The Millicent Rogers Museum

The Millicent Rogers Museum The Millicent Rogers Museum was established in 1956 as a memorial to Millicent Rogers by her son Paul Peralta-Ramos.The Millicent Rogers Museum is committed to sharing the arts and cultures of the American Southwest.
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Millicent Rogers was the grand-daughter of Henry Huttleston Rogers,one of the original founders of Standard Oil. Regognized as a style Icon Millicent also designed her own jewelry after she was stricken with Rheumatic Fever at age ten. The disease would cripple her health and eventually cause her death. Millicent Rogers was known for her beauty, famous romances and keen intellect.She was a devoted patriot during World War ll and loving mother to three sons. In the last years of her life she lived in Taos New Mexico where she found beauty and peace in the land and a deep kinship and respect for the Native American people and culture. The Millicent Rogers Museum acquires,preserves and educates the public about the Native American,Hispanic and European American people of the Southwest. Please note: November 1 - March 31 the museum is closed on Mondays.

Operating as usual

08/24/2020
Thank You for making the 2020 Summer Auction Successful!

Left to right CornBringer Michaels, Laura Wynn, Carmela Quinto, Greta Brunschwyler, Karen Chertok, Pam Cambell with Sandra Giltner on the camera. The MRM staff is most gratefulfor the support and success of the recent 2020 Summer Auction fundraiser.

08/19/2020
2020 MRM Match Support Dollar for Dollar

Greta, Executive Director, shares the Match Support Campaign which gives a dollar for every dollar that is donated to the Millicent Rogers Museum! Any amount is going to be matched by some generous Patrons. Please share what you can and it will be matched. THANK YOU!!!

The Millicent Rogers Museum's cover photo
08/12/2020

The Millicent Rogers Museum's cover photo

Register today start bidding on the 2020 Summer Auction Fundraiser for the Millicent Rogers Museum. Take a peek at the l...
08/10/2020

Register today start bidding on the 2020 Summer Auction Fundraiser for the Millicent Rogers Museum. Take a peek at the link below. Bidding begins at 6PM Monday August 10th! Don't let these lots pass you by. Items will be added until August 19th.
https://www.silentauctionpro.com/bidonlinegrid.php?groupId=1642

2020 Summer Auction, August 19-23. Save the Date and join us for this online Super Silent Auction! Select Experiences, V...
08/04/2020

2020 Summer Auction, August 19-23. Save the Date and join us for this online Super Silent Auction! Select Experiences, Vintage Jewelry, Fine Art , and Donation Options to Support The Millicent Rogers Museum.
View the Auction Lots Today and leading up to the auction, we are adding items daily https://millicentrogers.org/pages/2020-summer-auction

07/25/2020

Carmela explains the symbolism of the Native American squash blossom necklace, including the "naja."

Creating the incredible Taos Fiesta Panel...
07/11/2020

Creating the incredible Taos Fiesta Panel...

Every year, on the third weekend of July, Taos Plaza is transformed into a place that celebrates culture. A mass, fiesta...
07/11/2020

Every year, on the third weekend of July, Taos Plaza is transformed into a place that celebrates culture. A mass, fiesta queen and court, coronation, and procession open the event. Community and visiting family who live out of state fill the plaza. Elders bring folding chairs to sit, listen, eat, and visit. Music, dancing, and smells of food fill the air. There are parades on two successive days down the Paseo del Pueblo. This is Las Fiestas de Taos.

The Fiestas include celebratory traditions passed from generation to generation as a way of preserving the rich heritage and cultural way of life that has developed in Taos over the last four centuries. This inclusive culture is unique to Taos, encompassing Pueblo and Plains Indians, Mexicanos, Spanish explorers, conquistadores, French fur trappers, and American mountain men.

Las Fiestas de Taos honors two saints. The first day is dedicated to Saint James, (Spanish: Santiago), who is the patron saint of Spain. The second day is always dedicated to St. Anne, (Santa Ana) the mother of the Blessed Mother of Jesus. The celebration of their feast days in our community has been due to the special regard in which Santiago and Santa Ana are held by the Spanish.

Santiago, St. James the Apostle, by tradition is said to have brought Christianity to Spain. As the patron saint of Spain, he was also the patron saint of Spanish conquistadores and caballeros. Santa Ana, the Mother of Mary, is esteemed by many women as the perfect example of motherhood.

In 1948, several Anglo artists in Taos created a special commoration of the Taos Fiestas. This mural sized set of four panels of caricatures of Taos personalities is in the collection of the Museum (MRM#2001.005.001A,B,C,D) Gifted to the museum by Saul Harborg in the 1970s.

