The Shelton-McMurphey-Johnson House

The Shelton-McMurphey-Johnson House The Shelton McMurphey Johnson House is Eugene, Oregon's Victorian house museum. It is open for tours and available for rentals. On display are period furniture, glassware, and photos of historic Eugene, as well as changing exhibits.
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Our favorite Tea proprietor was featured in Stir-Tea-Coffee Magazine!
06/18/2020
Q&A: Angela McDonald

Our favorite Tea proprietor was featured in Stir-Tea-Coffee Magazine!

Angela McDonald took on the role of president for the US League of Tea Growers in 2019. She has owned Oregon Tea Traders in Eugene, Oregon since 2011 and currently teaches classes about growing and drinking tea across the country.

#TBT A campaign advertisement in the November 1920 edition of Needlecraft featuring James Harding and Calvin Coolidge.
06/18/2020

#TBT A campaign advertisement in the November 1920 edition of Needlecraft featuring James Harding and Calvin Coolidge.

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Broadside, campaign advertisement featuring Warren G. Harding and Calvin Coolidge in Needlecraft, November 1920. 1980.0606.139.

(Reposted to change the font in the photo of the recipe)Have a Cup of TeaWe are partnering with Oregon Tea Traders for a...
06/17/2020

(Reposted to change the font in the photo of the recipe)

Have a Cup of Tea
We are partnering with Oregon Tea Traders for a fundraiser for the Shelton McMurphey Johnson House on July 11th. We thought it would be fun to do a collective cooking project for this event. Zoolbia is a traditional Persian Pastry. It is deep fried and served with tea. If you are making this with the kiddos, you can dust with nonpareil sprinkles for a colorful pop. The Orange Blossom Water is available at El Torito Market at 1333 7th Ave Eugene. - Event Coordinator Elizabeth Stuart

Zoolbia
2 cups cornstarch
1 cup plain yogurt
1/4¼ cup all-purpose flour - sifted
1 teaspoon cardamom
3 tablespoon Orange Blossom Water
1 ½ tablespoon melted butter
½ tsp baking soda
Neutral oil for frying

Syrup
2 cups granulated sugar
1 ½ cup water
1/4 cup Orange Blossom Water
1 teaspoon cardamom
2 slices of lemon (this keeps the syrup from crystalizing)

Directions
Syrup
1. Start syrup first. Combine all ingredients in a large pot. Keep at a simmer until syrup is thickened.

Pastry
1. In a large bowl mix the cornstarch and yogurt together. Let rest for 5 minutes.
2. While mixing add all-purpose flour, cardamom, melted butter, and baking soda. Mix until well
combined. Let rest for 30 minutes.
3. Place batter in pastry bag or large Ziploc bag. When you are ready to fry just snip a corner of the bag.
4. Place three inches of oil in a large frying pan. Heat until 375F.
5. In a circular motion pour batter in a four-inch spiral into the hot oil. Fry until golden brown on one side then flip and fry on the other side.
6. Lift spiral out of oil, let drain over pan, and place pastry directly into syrup. Let soak in syrup for one minute.
7. Drain pastry on rack. Enjoy with a black tea from Oregon Tea Traders.

#suffrage100  There is a ton of great resources here for teachers and students a like.
06/17/2020
Nevertheless, They Persisted: Women’s Voting Rights and the 19th Amendment

#suffrage100 There is a ton of great resources here for teachers and students a like.

This original exhibit connects Oregon history to the national history of woman suffrage and commemorates the bravery of the women (and men) who demanded the vote and used their rights to shape our nation and our world.

Lots of summer camp prep happening... #thisplacematters #historichomes #victorian #eugene #oldfashionedskills
06/17/2020

Lots of summer camp prep happening... #thisplacematters #historichomes #victorian #eugene #oldfashionedskills

Well behaved women rarely make history
06/16/2020

Well behaved women rarely make history

Peaceful protestors at the White House arrested for “obstructing traffic”?

Protestors arrested for climbing a statue?

Did this occur in 2020? Yes! But it also happened during 1917-1918 when the National Woman’s Party (NWP) engaged in voting rights activism by picketing the White House in silent protest.



This tactic of the “Silent Sentinels was a first, considered radical, and harshly suppressed by authorities. Several Oregon members of the NWP were among the picketers.



