Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA) is a premier Pacific Northwest visual arts center for exhibitions and collections of historic and contemporary art.
(80)

Operating as usual

06/07/2020
Reflections on the Origins and Meanings of Question Bridge: Black Males

In 1996, Chris Johnson started Question Bridge as a way to use media art to generate meaningful conversations about class and generational divisions within San Diego’s African American community. Question Bridge: Black Males critically explores challenging issues within the Black male community by instigating a transmedia conversation among Black men across the geographic, economic, generational, educational, and social strata of American society. Chris Johnson is a photographic and video artist, curator, and writer. A full professor of photography at the California College of the Arts, Johnson studied photography with Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, and Wynn Bullock.

In 1996, Chris Johnson started Question Bridge as a way to use media art to generate meaningful conversations about class and generational divisions within S...

The National Museum of African American History & Culture has provided a platform for resources and tools to learn how t...
06/06/2020
Talking About Race

The National Museum of African American History & Culture has provided a platform for resources and tools to learn how to talk about race. Learn how engaging constructively about race can make a difference. https://nmaahc.si.edu/learn/talking-about-race

Who Am I? I Am an Educator Whether you are teaching infants, adults, or any age in between, you are an influential part of your students’ learning and development. Educators too have an important role in communicating our history and culture. What and how the history of race in America is presente...

06/05/2020
Why Aren't There More Black People in Oregon? A Hidden History

Have you ever wondered why the Black population in Oregon is so small? Oregon has a history not only of Black exclusion and discrimination, but also of a vibrant Black culture that helped sustain many communities throughout the state—a history that is not taught in schools. Author and educator Walidah Imarisha discusses the hidden history of Oregon by posing the question “Why Aren’t There More Black People in Oregon?”

If you want to learn more about the Oregon Black History Timeline Walidah Imarisha developed, it is available on YouTube with social commentary provided by Walidah Imarisha: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fo2RVOunsZ8

A Conversation with Walidah Imarisha Have you ever wondered why the Black population in Oregon is so small? Oregon has a history not only of Black exclusion ...

The police slaying of George Floyd adds another appalling chapter to the chronicle of law enforcement killings of black ...
06/04/2020
Black Lives Matter | Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

The police slaying of George Floyd adds another appalling chapter to the chronicle of law enforcement killings of black people presented in the JSMA’s recent show by artist Carrie Mae Weems. Art is a powerful tool for social justice and we encourage you to watch People of a Darker Hue, the 15-minute video created by Weems. At the JSMA we believe museums have a responsibility to educate and teach from an anti-racist and equity lens through our exhibitions and education programs and not remain neutral in the fight to eliminate racism. When words are not enough, art can move people to change.

In this moment of crisis, what must be emphatically acknowledged is the continuing racist history of white supremacy in the United States and the incalculable pain, oppression, inequality, exhaustion, and untimely death sentences it exacts on black Americans in particular. Our anger at this history and our outrage that it continues should only be exceeded by our commitment to actions that will change it.

Please take a moment to read the powerful statement from our campus colleagues in the Black Strategies Group, the Black Cultural Center, and the Black Academic Excellence Team. We also want to recognize the University of Oregon leadership for speaking out and encourage you to read the statement from UO President Michael Schill, Provost and Senior Vice-President Patrick Phillips, Vice President for Equity and Inclusion Yvette Alex-Assensoh, and Kevin Marbury, Vice President for Student Life. We particularly agree that “we fully recognize we have much, much more to do here.”

As the JSMA plans how we will open our doors again later this year, we are already gearing up to work harder than ever to support racial justice. Black Lives Matter.

Additional resources: https://jsma.uoregon.edu/blacklivesmatter

The police slaying of George Floyd adds another appalling chapter to the chronicle of law enforcement killings of black people presented in the JSMA’s recent show by artist Carrie Mae Weems. Art is a powerful tool for social justice and we encourage you to watch People of a Darker Hue, the 15-minu...

This afternoon at 2 p.m., join JSMA curator Cheryl Hartup, UO Assistant Professor Mayra Bottaro and UO Associate Profess...
06/03/2020

This afternoon at 2 p.m., join JSMA curator Cheryl Hartup, UO Assistant Professor Mayra Bottaro and UO Associate Professor Laine Millar for a conversation about Performance as Artivism.