The panels were painted in Rebecca James' garage by Rebecca James, Dorothy Brett, Barbara Latham and Tom Benrimo (see picture below). They had been aided by Frank Waters, Taos writer, and his wife, Janey; Dorothy Benrimo, designer and silversmith; and Bob Gribbroeck, Hollywood animation cartoon artist.

2020 will mark the third time the Fiestas have been cancelled in the last 100 years. However, culture and tradition still continue. They reside within art galleries and living rooms, museums and classrooms, time-honored places of worship, and restaurants. They are embedded in the land, the adobe structures, and the hearts and minds of a resilient people. The Millicent Rogers Museum is honored to share and celebrate the traditions so important to our community.

Yarrow (white) and Rocky Mountain Penstemon
06/05/2020

Yarrow (white) and Rocky Mountain Penstemon

New Mexico Native Plants that are flowering at the Millicent Rogers Museum!
06/05/2020

New Mexico Native Plants that are flowering at the Millicent Rogers Museum!

New Mexico Native Plants that are flowering at the Millicent Rogers Museum!

Millicent Rogers' wearing blanket
05/31/2020

Millicent Rogers' wearing blanket

05/31/2020

Carmela talks about a "wearing blanket" and its rich red from Germantown Dye.

The Millicent Rogers Museum's cover photo
05/22/2020

The Millicent Rogers Museum's cover photo

Enjoy the video explanation of San Ysidro feast day with Carmela Quinto, Millicent Rogers Museum Curator. if you are a g...
05/15/2020

Enjoy the video explanation of San Ysidro feast day with Carmela Quinto, Millicent Rogers Museum Curator. if you are a gardener or acequia keeper, or rancher or farmer- he's your patron saint!

05/15/2020

May 15 the feast day for San Ysidro, patron saint of farmers, ranchers, and acequia keepers

The graduating class of 2020 achievements includes new social responsibilities that no other genre has encountered. May ...
05/15/2020

The graduating class of 2020 achievements includes new social responsibilities that no other genre has encountered. May this resilience be one of your greatest strengths as you go forward. Maintain your motivation and courage!

05/07/2020

Reading with Karen: "There Was a Coyote Who Swallowed a Flea"

04/30/2020
My dears, please follow us on twitter. Our account is new and we are looking to gather a bigger following everywhere we ...
04/29/2020
Millicent Rogers Museum (@MuseumRogers) | Twitter

My dears, please follow us on twitter. Our account is new and we are looking to gather a bigger following everywhere we can possibly Share the Arts and Cultures of the Southwest!
https://twitter.com/MuseumRogers

The latest Tweets from Millicent Rogers Museum (@MuseumRogers). Millicent Rogers Museum is the Hidden Jewel of the Southwest tucked away in the beautiful landscape of Taos, NM. 1504 Millicent Rogers Road

The Millicent Rogers Museum's cover photo
04/26/2020

The Millicent Rogers Museum's cover photo

Have you heard the exciting news?! One of our favorite books, “Luna, the Mare with the Sky Blue Eyes” has been awarded T...
04/25/2020

Have you heard the exciting news?! One of our favorite books, “Luna, the Mare with the Sky Blue Eyes” has been awarded The 2019 Nautilus Book Awards! This is beautiful collaboration of our dear friends: Dora Dillistone, Author, Jonathan Warm Day Coming, Illustrator, and Don “Wiz” Allred, Designer and Publisher. During a photo shoot earlier this year, our young model Davie Winters Jr. took a break to read this book on his grandma Mary’s lap. He loves books! Call our store today to get your copy of this keepsake for you or some special child you know of.

The Millicent Rogers Museum's cover photo
04/24/2020

The Millicent Rogers Museum's cover photo

04/24/2020
Lil Buck with Icons Of Modern Art

https://vimeo.com/193562626
At the Millicent Rogers Museum, we're very interested in exploring cultural convergence. "Everything is Art"

To mark the current exhibition at Foundation Louis Vuitton in Paris, Icons Of Modern Art: The Shchukin Collection, London-based director Andrew Margetson follows…

Thank you to all our Wonderful Volunteers! We really miss you and hope that you are thriving. We can't wait to hang out ...
04/20/2020

Thank you to all our Wonderful Volunteers! We really miss you and hope that you are thriving. We can't wait to hang out again...and put you all to work! Love from all the staff at the Millicent!

