East Hampton Historical Society

East Hampton Historical Society East Hampton Historical Society
101 Main Street
East Hampton, NY 11937

[email protected]
Phone: (631) 324-6850

http://easthamptonhistory.org

The East Hampton Historical Society is the parent organization for a complex of five museums, national landmark historic sites of both local and national importance:
Mulford Farm, c. 1680
Town House, c. 1731
Hook School House, late 18th century
Osborn-Jackson House, c. 1740
Clinton Academy, c. 1784
East Hampton Town Marine Museum
The Thomas & Mary Nimmo Moran Studio

The East Hampton Historical Society is the parent organization for a complex of five museums, national landmark historic sites of both local and national importance:
Mulford Farm, c. 1680
Town House, c. 1731
Hook School House, late 18th century
Osborn-Jackson House, c. 1740
Clinton Academy, c. 1784
East Hampton Town Marine Museum
The Thomas & Mary Nimmo Moran Studio

Operating as usual

In 1885, the first day of classes at Amagansett’s Union Free School started on Monday, September 12th.  The East Hampton...
09/08/2021

In 1885, the first day of classes at Amagansett’s Union Free School started on Monday, September 12th. The East Hampton Star reported that the first day had excellent attendance and that Mr. Chandier of Canton, St. Lawrence County, NY, welcomed the students at the door.

The four-square designed schoolhouse was still new, as it was built in 1881 and then enlarged in 1905. The first class, in 1881, had fifty scholars. The new frame building had an imposing front porch with six Ionic columns and big oak double doors. In the center of the hipped roof was cupula topped by a copper weathervane with a quill pen above the directional. The big bell, in the tower, could be heard all over the community. It was built on the south-eastern corner of Main Street and Atlantic Avenue, with the school facing west. A new brick school was constructed between 1936 and 1937.

We wish every student who returns to school this year, the absolute best for a wonderful year.

#backtoschool #easthamptonhistoricalsociety #history #oldschool #easthampton #amagansett

In 1885, the first day of classes at Amagansett’s Union Free School started on Monday, September 12th. The East Hampton Star reported that the first day had excellent attendance and that Mr. Chandier of Canton, St. Lawrence County, NY, welcomed the students at the door.

The four-square designed schoolhouse was still new, as it was built in 1881 and then enlarged in 1905. The first class, in 1881, had fifty scholars. The new frame building had an imposing front porch with six Ionic columns and big oak double doors. In the center of the hipped roof was cupula topped by a copper weathervane with a quill pen above the directional. The big bell, in the tower, could be heard all over the community. It was built on the south-eastern corner of Main Street and Atlantic Avenue, with the school facing west. A new brick school was constructed between 1936 and 1937.

We wish every student who returns to school this year, the absolute best for a wonderful year.

#backtoschool #easthamptonhistoricalsociety #history #oldschool #easthampton #amagansett

For many East Hampton vacationers, in the 1920s and 1930s, summers ended abruptly on the last day of August.  By that la...
09/06/2021

For many East Hampton vacationers, in the 1920s and 1930s, summers ended abruptly on the last day of August. By that last summer holiday day, cars were packed ready for the long drive home and a few days of shopping for school supplies. Early September was back to classrooms and offices. The platform at the East Hampton Rail Road Station was usually very crowded for the afternoon trains back to New York.

This undated picture is titled “Ready to Return at six-thirty in the Morning.” It has clearly been cut out of a photograph album, but luckily the caption was preserved. The early morning shadows and general calm of waiting is likely why this couple woke-up early to leave behind the beaches of summer, and buckle-down to fall in the city.
#easthampton #laborday

For many East Hampton vacationers, in the 1920s and 1930s, summers ended abruptly on the last day of August. By that last summer holiday day, cars were packed ready for the long drive home and a few days of shopping for school supplies. Early September was back to classrooms and offices. The platform at the East Hampton Rail Road Station was usually very crowded for the afternoon trains back to New York.

