Howard County Maryland Black History

Howard County Maryland Black History A page dedicated to facilitating a more balanced history narrative about pre-1930 Howard County MD

The naming of HOWARD and MARRIOTTS RIDGE HIGH SCHOOLS. Is “Howard High” or “Howard County Senior High” the official name...
11/29/2023

The naming of HOWARD and MARRIOTTS RIDGE HIGH SCHOOLS.
Is “Howard High” or “Howard County Senior High” the official name of the school?
Which school made the news for the request to drop an apostrophe from its name?
Woodford, an African American name.
An area resident was appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court?
Is the county named for John Eager Howard? Where’s the original source for that?

This is part two of a larger report on county naming that was dropped to the community for input/comment on Monday and Tuesday. This part pertains to two county high schools. Though the school system has their own policy regarding the naming of schools as does the county library system (neither under the control of county government), the commission reviewed the naming to see it in action believing it to reveal important information for anyone examining naming in the county. Did we miss something important? Have comments? Make them here or email to [email protected]

The draft report on these two schools can be found at:

https://hocoltr.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Howard-and-Marriotts-Ridge-report-DRAFT.pdf

The sources used for Howard High can be found at :
https://app.box.com/s/uwnykyxs6camel2tc6qtt0wbvefewz8b

The sources used for Marriotts Ridge High can be found at:
https://app.box.com/s/32ngdshkn0tpjuloyl6n75jcd6xlmkjw

Don’t forget, part one can be found on Tuesday’s post. Keep the suggestions coming!

County desegregation:  federal government pressures and citizen involvement?Request in 1960s that African American histo...
11/28/2023

County desegregation: federal government pressures and citizen involvement?
Request in 1960s that African American history be taught in county schools?
A County Exec successfully campaigned as being “independent” of Democrat factions? Which Executives have/don’t have buildings named for them?
1977 local county commission trying to rename Ellicott City?
1960/70s history of local human relations/rights

On Monday, the full third report of the 2022 public spaces commission got dispensed via newsletter and social media. It is packed full of 46 pages of material about Howard County history. A suggestion was made by a reader of it to make it as easy as possible for people to consume in a sitting. The full report was created chronologically with the buildings, so the East Columbia 50+ Center recently named for Dr. Edward L. Cochran Jr. is therefore first up. There will be four posts total in the coming days. Know of anything we should add? Here is the Cochran one, appropriate to start with since he was the first the commission could find who spoke about naming public buildings other than schools/libraries:
https://hocoltr.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Miscellaneous-Buildings-Report-COCHRAN-DRAFT.pdf

The full report and associated files can be found on this webpage:
https://hocoltr.org/hocopublicspaces/

Monday local history anyone? There was a local citizen-led effort to desegregate Howard County schools? There was federa...
11/27/2023

Monday local history anyone? There was a local citizen-led effort to desegregate Howard County schools? There was federal government pressure on the county to desegregate? There was a County Executive who had successfully campaigned in Howard as being “independent” of Democrat factions? There were citizens in a 1977 local county commission trying to figure out how to rename Ellicott City? The Tubman school building was renamed multiple times? What’s the story with the sign on the building? Someone from here was to be a Supreme Court judge? We’ve had 9 County Executives. How many have had public buildings named for them?

History in the reports revolve around: Cochran East Columbia 50+ Center; Howard High, Marriotts Ridge High, Thomas Isaac’s Log Cabin, Tubman Building. (Official building names are listed on the report)

Local citizens did this work for our county, you’ll read, with ONE agenda: finding the most complete and accurate truth possible, and it took a tremendous amount of time to do it. This report is the only one of its kind in the county that examined the naming through the lens of naming POLICY. This is the third report issued by the commission. Have anything to add to the work? Let your voice be heard. In history, it was always valued and captured as you’ll read. Please share as you see fit.
https://hocoltr.org/hocopublicspaces/

It was a great day. We approached the venue's capacity upstairs at Backwater Books, and the hardback editions we had the...
11/20/2023

It was a great day. We approached the venue's capacity upstairs at Backwater Books, and the hardback editions we had there sold out. People were patient as they stood for the event, and apologies to those who texted that they couldn't find a parking space. It was a great weather day, which brings people out.