04/15/2020
Millicent's Yalalag

The yalalag necklace originated in Yalalag, Oaxaca, Mexico. While its design varies from piece to piece, it always includes religous symbolism.

04/15/2020

We hope that you and your loved ones are weathering this global crisis as well as possible, and that you are healthy and safe. All of us have been affected in ways we could hardly have imagined just two months ago. While the Museum is closed indefinitely, our dedicated staff continues working as best possible to keep us going so that we can emerge stronger, with new ways to offer you access to our Museum’s content and cultural mission through online channels.

The Millicent Rogers Museum Board of Directors has decided to reschedule the Museum’s traditional August fundraising event to next August 7, 2021 at El Monte Sagrado. Our partner, Taos Onstage is happy to be joining us to present live mystery theater. While many factors were taken into consideration in making this decision, we will not elaborate, as you’re probably familiar with them already.

Many of our event sponsors have generously gifted the Museum their sponsorship dollars to be used for operating expenses during this time when we have no income. We cannot tell those folks enough just how much we appreciate their generosity and support. With our doors closed, the Millicent Rogers Museum has no revenue from ticket sales. Like many other museums, the Millicent is experiencing steep financial losses. At this time, we are focused on safeguarding our two greatest assets— the priceless collection and a community of talented staff dedicated to our mission. Now, more than ever, a gift of any amount or an early renewal, will serve as your endorsement of the Millicent Rogers Museum. Thank you for your consideration. – The Millicent Rogers Museum staff and Board of Directors

She Who Watches from the MRM Courtyard, spring and new life ...
04/12/2020

She Who Watches from the MRM Courtyard, spring and new life ...

Address

1504 Millicent Rogers Rd
El Prado, NM
87259

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Videos

Our Story

Imagine yourself in Gallup, New Mexico on a warm desert evening in 1947 at the Intertribal Ceremonial, a gathering of Indian artists, dancers, drummers, and singers. In the crowd is a woman–striking, well-tailored, and blonde–and she strolls among sale displays including silver and turquoise jewelry, textiles, and drums. She stops to visit with one Native vendor, then another, all the time eyeing art forms that are completely new to her. She randomly picks up bracelets, earrings, and belts and closely examines details of stamped patterns, the inlays of coral, mother of pearl, and onyx, and the interesting shapes of dragonflies, crosses, and snakes that have been formed from silver. And then she sees a necklace of beautiful turquoise that makes her take a quick breath: 294 irregularly shaped tabs of blue and green turquoise are strung with a large pendant of the same stone. The necklace is heavy in her hands, perhaps nearly four pounds.

Why would Millicent Rogers acquire these things? You have to know, in part, a bit more about Rogers herself, and her life was not ordinary. Millicent Rogers (1902-1953) grew up in New York within privilege and wealth and she was often referred to in the press as the “Standard Oil Heiress,” since it was her grandfather, H.H. Rogers, who was the co-founder with John D. Rockefeller of the Standard Oil Trust. Rogers’ life, before Taos, includes the things one would expect, such as travel, homes, marriage, and children. But she was also distinctive for her looks and her fashionable style, which resulted in popularity with photographers, clothing designers, and fashion magazines. Apart from photographing well and having a figure for couture design, Rogers had a way of combining fashion elements with an engaging flair, which in turn caught the eye and attention of fashion devotees. So how does this answer why Rogers collected art of the Southwest? That Rogers approached fashion creatively is the key.

Her correspondence with fashion designers such as Charles James reveal aspects of her creative style. Drawing designs for bold, modern, and sometimes abstract jewelry pieces that she eventually had made (or made herself at her own bench) also display her own artistic ability. No doubt responding to beautifully designed, well-constructed, and artful pieces, Millicent Rogers, surely in part, collected jewelry, textiles, and baskets because as an artist herself she responded to and appreciated beauty that can be found in the objects of devotion, utility, and adornment that are unique to the Southwest.

Rogers came to Taos in 1947 with a heart broken by Clark Gable, and physically weakened by rheumatic fever as a child. But settling in Taos did not mean she would simply slow down.

Rogers was very passionate about both the Hispanic and Native American communities in New Mexico. She played a quiet but instrumental role in securing Blue Lake for Taos Pueblo. While her tenure in Taos was brief, just a few short years, her impact on the community was tremendous. Today, that legacy remains in the museum that bears her name.

Please note: November 1 - March 31 the museum is closed on Mondays.

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Comments

Check out the online auction, you've got until Sunday at midnight Mountain Time! there are still some great bargains left.
I tried to go to your sale......
Such talented students ....JOB WELL DONE!