Baltimore & Ohio Ellicott City Station Museum

Baltimore & Ohio Ellicott City Station Museum The B&O Ellicott City Station Museum is the oldest surviving railroad station in the United States. Admission is free! The B&O Railroad Museum: Ellicott City Station is the oldest surviving railroad station in America, and was the original terminus of the first 13 miles of commercial railroad in the country!
(84)

ADMISSION TO THE MUSEUM IS NOW FREE!!!!

Operating as usual

The Living History and Heritage Program, under which the B&O Ellicott City Station Museum operates, is proud to have rec...
06/09/2021

The Living History and Heritage Program, under which the B&O Ellicott City Station Museum operates, is proud to have received a 2021 National Association of Counties (NACo) Achievement Award for its Scout Archaeology Program! Designed to help scouts earn their Archaeology Merit Badge or Citizen Scientist Journey, scouts get the chance to participate in hands-on archaeology and learn what it takes to uncover artifacts and take care of them in the lab. We're so excited to share our programs with you! Thank you to our staff and volunteers for making our Scout Archaeology program great!

Howard County Recreation & Parks is proud to announce that we’ve received four 2021 National Association of Counties (NACo) Achievement Awards!

This year, the Department was recognized for the Robinson Nature Center’s Take-Home Programs, our RecZone child care program, the Living History & Heritage division’s Scout Archaeology Program and our Community Center Family Fun Kits.

Thank you to our hardworking staff and congratulations for these well-deserved awards. For more information on the 27 awards Howard County received this year, visit https://www.howardcountymd.gov/News060721.

Did you know blacksmiths were integral to train travel?  Many supplies needed to be forged, such as railroad spikes.  Th...
06/05/2021

Did you know blacksmiths were integral to train travel? Many supplies needed to be forged, such as railroad spikes. The Living History and Heritage Program, in conjunction with the Living Farm Heritage Museum, hosts blacksmithing workshops! Tickets are still available for our Intermediate Blacksmithing class on June 12-13. If you've taken our Beginner blacksmithing class and you're looking to further expand your skills, this is the class for you. Registration closes on Wednesday! Info: https://tinyurl.com/IntermediateBlacksmithJune2021

Did you know blacksmiths were integral to train travel? Many supplies needed to be forged, such as railroad spikes. The Living History and Heritage Program, in conjunction with the Living Farm Heritage Museum, hosts blacksmithing workshops! Tickets are still available for our Intermediate Blacksmithing class on June 12-13. If you've taken our Beginner blacksmithing class and you're looking to further expand your skills, this is the class for you. Registration closes on Wednesday! Info: https://tinyurl.com/IntermediateBlacksmithJune2021

On this Day in Ellicott City Station History! Did you know that Andrew Jackson was the first President to travel by trai...
06/05/2021

On this Day in Ellicott City Station History! Did you know that Andrew Jackson was the first President to travel by train? On June 6th 1833, President Andrew Jackson made history as the first U.S. President to take a train. He made a pleasure trip from Ellicott Mills to Baltimore on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. President Jackson would have boarded this train at the Ellicott City Freight Depot and rode the first 13 miles of the B&O Railroad to Baltimore. President Jackson’s train would have most likely have been pulled by a ‘Grasshopper’ type locomotive like the Atlantic, the earliest class of steam locomotives to enter regular service on the B&O Railroad. As railroads began to crisscross the country, presidential travel by rail continued to be popular until the 1950s.

Images:
Andrew Jackson, from WIkimedia Commons
The ‘Atlantic’ Grasshopper Type locomotive, from WIkimedia Commons

On this day in B&O history! On May 24th, 1830, the first 13 miles of the Baltimore and Ohio opened for public traffic. T...
05/24/2021

On this day in B&O history! On May 24th, 1830, the first 13 miles of the Baltimore and Ohio opened for public traffic. The journey between Baltimore and Ellicott’s Mills was by horse drawn railcar, A one-way trip only took one and a half hours to complete, with a stopover at Relay to change horses. The new railroad was an immediate success as the journey by horse drawn railcar was much faster and more comfortable than the equivalent journey by stage coach. This was the first regular rail service in the United States. However, horse drawn railcars would be quickly be replaced by Steam Locomotives which were being developed at the same time. To learn more about early railroad history, stop by the Ellicott City Station Museum between Wednesdays and Sundays and see our replica of the Pioneer car, the first horse drawn railcar to make the journey on the Railroad!

