 1969 were a turning point in LGBTQ history. Join us here on Facebook Live.

The Pacific Northwest rocks! Celebrate the region’s geology with Earth science games and hands-on activities for the who...
06/22/2020

The Pacific Northwest rocks! Celebrate the region’s geology with Earth science games and hands-on activities for the whole family. http://ow.ly/28te50AcQJ8 #MuseumFromHome

Stay connected and stay curious with the Museum of Natural and Cultural History. Our new Explore from Home program offer...
06/20/2020

Stay connected and stay curious with the Museum of Natural and Cultural History. Our new Explore from Home program offers free virtual museum adventures for the whole family—featuring hands-on science and culture activities, crafts, games, and more! https://mnch.uoregon.edu/explore-home #MuseumFromHome

Mantente conectado y mantén tu curiosidad con el Museo de Historia Natural y Cultural. Nuestro nuevo programa Explora de...
06/20/2020

Mantente conectado y mantén tu curiosidad con el Museo de Historia Natural y Cultural. Nuestro nuevo programa Explora desde Casa ofrece aventuras en el museo virtuales y gratuitas para toda la familia y presenta actividades científicas y culturales prácticas, manualidades, juegos, ¡y más! https://mnch.uoregon.edu/explora-desde-casa

#Preschoolers and their adults are invited to our newest Virtual Little Wonders! 🦉 Join us and our special guests, Casca...
06/19/2020

#Preschoolers and their adults are invited to our newest Virtual Little Wonders! 🦉 Join us and our special guests, Cascades Raptor Center for a story, crafts, videos, and more—all celebrating birds in their fine, feathered glory. https://mnch.uoregon.edu/virtual-little-wonders

What's in a name? Quite a lot, if the name in question reflects a history of opression. Included in the Black Student Ta...
06/11/2020

What's in a name? Quite a lot, if the name in question reflects a history of opression. Included in the Black Student Task Force's 2015 demands to the University of Oregon was a call for the renaming of all campus buildings named after known racists. As discussed in our Racing to Change exhibit, in 2017 the UO renamed Dunn Hall in honor of DeNorval Unthank Jr., the university's first Black architecture graduate. But it declined to rename Deady Hall, named after a judge who was both a vocal racist and a strong supporter of the newly founded UO. This week, at the urging of UO trustee Andrew Colas, President Michael Schill sent a recommendation to dename Deady Hall to the university’s Board of Trustees. The board will hold a special meeting in late June to address the recommendation.

The museum strongly supports the renaming recommendation and looks forward to further university action in support of Black students' wellbeing, inclusion, and success.

You can read President Schill's full statement here: https://president.uoregon.edu/deady-hall-denaming

Black students at the University of Oregon have been advocating for justice for generations. In 1968, the Black Student ...
06/10/2020

Black students at the University of Oregon have been advocating for justice for generations. In 1968, the Black Student Union issued a set of demands calling on UO to hire more Black faculty, increase funding for Black students, institute Black culture and heritage studies, and more. In 2015, the Black Student Task Force released a second and very similar set of demands, which among other things led to the creation of the Black Cultural Center that opened last fall. Last week, the Black Student Collective issued an updated set of demands on the UO—demands that echo the 1968 set while also calling for a direct response to police brutality, the removal of campus monuments that perpetuate white supremacism, and the creation of sustainable funding for the Black Cultural Center. Take a look at these excerpts from the 1968 and 2015 demands, as seen in our Racing to Change exhibit. How and why have they changed over time? Which demands remain the same? What does it all reflect about race, equity, and justice at the UO over the last 52 years?

Racism has deep roots and a lasting legacy in Oregon. Confronting this truth is a necessary step in advancing justice in...
06/05/2020

Racism has deep roots and a lasting legacy in Oregon. Confronting this truth is a necessary step in advancing justice in our communities and institutions. Last fall, in partnership with Oregon Black Pioneers, the museum opened Racing to Change—an exhibit that illuminates the history of systemic racism in Eugene and at the University of Oregon, and honors the unceasing efforts of Oregon’s Black communities to bring about needed change. While the public exhibit is temporarily closed due to COVID-19, we want to continue the dialogue it has inspired, to keep expanding our collective understanding of racism, white privilege, and the ways they play out in our community. If you haven’t already, check out the Racing to Change video collection and listen as members of Eugene’s Black communities share their experiences with racism, Black resistance, and Black resilience: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UsE2ncdgR4w&list=PLrD9PUAkm-FVtJBGE9T9EiMz29sZJ4935

Address

1680 East 15th Ave.
Eugene, OR
97403

Opening Hours

Tuesday 11:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 17:00
Thursday 11:00 - 20:00
Friday 11:00 - 17:00
Saturday 11:00 - 17:00
Sunday 11:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(541) 346-3024

Website

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The museum is a place for making connections—to each other, to our past, and to our future. It's a place for digging into science, celebrating culture, and joining together to create a just and sustainable world.

Open to the public and known for our family-friendly science and culture exhibits, we’re the largest natural history museum between Seattle and San Francisco, and a global center for archaeological and paleontological research. Our mission is to enhance knowledge of Earth's environments and cultures, inspiring stewardship of our collective past, present, and future.

We are located near Hayward Field and next to the Knight Law Center on the east side of the University of Oregon campus.

Nearby museums


Comments

When the Kent State shootings happened 50 years ago this week my university in Portland, Oregon picked up the torch and carried it forward. Ever since we've felt a connection in solidarity with KSU and Ohio.
I have found thousands of astonishing artifacts in the Willamette Valley in more than twenty years.
I found this in a creek bed, while out hiking in the woods, (Central Oregon). The first photo was taken while it was raining; the dark spots are rain drops. I also added a photo of a charcoal rub on paper, just for fun. I found some unusual petrified wood in the same creek also.
#likeachamp Fun at the opening Saturday
Thousands of artifacts have been found in the Willamette Valley for more than twenty years. They do not resemble any previously known pre-Columbian artifacts. Facebook.com/stonespeaker
It is fun, the exhibits while educational are not dry and many are quite moving.
With the UO cutting $225,000 from the MNCH budget, there's never been a better time to support the award-inning Museum of Natural & Cultural History! Go #DucksGive!
Study the evidence. The 'Phrygian Cap' appeared in Oregon long before its apparent Arrival in Anatolia. Over one thousand artifacts, collected in the Willamette Valley for twenty years have been posted.
I have my mother's old shoe, circa 1921? and one of my own, Only one of each. Would any museum be interested in putting them in a nursery setting? I hate the idea of throwing them away....
Here are two crabs prepared for the collection of the Museum of Natural and Cultural History at U of O. I’m showing them off before they go back into the drawers. These took a total of 22.5 hours to prepare and were done under the microscope in a couple of 30-minute segments each day. Orbitoplax weaveri crabs from the Lookingglass Fm. are roughly 50 MYO and part of the several thousand crabs donated by retired professor Eric Gustafson who volunteers at the museum to curate the collection. Eric says that Orbitoplax weaveri number more than any other taxon in the museum database.
I have posted hundreds of astonishing artifacts that were found in the Willamette Valley for over twenty years. Please study them carefully with both deductive and inductive reasoning. Facebook.com/stonespeaker
University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History was named a Most Astounding University Museum by EDsmart!