San Diego Archaeological Center

San Diego Archaeological Center The Mission of the San Diego Archaeological Center is to preserve archaeological collections and promote their educational, scientific and cultural useto benefit a diverse public.
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The San Diego Archaeological Center is a museum where visitors can learn the story of how people have lived in San Diego County for the past 10,000 years. In addition to its role as a museum, the Center serves as an education and research facility and is the only local organization dedicated to the collection, study, curation and exhibition of San Diego County's archaeological artifacts.

Operating as usual

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: This is a common type of SEDIMENTARY rock found in San Diego County.
07/07/2021

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: This is a common type of SEDIMENTARY rock found in San Diego County.

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: This is a common type of SEDIMENTARY rock found in San Diego County.

#FindOutFriday Humans have used rocks and minerals since early prehistory. The study of geology, which includes rocks an...
07/02/2021

#FindOutFriday Humans have used rocks and minerals since early prehistory. The study of geology, which includes rocks and the processes by which they change, documents the history of the Earth.

Photo: Sergei Gussev

#FindOutFriday Humans have used rocks and minerals since early prehistory. The study of geology, which includes rocks and the processes by which they change, documents the history of the Earth.

Photo: Sergei Gussev

What is a fluffle of bunnies? And what do bunnies have to do with archaeology?A fluffle is a group of wild rabbits. And ...
07/01/2021

What is a fluffle of bunnies? And what do bunnies have to do with archaeology?

A fluffle is a group of wild rabbits. And it turns out that a specific fluffle of bunnies has been uncovering some very interesting artifacts on Skokholm Island in the United Kingdom.

Learn more in our latest post on Dr. Arty Fax’s Archy Facts blog that introduces kids to the exciting world of archaeology: https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/oh-my-fluffle/

What is a fluffle of bunnies? And what do bunnies have to do with archaeology?

A fluffle is a group of wild rabbits. And it turns out that a specific fluffle of bunnies has been uncovering some very interesting artifacts on Skokholm Island in the United Kingdom.

Learn more in our latest post on Dr. Arty Fax’s Archy Facts blog that introduces kids to the exciting world of archaeology: https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/oh-my-fluffle/

07/01/2021

Hello everyone! We need some gardening/landscaping work done at the Center. Can anyone recommend someone who works in the North County area?

If so, please email [email protected].

Thanks!

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: This tool is used to catch food, and the modern-day version is often made from meta...
06/30/2021

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: This tool is used to catch food, and the modern-day version is often made from metal.

#archaeology #shell

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: This tool is used to catch food, and the modern-day version is often made from metal.

#archaeology #shell

Explore the Recycled Knowledge section of our gift shop during our Summer Sale.Not ready for traveling abroad?  Try trav...
06/29/2021

Explore the Recycled Knowledge section of our gift shop during our Summer Sale.

Not ready for traveling abroad? Try traveling through space with Contact and The Meaning of Relativity. Or go In Search of Schrodinger’s Cats.

All Recycled Knowledge on sale! Members 50% off; Non-members 25% off. Visit the Center Thursday through Saturday to browse our selection.

Explore the Recycled Knowledge section of our gift shop during our Summer Sale.

Not ready for traveling abroad? Try traveling through space with Contact and The Meaning of Relativity. Or go In Search of Schrodinger’s Cats.

All Recycled Knowledge on sale! Members 50% off; Non-members 25% off. Visit the Center Thursday through Saturday to browse our selection.

#FindOutFriday Bone and shell were often used for tool making. They are softer than stone and harder than wood, making t...
06/25/2021

#FindOutFriday Bone and shell were often used for tool making. They are softer than stone and harder than wood, making them resilient materials useful for humans.

#FindOutFriday Bone and shell were often used for tool making. They are softer than stone and harder than wood, making them resilient materials useful for humans.