On this day in B&O history! On May 24th, 1830, the first 13 miles of the Baltimore and Ohio opened for public traffic. The journey between Baltimore and Ellicott’s Mills was by horse drawn railcar, A one-way trip only took one and a half hours to complete, with a stopover at Relay to change horses. The new railroad was an immediate success as the journey by horse drawn railcar was much faster and more comfortable than the equivalent journey by stage coach. This was the first regular rail service in the United States. However, horse drawn railcars would be quickly be replaced by Steam Locomotives which were being developed at the same time. To learn more about early railroad history, stop by the Ellicott City Station Museum between Wednesdays and Sundays and see our replica of the Pioneer car, the first horse drawn railcar to make the journey on the Railroad!

Today for National Inventor’s Month, we explore the invention of Granville T. Woods, an African American inventor. Woods...
05/21/2021

Today for National Inventor’s Month, we explore the invention of Granville T. Woods, an African American inventor.

Woods was born in Ohio in 1856, and left school at the age of 10 in order to find work to help support his family. In his early life Woods worked a variety of jobs, including as an engineer in a railroad machine shop, as an engineer on a British ship, and as a Locomotive Engineer for the Dayton and Southeastern Railway. Despite his engineering skills in the positions that he held, Woods would experience racial discrimination limiting his ability to progress. In 1880 Woods established his own machine shop in Cincinnati, Ohio where Woods would use his engineering skills and railroad experience to help develop his inventions.

In 1887, Woods invented the Synchronous Multiplex Railway Telegraph. This groundbreaking system allowed railroad workers to know where the trains were on the railway. Before this no one knew precisely when a train was coming down the tracks. Woods's invention would help prevent many collisions and deaths.

Woods also developed many innovations for electric rail systems. These included developing the first overhead electric railway system that was powered with electric lines from above the train. Previously the lines had run alongside the tracks and been quite dangerous to pedestrians. Granville Woods also developed the technology behind the ‘Third Rail’ electrical conductor rails that is used today by subway systems around the world. Another of his inventions for railroads was an automatic air brake, which slows or stops a train to prevent impact if a conductor is incapacitated.

Woods sold his inventions to several companies, including the American Bell Telephone Company, Westinghouse and the General Electric Company. By the time of his death on July 30, 1910, Woods had received more than sixty patents. His inventions would make life easier and safer for countless Americans on the railroads.

Image of Granville T. Woods, circa 1895, from Wikimedia Commons.

Today for National Inventor’s Month, we explore the invention of Granville T. Woods, an African American inventor.

Woods was born in Ohio in 1856, and left school at the age of 10 in order to find work to help support his family. In his early life Woods worked a variety of jobs, including as an engineer in a railroad machine shop, as an engineer on a British ship, and as a Locomotive Engineer for the Dayton and Southeastern Railway. Despite his engineering skills in the positions that he held, Woods would experience racial discrimination limiting his ability to progress. In 1880 Woods established his own machine shop in Cincinnati, Ohio where Woods would use his engineering skills and railroad experience to help develop his inventions.

In 1887, Woods invented the Synchronous Multiplex Railway Telegraph. This groundbreaking system allowed railroad workers to know where the trains were on the railway. Before this no one knew precisely when a train was coming down the tracks. Woods's invention would help prevent many collisions and deaths.

Woods also developed many innovations for electric rail systems. These included developing the first overhead electric railway system that was powered with electric lines from above the train. Previously the lines had run alongside the tracks and been quite dangerous to pedestrians. Granville Woods also developed the technology behind the ‘Third Rail’ electrical conductor rails that is used today by subway systems around the world. Another of his inventions for railroads was an automatic air brake, which slows or stops a train to prevent impact if a conductor is incapacitated.

Woods sold his inventions to several companies, including the American Bell Telephone Company, Westinghouse and the General Electric Company. By the time of his death on July 30, 1910, Woods had received more than sixty patents. His inventions would make life easier and safer for countless Americans on the railroads.

Image of Granville T. Woods, circa 1895, from Wikimedia Commons.

The Baltimore & Ohio Ellicott City Station Museum is now open at 100% capacity with no restrictions. For additional info...
05/20/2021

The Baltimore & Ohio Ellicott City Station Museum is now open at 100% capacity with no restrictions. For additional information on Howard County Recreation and Parks's revised COVID-19 restrictions, please see the infographic and post below.

As we align with Howard County Government and the State of Maryland's orders on capacity limitations, here is a breakdown of our updated COVID-19 restrictions:

INDOOR FACILITIES

All HCRP community centers, the Robinson Nature Center, Baltimore & Ohio Ellicott City Station Museum, Meadowbrook Athletic Complex, Ellicott City Firehouse Museum and select historic sites are now open at 100% capacity with no restrictions.

Belmont Manor & Historic Park, Waverly Mansion and Kiwanis-Wallas Hall are open by appointment only.

HCRP Headquarters is closed.

INDOOR YOUTH PROGRAMS & CHILDCARE

All instructors and participants over the age of five are required to wear a face covering when participating in our youth indoor camps, classes or childcare programs.

