World War II History Center

World War II History Center The World War II History Center is a museum and research library that has information about the entire War on the European, Pacific and Home Fronts, and how the entire country pulled together to help win the war.
The World War II History Center is a museum and research library dedicated to World War II. The Center includes information about the entire war on the European, Pacific and Home Fronts, and how the entire country pulled together to help win the war. Not only does the center feature the American perspective, but it also highlights the efforts of the Allies and the Axis alike. The purpose is to provide one of the most comprehensive facilities on the subject of World War II in the United States, and potentially the world.
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Got a question about WWII? We can answer it! Ask our research department - http://wwiihistorycenter.org/researchpage.htm Vision Statement To remember a generation, to honor their sacrifices, and to educate future generations. Mission Statement The mission of the World War II History Center Foundation is to facilitate a museum and resource facility dedicated to the history of the World War II era. The center will strive to educate all generations about the reasons for the war and the profound impact WWII had on the world. The Importance of World War II The World War II era was a defining era for the United States , as well as the world. It was the last time that America was united with one goal - good overcoming evil. WWII was the largest war in human history, resulting in over 50,000,000 deaths world-wide. Over 16,000,000 men and women served in America's Armed Forces the largest number to serve at one time. Over 400,000 Americans died protecting the freedoms the United States were founded on. The world changed before, during and after the war. Politics, news coverage, ethnic tolerance, women's equality, advancements in technology, military strategies, foreign policies and governments. World War II on All Fronts There are many museums in the United States that touch on World War II, focusing on a unit, a battle, or a region of the war. This museum will be one of the few that will cover the entire war, on the European and Pacific fronts, as well as the home front. The resource center will contain information on all aspects of the war and will be available through the use of a computer database accessible for free on the internet. Kansas: Why, Where, and When? Kansas has its own unique history tied to the World War II era. The Boeing plant in Wichita built B-29 bombers for the Pacific Theater. 13 prisoner of war camps were located in Kansas, housing German and Italian POWs. There were several air bases in Kansas including Topeka, Hutchinson and Winfield. A Red Cross and United Service Organization (USO) canteen was located in Newton at the railroad depot, serving over 2,000,000 service men and women. Lastly, the Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces, Dwight D. Eisenhower's childhood home is located in Abilene. Goals To be a valued contributor of cultural opportunities for the Wichita Metro area, as well as the surrounding communities. To partner with area schools and colleges offering research opportunities, outreach programs, K-12 educational programs tied to Kansas State Standards, adult lecture series, summer programs, and internships. To be a nationally recognized, regional-level museum and resource center, offering research capabilities, interactive exhibits and educational programs. History of the Foundation The World War II History Center Foundation was envisioned by founder Allen Cooley. Allen was a co-creator of the Kansas World War II Historical Society, a group of individuals that shared the same passion for preserving the history of World War II. After a few years of setting up displays of memorabilia at Veteran's Day events, local fairs and other outlets, Allen decided it was time to proceed to the next step of creating a permanent museum. It was clear that with so many people involved in the war effort, that there was a vast number of descendants that wanted to learn more about their family's service during the war. After doing some research on World War II museums across the country, Allen was shocked discover that there were so few that focused entirely on the war, and even fewer that covered the whole war. There are many museums in this country that touch on the war, or that cover a portion of it, but there are always visitors to these places that feel left out or forgotten. Allen's intent early on was to create an all-inclusive museum and research facility that even covered aspects of the Axis side of the war. Allen learned about the process of create a non-profit organization, a necessary step in developing a museum, and set out to recruit people willing to serve on the board of directors. After a few short months in April of 2006, the World War II History Center Foundation was established as a corporate entity in the State of Kansas. By June that same year, the Foundation was recognized as a 501(c)3 non-profit by the Federal government, allowing the Foundation to raise funds with a tax-exempt status. Support for the Foundation grew as members of the original Board of Directors recruited members and volunteers. By the end of 2007, the Foundation had found a home for the organization as well as enough space to set up basic museum operations on the 4th floor of the Commerce Bank building in downtown El Dorado, Kansas. This was a big step for the Foundation because it gave the organization a physical location that members, volunteers, and potential funders to visit and learn more about the World War II History Center and its capabilities. Prior to the creation of the Foundation, Allen had created the World War II Research Database on his home computer in November of 2005. He created the database of military personnel, units and naval vessels of all combatant nations that served during the war as a way to help people find information that sought regarding a loved one's service during the war. Allen had always been an avid reader of World War II history, but often thought about the amazing stories he read about servicemen and women that would likely never be known by their descendants. So, Allen created a website and began cataloguing his small collection of books and magazine articles on the war. This website became the World War II History Center's website, and the Research Database became a unique and on-going service provided by the World War II History Center. Initially, research requests regarding information in the database were completed free of charge. However, by the middle of 2007, so many requests were coming in (4 or 5 per week) that they could not be completed timely enough, and it was decided to begin charging a small fee for completion of the research. This service continues today and the Center received over 500 requests in 2008 alone. At the end of 2007, the Foundation was forced to find a new home because its location at the Commerce Bank building was going to be no longer available. It was at that time that the Foundation worked out a deal with the owner of another building in downtown El Dorado that had been vacant for almost 2 years. The building needed a lot of work, and needed to be brought up to code before it could be used, but the owner (Nita Whiteman) allowed the Foundation to lease the building rent-free for 18 months while renovation work was completed. By the fall of 2008, a majority of this work was complete and the World War II History Center officially opened in its new location at 119 W. Central on September 27th, 2008. The Center now includes a Tribute Gallery, Research Library, Gift Shop and several exhibits. It also has the capability to host guest lectures and a regular movie night event. The Center began keeping regular operating hours in November, 2008 and since then has seen an average of 7 visitors per day. In September, 2010, the Foundation was able to purchase the building it had been leasing for the previous two years from owner Nita Whiteman. The purchase was made possible by funds raised by the Foundation as well as two large grants from the Stone Family Foundation and the K.T. Wiedemann Foundation, Inc. The achievement of this goal was the largest accomplishment to date by the World War II History Center Foundation and it secured a home for the foreseeable future which allowed the Center to focus on developing and improving the museum and its research services.

