World War II History Center

World War II History Center The World War II History Center is a museum and research library that has information about the entire War on the European, Pacific and Home Fronts, and how the entire country pulled together to help win the war.

The World War II History Center is a museum and research library dedicated to World War II. The Center includes information about the entire war on the European, Pacific and Home Fronts, and how the entire country pulled together to help win the war. Not only does the center feature the American perspective, but it also highlights the efforts of the Allies and the Axis alike. The purpose is to pro

The World War II History Center is a museum and research library dedicated to World War II. The Center includes information about the entire war on the European, Pacific and Home Fronts, and how the entire country pulled together to help win the war. Not only does the center feature the American perspective, but it also highlights the efforts of the Allies and the Axis alike. The purpose is to pro

Operating as usual

Timeline Photos
09/06/2021

Timeline Photos

A British Postman on his rounds. London during the Blitz, 1940.

09/05/2021
08/29/2021

Now hear this!

"To the German Commander: Nuts!"

The defense of Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge is one of the most iconic battles of the ETO told time and time again in books, articles, and film. What is often left out of such stories is the actions taken by the tankers, armored artillerymen, armored infantrymen, and tank destroyer crewmen fighting alongside their 101st Airborne brethren.

The 10th Armored Division's armored field artillery support played a crucial role during the defense of Bastogne in Dec. 1944. While the artillery constantly brought down the steel rain on the attacking German forces, some of the M7 HMC Priest crews did at times find themselves in unique situations when faced against the attacking forces.

That is all.

#OTD 1942. Assault crossing of Severnaya Bay in the closing days of the Battle of Sevastopol.
06/29/2021

#OTD 1942. Assault crossing of Severnaya Bay in the closing days of the Battle of Sevastopol.

This illustration depicts the assault crossing of Severnaya Bay by the German LIV Corps at 0120hrs on 29 June 1942. Here, a German platoon from the 65th Infantry Regiment has just landed in six to eight assault boats near the power plant and has begun to engage a nearby Soviet outpost with MG34s (from the boats), MP40s and stick grenades from the lead troops. The Soviets are just beginning to open fire with a few weapons from nearby buildings and a red flare is fired over the nearby hill, indicating that the landing has been spotted. The German Leichtes Sturmboot 39 (light assault boat 39) was a wooden craft that could carry six assault troops at a speed of up to 16 knots. Within 45 minutes of landing, Oberst Schitting’s assault troops had seized the dominant hills overlooking the beachhead and were pushing inland. The landing was a great success and enabled LIV Corps to strike the strongpoints around Inkerman from behind. By the time that the Soviets began to react to this landing, the Germans had managed to reinforce the beachhead with the four infantry Kampfgruppen and some Panzerjäger from the 22nd and 24th Infantry Divisions.

Artwork by Howard Gerrard from CAM 189: Sevastopol 1942, written by Robert Forczyk: https://bit.ly/3hcdJkW

Timeline Photos
06/27/2021

Timeline Photos

While he was widely admired for his athletic achievements, few knew about cyclist and two-time Tour de France winner Gino Bartali's rescue efforts during World War II.

Germany occupied Italy, its former Axis partner, in 1943. Afterward, Gino used his fame and athleticism to smuggle messages in the handlebars and seat of his bicycle for underground rescue networks. He couriered counterfeit paperwork to Jews in hiding, enabling them to escape deportation to Auschwitz. Gino cycled from Florence throughout much of occupied Italy, sometimes even riding as far as Rome, proudly wearing his Italian racing jersey decorated with his name.

Gino helped save the lives of hundreds of Italian Jews, then went on to win the Tour de France in 1948, ten years after his first win.

Gino did not speak about what he did during the war, sharing just a few details with his son. It was only after Gino's death in 2000 that his rescue efforts became known. In 2013, Yad Vashem recognized Gino as Righteous Among the Nations.

Photo: Yad Vashem https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/article/gino-bartali?utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=socialholiday&utm_content=tourdefrancebegins20210626

06/27/2021

When you visit our WWII Gallery, one of the first vehicles you will come across in Amphibious Landings is this Special Operations Canoe. This canoe breaks down into three pieces and gets stored in the hull of a submarine. This was used as a reconnaissance vehicle and soldiers would sail out in the middle of the night in dark, treacherous waters. The soldier stories behind this canoe show the service and sacrifice WWII veterans gave during that time.