06/02/2020
Carrie Mae Weems: PEOPLE OF A DARKER HUE

For reasons unknown, I saw him running.
I saw him stop.
I saw him turn with raised hands.
I heard a shot.
I saw him fall.
For reasons unknown I reject my own knowledge and I deceived myself by
refusing to believe that this was possible.
Commemorating all of the fallen and all those who have endured.
Commemorating every black man who lives to see age twenty-one.
— Excerpt from “People of A Darker Hue,” recited by artist Carrie Mae Weems, 2016.

In outrage and sorrow for the black lives lost to police violence, the JSMA stands in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement and the community that demands an end to police brutality and racism in the struggle for social justice.

The killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery add another appalling chapter to the chronicle of killings of people of color presented in Carrie Mae Weems’s “The Usual Suspects.” Art is a powerful tool for social change. We will continue to provide a space for art and dialogue which addresses human rights issues, both historically and in the present. We believe museums have a responsibility to educate and teach from an anti-racist lens through our exhibitions and education programs and not remain neutral in the fight to eliminate racism.

[ Carrie Mae Weems. “People of A Darker Hue, 2016. Single channel video.]

⁣Jean Dubuffet (French, 1901-85)⠀"L' Amphibologique" 1965⠀Oil on canvas⠀⠀Jean Dubuffet studied painting as a young man b...
06/01/2020

⁣Jean Dubuffet (French, 1901-85)⠀
"L' Amphibologique" 1965⠀
Oil on canvas⠀

Jean Dubuffet studied painting as a young man but only seriously began making art at age 41. Rejecting his formal education, Dubuffet turned for inspiration to art created by children and the mentally ill. He termed his style art brut, or “raw art,” advocating for an expressive spontaneity untainted by the limitations of academic⠀
convention and dominant cultural trends. "L’Amphibologique" is a prime example, from the series "L’Hourloupe", which he began 1962 and worked on for over a decade.⠀

The series began as a cycle of drawings in red and blue ballpoint pen inspired by a doodle he produced while on the telephone. Translated through paint, the juxtaposition of the linear with organic curves, of black with primary colors, serves as a visual expression of the titles of the painting and the series. "Amphibologique", related to the French adjective "amphibolous", refers to the notion of syntactic ambiguity and the multiple meanings that can arise from the relationships between words and clauses within a sentence. "Hourloupe" merges the French verbs "hurler" (to oar) and "hululer" (to hoot) with the noun "loup" (wolf), creating an ambiguous phonetic jumble. As Dubuffet explained, “it evokes a character who’s at once somewhat enchanting and grotesque: a kind of tragic, growling, lumbering figure.” ⠀

[Image Jean Dubuffet (French, 1901-85) "L' Amphibologique" 1965. Oil on canvas.] #MasterworksMonday #MasterworksOnLoan #JeanDubuffet #FrenchArt

05/29/2020
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Explore the exhibition Claire Burbridge: Pathways to the Invisible from your home with the JSMA's new video series, A Minute Exhibit. If you want to learn more about the art and artist, we are offering a free download of the exhibition catalog: https://bit.ly/33PrSgR

Inspired by an almost microscopic examination of nature,Claire Burbridge creates beautifully drawn magical worlds. We recognize the sources of her creations—trees, flowers, plants, fungi, insects, and more—but her subjects morph from realistic depictions into a heightened reality that entices our vision and invigorates our spirit. “My works,” she says, “aim to draw attention to the mysteries of the physical world.” Born in London in 1971, Burbridge grew up on the west coast of Scotland and in rural Somerset. She received her BA in Fine Art and History of Art from Oxford University and her MA from Camberwell College of Arts, London. For many years, she produced sculptural pieces, but, in 20l0, when she moved to Ashland, Oregon, she returned to drawing and the study of nature. Wild nature greets her each morning at her hilltop home, whose backyard offers vistas of mountain ranges, unkempt gardens, and untamed creatures. Burbridge’s work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and is in many corporate, museum, and private collections.