#NewAcquisitionThursday Only 14 cultural resources were recovered from this site in Valley Center. The scarcity of objec...
06/24/2021

#NewAcquisitionThursday Only 14 cultural resources were recovered from this site in Valley Center. The scarcity of objects and limited access to water nearby leads archaeologists to believe that this site was used for temporary food processing. This quartz mano was recovered during site monitoring. Visit the virtual exhibit NEW ACQUISITIONS to learn more: https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/new-acquisitions/

#NewAcquisition #archaeology

#NewAcquisitionThursday Only 14 cultural resources were recovered from this site in Valley Center. The scarcity of objects and limited access to water nearby leads archaeologists to believe that this site was used for temporary food processing. This quartz mano was recovered during site monitoring. Visit the virtual exhibit NEW ACQUISITIONS to learn more: https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/new-acquisitions/

#NewAcquisition #archaeology

Join us tonight for our virtual Living Room Lecture: The Roman City of Jerash, Jordan as documentary filmmaker Chris Boy...
06/24/2021
Living Room Lecture: The Roman City of Jerash, Jordan

Join us tonight for our virtual Living Room Lecture: The Roman City of Jerash, Jordan as documentary filmmaker Chris Boyd presents considerations on how archaeological material and concepts are presented to the general public through popular media, using an ongoing restoration project in Jerash, Jordan as a case study.

Register at https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/jerash/

Registration closes on Thursday at 4 PM.

Documentary filmmaker Chris Boyd presents considerations on how archaeological material and concepts are presented to the general public through popular media, using an ongoing restoration project in Jerash, Jordan as a case study. Boyd discusses his background, and how he oriented his career toward...

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: Tools made of this material are not commonly found in the County's archaeological r...
06/23/2021

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: Tools made of this material are not commonly found in the County's archaeological record.

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: Tools made of this material are not commonly found in the County's archaeological record.

Join us Thursday for our virtual Living Room Lecture: The Roman City of Jerash, Jordan as documentary filmmaker Chris Bo...
06/22/2021

Join us Thursday for our virtual Living Room Lecture: The Roman City of Jerash, Jordan as documentary filmmaker Chris Boyd presents considerations on how archaeological material and concepts are presented to the general public through popular media, using an ongoing restoration project in Jerash, Jordan as a case study.

Register at https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/jerash/

Registration closes on Thursday at 4 PM.

Join us Thursday for our virtual Living Room Lecture: The Roman City of Jerash, Jordan as documentary filmmaker Chris Boyd presents considerations on how archaeological material and concepts are presented to the general public through popular media, using an ongoing restoration project in Jerash, Jordan as a case study.

Register at https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/jerash/

Registration closes on Thursday at 4 PM.

After prehistoric societies consumed the meat from animals, bones and shell were often used to make things like tools, j...
06/19/2021

After prehistoric societies consumed the meat from animals, bones and shell were often used to make things like tools, jewelry, and items that could be used as currency. Want to learn more? Head over to our blog THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF Southern California Animal Bone and Shell Archaeology: https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/the-wonderful-world-of-animal-bone-and-shell/

These shell beads date to the Late Prehistoric Tradition (3,000 to 300 years ago).

#thewonderfulworldof #archaeology

After prehistoric societies consumed the meat from animals, bones and shell were often used to make things like tools, jewelry, and items that could be used as currency. Want to learn more? Head over to our blog THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF Southern California Animal Bone and Shell Archaeology: https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/the-wonderful-world-of-animal-bone-and-shell/

These shell beads date to the Late Prehistoric Tradition (3,000 to 300 years ago).

#thewonderfulworldof #archaeology

#FindOutFriday Shellfish have been popular for food consumption throughout time. Shellfish remains found at archaeologic...
06/18/2021

#FindOutFriday Shellfish have been popular for food consumption throughout time. Shellfish remains found at archaeological sites in San Diego help determine the age of the site using carbon-14 technology.

Once a shellfish dies, the present carbon-14 atoms begin to decay. Carbon-14 has a half-life of 5,730 years, so there would be half as many carbon-14 atoms present in the shell after 5,730 years. By counting how many carbon-14 atoms remain, it can be determined when the shellfish was alive and provide dating information for a specific site.

#FindOutFriday Shellfish have been popular for food consumption throughout time. Shellfish remains found at archaeological sites in San Diego help determine the age of the site using carbon-14 technology.

Once a shellfish dies, the present carbon-14 atoms begin to decay. Carbon-14 has a half-life of 5,730 years, so there would be half as many carbon-14 atoms present in the shell after 5,730 years. By counting how many carbon-14 atoms remain, it can be determined when the shellfish was alive and provide dating information for a specific site.