This undated picture is titled “Ready to Return at six-thirty in the Morning.” It has clearly been cut out of a photograph album, but luckily the caption was preserved. The early morning shadows and general calm of waiting is likely why this couple woke-up early to leave behind the beaches of summer, and buckle-down to fall in the city.
#easthampton #laborday

Hurricane Carol was born near the Bahamas and developed into a category 3 as it moved northwestward.  Though often forgo...
08/31/2021

Hurricane Carol was born near the Bahamas and developed into a category 3 as it moved northwestward. Though often forgotten here, she is among the worst in the damage of Connecticut and Rhode Island. Carol was the strongest Hurricane of the 1954 Atlantic season.

We were recently given a small album of black and white photographs that record what Hurricane Carol did to East Hampton Town on August 31st, 1954. The pictures record the extensive damage to our trees, the Amagansett Beach Association and heavy flooding.

Here we share three:

1. The Aymar Embury house on Main Street, East Hampton Village. It is next to the Thomas and Mary Nimmo Moran Studio
2. The Hedges Inn on James Lane, East Hampton Village
3. The Home of Mrs. George Ludwig, on Further Lane

#hurricancarol1954 #easthamptonhistoricalsociety #hurrican

Judging from the front page of the August 30th, 1928, issue of the STAR, The Maidstone Club’s first tennis tournament fo...
08/26/2021

Judging from the front page of the August 30th, 1928, issue of the STAR, The Maidstone Club’s first tennis tournament for their young members, was a winner for both the contestants as well their audience. The finals drew such a large crowd that everyone felt that this tournament must become an annual event.

A national society page publicity photographer caught this shot at the Saturday finals, on August 26th. Described as “members of the younger set of smart society,” we see Emily Torrey on the left (from Cape Cod, Massachusetts) and Isabel Gardiner of East Hampton. The typed label attached to the back of the glossy print, notes that the girls have “adopted the fad of wearing very short stockings during the summertime.”

Ten trophies were donated by Mr. Harold O. Barker for this tennis event. The doubles award went to Mr. Barker’s son, Harold Jr. and Samuel I. Skidmore, Jr. As it should be, the list of winners is long and very supportive of the young players. Several “goodbyes” were heard, as this weekend was the last for many of the summer families until the summer of 1929.

Judging from the front page of the August 30th, 1928, issue of the STAR, The Maidstone Club’s first tennis tournament for their young members, was a winner for both the contestants as well their audience. The finals drew such a large crowd that everyone felt that this tournament must become an annual event.

A national society page publicity photographer caught this shot at the Saturday finals, on August 26th. Described as “members of the younger set of smart society,” we see Emily Torrey on the left (from Cape Cod, Massachusetts) and Isabel Gardiner of East Hampton. The typed label attached to the back of the glossy print, notes that the girls have “adopted the fad of wearing very short stockings during the summertime.”

Ten trophies were donated by Mr. Harold O. Barker for this tennis event. The doubles award went to Mr. Barker’s son, Harold Jr. and Samuel I. Skidmore, Jr. As it should be, the list of winners is long and very supportive of the young players. Several “goodbyes” were heard, as this weekend was the last for many of the summer families until the summer of 1929.

On a beautiful warm day August 24th, 1899, over 1,000 residents and visitors lined-up along East Hampton’s streets and l...
08/24/2021

On a beautiful warm day August 24th, 1899, over 1,000 residents and visitors lined-up along East Hampton’s streets and lanes to watch the parade celebrating the 250th anniversary of this English settlement. Local historian Henry P. Hedges had concluded that the first British in East Hampton had settled the town in the spring or summer of 1649. Today scholars are confident that the date was a year earlier, in 1648.