Raúl Corrales is best known for documenting the Cuban revolution as Fidel Casto’s official photographer during the semin...
05/28/2020

Raúl Corrales is best known for documenting the Cuban revolution as Fidel Casto’s official photographer during the seminal dates of the uprising in 1959-1961. His pictures of Castro, Ché Guevara and guerrillas during and after the Revolution established him as one of the best of a small group of photographers that became known as Cuba's "epic revolutionary photographers". He is considered a national treasure in Cuba, and his work has been exhibited internationally.⠀

A gifted self-taught photographer, his first jobs in 1944 were as a photography assistant working for two newspapers run by the Socialist Party. Later in the 1950’s his pictures were extensively published in newspapers and magazines where he often took photos of local events.⠀

The Fishing Net is an exuberant pictorial capturing of an everyday scene- a man tossing his net to clean and prepare for the next usage. Taken in darkness probably with help of a flashbulb, the quick exposure grabs a fluid moment and transforms the mundane into the poetic. The fisherman’s outstretched arms take on the role of an imaginary dancer flinging a cape, the graphic tones enhance the shapes that are held in stasis.⠀
Corrales intuitively grabs hold of life and stills the fluid moment, allowing us forever to hang between what is and what will be.⠀

#STILLPhotography #NationalPhotographyMonth #Photography⠀

[Image: #RaúlCorrales. La atarraya, 1948 (print 2003). Gelatin Silver Print, 17 x 19-3/4 inches.Gift of Linda and Irwin Berman, in memory of Linda]⠀

05/27/2020
Every Word Was Once an Animal

We are excited to share a virtual gallery talk on the collaborative exhibition "Every Word Was Once an Animal"

The exhibition bridges art, science, dance, music, and animal studies. Watch the virtual gallery talk here:

Inspired by research on the gestural language and olfactory world of Western fence lizards, Every Word was Once an Animal explores the overlapping forces of ...

⁣“Art should be something that liberates your soul, provokes the imagination and encourages people to go further.” - Kei...
05/25/2020

⁣“Art should be something that liberates your soul, provokes the imagination and encourages people to go further.” - Keith Haring⠀

#KeithHaring moved to New York in 1978, beginning a short but prolific career inspired by the city's rich outpouring of masterful urban graffiti, its flowering hip-hop culture, and the conceptual gap between “high” and “low” art. Haring developed a deceptively simple pictorial language in which he rendered form, setting, and emotional energy through little more than line and monochromatic accents of color. An AIDS diagnosis in 1988 did little to deter the artist's creative output.⠀

"Untitled" features dozens of Haring’s iconic characters, who seem to dance in a celebration of life, contorting wildly to music we cannot hear. Completed shortly before the artist’s death, the painting demonstrates Haring’s professional and personal ambition to infuse art with commentaries on global issues like the AIDS crisis. Haring saw his disease as a reason to celebrate living, not to fear pain or an inevitable end. Wishing to accept his impending death without regret and limitation, Haring explained, “No matter how long you work, it’s always going to end sometime. And there’s always going to be things left undone…. If you live your life according to that, death is irrelevant. Everything I’m doing right now is exactly what I want to do.”⠀

[Image: Keith Haring (American, 1958-90). Untitled, 1990. Sumi Ink on board.] #MasterworksMonday #MasterworksOnLoan #MuseumFromHome #ArtForTheSociallyDistanced #PopArt #StreetArt

University of Oregon architecture student and JSMA student employee Anapaola Araujo Tupayachi has been exploring our col...
05/24/2020

University of Oregon architecture student and JSMA student employee Anapaola Araujo Tupayachi has been exploring our collections while staying home, and is sharing this intriguing work of art by Adrián Fernández Milanés, titled Sin título núm. 1 (Untitled No. 1) for Photography Month (in both Spanish and English!):

Las festividades de Parrandas en Remedios, Cuba, son la fuente de inspiración de Memorias pendientes, una serie de fotografías de Adrián Fernández Milanés. En esta fiesta callejera, tipo carnaval previo a la Navidad, estructuras de madera y/o metal imitan las fachadas de las iglesias en forma e imagen, creando el andamiaje para un “espectáculo de luces” con pirotecnia. Estas me recuerdan a mi infancia en mi ciudad natal, Cusco, Perú, pues allí también usamos estructuras similares con un poco de pirotecnia y detalles artísticos para expresar la euforia y alegría en las celebraciones, especialmente religiosas. En Perú como en Cuba, al finalizar las celebraciones “las vidas” de estas estructuras también finalizan.