Explore this timely history here: http://www.oregonwomenshistory.org/oregon-women-protest-for-suffrage-national-womans-party-members-in-oregon-and-in-washington-d-c-1917-1918/



Newspaper source: “Portland Girls To Serve Jail Term,” Oregonian, November 15, 1917, 5.

#TriviaTuesday Wiley Griffon (sometimes spelled "Griffin") poses with the mule-drawn streetcar that he drove from Willam...
06/16/2020
s3.amazonaws.com

#TriviaTuesday Wiley Griffon (sometimes spelled "Griffin") poses with the mule-drawn streetcar that he drove from Willamette Street to the University of Oregon. The mule-driven line was owned by Henry W. Holden, and was later replaced by Portland, Eugene & Eastern Company's electric line. Wiley Griffon was one of Eugene's first black (African-American) residents. This photo is part of the Shelton McMurphey collection at the Lane County History Museum.

You can learn more about Mr. Griffon at: https://hiddenhistory.uoregon.edu/items/show/1

Preparing for our Victorian Finishing School Summer Camp kits. Next step... embroidery
06/15/2020

Preparing for our Victorian Finishing School Summer Camp kits. Next step... embroidery

National Women's History Museum
06/15/2020
National Women's History Museum

National Women's History Museum

"The prominence of black women in these protests is not a sudden development. In taking to the streets in support of their goals, they are building upon a rich tradition of black women’s organizing."

06/14/2020

Take yourself on a world tour of black teas! This sampler includes an ounce each of black teas from:

Ceylon (Sri Lanka)

Colombia

Kenya

Darjeeling, India

Yunnan Province, China

Along with having the tea delivered to your door, you will be invited to brew and drink them along with a live Zoom class webinar about these teas with our founder, Angela McDonald. The class will be held on July 11th at 11 am.

Benefits from this class will be donated to the Shelton McMurphey Johnson House!

https://oregonteatraders.com/collections/black-tea/products/black-tea-world-tour-zoom-class

Thank you to the Eugene Hotel Retirement Community for hosting our "The Work that was Done" exhibit.
06/13/2020

Thank you to the Eugene Hotel Retirement Community for hosting our "The Work that was Done" exhibit.

The first of our two suffrage themed exhibits opened on February 17, 2020. We look at the work that it took to not only pass the 19th Amendment, but the continued struggle for enfranchisement and equality for everyone.

Lots and lots of people are asking what they can do. There are all kinds of options.
06/12/2020

Lots and lots of people are asking what they can do. There are all kinds of options.

Thanks to the Henry Plant Museum for this fun activity!
06/11/2020

Thanks to the Henry Plant Museum for this fun activity!

#TBT Racism is tied into our very basic life pursuits, including voting. POC have been fighting this fight for a long ti...
06/11/2020

#TBT Racism is tied into our very basic life pursuits, including voting. POC have been fighting this fight for a long time.

*Sessions will not be recorded.*Any participant may be anonymous if they so choose. You may choose to participate with o...
06/10/2020
Community Conversations - Oregon Department of Justice

*Sessions will not be recorded.
*Any participant may be anonymous if they so choose. You may choose to participate with or without your name and/or organization spelled out on the right side of the screen, you can choose not to show any video of yourself by clicking the no video icon at the bottom of your screen, you can choose to call in anonymously and will be identified only as Caller 1, 2, 3, etc.
*It is important to us that we make these conversations a safe place to share and accessible to communication going both ways.

What Gets in the Way? LET’S TALK ABOUT… Your experiences with Institutional racism and implicit bias Oregon’s new hate crime law How Oregon DOJ can engage with your community The time for meaningful change is now. Help us open pathways to justice & support for marginalized & oppressed people i...

Take a Moment and Listen My daughter is teaching me things this week. She has recommended books, podcasts, and is resear...
06/10/2020

Take a Moment and Listen
My daughter is teaching me things this week. She has recommended books, podcasts, and is researching people of color businesses to support. I am listening. My recommendation for this week is go out into your communities
and listen like everyone is your child. Love them, hear them,
and take action to make us a stronger society. - SMJ House Event Coordinator Elizabeth Stuart.