Mission: The mission of the World War II History Center Foundation is to facilitate a museum and resource facility dedicated to the history of the World War II era. The center will strive to educate all generations about the reasons for the war and the profound impact WWII had on the world.

04/16/2020
The National WWII Museum

The National WWII Museum

Join us live NOW for an interview with WWII Veteran Steve Ellis.

WWII Veteran Steve Ellis served in the US Navy from 1944 to 1946 aboard LST-751. A Tulane graduate, Museum volunteer, and lifelong New Orleans resident, Ellis took part in the campaigns to liberate the Philippines and survived Japanese Kamikaze attacks. Join us live to hear him recount his wartime experiences in an interview with Dr. Tyler Bamford, Leventhal Research Fellow at The National WWII Museum.

101st Airborne World War II Living History Camp
04/06/2020
101st Airborne World War II Living History Camp

101st Airborne World War II Living History Camp

Living history enthusiast Greg Henesy tours a reconstructed World War II U.S. Army Airborne barracks, showing vehicles and equipment.

Ohrdruf
04/05/2020
Ohrdruf

Ohrdruf

Find topics of interest and explore encyclopedia content related to those topics

WW2 RADIO
03/21/2020

WW2 RADIO

In Harm's Way - 1965

La flottille miniature utilisée pour le film In Harm's Way d'Otto Preminger en 1965.

Photos : Ralph Crane - LIFE Collections ©

03/21/2020

Due to the current corona virus situation the board has decided to temporarily keep the museum closed. We don't know how long this closure will be necessary, but we will monitor the situation and return to regular business hours as soon as it is deemed prudent. Thank you for your understanding and support.