Today's Tours:
10:30am - Marshall Gallery (WWII)
12:00pm - Puller Gallery (Korea and Vietnam)
1:00pm - Founders tour of the Marshall and Puller galleries with owner Dan Starks

We are currently open daily 10am-5pm (with the exception of July 4).

Photos from The Greatest Generations Foundation's post
06/06/2021

Photos from The Greatest Generations Foundation's post

#OTD in 1945, #OperationOlympic, the invasion of mainland Japan, was approved by the Joint Chiefs. The initial naval lan...
05/25/2021

#OTD in 1945, #OperationOlympic, the invasion of mainland Japan, was approved by the Joint Chiefs. The initial naval landing of 40 Divisions would have dwarfed the 12 Divisions initially landed in France in Operation Overlord.

A chilling glimpse of what might have been. It was #OTD in 1945 that Operation Olympic, the start of the invasion of Japan, was approved by the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, setting the date at 1 Nov 1945 (code-named X-Day).

Olympic was part one of a two-part invasion plan known as Operation Downfall. Olympic targeted the Japanese home island of Kyushu with Okinawa acting as the primary staging area. The invasion fleet was to include 42 aircraft carriers, 24 battleships, and over 400 destroyers and destroyer es**rts. The fleet would es**rt 14 American divisions, both Army and Marine Corps, that would form the initial assault force.

Part two would be Operation Coronet planned around 1 Mar 1946 (code named Y-Day) assuming Olympic successfully secured enough airfields. It was to be the largest amphibious operation in history, with 25 divisions participating in the initial invasion.

Photos from WWII Airborne Demonstration Team's post
05/22/2021

Photos from WWII Airborne Demonstration Team's post

05/08/2021
05/06/2021
Timeline Photos
05/04/2021

Timeline Photos

I'll take "Obscure Aircraft" for $600...

This "tandem wing" British design for a carrier fighter first flew #OTD in 1942. The unique wing arrangement gave it small size, high maneuverability, excellent visibility, reduced weight, and reduced drag. The company that designed it, Miles Aircraft, had built it without official authority though, and the company was reprimanded by the Ministry of Aircraft Production which, along with the Admiralty, rejected the proposed fighter.

Be sure to phrase your answer in the form of a question. 😉

Photos from Did That Happen Today In History?'s post
04/29/2021

Photos from Did That Happen Today In History?'s post

Go check out the Wwii Pow Camp Concordia on May 1!
04/22/2021

Go check out the Wwii Pow Camp Concordia on May 1!

Visit the link below and click on "Laura Hansen - April 19, 2021" to listen in as she joins local radio personality, Toby Nosker, for KNCK's "Talk of the Town". They preview our annual Victory Day Celebration, which is set for Saturday, May 1st!

https://www.ncktoday.com/talk-shows

#OnThisDay - The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising19 April 1943As the Germans begin the final effort to transport the remaining pop...
04/19/2021

#OnThisDay - The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
19 April 1943
As the Germans begin the final effort to transport the remaining population to death camps, the Jews in the #WarsawGhetto begin a heroic but ultimately futile uprising. 13,000 Jews were killed in the fighting and the remaining 50,000+ were captured and shipped to death camps. The inspiration to fight, said Marek Edelman, was "to pick the time and place of our deaths."

#OnThisDay - The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
19 April 1943
As the Germans begin the final effort to transport the remaining population to death camps, the Jews in the #WarsawGhetto begin a heroic but ultimately futile uprising. 13,000 Jews were killed in the fighting and the remaining 50,000+ were captured and shipped to death camps. The inspiration to fight, said Marek Edelman, was "to pick the time and place of our deaths."

04/14/2021

"Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away." General Admission tickets now available for purchase. Opens at Union Station June 14.

Featuring more than 700 original objects and 400 photographs brought together from over 20 institutions and museums around the world, "Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away" is the most comprehensive exhibition dedicated to the history of Auschwitz and its role in the Holocaust ever presented in North America. A story and experience to shake the consciousness of the world and an unparalleled opportunity to confront the singular face of human evil. One that arose not long ago and not far away.

Opening at Union Station on June 14 and running thru January 2022.

Union Station is honored to be one of only two U.S. locations hosting this important international exhibition. After leaving Union Station, the exhibition must return to Europe.

After an initial VIP ticket pre-sale, over 20,000 tickets have already been secured by people from across 38 States. On the heels of this record pre-sale, general admission tickets will now be released, with all tickets being offered on a date and time-specific basis. While plenty of General Admission tickets are available, demand for tickets is high, and early ticket purchase is encouraged to ensure you can visit on your preferred day.