Join us for our next virtual Living Room Lecture: The Roman City of Jerash, Jordan as documentary filmmaker Chris Boyd p...
06/17/2021

Join us for our next virtual Living Room Lecture: The Roman City of Jerash, Jordan as documentary filmmaker Chris Boyd presents considerations on how archaeological material and concepts are presented to the general public through popular media, using an ongoing restoration project in Jerash, Jordan as a case study.

More info and registration at https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/jerash/

#archaeology #virtual #virtualevents #ancientrome

Join us for our next virtual Living Room Lecture: The Roman City of Jerash, Jordan as documentary filmmaker Chris Boyd presents considerations on how archaeological material and concepts are presented to the general public through popular media, using an ongoing restoration project in Jerash, Jordan as a case study.

More info and registration at https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/jerash/

#archaeology #virtual #virtualevents #ancientrome

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: These animals were a staple in California coastal society.
06/16/2021

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: These animals were a staple in California coastal society.

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: These animals were a staple in California coastal society.

Surprise your father this Father’s Day with a trip into nature. We have a wide variety of fields covered in the Recycled...
06/15/2021

Surprise your father this Father’s Day with a trip into nature. We have a wide variety of fields covered in the Recycled Knowledge area of our gift shop, including titles that take one river boating in The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons, adventuring with John Muir in The Yosemite, or delving into history with The People Behind the Border Lines.

All Recycled Knowledge on sale! Members 50% off; Non-members 25% off. Visit the Center Thursday through Saturday to browse our selection.

Surprise your father this Father’s Day with a trip into nature. We have a wide variety of fields covered in the Recycled Knowledge area of our gift shop, including titles that take one river boating in The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons, adventuring with John Muir in The Yosemite, or delving into history with The People Behind the Border Lines.

All Recycled Knowledge on sale! Members 50% off; Non-members 25% off. Visit the Center Thursday through Saturday to browse our selection.

06/11/2021

Archaeologists in northeastern Florida have uncovered remains of what they believe may have been a settlement belonging to the indigenous Timucua people. French and Spanish chroniclers described Timucuan communities as usually featuring wooden palisade walls, houses, public buildings, and granaries.

archaeology.org/news/9743-210609-florida-sarabay-contact

(University of North Florida)

#FindOutFriday Animal bones in archaeological sites can provide evidence about the time span, environment, health and di...
06/11/2021

#FindOutFriday Animal bones in archaeological sites can provide evidence about the time span, environment, health and diet, and population of prehistoric cultures.

This is a scapula, or shoulder bone. Often after animals were consumed for food, their remains were used for other purposes. A scapula could possibly be attached to wood and used for digging as a hoe.

Photo: Malcom Lidbury

#FindOutFriday Animal bones in archaeological sites can provide evidence about the time span, environment, health and diet, and population of prehistoric cultures.

This is a scapula, or shoulder bone. Often after animals were consumed for food, their remains were used for other purposes. A scapula could possibly be attached to wood and used for digging as a hoe.

Photo: Malcom Lidbury

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: The study of these in archaeology is called osteoarchaeology or zooarchaeology.
06/09/2021

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: The study of these in archaeology is called osteoarchaeology or zooarchaeology.

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: The study of these in archaeology is called osteoarchaeology or zooarchaeology.

#NowCuratingTuesday Chitons are different from other marine shell species as they consist of eight separate plates or va...
06/08/2021

#NowCuratingTuesday Chitons are different from other marine shell species as they consist of eight separate plates or valves which are covered by a fleshy mantle. A small amount of Cryptochiton, Giant Chiton, is present. This species is a cold-water form no longer found in southern California. That it is found in sites along the San Diego coast reveals the fluctuations in the sea’s average temperature in the past.

Excerpt from Seashore Life of Southern California by Sam Hinton

Learn more in our newest virtual exhibit Now Curating: https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/now-curating/

#NowCuratingTuesday Chitons are different from other marine shell species as they consist of eight separate plates or valves which are covered by a fleshy mantle. A small amount of Cryptochiton, Giant Chiton, is present. This species is a cold-water form no longer found in southern California. That it is found in sites along the San Diego coast reveals the fluctuations in the sea’s average temperature in the past.