Our primary purpose was to let our community know about some of the county pre Civil War Black history that got reclaimed through the research efforts of citizens (the 3 people crouched down in the photo are the coauthors) that got created into one great book (hardback and softcover) published by our nonprofit that is run by one of them. Board members also attended to witness the fruits of their efforts, one is a descendant of the county’s last documented lynching victim. Yesterday it was said that the hours for the log home have been extended into the next weekend for people who wish to see the new history that is now there for the first time in its existence. We'll confirm that when it gets confirmed for certain with Recreation and Parks.

Howard County Lynching Truth & Reconciliation, Inc.

Whether you come to today’s booksigning event at 2pm or not, here is some info you can use if you’re going to see the lo...
11/18/2023

Whether you come to today’s booksigning event at 2pm or not, here is some info you can use if you’re going to see the log home while it’s open this weekend from 1-4pm. It will unfortunately not be open again until April. We’ll be walking there from the bookstore after the talk and signing event. This is the introduction of Ellicott City Black History to our community, and our work involves the entire county. EC is the county seat, so it holds a significance that can’t be ignored (so we didn’t/couldn’t). We’re ultimately connecting all of the county stories together, but this was a necessary start.

There’s new history coming to Ellicott City. For the weekend of Nov 18/19 2023, an old building gets a new makeover

Doing everything we can to let people know about the rare opportunity this weekend. This is the newsletter that went out...
11/18/2023

Doing everything we can to let people know about the rare opportunity this weekend. This is the newsletter that went out this afternoon to our nonprofit’s subscribers.

The oldest structure associated with county Black History unveiled this weekend

RECLAIMING HISTORY. It’s a thing, and in many cases it’s not easy to do. The accurate history associated with a building...
11/17/2023

RECLAIMING HISTORY. It’s a thing, and in many cases it’s not easy to do. The accurate history associated with a building people named the “Thomas Isaac’s Log Cabin” wasn’t as important as saving it for preservation and relocated for installation and interpretation as a “way station” on the state’s National Road tourism system. A way station is a place where people can stop to rest as they travel between two places. For many years, a small cot in a corner with almost no furnishings inside was the interpretation that greeted decades of Ellicott City visitors and residents.

There’s a famous quote embraced by many that “history is written by the victors” but that’s primarily due to how power typically works. Those who have taken/assumed or were given the power are the ones who decide what they think is valuable in history and is significant to them, and it’s what gets showcased/uplifted. Sometimes, the decision of what history to uplift is a monetary one created around decisions about what will bring in money which is reality. Another famous quote is an African proverb: Until the lion learns to write, every story will glorify the hunter. Nothing can be done about the decision that was made in the past to interpret the building’s past as a temporary safe space for those passing through town (cabin/way station) instead of the home of Levi Gillis (Mulatto, never enslaved) that he most likely built for his wife Eliza Jane, and their five children about a decade before the Civil War that he sold to Thomas Isaac. But we CAN celebrate that the history has been reclaimed by the work of citizens who wanted to know the accurate history and (when they discovered it after working for 9 months) wanted their county’s residents, students and visitors to also know.

After several months of working with county Rec and Parks with content shared with them from the efforts of those citizens, a new narrative inside the log home (respecting its permanence) has been created and is available to be seen this weekend only. We’re happy and grateful for what we can get, particularly since the building was originally scheduled to be closed for the season (until April) today. Help us celebrate by coming to meet those citizens who dedicated their time to do this at the first book signing event of the local nonprofit’s held at an independent bookstore down the street from the log home. Hear some about how we did it, and what it meant for us to do it. Then go to over to what was first Levi and Eliza Jane’s home to imagine what life was like for them living in the house during 1850s Ellicott’s Mills with their children. We hope many people will find this history as significant for our county and state history narrative as we do. We now join the rest of the state that always celebrates this history when discovered in their jurisdictions.

We start at 2pm Saturday upstairs at Backwater Books on Main Street in Ellicott City. Decent temps are anticipated, and an outside side patio to spill over into if needed. The log home is open this weekend only for 2023, 1-4pm on both days. An introduction of what is a larger plan of Howard County Lynching Truth & Reconciliation, Inc.’s (HCLTR) for history interpretation and a more balanced narrative for students, residents and visitors. Our nonprofit appreciates the new Director of Rec and Parks (and the outgoing one) who were instrumental in getting this done in the clutch. Thanks in advance to the docents staffing the weekend hours. On behalf of Levi and Eliza Jane Gillis and all of the Black and Mulatto people who knew them when they came to the area and lived in Ellicott’s Mills, I thank them also. A descendant, a county resident, was personally invited by me to attend. For some, this is just more history added to the mix. For us and others I know, it’s so much more.