Stuffed Shrimp

12 largest shrimp you can find.
1/2 lb salad shrimp
1/4 lb bay scallop
1/2 cup breadcrumbs
1/4 cup good mayonnaise
1/4 tsp Old Bay
1/4 tsp salt
1/8 - 1/4 tsp Cayenne Pepper
Zest of ½ small lemon
1 stick butter - melted

DIRECTIONS
Preheat Oven to 350
1. De-vein and split shrimp down back so they stand up
2. Place shrimp and scallops in the food processor. Mix for 30 to 40 seconds until a paste forms but still chunky
3 Place in a medium size bowl and add rest of the ingredients. (excluding butter) and mix gently with spoon
4. Roll seafood mix into balls and place in shrimp rolling the tail up over the top of the ball. This works as a handle for guests to pick up Stuffed Shrimp.
5. Place shrimp on a cookie sheet with a lip. Flood the cookie sheet with the melted butter. This keeps the shrimp from drying out while cooking.
6. Place cookie sheet with shrimp in the oven. Bake for 15 min - 18 min until shrimp are opaque and stuffing is a light golden brown.

06/10/2020
PBS

#suffrage100 Have you watched this yet?

The right to vote wasn't given to women — they fought for it, and won. Stream #TheVotePBS from @AmericanExperiencePBS before the broadcast premiere with PBS Passport: https://to.pbs.org/2A4KPlf

#WreathWednesday Show your support right at your front door.
06/10/2020
Black Lives Matter/African Wreath/Celebrating Red/Black/Green/No Justice/No Peace/Equal Rights/All LIVES Matter/B.L.M. Hanging Door Wreath

#WreathWednesday Show your support right at your front door.

~ A 22 Work Rail Deco Mesh, Swag Door Wreath, Black African Angel Door Wreath ~ Materials Used: ~ African American Decorations of, Red, Gold, Green & Black Poly Deco Material ~ Narrow Red Poly Deco Mesh, 10 x 10 yd ~ Narrow Gold Poly Deco Mesh, 10 x 10 yd ~ Emerald Poly Deco Mesh, 10 x 10 yd ~

We are offering our Victorian Finishing School as a Camp "In A Box"! All the "ed'fun'cational" activities together in an...
06/09/2020
2020 Summer Camp "In a Box" - SMJ House

We are offering our Victorian Finishing School as a Camp "In A Box"! All the "ed'fun'cational" activities together in an easy kit for your youngster to do on their own time in the safety of your own home. We will be offering optional virtual activities for those who are interested...

This will be three days of playing dress-up, while learning a bit of history along the way. Each student will learn a few “Victorian life skills” that are just important today as they were then.

06/09/2020

#TriviaTuesday The Oregon Black Pioneers is an all volunteer nonprofit organization based in Salem, Oregon. It was founded in 1993 and incorporated in 1994 to do research and educate Oregonians about African-Americans’ contributions to Oregon’s history. Within the next few years, the organization developed a small resource booklet and study guide on Oregon’s black history and distributed it through the Salem-Keizer School District and Marion County Historical Society. http://www.oregonblackpioneers.org/blog/home/

The Oregon Historical Society put together this great blog post pulling together some of the work they have done on race...
06/08/2020
“History is who we are and why we are the way we are”

The Oregon Historical Society put together this great blog post pulling together some of the work they have done on race in Oregon.

Eliza E. Canty-Jones, editor of the Oregon Historical Quarterly, shares Oregon Historical Society resources that highlight the work of black scholars, activists, and community leaders who shared their experiences, insights, and analyses about racism, white supremacy, and resistance.

06/08/2020
Webinar - Picturing Political Power: Images in the Women’s Suffrage Movement

The Massachusetts Historical Society hosted a virtual discussion about a new book, Picturing Political Power last week. I found it a really interesting discussion about how images impact our political lives.

Picturing Political Power offers a comprehensive analysis of the connection between images, gender, and power. This examination of the fights that led to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment explores how suffragists pioneered one of the first extensive visual campaigns in modern American history. Prof. Allison Lange shows how pictures, from early engravings and photographs to colorful posters, proved central to suffragists’ efforts to change expectations for women, fighting back against the accepted norms of their times. Picturing Political Power demonstrates the centrality of visual politics to American women’s campaigns throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, revealing the power of images to change history.

-- Webinar recorded 3 June 2020 -- - Allison K. Lange, Wentworth Institute of Technology, in conversation with Catherine Allgor, MHS Picturing Political Powe...

If you haven't had a chance to check out this exhibit at the MNCH, please make sure you put it on your list of to-do's a...
06/05/2020

If you haven't had a chance to check out this exhibit at the MNCH, please make sure you put it on your list of to-do's after they reopen.