Excerpt from Seashore Life of Southern California by Sam Hinton

Learn more in our newest virtual exhibit Now Curating: https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/now-curating/

#FindOutFriday These Donax shellfish are commonly found among shell middens in the San Diego area. By studying ecologica...
06/04/2021

#FindOutFriday These Donax shellfish are commonly found among shell middens in the San Diego area. By studying ecological changes in the local environment, archaeologists know that the site where these were found must date after 4,000 years before present.

This species of shell did not become prevalent in San Diego until about 4,000 years ago when the water warmed. The stone bowl holding the Donax shells is from the La Jolla Tradition dating 7,500 - 3,000 years ago.

#archaeology #shell

#FindOutFriday These Donax shellfish are commonly found among shell middens in the San Diego area. By studying ecological changes in the local environment, archaeologists know that the site where these were found must date after 4,000 years before present.

This species of shell did not become prevalent in San Diego until about 4,000 years ago when the water warmed. The stone bowl holding the Donax shells is from the La Jolla Tradition dating 7,500 - 3,000 years ago.

#archaeology #shell

An Excavation of the COVID-19 Pandemic
06/03/2021
An Excavation of the COVID-19 Pandemic

An Excavation of the COVID-19 Pandemic

Contemplating Pompeii’s sudden demise in A.D. 79, an anthropologist asks what future generations will uncover when they sift through the pandemic’s remains.

Join us for our next virtual Living Room Lecture: The Roman City of Jerash, Jordan as documentary filmmaker Chris Boyd p...
06/03/2021

Join us for our next virtual Living Room Lecture: The Roman City of Jerash, Jordan as documentary filmmaker Chris Boyd presents considerations on how archaeological material and concepts are presented to the general public through popular media, using an ongoing restoration project in Jerash, Jordan as a case study.

In highlighting his work in Jordan in 2019 for a joint archaeological project sponsored by the US State Department, Boyd presents ways in which modern media — most importantly, short-form documentary work distributed online — is a crucial tool for disseminating academic archaeological work and educating the general public about its cultural value.

More info and registration at https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/jerash/

#archaeology #virtual #virtualevents #ancientrome

Join us for our next virtual Living Room Lecture: The Roman City of Jerash, Jordan as documentary filmmaker Chris Boyd presents considerations on how archaeological material and concepts are presented to the general public through popular media, using an ongoing restoration project in Jerash, Jordan as a case study.

In highlighting his work in Jordan in 2019 for a joint archaeological project sponsored by the US State Department, Boyd presents ways in which modern media — most importantly, short-form documentary work distributed online — is a crucial tool for disseminating academic archaeological work and educating the general public about its cultural value.

More info and registration at https://sandiegoarchaeology.org/jerash/

#archaeology #virtual #virtualevents #ancientrome

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: These garbage pits tell archaeologists a lot about what past societies ate.Photo cr...
06/02/2021

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: These garbage pits tell archaeologists a lot about what past societies ate.

Photo credit: Martyn Gorman

#archaeology #guessinggame #prehistoric

#WhatIsItWednesday What is it? Hint: These garbage pits tell archaeologists a lot about what past societies ate.

Photo credit: Martyn Gorman

#archaeology #guessinggame #prehistoric

#FindOutFriday Local stone tool technology was innovative and complex with many modern tools used today being modeled of...
05/28/2021

#FindOutFriday Local stone tool technology was innovative and complex with many modern tools used today being modeled off of this creativity and ingenuity.

If you look around your house, chances are you will find many tools similar to those created by Indigenous cultures thousands of years ago. A mortar and pestle are commonly used kitchen tools today—still made from stone and used to grind a variety of things like spices, nuts, and seeds.

#FindOutFriday Local stone tool technology was innovative and complex with many modern tools used today being modeled off of this creativity and ingenuity.

If you look around your house, chances are you will find many tools similar to those created by Indigenous cultures thousands of years ago. A mortar and pestle are commonly used kitchen tools today—still made from stone and used to grind a variety of things like spices, nuts, and seeds.