Marlena Jareaux
Executive Director
HCLTR

P.S. We don’t have a stash like some of the organizations. We could use your help to get this to the county schools and libraries. https://secure.givelively.org/donate/howard-county-lynching-truth-reconciliation-inc/newly-discovered-ellicott-city-md-black-history-help-us-to-treasure-it

It Is Time. It’s actually been long overdue that we do this. Our first book signing event will be this Saturday, Novembe...
11/14/2023

It Is Time. It’s actually been long overdue that we do this. Our first book signing event will be this Saturday, November 18th at 2pm in downtown historic Ellicott City at an independent bookstore (go small business!) called BackWater Books. If you can’t make it, don’t worry. I can assure you that this will not be the last, but there can only be one first! We were really really hoping that Rec and Parks would have the interior messaging finished that we were working with them since April to update in order to coincide with this first book signing, but that was not to be. With the structure soon closing for the season, it no longer worked for us to delay this story. Particularly given the fact that we were invited by the state archives back in August to be THE Lunch and Learn presentation for Black History Month! When that got (of course) accepted, scheduled and placed onto their website, it was time to get going in our county and end the delays. History finds like ours have ALWAYS been celebrated in our state, and the celebration begins Saturday November 18th. Come help us celebrate 🎉, learn the new story, and buy a book signed by the authors.

Nice way to show the journey…
11/11/2023

Nice way to show the journey…

Just as has been done in prior administrations, Emancipation Day in Maryland is being recognized today. Many don’t know ...
11/01/2023

Just as has been done in prior administrations, Emancipation Day in Maryland is being recognized today. Many don’t know that it was made a requirement in 2013 by Chapter 436 of the Acts of the General Assembly for the Governor to proclaim Nov. 1 as Maryland Emancipation Day in Maryland. Every year there are Emancipation Day activities to be found across the state in local jurisdictions, and this year has been no exception. One of the best writeups I’ve read regarding the history can be found on this article. In the comments will be a YouTube link to last year’s recording about Emancipation Day which features historian Anthony Cohen from Montgomery County. More work should be done to show how Emancipation Day felt for citizens in each place in Maryland since the actual history involving Texas (Juneteenth) happened AFTER our own’s state’s liberation from slavery.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/md-politics/the-not-quite-free-state-maryland-dragged-its-feet-on-emancipation-during-civil-war/2013/09/13/a34d35de-fec7-11e2-bd97-676ec24f1f3f_story.html

Emancipation Day activities in Howard County will happen next year. Our neighbor in Montgomery are having this event com...
10/29/2023

Emancipation Day activities in Howard County will happen next year. Our neighbor in Montgomery are having this event coming up, and a large Emancipation Day event happened yesterday at Button Farm also in Montgomery County. Easton has always done a significant one, as well as Baltimore and Frederick County. It takes time to have our county catch up to those around us with historical research about what happened specifically in our county.

Celebrate Maryland Emancipation with us. Register for various activities at Sandypringslavemuseum.org to purchase tickets.

Some places in the country engage with their citizens and examine their choices in history.
10/27/2023

Some places in the country engage with their citizens and examine their choices in history.

The Friday ceremony marked the conclusion of the post-renaming process.

The question of “who are we as a community?” is an individual question for each jurisdiction to ask itself. Sent by a fo...
10/16/2023

The question of “who are we as a community?” is an individual question for each jurisdiction to ask itself. Sent by a follower of our page…
https://www.baltimoresun.com/maryland/harford/aegis/cng-ag-harford-county-petition-re-adopt-names-william-paca-john-archer-schools-20231009-azfdggjm6zeuxpnvdancidb6xq-story.html?fbclid=IwAR1rlfO65UKwB2la6oUqoc_YzQjO454A1nlmzFcyboAyYgQkIlkJBepsRuw

A petition to restore the names of two Harford County public schools that were previously named for slaveholders has been circulated by the county's chapter of political action group Moms for Liberty.

Stellar efforts in Wilsontown done by our neighbors with shared history
10/15/2023

Stellar efforts in Wilsontown done by our neighbors with shared history

Bessie Queen, Lillian Rollins and Everdean Holloway all grew up in Wilsontown, a historic Black community. Jan Randall and Jackie Irvine spent much of their pandemic lockdown months researching Wilsontown. Anne Arundel Genealogical Society, Dennis Green, Cemetery/Cleanup, and Joshuah Emery, Park Ran...