OUTDOOR TOURNAMENTS

May resume at 100% capacity without restrictions.

PARKS & OUTDOOR PROGRAMS

Parks and Outdoor Programs are open at 100% capacity without restrictions.

WEDDINGS & PAVILIONS

Weddings & Pavilions are open at 100% capacity without restrictions.

WORTHINGTON DOG PARK

The Worthington Dog Park is open at 100% capacity without restrictions.

Have you been by the museum lately?  We've got some exciting new things in our gift shop!  We have new t-shirts, mugs, d...
05/20/2021

Have you been by the museum lately? We've got some exciting new things in our gift shop! We have new t-shirts, mugs, diesel pullbacks, and Ellicott City coloring books.

We continue our celebration of National Inventor’s Month with railway safety!  One of the most important and commonplace...
05/14/2021

We continue our celebration of National Inventor’s Month with railway safety! One of the most important and commonplace pieces of railroad safety equipment is the railroad crossing gate. They help prevent traffic driving onto a grade rail crossing but did you know that the Railroad Crossing Gate was invented by a woman?

In the 19th century, accidents on the railroad were commonplace especially at road crossings. Horses, wagons, pedestrians and children would regularly be hit by speeding trains making their way through towns.

One witness to such an accident was a woman by the name of Mary Isabelle Riggin of Newark, New Jersey. After seeing such an event, Riggin had the idea for a railroad crossing gate. This gate was intended to warn pedestrians and drivers of an approaching train. This gate could be raised and lowered by an operator by using a system of pulleys and chains. Mary Riggin’s idea for a railroad crossing gate was approved by the US Patent Office on January 14th, 1890. These crossing gates have helped save countless lives, and the modern automated crossing gates still use the basic principles developed by Mary Riggin.

Images of Mary Riggin's 1890 crossing gate patent, from Google Patents.

05/07/2021

Please note: With the weather forecast for Saturday, May 8, our special event, All About That Lace at the Thomas Isaac Log Cabin has been postponed until Saturday, June 12.

Happy National Inventor’s Month!  Each Friday in May, we’ll highlight inventors and inventions associated with railroad ...
05/07/2021

Happy National Inventor’s Month! Each Friday in May, we’ll highlight inventors and inventions associated with railroad history. Today we’re featuring early designs for railcars! In 1830 The first Railcars that traveled the first 13 miles of the B&O between Baltimore and Ellicott’s Mills were simple Horse drawn cars. The B&O Railroad anticipated that they would soon be replaced by the brand-new technology of steam locomotives that were being developed in Britain.

In July of 1830 Peter Cooper’s experimental engine known as the ‘Tom Thumb’ would become the first successful American built and designed steam locomotive to run on an American railroad. However, some inventions developed for the railroad weren’t as successful as the Tom Thumb. Before adopting steam power, the railroad would experiment with more wacky forms of traction power. One design was a railcar that was powered by a horse walking on a steep treadmill named the ‘Cyclopede’. Experiments with this design would end abruptly when on a test run the Cyclopede hit a stray cow on the tracks which cause it to dump the horse and its passengers into a bush!

Another unconventional experimental design was a sail powered railcar. Evan Thomas, the brother of the first director of the B&O Phillip Thomas, designed a railcar powered by sail named the “Ae**us”. This sail powered railcar would attempt to make several runs between Baltimore and Ellicott’s Mills. The Ae**us greatly impressed the visiting Russian Ambassador Baron de Krudener, who even made a trip on the car, managing the sail himself. However, the Ae**us would prove to be an impractical design because it would be rendered immobile by lack of wind power and it was unable to “sail” against the wind.

All Images taken from The History of The First Locomotives In America by W.H. Brown, published in 1874, available in Google Books

Individuals 16 or older are eligible for today's walk-up vaccine clinic at Howard County Community College. See below fo...
05/05/2021

Individuals 16 or older are eligible for today's walk-up vaccine clinic at Howard County Community College. See below for more info.

REMINDER: The Howard County Health Department is hosting a PFIZER COVID-19 vaccine clinic today, May 5th, from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Howard Community College's Athletic & Fitness Center in Columbia. Individuals 16 AND OLDER ARE ELIGIBLE for this clinic. While appointments are available (https://bit.ly/2QWDk8f), they are not necessary as walk-ups will be accepted while supplies last. Please help us spread the word!

This Wednesday, there will be a FREE Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine clinic at Howard Community College between 10am and 5pm. To...
05/03/2021

This Wednesday, there will be a FREE Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine clinic at Howard Community College between 10am and 5pm. To register for an appointment, visit https://www.marylandvax.org/reg/2084781699.

The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is available!

We strongly encourage our youth, those between the ages of 16 and 18, register for our vaccine clinic on Wednesday, May 5th, at Howard Community College between 10am and 5pm. While walk-ups will be available, we encourage our youth to register to secure a vaccine dose.