The great parade started in the shade of the Hook Mill at 11:00 am and followed Main Street until it turned west on Woods Lane. From there the bands and elaborate floats went to Apaquogue Road, then to Cottage Avenue and on to Ocean Avenue. The route returned to Main Street, and what was described as the biggest parade ever seen on the East End, disbanded on the Village Green, opposite Buell Lane. The parade’s theme of course was the history of the Town including colorful flower adored floats representing Monauketts, pilgrims, preachers and whalers.

Awaiting on the Green was a spectacle. A huge pageant was performed with several hundred costumed actors, recreating their history of East Hampton. All in all, it was a day to be remembered. A youngster was overheard saying she planned on being around for the Town’s 300th Birthday!

#parade #easthamptonhistoricalsociety #Easthampton #summer

On a beautiful warm day August 24th, 1899, over 1,000 residents and visitors lined-up along East Hampton’s streets and lanes to watch the parade celebrating the 250th anniversary of this English settlement. Local historian Henry P. Hedges had concluded that the first British in East Hampton had settled the town in the spring or summer of 1649. Today scholars are confident that the date was a year earlier, in 1648.

The great parade started in the shade of the Hook Mill at 11:00 am and followed Main Street until it turned west on Woods Lane. From there the bands and elaborate floats went to Apaquogue Road, then to Cottage Avenue and on to Ocean Avenue. The route returned to Main Street, and what was described as the biggest parade ever seen on the East End, disbanded on the Village Green, opposite Buell Lane. The parade’s theme of course was the history of the Town including colorful flower adored floats representing Monauketts, pilgrims, preachers and whalers.

Awaiting on the Green was a spectacle. A huge pageant was performed with several hundred costumed actors, recreating their history of East Hampton. All in all, it was a day to be remembered. A youngster was overheard saying she planned on being around for the Town’s 300th Birthday!

#parade #easthamptonhistoricalsociety #Easthampton #summer

For five years, East Hampton Historical Society's Summer Lecture Luncheon has brought together some of the best designer...
08/13/2021

For five years, East Hampton Historical Society's Summer Lecture Luncheon has brought together some of the best designers and architects from around the country for a day of fun, friends, and food - and it was just that!

Perry Guillot was an amazing speaker, and we can't thank him enough for an incredible presentation.

A special thanks to David Netto, our fantastic sponsors, Luncheon Committee Members, Luncheon Committee Chair, Debbie Druker, Bonnie Brennan, President of Christie’s Americas, the Maidstone Club, and all of you for supporting this magnificent event! We hope everyone who came enjoyed themselves as much as we did.

Again, thank you again for your support!

Pictured:
1. Perry Guillot, Bonne Brennan, & David Netto
2. Debbie Druker introduces our speakers
3. Lunch with friends

Photo Credit: Richard Lewin

For more information about the Society please visit easthamptonhistory.org.

#easthamptonhistoricalsociety #perryguillot #davidnetto #bonniebrennan #markcross #christies #naturopathica #maidstoneclub

It’s the beginning of the hot and humid last few summer weeks.  Time for catching the rays of the sun alongside an aqua-...
08/10/2021

It’s the beginning of the hot and humid last few summer weeks. Time for catching the rays of the sun alongside an aqua-hued pool with a slippery-sided glass holding a cold rum drink, I would say.

From our image archive we have selected a classic image of one of East Hampton’s most beautifully architecturally designed private pool complexes---the Beach Club at the Maidstone Club as seen about 1939. Since the buildings surrounding the Maidstone pool are an homage to the clubhouse, let’s start with a little history.