03/17/2020
National Museum of Military Vehicles

in Dubois Wyoming

Educating guests on military history and the contributions military vehicles and brave soldiers made throughout US-involved wars.

03/16/2020
Hedy Lamarr and the Torpedo

Hedy Lamarr and the Torpedo

The History Guy remembers how "the most beautiful woman in film," Hedy Lamarr, helped invent WiFi. The History Guy uses images that are in the Public Domain....

Women of World War II
03/16/2020

Women of World War II

Lieutenant Mae Olson (left), of the United States Army Nurses Corps, takes the name of a wounded American soldier as he is placed aboard a hospital plane of a United States Army Air Force aerial evacuation unit on Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands. Army nurses care for wounded men in flight on the way to modern station hospitals.

https://www.womenofwwii.com/army-nurses/

03/09/2020
The Women Who Saved Stalingrad

The Women Who Saved Stalingrad

The unknown story of the 1077th Anti-Aircraft Regiment, whose female gunners made an extraordinary land stand on the first day of the Battle of Stalingrad, 1...

02/29/2020
60 Seconds Of Awesome: Crackling v-12 Merlins

60 Seconds Of Awesome: Crackling v-12 Merlins

There's nothing quite like the throaty roar and crackling of a Rolls Royce v-12 Merlin aero engine (or two), as the aircraft comes in for a landing. Turn up ...

02/25/2020
Joël Stoppels Battlefield Tours

Joël Stoppels Battlefield Tours

🎥 Impressive footage of the crossing of the river Roer during operation Granade, February 1945 ⤵️

02/24/2020
Naval History & Heritage Command

Naval History & Heritage Command

Happening now! Join us live as we commemorate the 75th anniversary of the battle of Iwo Jima. During our discussion with historians from Navy Medicine and the National Museum of the Marine Corps we will learn about the battle and the Sailors and Marines who served at Iwo Jima.

We'll be taking questions, so please leave a comment with yours! #IwoJima75 #WWII75

National Museum of the Marine Corps
02/24/2020

National Museum of the Marine Corps

75th Anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima

In commemoration of the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima, the Museum will host several events in February 2020.

February 19, 2020 -- March 26, 2020
Temporary Exhibit: Both Flags Raised on Iwo Jima
On February 23, 1945, Marines raised a small flag on Mount Suribachi to the cheers of the troops below and ships in the harbor. Later that day, different troops raised a larger flag while others respectfully lowered the original flag. The iconic photo of the second flag-raising captured by Joe Rosenthal became the enduring symbol of American resolve. This is the first time in recent years that both flags, which are included in the Museum’s collection, will be displayed together.

February 22, 2020 – 10 am – 2 pm
Heroes Among Us
The Museum is honored to host keynote speaker, Iwo Jima Marine Medal of Honor recipient Hershel “Woody” Williams for this year’s event. Williams will be sharing his story of service in the Medal of Honor Theater at 1 pm. During the day, historians and curators from the Marine Corps will provide special talks on the battle and the flag-raising. Also, visitors will have the opportunity to see a rare display of USMC and USN artifacts and archival materials that relate to the Battle of Iwo Jima. In addition to artifact display, there will be government and nonprofit organizations that assist active duty service members and veterans on hand sharing information. All are welcome to attend!

February 23, 2020 -10 am – 1 pm
Family Day – Iwo Jima
Join us in Leatherneck gallery for a special Family Day event to commemorate the anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima. Families will have the opportunity to learn more about the battle and participate in crafts and activities that relate to WWII. During the day, museum curators will have on display special artifacts from the Battle of Iwo Jima.

February 23, 2020, 2 pm
President’s Own Marine Corps Band Performance
Don’t miss this special performance by the President's Own Marine Corps Band in Leatherneck Gallery.

Please share this information with family and friends!