General admission tickets are available for immediate purchase at >> http://bit.ly/NotFarAwayTickets

"Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away." is presented by Bank of America and in partnership with the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education.

#Shermtiger
04/01/2021

#Shermtiger

Now hear this!

Throughout World War II there were numerous research projects and operations which have never been told publicly due to their sensitivity nor have they made it into the history books. Today we are proud to share one of those unknown research projects and operations which was discovered 12 months ago to this day. We were so intrigued by this piece of information that we had to share it with you all once again!

That is all!

03/28/2021

A Catalina (A24-65) of 43 Squadron RAAF "Black Cats" undergoes engine test whilst taxiing on Darwin Harbour in 1945. Note the two LAC's working on the port engine.

03/17/2021

The COOLEST WWII Diner in America | History Traveler Episode 118 - YouTube

Mobile Uploads
03/11/2021

Mobile Uploads

Elizabeth L. Remba Gardner, of Rockford, Illinois, Class 43-W-6 WASP (Women Airforce Service Pilot) at the controls of a Martin B-26 'Marauder' medium bomber. Harlingen Army Air Field, Texas. 1943 (Aged 22)

About Me and My Experiences
"My name is Elizabeth L. Gardner, or for short, Libby Gardner. I am a pilot for the Women Aircraft Service Planes. a.k.a. WASP, which is considered a civil service. Before the war, I was a housewife and a mother who stayed home to take care of my family. I was called to duty when the war started to learn how to test planes, instruct pilots, tow targets used for anti-aircraft artillery practice, and assemble planes. I was grateful for the opportunity because it made my childhood dreams of flying and fascinations with planes a reality. I work 7 days out of the week and some of those days happen to be better than others. When I first started learning, I was eager and nervous and also had two days of training under Lieutenant Col. Paul Tibbets who later commanded the B-29 that dropped the first atom bomb on Hiroshima. The training consisted of three phases; primary, basic, and advanced. On the days that we have check rides, a lot of pressure can be put on us women, and we feel that we must make a name for ourselves in this industry. I had a check ride the other day, and I must say that things did not go so well for me that day. The man testing me was very quiet and sarcastic and did not give me much information or say a lot to let me know how I was doing. I would make mistakes as turning to far out or using too much rudder on the turns; I did my best to relax, but his sarcastic remarks did not make it easy and different items in my performance were still sloppy including my stalls. The only good thing that came from that test was my landing; it was possible that he would give me credit for that, but instead he stepped out of the airplane without saying a word about whether or not I passed. I held back my tears. The opportunity is wonderful, and I love doing this every day.

(Colorized by Cândido Augusto from Brazil)

Timeline Photos
03/09/2021

Timeline Photos

Hannah Szenes, a young poet, immigrated from Hungary to the British Mandate for Palestine in 1939 at age 18. She was part of a group of young Jews who joined the British Army and parachuted into German-occupied Europe. Their mission was to organize resistance to the N***s and aid in the rescue of Allied personnel.

Hannah parachuted into Yugoslavia in March 1944 and crossed into Hungary, where she was captured with a radio transmitter. She was held for nearly five months and tortured but refused to give up the code for the radio transmitter. Hannah was executed at age 23.

Hannah wrote her last poem days before her arrest and gave it to another parachutist. Her poems are now widely published. #InternationalWomensDay

Photo: Beit Hannah Senesh https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/gallery/hannah-szenes?utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=womenshistorymonth&utm_content=internationalwomensday:hannahszenes20210308

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119 W Central Ave
El Dorado, KS
67042