Racism has deep roots and a lasting legacy in Oregon. Confronting this truth is a necessary step in advancing justice in our communities and institutions. Last fall, in partnership with Oregon Black Pioneers, the museum opened Racing to Change—an exhibit that illuminates the history of systemic racism in Eugene and at the University of Oregon, and honors the unceasing efforts of Oregon’s Black communities to bring about needed change. While the public exhibit is temporarily closed due to COVID-19, we want to continue the dialogue it has inspired, to keep expanding our collective understanding of racism, white privilege, and the ways they play out in our community. If you haven’t already, check out the Racing to Change video collection and listen as members of Eugene’s Black communities share their experiences with racism, Black resistance, and Black resilience: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UsE2ncdgR4w&list=PLrD9PUAkm-FVtJBGE9T9EiMz29sZJ4935

We wouldn't be able to do what we do without help from our friends!
06/04/2020

We wouldn't be able to do what we do without help from our friends!

We wouldn't be able to do what we do without help from our friends!

#TBT Suffrage was/is for everyone.
06/04/2020

#TBT Suffrage was/is for everyone.

Easy recipe from us this week. We hope you like it.
06/03/2020

Easy recipe from us this week. We hope you like it.

#WreathWednesday I love this from Maya Angelou
06/03/2020
Found this on Pinterest

#WreathWednesday I love this from Maya Angelou

Jun 22, 2014 - This Pin was discovered by Cat ( Cheryl) Martin. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest

Silence is violence. And because we have a voice, we should use it to amplify those who are not able to speak. The staff...
06/02/2020
assets.uua.org

Silence is violence. And because we have a voice, we should use it to amplify those who are not able to speak.

The staff and board of Shelton McMurphey Johnson House acknowledges the responsibility we have as a cultural and educational institution in our community. SMJ House has started work on how we can better address equity and inclusion in presenting the history of our community, and using our voice to create a better future.

This process is still ongoing, but we recognize that all of us have an active role to play in acknowledging systemic racism and bigotry in all its forms. We also know, as a largely white community, we have to work harder to boost the BIPOC voices so that they can be heard clearly.

We look forward to continuing to work with those in our community that have perspectives that we do not so that we can learn and teach our community together.

(You can find this sign at https://www.cafepress.com/thewawhshop/14198161 - this store is not affiliated with SMJ House in any way.)

Consider supporting these organizations in Oregon working on restorative justice, law enforcement reform and anti-racist...
06/02/2020
Organizations Working on Racial Justice Issues » Oregon Community Foundation

Consider supporting these organizations in Oregon working on restorative justice, law enforcement reform and anti-racist initiatives. This list is dynamic and will be updated frequently.

Consider supporting these organizations in Oregon working on restorative justice, law enforcement reform and anti-racist initiatives. This list is dynamic and w...

06/01/2020
Community Alliance of Lane County (CALC)

Don't wait for the "right time".... every day is the right time.

Nonprofit based in Eugene, OR working for peace, dignity and social justice.
(The posting of events or updates does not imply an endorsement by CALC of the sponsoring groups or their political views.)

Looking for a safe place to reflect about the current events?
06/01/2020

Looking for a safe place to reflect about the current events?

From the Black Cultural Center: "The public and silent hate, racism, injustices, and murders all across the United States and around the world are incomprehensible. The Lyllye Reynolds-Parker Black Cultural Center wants to provide a venue for Black students, faculty, and staff to come together to talk about it. We encourage you to join us on Tuesday, June 2 to discuss the past week's events & the systemic racism, bigotry, & violence we have as Black people in the U.S. while we may be physically apart we want to come together and support the UO Black population. #uoblacklivesmatter
#blm #blacklivesmatter

If you are looking for ways to move our world forward  ....
05/30/2020
Anti-racism resources for white people

If you are looking for ways to move our world forward ....

This document is intended to serve as a resource to white people and parents to deepen our anti-racism work. If you haven’t engaged in anti-racism work in the past, start now. Feel free to circulate this document on social media and with your friends, family, and colleagues.