Fernández Milanés colabora con un ingeniero, un arquitecto, y un diseñador para crear una imagen ambigua entre lo real y lo irreal. Él empieza con bocetos, construye una estructura de escala pequeña, toma una foto de la fachada trasera del modelo y virtualmente la introduce en un paisaje. Aquí, una estructura en desuso, quizás algo vulnerable, pero también imponente, está entre El Malecón vacío de La Habana y el mar y el cielo. Como un monumento detenido en el tiempo, la imagen nos conecta metafóricamente con la historia y realidad de la crisis por la que atraviesa Cuba por mucho tiempo.

¿Qué es lo que evoca Sin título núm. 1 en ti?


The Parrandas festivities in Remedios, Cuba, inspired Pending Memories, a series of photographs by Adrián Fernández Milanés. In this carnival-like street party just before Christmas, structures made of wood and/or metal, imitating the facades of churches, create scaffolds to support a "light show" with pyrotechnics. These remind me of my childhood in my hometown, Cusco, Peru, where we also use similar structures with pyrotechnics and artistic details to express euphoria and joy during celebrations, especially religious ones. In Peru, as in Cuba, the "lives" of these structures end with the celebration.

Fernández Milanés collaborates with an engineer, an architect, and a designer to create an ambiguous image between the real and the unreal. He begins with sketches, makes a small-scale structure, takes a photograph of the model’s rear facade, and introduces it virtually into a landscape. Here, a structure in disuse, perhaps somewhat vulnerable, but also imposing, stands between Havana’s empty ocean-side boulevard and the sea and sky. Like a monument arrested in time, the image connects us metaphorically with the history and current reality of the crisis Cuba has been going through for a long time.

What does Untitled No. 1 evoke for you?

[Image: Adrián Fernández Milanés, titled Sin título núm. 1 de la serie Memorias pendientes (Untitled No. 1 from Pending Memories series), 2018.]

Nothing like a little bit of color to brighten the day for this week’s #MuseumMomentofZen 🎨Happy Buddha consists of 100 ...
05/23/2020

Nothing like a little bit of color to brighten the day for this week’s #MuseumMomentofZen 🎨

Happy Buddha consists of 100 tree-inch square wooden blocks formed into a grid and varnished with a thick gloss coat. In each small block, a multi-colored Buddha is seated on a lotus pedestal. Kang Ik-Joong developed his series of Buddha paintings beginning in the 1990’s, but features the Buddha not as a religious icon, but as a ubiquitous being representing everyone including himself. The “happy” theme also appears in many of his works, suggesting Kang’s positive vision of life in which random combinations of multicolored blocks imply his desire to express a harmonious and connected universe.

Which one of the blocks is your favorite?

[Image: KANG Ik-Joong 姜益中 강익중. Happy Buddha (행복한 부처, Hangbokhan Bucheo), 2007. Crayon and tempera on pine board with Envirotex Lite polymer coating. H. 30-1/8 x W. 30-1/8 x D. 2 inches (image/frame)]

Image description: 100 multicolored blocks in a range of red, blue, green, yellow, orange and pink. Every square features a faceless Buddha in a different color sitting on a lotus flower.

05/21/2020
Global Engagement #NoPassportNeeded

Although Study Abroad trips have been canceled for this summer, University of Oregon students can still explore the world! #NoPassportNeeded

GEO Study Abroad is bringing the world to you this summer! Stay safe while making global connections with top faculty from around the world🌏

👉Special offer for Duck Parents and Grandparents: Enroll in a experience this summer and receive a $1,000 discount on a travel-based GEO study abroad program for your child or grandchild when programs resume normal operation.

This is "Global Engagement #NoPassportNeeded" by International Ducks on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Address

1430 Johnson Ln On The University Of Oregon Campus
Eugene, OR
97403

Lane Transit District EMX

Opening Hours

Wednesday 11:00 - 20:00
Thursday 11:00 - 17:00
Friday 11:00 - 17:00
Saturday 11:00 - 17:00
Sunday 11:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(541) 346-3027

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art:

Videos

Category


Other Art Museums in Eugene

Show All

Comments

You don't want to miss this FREE kick-off event for Fiesta Cultural, featuring live music by Son de Cuba and Los Cumbiamberos, mariachi, dance demos, kids art activities, a bilingual guided tour, tasty food, and more! https://www.facebook.com/events/505743273231802/
II am anxious to see the Barberini tapestries of Rome. Jan Hammer
The last of my 6 3'x4' oil on canvas paintings of my beautiful Royal Habsburg collection, featuring the family of Emperor Charles V.
hightly recommended!
volunteering at the Jordan Schnitzer, always Super!