Because, before you can talk authoritatively about some subjects you must first have the facts which come from researche...
09/27/2023

Because, before you can talk authoritatively about some subjects you must first have the facts which come from researchers.

The City of Boston announced on Monday that it’s looking for partners to put together research on the city’s ties and role in slavery, as its Reparations Task Force moves forward with understanding and addressing the legacy of the slave trade. Mayor Michelle Wu and the Boston Reparations Task Fo...

The importance of having accurate local history can’t be understated. A post about Howard County’s tourism website regar...
09/20/2023

The importance of having accurate local history can’t be understated. A post about Howard County’s tourism website regarding the Underground Railroad..

Despite Chapin’s case being famous, it did not happen in our county. It was a Montgomery County case. His lawyers wanted him moved to a safer place because many wanted him dead, but they took one look at our jail and essentially said “oh heck no.” Bail was posted for him, and he never appeared for trial. Bail was forfeited. Fascinating Montgomery County history. Warner Cook’s trial didn’t happen in our courthouse either. He sensed he wouldn’t get a fair trial. The Network to Freedom site information concerning his case given to them by our county that he was “ultimately found guilty” is very much incorrect. There can be no documentation that shows otherwise. He was found “not guilty” of five counts of enticing runaway activity.

Archival records examined in Annapolis reveal a robust history of our county for this period in which resistance to enslavement occurred in several ways. By next year at this time, better justice will be done for this topic by the nonprofit Howard County Lynching Truth & Reconciliation, Inc. As a teaser, the William Williams mentioned on the website.. The year was 1842 and he was a 67 year old gardener that was pardoned and ended up serving none of the ten year two month sentence imposed by the court. A Black woman served as a witness for his defense who had also been charged. Isn’t that more fascinating? Not sure why the word “insurrection” is being used on this website. Link to site is in the comments.

09/07/2023

Don’t normally share TikTok videos, but this one about erasure of African American Black history and the part that museums have played in that is something everyone should see and contemplate. There are many ways that the erasure has happened, and it’s a slow process to undo it. Brought to my attention by a Howard County high school teacher who loves her students… I love them too! We’re going to undo some erasure in the county this year!

It was fitting that the first day of September was used in order to launch our Resistance Project that will overlay resi...
09/02/2023

It was fitting that the first day of September was used in order to launch our Resistance Project that will overlay resistance to enslavement events that occurred on the lands that are now Howard County. September is Underground Railroad Month after all.

The attendees were engaged, evidenced by how long they stayed on a Friday before a holiday weekend. Program was scheduled to end at 1pm but we broke at 2:15. A sampling of materials were shown, and stories were told about a few known activities based upon documentation our nonprofit has been researching and collecting. Some were surprising. Attendees were asked to imagine what it must have felt like for Ferdinand who was advertised for at least twice due to his self-liberation attempt and his enslaver’s desire to have him back. Most wouldn’t know from the ad that he was from Howard County because the only name that appears is Ferdinand’s. Boy is there a story, one that ultimately involved potential reasons for self-liberation related to a freedom suit filed by someone who was being enslaved along with Ferdinand. Ferdinand was supposed to receive his freedom in a few years. Did he talk with the man who sued for his freedom and won? How about the man who was supposed to be freed right before Ferdinand self-liberated the first advertised time? Students at Marriott’s Ridge high should know this history, since it involves their namesake William Marriott. With our work…they will. One attendee involved in Indigenous work engaged in conversation to imagine how the local accurate story of that history can also be overlayed over a county map in order to pay homage to it, using research.

These are some of the things participants were told yesterday, and some of the materials that will be used in order to have a better understanding of what was really going on specific to our county. Attendees were told our philosophy that every person has a story, and is so much more than just an advertisement. Our upcoming work with high school students using modern tools to convey these stories and primary source materials was warmly met with enthusiasm yesterday. Hosted by a representative of the Historic Savage Mill, who also attended and expressed their excitement. They were a great host site, and a few stories local to Savage were given since we were all on those grounds. We have ads and activity that was never advertised in newspapers.

Local county history made accurate and engaging for students, visitors and residents ✅

The Resistance Project was initiated some time ago, and will be introduced at our upcoming Lunch and Learn on Sept 1…a f...
08/25/2023

The Resistance Project was initiated some time ago, and will be introduced at our upcoming Lunch and Learn on Sept 1…a first for our history nonprofit. This is David’s story involving the sheriff…
https://hocoltr.org/2023/08/25/david/

Join us for our first Lunch and Learn on Sept 1st. So so exciting to finally officially launch this to our community. Th...
08/21/2023

Join us for our first Lunch and Learn on Sept 1st. So so exciting to finally officially launch this to our community. The work continues, and we’re excited to be using local students for it!