"The President's Own" United States Marine Band Marine Corps Base Quantico

Landing Vehicle Tracked LVT4
02/17/2020

Landing Vehicle Tracked LVT4

Marine veteran Pleasant Rourk kept the helmet he was wearing during the battle of Iwo Jima 70 years ago when a Japanese soldier shot him in the head. The bullet pierced the front of his helmet, grazed the top of his head, then exited the back of the helmet.

http://warbirdsnews.com/warbirds-news/ghosts-of-the-po-river-valley-finding-the-lost-flyers-of-the-italian-air-campaign....
02/15/2020
Ghosts of the Po River Valley – Finding the Lost Flyers of the Italian Air Campaign

http://warbirdsnews.com/warbirds-news/ghosts-of-the-po-river-valley-finding-the-lost-flyers-of-the-italian-air-campaign.html

When many of us think about combat in the European Theatre during WWII, it is easy to focus upon the well-known battles, such as D-Day and the Battle of the Bulge. Indeed, we celebrate D-Day each year. But too often we neglect to consider some of the other significant regions of conflict, such as th...

02/12/2020
I'm A Useless Info Junkie

I'm A Useless Info Junkie

That's how it looked like just after the Germans surrendered!
(via Konstantin von zur Muehlen & Chronos Media GmbH)

So sad to hear of the passing of Britain's last surviving Ace from the Battle of Britain. Clear skies and tailwinds, sir...
02/09/2020
Battle of Britain fighter pilot Paul Farnes dies at 101

So sad to hear of the passing of Britain's last surviving Ace from the Battle of Britain. Clear skies and tailwinds, sir.

LONDON (AP) — Paul Farnes, one of the last remaining Battle of Britain fighter pilots who helped protect the U.K. during World War II, has died. He was 101. Farnes, who was a wing commander...

Vintage T-34 Tanks Return to Russia
02/02/2020
Vintage T-34 Tanks Return to Russia

Vintage T-34 Tanks Return to Russia

Peter Suciu While the Russian Federation is on track to receive the first 100 of a planned 2,300 T-14 Armata main battle tanks by 2020, TV Zvezda, the

Landing Vehicle Tracked LVT4
01/20/2020

Landing Vehicle Tracked LVT4

May 17, 1941. A Grumman F4F Wildcat, '6-F-2', of VF-6, aborts landing aboard USS Saratoga off the San Diego coast when Ens. H. E. Tennes, Chicago, cannot extend the undercarriage. He ditches in San Diego Bay. Flotation bags deploy to keep the fighter from sinking and it and the pilot are rescued by a Navy crash barge.

The First of Many – RAF Goxhill
01/19/2020
The First of Many – RAF Goxhill

The First of Many – RAF Goxhill

The First of Many – RAF Goxhill January 17, 2020 WarbirdsNews Articles, Aviation Museum News 0 The Military Aviation Museum's North American P-51D Mustang standing in front of the authentic WWII airfield watch tower which once served at RAF Goxhill during the war. The MAM dismantled the structure,...

What a deal!  Allison V-1710 engines being sold after the war for $350!  These engines were used on such aircraft as the...
01/17/2020

What a deal! Allison V-1710 engines being sold after the war for $350! These engines were used on such aircraft as the P-40 Warhawk, P-38 Lightning and the P-51 Mustang.

That's a bargain!

Military Vehicles Magazine
01/01/2020

Military Vehicles Magazine

Kyle Roloson sent this photo of his 1941 G-506. Kyle and his father restored it over the last two years. He saved it from a slow death of rotting away in the mountains of PA. The truck needed everything done to it from engine work to major body work. Over 700 hours went into this project and they are very proud of the end result and what/who it represents.

Museum of The American GI
12/28/2019

Museum of The American GI

Exactly 75 years ago today, the siege of Bastogne was broken when the Cobra King tank crew linked up with the 101st’s Able Company, 326th Airborne Engineer Battalion, at the pillbox about two miles from the center of town. At 5:10 pm, the German line had been broken and the siege of Bastogne had ended.. but the fight was far from over. It took two more weeks to push the Germans east of Bastogne, and the battle did not officially end until Jan. 17, 1945. Pvt. James G. Murphy, a loader on the Cobra King is now buried in Bryan, Texas. The Cobra King tank now resides in Fort Belvoir, Virginia, at what will become the National Museum of the United States Army. This museum is set to open in June of 2020.