Address

303 Willamette St (enter Driveway Off 3rd And Pearl Streets)
Eugene, OR
97401

LTD Route 1, 51, 52

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 13:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 13:00
Thursday 10:00 - 13:00
Friday 10:00 - 13:00
Saturday 13:00 - 16:00
Sunday 13:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(541) 484-0808

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when The Shelton-McMurphey-Johnson House posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to The Shelton-McMurphey-Johnson House:

Videos

Our Story

The history of the Shelton McMurphey Johnson House, or the “Castle on the Hill,” begins with Thomas Winthrop Shelton and his wife, Adah. The Sheltons made the move from Salem to Eugene with their daughter, Alberta, in 1873. After buying 320 acres in downtown Eugene, including Skinner’s Butte, from pioneer Mary Skinner Cook, Dr. Shelton hired architect Walter Pugh to design a home to sit on the slope of the butte overlooking downtown and the train station. Nels Roney served as the builder. The home was completed in 1887; however, an aggrieved workman set fire to the house (only admitting to the crime once on his deathbed decades later) and the home had to be rebuilt. The building was completed in 1888, for a total cost of $8,000. 1888 is marked on the western elevation of the house.

Dr. Shelton, Adah, and Alberta lived in their Victorian castle until Dr. Shelton died of leukemia in 1893, at the age of 49. After her husband’s death, Adah moved to Portland and gave the house to her daughter. Alberta lived there with her husband, Robert McMurphey, whom she had met at a Christian Endeavor Conference in Minnesota. The couple had four daughters and two sons. Alberta and Robert were married in the parlor of the Shelton McMurphey Johnson House, and three of their four daughters went on to be married in the same place (in the alcove created by the cornering of the bay windows in the parlor).

Robert McMurphey died in 1921 in Roseburg, Oregon. Alberta spent the majority of her years living in the house atop the hill, and remained an active member of the community in Eugene for 28 years following her husband’s death. She died in a nursing home in Portland in 1949, and the house was sold to Eva Johnson and Eva’s husband, Curtis Johnson.

Dr. Eva Johnson was born in Pendleton, Oregon, but moved with her mother to Eugene following her father’s tragic death in the Blue Mountains. They lived with Eva’s grandmother in the Campbell House, just around the corner from the Shelton McMurphey Johnson House. Growing up, Eva was close to the McMurphey children, and spent much of her time at their home. She grew up loving the house and hoped to someday own it. When Alberta died, none of the six McMurphey children wanted to take on the responsibility to keep the house, so it went on the market and Eva purchased it for $30,000.

Eva and her husband Curtis had met at Rush Medical School in Chicago. They had two daughters and two sons, and spent 25 years practicing medicine in Madison, Wisconsin. Eva studied psychology and Curtis served in the U.S. Army, including a stint as the pediatrician for General Douglas MacArthur’s son. Once Curtis was honorably discharged in 1950, the Johnsons moved to Eugene and opened up offices within their new house on the hill. Eva specialized in personal and divorce counseling. Curtis died in 1967, and Eva continued to live in the house, renting rooms out to university students.

In 1975, Eva offered the house to her children; however, none of them were able to take it, so she made a deal with the Lane County Historical Society: they could have the house, but she would be able to live there until she died. She died in 1986 at age 97, and the house was subsequently transferred from Lane County to the City of Eugene. The house is now kept open to the public by the nonprofit Shelton McMurphey Johnson Associates.

Our mission is to preserve the heritage of the Shelton McMurphey Johnson House for the benefit of current and future generations. We accomplish our mission by providing educational opportunities for the community and by hosting events and exhibits that highlight the people and history of Eugene.

Nearby museums


Comments

When can we bid on wreaths?
Such a gorgeous backdrop for our Eugene Hexenbrut photo shoot! Thanks again!
and one more
Took a photo from the Hilton today, thought you'd enjoy it.
How do I become a member?
Thank you for such a lovely time today. The young woman who let us in is very knowledgeable about the house ,pleasant and a joy to speak with
Been here, really cool! Had to search for it by name because it's not on many of the "things to do in Eugene" pages on the internet.
Who would I speak to about a couple of program ideas or feedback? I appreciate what you have done historically, and have been following a couple of things on facebook. Thank you for your mission and efforts.
Good morning! I am a member of the Eugene Hexenbrut dance troupe(you can check us out on facebook). We "flashmob" and schedule dances at various venues and events around the Halloween season in the Eugene/ Springfield area. We would love to do a dance at your Witches High Tea in October. We do not charge a fee for our dance, we are a group of women who do this for fun! If you are interested, please get back to me and we will schedule a date and time to be there with our broomsticks at the ready!
Shelton McMurphey Johnson House is in Oregon's new afternoon tea directory from Destination Tea (www.destinationtea.com/oregon)! #ORAfternoonTea