Please share this information with young people in your life, and encourage them to register TODAY. Let’s bring this pandemic to an end, together!

Register: https://www.marylandvax.org/reg/2084781699

Our final National Poetry Month feature post comes from the July 1922 edition of the B&O Employee Magazine, again writte...
04/30/2021

Our final National Poetry Month feature post comes from the July 1922 edition of the B&O Employee Magazine, again written by James Edward Hungerford and accompanied by illustrations by Robert L. Heiser. It is a tribute to the line men of the Railroad, the men who performed the vital role on installing and maintaining Telegraph wires and communication lines alongside the railroad. These jobs were highly dangerous but an essential part of the functioning of the railroad and the world.

The Wire-Stringin' Crew
By James Edward Hungerford

If you're lookin' for heroes, and anxious to praise 'em
Then take a good squint at the wire-stringin' crew;
Just look the gang over, and keenly appraise 'em,
And size up the things they have done and can do!

They're ready for any old kind of a venture
Heroic, all right, but their deeds are unsung
They're chock-full of grit, and dead keen for adventure,
Wherever there's telegraph wires to be strung!

Just give them the word, and they're off in a twinkle;
With pliers and climbers-alert, wide-awake;
You don't have to show' em-they know every wrinkle,
And don't give a rap for the chances they take!

Just point out the job to be done, and they'll do it
A job that takes deftness and courage and grit;
They'll laugh at the hardships, and stick 'til they're through it,
Or die on the job -- for they never say “quit.”

You'll find 'em up North, where the blizzards are raging;
You'll find 'em down South, where it's hotter than sin;
They're perched up on poles, where the clouds are rampaging
Good natured and cheerful, but drenched to the skin;

Their job is to string up the wires, and they string 'em,
Regardless of where they have got to be hung;
The rain it can pelt ' em; the hailstones can sting 'em;
But just the same, hombre, those wires'll be strung!

They're always on deck in a time of disaster,
Repairing the damage of flood or of fire;
They'll land on a job, and stick tighter than plaster,
Until they've repaired every snapped or down wire!

So, take a good look at the gang, and appraise 'em,
And size up the things they have done, and can do;
You'll find 'em dead game, and that nothing can feaze 'em
You'll take off your hats to the wire-stringin ' crew!

Images of locomotive traveling along the line, and of person on a telegraph pole stringing the wires. Images from B&O Employee Magazine, July 1922, available on Google Books.

Address

3711 Maryland Ave
Ellicott City, MD
21043

General information

This is the official page for the B&O Ellicott City Station Museum Page. The site is now under the managment of the Living History and Heritage program of the Howard County Recreation and Parks. The B&O Railroad Museum: Ellicott City Station is the oldest surviving railroad station in America, and was the original terminus of the first 13 miles of commercial railroad in the country! We are open Wednesdays and Thursdays 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM, and Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM. We are located at 3711 Maryland Ave, at the intersection of Main Street and Maryland Ave. You can reach the museum via phone at 410-313-1945 or by messaging this page. ADMISSION TO THE MUSEUM IS NOW FREE!!! We welcome you and your comments to any of Howard County Government's social media pages. The purpose of these sites is to present matters of public interest to Howard County, including its many residents, businesses and visitors. We encourage you to submit your thoughts, questions and/or concerns as comments on our social media sites, but please note this is a moderated online discussion site and not a public forum. Once posted, Howard County Government reserves the right to delete user comments that: are spam or include links to other sites; are clearly off topic; advocate illegal activity; promote particular services, products, events or political organizations unrelated to Howard County Government; infringe on copyrights or trademarks; use personally identifiable medical information, as we recommend you not share any of your medical information on our social media pages. In addition, to protect your privacy and the privacy of others, do not include your full name, phone number(s), e-mail addresses, social security number, case numbers or any other sensitive personally identifiable information in your comments or responses. Please note that the comments expressed on this site do not reflect the opinions and position of the Howard County Government or its officers and employees. If you have any questions concerning the operation of this online moderated discussion site, please contact the Office of Public Information at [email protected] In addition, to protect your privacy and the privacy of others, do not include your full name, phone number(s), e-mail addresses, social security number, case numbers or any other sensitive personally identifiable information in your comments or responses. Please note that the comments expressed on this site do not reflect the opinions and position of the Howard County Government or its officers and employees. If you have any questions concerning the operation of this online moderated discussion site, please contact the Office of Public Information at [email protected]

Opening Hours

Wednesday 10:00 - 15:00
Thursday 10:00 - 15:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(410) 313-1945

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Baltimore & Ohio Ellicott City Station Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Baltimore & Ohio Ellicott City Station Museum:

Videos

Category

Nearby museums


Other History Museums in Ellicott City

Show All