African American Military History Museum
12/24/2019

African American Military History Museum

World War II became a major turning point in the desegregation of the U.S. military. It was during this period that the U.S. Marine Corps first began inducting African-American recruits into an elite group that became known as the Montford Point Marines.

Lawrence "Larry" Diggs born and raised in Inverness, Mississippi was drafted into the military in May 1942, six days after his 19th birthday while living in Chicago. He became one of the first African Americans recruited by the Marine Corps.
After finishing basic training at Montford Point, Diggs took part in jungle warfare and special weapons training in Guadalcanal. From there he was assigned to the 7th Ammunition Company attached to the 1st Marine Division and was shipped to the Pacific. Diggs participated in the amphibious assault against Japanese forces. Based on the Jungle Training he received at Guadalcanal, Mr. Diggs was selected to move forward with the 1st Marine Division and secure the island. Diggs’ unit was rotated up to the line every three days, where they would assume positions in “foxholes” as they worked to clear caves of Japanese troops to secure the island, at times engaging the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. Diggs and his fellow Marines secured the island and established the U.S. presence there until March 1945. He later served in Saipan where he supported the “supply-side” of bombing missions being flown to Tokyo. After his service in the marines, Corporal Diggs returned to Chicago, where he worked for the United States Steel Corporation and the United States Post Office. He retired from the post office after more than 26 years of service. In June 2012, Mr. Diggs was one of 400 Montford Point Marines to receive the Congressional Gold Medal. *Photo credit: MarineParents.com*

WWII Veterans History Project
12/21/2019

WWII Veterans History Project

ON THIS DAY IN 1945 | GENERAL GEORGE PATTON DIES IN GERMANY

"It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather we should thank God that such men lived." - General George S. Patton Jr.
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On December 8, 1945, General Patton's chief of staff, Major General Hobart Gay, invited him on a hunting trip near Speyer, Germany, to lift his spirits. Observing derelict cars along the side of the road, Patton said, "How awful war is. Think of the waste." Moments later, his vehicle collided with an American army truck at low speed.
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Patton hit his head on the glass partition in the back seat and began bleeding from a gash, complaining that he was paralyzed and having trouble breathing. Taken to a hospital in Heidelberg, Patton was found to have a compression fracture and dislocation of the cervical third and fourth vertebrae, resulting in a broken neck and cervical spinal cord injury that rendered him paralyzed from the neck down. Patton, who was told he had no chance of ever riding a horse again or resume a normal life, at one point commented, "This is a hell of a way to die."
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On December 21, 1945, at around 6:00 PM, General Patton died in his sleep of pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure. He was 60 years old. Per his request to "be buried with [his] men", he was interred at the Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial in the Hamm district of Luxembourg City, alongside many wartime casualties of the Third Army. While in Europe for the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge, we visited Patton's grave and paid our respects to this American icon.
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Today, on the 74th Anniversary of his death, we remember and honor General George S. Patton Jr. for his years of dedicated military service. He is commonly regarded as one of the most successful United States field commanders of any war. 🇺🇸