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16666 San Pasqual Valley Rd
Escondido, CA
92027

Opening Hours

Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 14:00

Telephone

(760) 291-0370

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oyQhRQswpWk&t=8s This is one of the Video Exhibits at The AIA’s Riverside local society’s YouTube Play Lists, celebrating International Archaeology Day. Take a look and subscribe
looking forward to this lecture.
Celebrate International Archaeology Day with the “2020 Archaeology Expo,” Sponsored by the Riverside Local AIA Society, our YouTube Channel has three play lists, with submitted short YouTube videos and original content from California to Poland. Take a look and subscribe. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKvhP0CTa-1Xp8MtY9iVFQw The ‘What Archaeologist Do” list, takes the viewer thought the basic archaeological process, from planning to publication with a number of short video. The “Experimental Archaeology” list contains video exhibits of several recreations of traditional and ancient technologies. The “Discovery” Expo list has videos exhibits from a wide range of archaeological sites and methods. In 2019 we had over 600 people attend our Archaeology Expo, but the year we went online
Grant Applicants Needed! $1000 grant available! See website below for more info.
How do I access the submarine history video going on right now?
Amazing find in Switzerland!
Many thanks to SDPD officer and author Steve Willard for presenting a lecture on his recent book, San Diego Murder and Mayhem, with the San Diego Archaeological Center! Thanks to all who visited the Center during our May 2nd Saturday event. We hope to see you all again next month! #sdac #SDPD #murderandmayhem #2ndSaturday #magec #historicsandiego #archaeology #localhistory
As promised, Part 2. Today is the Reopening under new ownership. El Carrito quickly became a social hub for Barrio Logan. Although it eventually passed out of Johnston family ownership, it continued to operate as a Mexican restaurant, then called El Nuevo Carrito, until closure in 2016. The retiring owners sought a new owner who would appreciate the history of El Carrito and Barrio Logan: enter Milo Lorenzana, owner of the Por Vida coffee shop on same block. Lorenzana is restoring El Carrito, which will reopen serving breakfast and lunch on June 1, 2018. He has done extensive woodwork while keeping as much of the historic material as possible, even when impractical, and adopting the cream and sage paint scheme of the 1930s and 1940s trolleys. El Carrito Cocina Mexicana is located at 2154 Logan Avenue in Barrio Logan, one block from Chicano Park and a couple of doors down from Lorenzana’s Por Vida Café. In keeping with El Carrito’s history as a community hub, Lorenzana and the adjacent San Diego Vintage Co. host a monthly flea market in the adjacent lot, offering clothing, craft stalls, and local food trucks. Find more info at https://www.facebook.com/elcarritobarriologan/, https://www.porvidacollective.com/, and https://www.facebook.com/barriologanfleamarket/. Figure 2. El Carrito prior to reopening, May 2018.
San Diego Electric Railway Car 150 – “El Carrito” Part 1 The San Diego Electric Railway, in service from 1891 to 1947, was responsible for the growth of several San Diego neighborhoods including North Park and Normal Heights and delivered many of the 3.7 million visitors to the 1915-16 Panama-California Exposition, San Diego’s World’s Fair in Balboa Park. When the system was shut down in favor of buses, many of the old streetcars were demolished or sold for scrap. However, a few of the cars were sold and converted to back-country cabins or suburban cottages in an early example of adaptive reuse. Alfonso “Pelón” Johnston, a Barrio Logan community organizer and musician, purchased one of these streetcars. Car 150 was a Class 2 “Expo” electric trolley car built in 1914 by the McGuire-Cummings Manufacturing Company of Paris, Illinois. The car seated 52 passengers, was mainly constructed of wood, and provided all the latest technology including electric lighting, window shades, and pull cords for signaling stops. Johnston installed the decommissioned car in the front yard of 2154 Logan Avenue, right along the No. 12 – Logan Heights trolley line. He built a stucco enclosure on one end, installed kitchen equipment, and opened a restaurant called El Carrito (“the little car”) in 1948. Written by Senior Historian and Archaeologist Doug Mengers Figure 1. El Carrito under construction in 1947; Alfonso “Pelón” Johnston at right (Pacific Southwest Railway Museum).
Proud to announce Nick Case as a Winner in the 2018 National Geospatial Technology Center's Student Competition. Article from SD Mesa College. http://www.sdmesa.edu/_resources/newsroom/posts/geoed_mesastudent.php
3th INTERNATIONAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL FILM FESTIVAL OF CASTILLA Y LEÓN (ZAMORA, SPAIN):