Lunch and Learn: introducing the project to map Howard County Maryland’s runaway slave activity

Many times through the years of going to the state archives I’ve encountered things I wasn’t looking for. Records and do...
08/13/2023

Many times through the years of going to the state archives I’ve encountered things I wasn’t looking for. Records and documents are king. Some alter myths and misperceptions about pre Civil War Black history like this gem I found Friday. Our nonprofit incorporates findings like this into the collective work we do.

This document is the answer of the Baltimore bank in a lawsuit in which about 120 free Black men and women were suing for the financial account book that was being withheld from them. The year was 1840. There was always an association between the geographic area of Anne Arundel that would become Howard County and Baltimore City, and it’s a good bet that some of the 120 had lived or worked in the county at some point before this lawsuit was filed. What was the bank account for? The Baltimore Association for the Education of Colored Children. Does that change perceptions? I hope so…
Marlena

Inspired by the recent Washington Post article regarding Ms. Gilbert and her Howard County ancestor OC Gilbert.
08/08/2023

Inspired by the recent Washington Post article regarding Ms. Gilbert and her Howard County ancestor OC Gilbert.

I started getting calls about the story that got dropped by the Washington Post while I was at the state archives in Annapolis last Saturday as I often do...

It happens that records have to get corrected at times, even those at the state archives. The devil is in the details, i...
08/04/2023

It happens that records have to get corrected at times, even those at the state archives. The devil is in the details, it’s often said. Taking the time to get things corrected matters for so many reasons. The online Maryland Manual for Howard County is a good recent example.

Imagine that a class of students is tasked with writing history of our county and they do what is common these days… look at online web pages for the answers for their work. As of a few weeks ago, the state archives had the wrong date on the chronology page for when our county officially began. It had June 14. Took a while, and had to show the proof, but now it’s corrected.

Now, the county’s first State’s Attorney…listed here on the county listing to be William H G Dorsey, son of chief judge Thomas B Dorsey, it is not correct. Why is it important? Because the stories our nonprofit has been composing using the info and data collected in order to make them contains the names of people like the State’s Attorney. In fact, a freedom suit filed right around that time period has William’s name on it as the lead attorney, and it’s important to get it accurate for whether or not he was also the State’s Attorney for Howard County when we go to give these local history stories to school students etc. as we’re planning. We have a collection of freedom suits that we are working to place onto a StoryMap so that students and visitors can visualize where these events happened. Here in the oath book is our first county elected commissioners and the first State’s Attorney for the county who was John TB Dorsey. Forwarded to our state archives for correction, and our files are noted. FYI, John was William’s brother. He factors into our local Black history work also. Details do matter, as does accuracy.

“.. both men and both institutions have benefitted from a century of misleading and incomplete historical narratives. Th...
07/28/2023

“.. both men and both institutions have benefitted from a century of misleading and incomplete historical narratives. The family lore that animated Helen Thom’s 1929 panegyric Johns Hopkins: A Silhouette was for a long time regarded as fact. One of the early headmasters of the McDonogh School, William Allan, published in 1886 the Life and Work of John McDonogh, a similarly hagiographic account that has been left relatively unscrutinized for decades.”
This is what makes work like this important.

Johns Hopkins, John McDonogh, and Our Part in the Baltimore Institutions They Left Behind

Today in history. It passed, despite the fact that the state of Maryland specifically rejected it.
07/09/2023

Today in history. It passed, despite the fact that the state of Maryland specifically rejected it.

By now, many know that the county Flag Bill (CB31) died last night at the legislative session. There was sooo much that ...
07/06/2023

By now, many know that the county Flag Bill (CB31) died last night at the legislative session. There was sooo much that wasn’t known about what our county flag is really depicting, whether the process creating it was open/transparent/fair and if we’d be locking ourselves into that flag design (which many have strong feelings of dislike for) by going with a September 19 date, that it had to die. Our nonprofit will always be an advocate for ACCURATE history, especially COUNTY-SPECIFIC local history, and we hope that the interest in local history continues to grow. Our nonprofit has always specialized in researching, compiling, and disseminating local Black history in particular which does rely upon information about general county history.