World War II History Center's cover photo
12/17/2019

World War II History Center's cover photo

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El Dorado, KS
67042

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Just saw. wonder what other battles have been photographed and analyzed?
This is the perfect show for anyone who loves the 1940's, old-time radio and comedy - A Tribute to Bob Hope! Be sure to join us at the historic Brown Grand Theatre in Concordia, Kansas for this USO-type show, as we celebrate the 75th anniversary of D-Day. https://www.facebook.com/events/1933213810318001/
Hope to see many of you at the POW Camp Concordia Victory Day Celebration!
Jay LaMont shared a post. Admin · September 12 at 8:36 PM Jay LaMont September 12 at 8:35 PM D DAY - AND THE MENTAL ACTIVITIES OF ROOSEVELT, CHURCHILL, AND HITLER: On June 6, 1944 with the weather still a grave concern, the anxiety of the forces that had gathered on the shores of England couldn't have been more extreme then that which was born by the leaders whose decisions were at hand. Eisenhower, the supreme allied commander, had written a letter accepting full responsibility for the FAILURE of the invasion. That letter was fortunately not necessary and was never delivered. On this occasion, Winston Churchill became unglued, first insisting that the invasion NOT proceed then, and he was desperately afraid of the tremendous loss of life that was about to occur. When he was told to back off, he then insisted that he accompany the forces on board ship, which in his frame of mind could not be allowed. There was a great deal of consternation caused by his actions on that day. In a December 20, 1943 message to Prime Minister Churchill, President Roosevelt discussed the timing of the announcement of General Eisenhower's selection. At the end of the message he added a personal note about Churchill's health. Finally, it took a surprise visit by the king who said: If you go, then I have to go as well. At that, Churchill immediately surrendered to the cause. It isn't as clear what the mental anxiety of Roosevelt was on that day. He addressed the nation that same day with both a message and a prayer for their great undertaking, outlining what was at stake, and praying for God to receive those who would be lost with the gentleness that is the antithesis of the battle field. Out side of that, we have the written comments of his wife Eleanor in a letter to Joseph P Lash she wrote about the way his mind was wandering in a less then coherent way on June 6. [From the Roosevelt archives, this quote by Eleanor to Joe Lash who became her biographer] "The last dispatch F.[Franklin D. Roosevelt] read us says that over a 60 mile front in Normandy we have advanced 10 miles. All has gone according to schedule tho' it was rough at the start and we have lost 1 destroyer, 1 mine sweeper, and 1 LST with how much loss of life we don't know. There is less tension but F.[Franklin D. Roosevelt] keeps us all a bit undecided by saying he doesn't know what he will do and that when he hears Hitler is ready to surrender he will go to England at once and then in the next breath that he may go to Honolulu and the Aleutians." At such a dark moment, rare in history, fear, anxiety, and uncertainty darken every foot step from the most humble soldier to the generals, and leaders as well. What lay on Eisenhower's shoulders was immense. The unwitting hero of the hour, turns out to be none other then Hitler himself. Hitler was told that if they were to win the war, the Allies must never be allowed to land successfully. They had a huge tank force in back up ready to accomplish that end, but on June 6 Hitler took to his bed to sleep, leaving orders not to awaken him. And, the tank force was not to be released except by his direct order. At an earlier time Hitler met his personal physician who was less then orthodox in methodology. He had started to inject Hitler with a new drug that the Nazi's hoped to use to help keep their troops alert for longer periods of time. The drug was none other then Crystal Meth which explains his wild rants, his being awake all night and sleeping in the day time, and as a result the inability of the high command to release those tanks into battle. How strange is the element of chance in the course of history. But, I think about those two intellectuals discussing the likelihood of neighbors in outer space. One asked of the other: Do you think it likely? The other answered affirmatively. Then why haven't they made themselves known, asked the one. And, the other answered: They reached the level of total destruction. Something to think about............................We learn from history, or we are doomed to repeat it. 3 Comments 11 Like Show more reactions Comment Share Comments View 1 more comment Paul Teddy Watts Paul Teddy Watts Good read Jay. You must have read Pat's "Churchill, Hitler and the Unnecessary War." It was great look at WWII unlike most of the other historians. 1 Manage LikeShow more reactions · Reply · 13h Jay LaMont Jay LaMontYou and 3 others manage the membership, moderators, settings, and posts for Pat Buchanan Fan Club. Thank you - an area of interest
We would love to have you all join us at the POW Camp Concordia Museum for the Victory Day celebration in Concordia, Kansas!
Hello! I am looking for history on a German POW camp in St Clair Du Rhone? Thank You!