There were two Maidstone Clubhouses on Maidstone Lane. The original was constructed in 1890 and was destroyed by a fire in 1901. A second was built, also on Maidstone Lane, but burned down in 1921. The Club decided to move to the Atlantic dunes and their third clubhouse overlooking the ocean waves. Built between 1922 and 1924, the present structure was designed by Roger Harrington Bullard, who in his short life designed many opulent homes and clubhouses for the prominent social set of the era. His designs for Maidstone fall into the French farmhouse mode. The long stretched-out building hugs the crest of the dune and its silhouette follows the trees on the horizon. In 1928 the club built a “Beach Club” below the clubhouse. Between the dunes and the ocean, summer colonist, architect and artist John H. Jewett, designed the very French Riviera feel of the beach club. It blends beautifully with Bullard’s clubhouse. The complex cloisters the pool, like French farm barns surround a central farmyard. The wings of the cabanas create a private informal satellite below the formal dining rooms above. A toast to another lively and lazy summer in East Hampton.

#maidstone #easthamptonhistoricalsociety #history #summer

It’s the beginning of the hot and humid last few summer weeks. Time for catching the rays of the sun alongside an aqua-hued pool with a slippery-sided glass holding a cold rum drink, I would say.

From our image archive we have selected a classic image of one of East Hampton’s most beautifully architecturally designed private pool complexes---the Beach Club at the Maidstone Club as seen about 1939. Since the buildings surrounding the Maidstone pool are an homage to the clubhouse, let’s start with a little history.

There were two Maidstone Clubhouses on Maidstone Lane. The original was constructed in 1890 and was destroyed by a fire in 1901. A second was built, also on Maidstone Lane, but burned down in 1921. The Club decided to move to the Atlantic dunes and their third clubhouse overlooking the ocean waves. Built between 1922 and 1924, the present structure was designed by Roger Harrington Bullard, who in his short life designed many opulent homes and clubhouses for the prominent social set of the era. His designs for Maidstone fall into the French farmhouse mode. The long stretched-out building hugs the crest of the dune and its silhouette follows the trees on the horizon. In 1928 the club built a “Beach Club” below the clubhouse. Between the dunes and the ocean, summer colonist, architect and artist John H. Jewett, designed the very French Riviera feel of the beach club. It blends beautifully with Bullard’s clubhouse. The complex cloisters the pool, like French farm barns surround a central farmyard. The wings of the cabanas create a private informal satellite below the formal dining rooms above. A toast to another lively and lazy summer in East Hampton.

#maidstone #easthamptonhistoricalsociety #history #summer

We have so many beautiful areas to enjoy all the recreational opportunities that East Hampton Town offers.  Between the ...
08/10/2021

We have so many beautiful areas to enjoy all the recreational opportunities that East Hampton Town offers. Between the community parks and beaches, we have New York State parks, Suffolk County and East Hampton Town parks. In going through our collection of antique postcards we came upon this card from the mid-1930s of the Hither Hills State Park’s campground, which often is called the state’s most beautiful ocean view campsite.

In 1879 Arthur Benson, a millionaire who developed Bensonhurst, was able to buy much of Montauk from the East Hampton Town Trustees for $151,000. He did not want disturb its natural beauty and saw his purchase as a hunting preserve. After Benson’s death in 1889, his son worked with the president of the Long Island Rail Road, Auston Corbin, to develop Montauk by turning it into a huge resort.

Along came Robert Moses, public official who transformed much of the New York Metropolitan area. He was called the “master builder” and changed Long Island (and many other New York State location’s) urban development for ever. He was a magician with his plans for highways and parks. In 1924 he stated to condemn much of the Benson landholdings in Montauk. The Long Island State Park Commission, which he headed, sized by eminent domain 1,842 acres from the Benson Estate. Two parks were carved out to form the 945-acre Montauk Point State Park and 1,775 acres left, became Hither Hills State Park.

By 1926 the Hither Hills Park opened with campsites, playing fields, two miles of sandy ocean beach, picnic areas and a 40-acre freshwater pond. This mid 1930s photograph shows both tent, trailer sites, and the wash house, front and center. No wonder these campsites sell out within a day or two, when offered. Life is a beach, right?