For purposes of establishing a trail of documentation concerning important dates in county history, which will be useful in future discussions concerning a possible new flag for the county (discussed by several but not all council people last night), I’m putting this record here of the date in which the Maryland Governor proclaimed the 1851 election results which was to be either FOR or AGAINST the new constitution. That constitution is the one which officially created Howard County out of Anne Arundel. Election was June 4, and constitution was to take effect July 4. Fun fact: Anne Arundel county alone, by a majority, voted NO to the constitution that would create Howard County! The constitution was hotly contested from the time the delegates finished with it to the day of the election, for many reasons contained in it. In some ways… we can thank each of the other jurisdictions that overwhelming voted FOR it because without them, the county would not have become its own separate county. How many people know this about the county they live and work in?

If the goal was really to have a local Flag Day in which to have occasion to talk about county history, we never needed one special day to do that. We have a lot to do to make history accurate here in the county, which is why our nonprofit formed a local history summit this past January with the other history nonprofits (and the only county government entity- Rec and Parks) to begin to address making local history accurate here. There’s a lot one can learn from history that informs why things are the way they are today (how we got here). Many politicians will tell you this about history and understand its value. Some things repeat, or change only slightly so that it can be repeated by those who desire things to remain the same. I hope that the people behind the legislation won’t see it as a fail, and will instead see it as the true opportunity it is. I’m sure they never imagined that there were others out there who also care about county history and what we’re telling students/visitors/residents for their consumption and understanding. I hate the phrase “history is complicated” because it’s humans that are complicated. What history is is evolving, and that’s due to many things like new information being researched and compiled for consumption that wasn’t deemed to be significant by those who exclusively had the microphones before.

I really hope that an effort gets underway to explore creating a new county flag design that will truly represent the desires of the many who invest so much of themselves to be able to call this “______ Best Place ___” their home. The Jean Hannon flag and whatever the symbols actually represented are forever a part of our history now. Yes, our state flag has elements that were adopted by the Confederacy which our past Governor loudly proclaimed he would not touch a few years ago. He, nor any Governor, doesn’t have any say about local flag designs in which our flag contains a similar element. That’s a decision for We The People of the county.

Marlena
Exec. Dir. HCLTR

Archivists in the community.
07/06/2023

Archivists in the community.

More on pending county council bill CB31 created in the 1960s when the county was in a state of great transition and cha...
07/05/2023

More on pending county council bill CB31 created in the 1960s when the county was in a state of great transition and changes like desegregation, civil rights legislation, and charter government.

What in a triangle? In the case of the right lower panel of the Howard County flag, it’s the shape of the county itself that is in it.

A blog post called “A County Flag Was Born, But Who Birthed It?” about the county flag that was created in June 1968 (ri...
06/27/2023

A blog post called “A County Flag Was Born, But Who Birthed It?” about the county flag that was created in June 1968 (right after The Civil Rights Act of 1968 was passed) while Columbia was being built by Rouse, etc. This relates to CB31-2023 currently pending. https://hocoltr.org/2023/06/27/a_county_flag_was_born/

Tomorrow night. This has implications for Howard County history.
06/14/2023

Tomorrow night. This has implications for Howard County history.

Author and journalist Rachel Swarns will report on the 272 enslaved people that were sold by Catholic priests in 1838 to ensure the growth of the Catholic institution of higher learning now known as Georgetown University. The author will explore this history through the many generations of the Mahon...

On this day…
05/18/2023

On this day…

When your County Executive finds out that a new book with the accurate pre Civil War Black History of the log home he’s ...
05/12/2023

When your County Executive finds out that a new book with the accurate pre Civil War Black History of the log home he’s stood in front of many times has been published, and new narrative is coming for visitors and residents…

A thing happened today outside the Bernard Fort house that I'm really happy about for our nonprofit. We got recognized d...
05/10/2023

A thing happened today outside the Bernard Fort house that I'm really happy about for our nonprofit. We got recognized during National History Preservation Month for the work we do. We're the newest kid on the block in the arena, and it wasn't easy getting where we are. As County Executive Ball said today, sometimes people fight because they are passionate and feel strongly about what they do. YEP.

Dr. Ball got personally introduced to the new book we published (as did others), which gives "our history new life, new purpose and a new place on our hearts and minds" as the language on the certificate mentions. Even after the ceremony, many of us were "working" discussing history work currently underway and how to collaborate to make local history better for the community/visitors! Was a great afternoon. (Pictured in the photo with Dr. Ball is Fred Dorsey)

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