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This article gives the history behind one of the missions that the author's father, a WWII bomber pilot, flew over central Germany in September 1944—but then it goes two steps further. We don't want to spoil it for you, but the first step came nearly five decades later, when pilots from both sides of that deadly mission came together again in Germany; the second step came this winter, over Zoom, and is still ongoing... This is a compelling read, and we highly recommend that you take a look; we thought you might want to share it with your followers!
Hope to see you all on May 1st in Concordia! 🇺🇸
Only $5/person suggested donation to attend this great event on May 1st! 🇺🇸 https://www.facebook.com/events/508122193518580 If anyone has photos from the 1940s, pertaining to or of Camp Concordia, please PM them to me. The museum's Preservation Society is hoping to add relevant, historical photos to their collection to share with visitors.
Here are some visitors enjoying a ride in Loren's 1943 Willys MB! Jeep rides on select weekends, only! Send a message for dates and times.
Seeking archives, accounts, photos of the 29th ID 7 to 10 June 44. Can you help ? Tks,
Just saw. wonder what other battles have been photographed and analyzed?
This is the perfect show for anyone who loves the 1940's, old-time radio and comedy - A Tribute to Bob Hope! Be sure to join us at the historic Brown Grand Theatre in Concordia, Kansas for this USO-type show, as we celebrate the 75th anniversary of D-Day. https://www.facebook.com/events/1933213810318001/
Hope to see many of you at the POW Camp Concordia Victory Day Celebration!
Jay LaMont shared a post. Admin · September 12 at 8:36 PM Jay LaMont September 12 at 8:35 PM D DAY - AND THE MENTAL ACTIVITIES OF ROOSEVELT, CHURCHILL, AND HI**ER: On June 6, 1944 with the weather still a grave concern, the anxiety of the forces that had gathered on the shores of England couldn't have been more extreme then that which was born by the leaders whose decisions were at hand. Eisenhower, the supreme allied commander, had written a letter accepting full responsibility for the FAILURE of the invasion. That letter was fortunately not necessary and was never delivered. On this occasion, Winston Churchill became unglued, first insisting that the invasion NOT proceed then, and he was desperately afraid of the tremendous loss of life that was about to occur. When he was told to back off, he then insisted that he accompany the forces on board ship, which in his frame of mind could not be allowed. There was a great deal of consternation caused by his actions on that day. In a December 20, 1943 message to Prime Minister Churchill, President Roosevelt discussed the timing of the announcement of General Eisenhower's selection. At the end of the message he added a personal note about Churchill's health. Finally, it took a surprise visit by the king who said: If you go, then I have to go as well. At that, Churchill immediately surrendered to the cause. It isn't as clear what the mental anxiety of Roosevelt was on that day. He addressed the nation that same day with both a message and a prayer for their great undertaking, outlining what was at stake, and praying for God to receive those who would be lost with the gentleness that is the antithesis of the battle field. Out side of that, we have the written comments of his wife Eleanor in a letter to Joseph P Lash she wrote about the way his mind was wandering in a less then coherent way on June 6. [From the Roosevelt archives, this quote by Eleanor to Joe Lash who became her biographer] "The last dispatch F.[Franklin D. Roosevelt] read us says that over a 60 mile front in Normandy we have advanced 10 miles. All has gone according to schedule tho' it was rough at the start and we have lost 1 destroyer, 1 mine sweeper, and 1 LST with how much loss of life we don't know. There is less tension but F.[Franklin D. Roosevelt] keeps us all a bit undecided by saying he doesn't know what he will do and that when he hears Hi**er is ready to surrender he will go to England at once and then in the next breath that he may go to Honolulu and the Aleutians." At such a dark moment, rare in history, fear, anxiety, and uncertainty darken every foot step from the most humble soldier to the generals, and leaders as well. What lay on Eisenhower's shoulders was immense. The unwitting hero of the hour, turns out to be none other then Hi**er himself. Hi**er was told that if they were to win the war, the Allies must never be allowed to land successfully. They had a huge tank force in back up ready to accomplish that end, but on June 6 Hi**er took to his bed to sleep, leaving orders not to awaken him. And, the tank force was not to be released except by his direct order. At an earlier time Hi**er met his personal physician who was less then orthodox in methodology. He had started to inject Hi**er with a new drug that the Nazi's hoped to use to help keep their troops alert for longer periods of time. The drug was none other then Crystal M**h which explains his wild rants, his being awake all night and sleeping in the day time, and as a result the inability of the high command to release those tanks into battle. How strange is the element of chance in the course of history. But, I think about those two intellectuals discussing the likelihood of neighbors in outer space. One asked of the other: Do you think it likely? The other answered affirmatively. Then why haven't they made themselves known, asked the one. And, the other answered: They reached the level of total destruction. Something to think about............................We learn from history, or we are doomed to repeat it. 3 Comments 11 Like Show more reactions Comment Share Comments View 1 more comment Paul Teddy Watts Paul Teddy Watts Good read Jay. You must have read Pat's "Churchill, Hi**er and the Unnecessary War." It was great look at WWII unlike most of the other historians. 1 Manage LikeShow more reactions · Reply · 13h Jay LaMont Jay LaMontYou and 3 others manage the membership, moderators, settings, and posts for Pat Buchanan Fan Club. Thank you - an area of interest
We would love to have you all join us at the POW Camp Concordia Museum for the Victory Day celebration in Concordia, Kansas!
Hello! I am looking for history on a German POW camp in St Clair Du Rhone? Thank You!