#easthamptonhistoricalsociety #easthampton #hillsstatepark

We have so many beautiful areas to enjoy all the recreational opportunities that East Hampton Town offers. Between the community parks and beaches, we have New York State parks, Suffolk County and East Hampton Town parks. In going through our collection of antique postcards we came upon this card from the mid-1930s of the Hither Hills State Park’s campground, which often is called the state’s most beautiful ocean view campsite.

In 1879 Arthur Benson, a millionaire who developed Bensonhurst, was able to buy much of Montauk from the East Hampton Town Trustees for $151,000. He did not want disturb its natural beauty and saw his purchase as a hunting preserve. After Benson’s death in 1889, his son worked with the president of the Long Island Rail Road, Auston Corbin, to develop Montauk by turning it into a huge resort.

Along came Robert Moses, public official who transformed much of the New York Metropolitan area. He was called the “master builder” and changed Long Island (and many other New York State location’s) urban development for ever. He was a magician with his plans for highways and parks. In 1924 he stated to condemn much of the Benson landholdings in Montauk. The Long Island State Park Commission, which he headed, sized by eminent domain 1,842 acres from the Benson Estate. Two parks were carved out to form the 945-acre Montauk Point State Park and 1,775 acres left, became Hither Hills State Park.

By 1926 the Hither Hills Park opened with campsites, playing fields, two miles of sandy ocean beach, picnic areas and a 40-acre freshwater pond. This mid 1930s photograph shows both tent, trailer sites, and the wash house, front and center. No wonder these campsites sell out within a day or two, when offered. Life is a beach, right?

#easthamptonhistoricalsociety #easthampton #hillsstatepark

Address

101 Main St
East Hampton, NY
11937

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 4pm
Tuesday 10am - 4pm
Wednesday 10am - 4pm
Thursday 10am - 4pm
Friday 10am - 4pm

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(631) 324-6850

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starts with the AMAGANSETT INCIDENT OF 1942 and ends with the MAGICAL TICKER TAPE PARADE of OCTOBER 19, 1960 in New York City.....
Looking for the Old Bennett Burial Ground in Northwest Woods. I know where the old homestead was I've seen the old foundation. Am I close? Augustus/Huldah and Jeremiah/Elizabeth are my 4th and 5th Great Grandparents.
The original owner of "The Creeks"
Hello there, I read that East Hampton town records might contain transcripts of testimonies from the first witch trial in the colonies where Goody Garlick was accused in about 1657. Is that true?
**Help Support the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery Memorial Campaign** @SSHMarinersGenealogy The Descendants of Sailors’ Snug Harbor Mariners have been reaching out to the Greater New York City Metro Area Heritage (Historical and Genealogical) Societies, Museums, Military Veterans Groups, and Concerned Citizens, to invite them to join a Letters of Support Campaign to support their efforts to gain access to the old Sailors’ Snug Harbor Cemetery on Staten Island to honor their Ancestors, and all of the 6,500 Merchant and Naval Mariners interred there (1834-1976), by installing a Memorial Monument (Obelisk) and holding an annual Memorial Service. Some of the Mariners were famous Sea Captains and some sailed on famous Merchant and Naval ships dating back to the American Revolution. Many were just average seamen whom sailed and endured for many years on the sea under arduous conditions. Sadly, the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery is devoid of gravestones or markers, except for 15 remaining gravestones. The Cemetery is closed and not open to the public. The Board of Trustees of Sailors' Snug Harbor have rejected the Descendants' requests to access the SSH Cemetery to honor their Ancestors. The Descendants are collecting Letters of Support to persuade the Trustees of Sailors’ Snug Harbor to change their decision. For more information and Support Letter Writing Instructions, use the following link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sZv5VFLNWw0HA-pW2i33RhbgVFQ6oExx
I am looking for information about the convent/ or monastery that was in one of the Hamptons. Who was the original owner of the mansion and property? Anyone out there with the info?
Hello, I`am looking for any Edwards descendants still living in East Hampton, who would know the?? genealogy of Jphn Edwards & Mary Stanborough