Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation

Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation Tax deductible donations and membership can be mailed or paid on line www.ayresknuth.org Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation P. O. Box 304 Denville, NJ 07834 The Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation, Inc.
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is a community based organization located in Denville, NJ. The Ayres/Knuth Farm is listed on the State and Federal Historic Sites Registers. It was purchased by Denville Township in May 1996. It has been farmed for over 200 years, an endeavor that continues today on a portion of the acreage.

is a community based organization located in Denville, NJ. The Ayres/Knuth Farm is listed on the State and Federal Historic Sites Registers. It was purchased by Denville Township in May 1996. It has been farmed for over 200 years, an endeavor that continues today on a portion of the acreage.

Mission: The Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation, Inc. is a community based organization located in Denville, NJ. The purpose of the Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation, Inc. is to engage in activities which focus on the protection and enhancement of the historical, agricultural, and environment aspects of the Denville Township Ayres/Knuth Farm. To support these endeavors, the Foundation will raise and direct funds and organize volunteer efforts towards the preservation of the historical and environmental components of the multi-use open space facility.

Operating as usual

New Jersey Conservation Foundation
10/15/2020

New Jersey Conservation Foundation

The board of the Garden State Preservation Trust approved
$52.8 million on Monday for an array of projects and local grants statewide to preserve farmland and improve farm soil conservation. They also approved a grant to the Geospatial Lab at Rowan
University for the development and maintenance of the New Jersey Conservation Blueprint Web site, which can be found at https://www.njmap2.com/blueprint

Read more at https://www.insidernj.com/press-release/garden-state-preservation-trust-approves-52-8-million-preserve-farmland/

New Jersey Conservation Foundation
10/15/2020

New Jersey Conservation Foundation

Executive director Michele S. Byers was honored with the Candace McKee Ashmun Environmental Legacy Award at the opening session of the ANJEC Environmental Congress! Michele has led NJ Conservation's land-saving efforts since 1999 but has been a lifelong protector of natural resources.

Please join us in congratulating Michele!

2020 COVID: annual fundraiser is coming soon. All volunteers will wear facemasks. Morris County has given us an infrared...
10/12/2020

2020 COVID: annual fundraiser is coming soon. All volunteers will wear facemasks. Morris County has given us an infrared thermometer. Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation purchased the contactless Square...tap, wave, card or phone NO Touch purchase by customers or volunteers. Exact cash purchases and tips will not be touched. Watch for updates.

Thank you Cindy
10/10/2020

Thank you Cindy

Don't toss out your uncut pumpkins, or those acorns you're raking up. We can use them here. Raccoons, foxes, deer, goats, cows, donkeys, pigs...they all love to eat them! You don't have to pick out the acorns, we can take leaves, twigs and all. It's fun for the animals to pick thru the piles 😃

Visit our friends at Union Hill Farms
10/10/2020

Visit our friends at Union Hill Farms

It’s a beautiful day to take a trip to Union Hill! Come hop on the tractor ride to the pumpkin patch or grab some corn stalks and hay. How about our own fresh pressed Apple Cider or some delicious @jerseygirlcheese? We also picked some gorgeous heirloom tomatoes! We’re open today and tomorrow 9-5 and hayrides are from 11 to 4:30! Soon it’ll be snowy and cold and we’ll all be missing the freshest fruits and veggies from the garden state. So, grab it while there’s still time!

10/10/2020

Contact us. Call us. Message us on Facebook. Email us. Contact us through our web page. Write us. P.O. Box 304, Denville, NJ 07834

10/10/2020

Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation has a new phone number.
973-543-5967

10/09/2020

The Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation Annual Tree Sale and much more is starts the Friday after Thanksgiving.

10/09/2020

Attention all VOLUNTEERS!
The "Annual Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation Tree Sale and much more "will be setting up starting Thanksgiving week and breaking down Sunday 13 December at 4 PM or sooner. Volunteers of all ages and skills will be needed. Work will be done in short shifts following COVID precautions including facemask. More volunteers and less time spent is the goal. Much of the work is outdoors. Hope you and yours can volunteer.. Thank you.

10/08/2020
World War One Centennial Commission

World War One Centennial Commission

FREE WEBINAR, Fri. Oct. 09,2020, 1pm ET:
Registration: https://bit.ly/30AFo7v

The #Poppy is an enduring symbol of #WWI. It is an icon for #veterans, #remembrance #AmericanLegion and more. Special guest, author Mathew Leonard explains its impact in Poppyganda.
Update on #BellsofPeace commemoration at 11am on 11.11 and the #BellsOfPeace Participation #App.

Bonus feature: "#Immigration & WWI" 6 minute documentary from our How WWI Changed #America series.

New Jersey Conservation Foundation
10/07/2020

New Jersey Conservation Foundation

Looking to get out this fall? The NJ Land Trust Network is offering two FREE workshops this month. They are both in-person outdoor tours with organizations doing work in urban agriculture, biodiversity, stewardship, etc. Please join us for one or both!

The first is in Elizabeth (10/14) and the second is in Trenton (10/23)

Check out the links below for details and registration.
https://www.njconservation.org/…/tour-groundwork-elizabeth…/

https://www.njconservation.org/…/land-stewardship-green-in…/

Strict social distancing and other CDC guidelines will be adhered to at all times.

10/06/2020
Pathways of History Tour of Historic Places

Pathways of History Tour of Historic Places

Mark your calendars! The tentative dates for the next Pathways of History Tour of Historic Places are
May 1 and 2, 2021.

Antique Trader
10/06/2020

Antique Trader

Young women deliver ice in lower Manhattan in 1918 in this colorized photo. With many men sent to the battlefield in WWI, women stepped up to perform jobs previously done only by them. (Photo from @HistoryUncovered)

Good People News
10/05/2020

Good People News

“Do you know who this is a photo of? Chances are you don’t, but don’t feel bad because probably not one American in one million does, and that is a National tragedy. His name is Eugene Jacques Bullard, and he is the first African-American fighter pilot in history. But he is also much more then that: He’s also a national hero, and his story is so incredible that I bet if you wrote a movie script based on it Hollywood would reject it as being too far-fetched.

Bullard was an expat living in France, and when World War 1 broke out he joined the French Infantry. He was seriously wounded, and France awarded him the Croix de Guerre and Medaille Militaire. In 1916 he joined the French air service and he first trained as a gunner but later he trained as a pilot. When American pilots volunteered to help France and formed the famous Lafayette Escadrille, he asked to join but by the time he became a qualified pilot they were no longer accepting new recruits, so he joined the Lafayette Flying Corps instead. He served with French flying units and he completed 20 combat missions.

When the United States finally joined the war, Bullard was the only member of the Escadrille or the French Flying Corps who was NOT invited to join the US Air Service. The reason? At that time the Air Service only accepted white men.

Now here is the part that almost sounds like a sequel to ‘Casablanca’: After WWI Bullard became a jazz musician in Paris and he eventually owned a nightclub called ‘L’Escadrille’. When the Germans invaded France and conquered it in WW2, his Club, and Bullard, became hugely popular with German officers, but what they DIDN’T know was that Bullard, who spoke fluent German, was actually working for the Free French as a spy. He eventually joined a French infantry unit, but he was badly wounded and had to leave the service.

By the end of the war, Bullard had become a national hero in France, but he later moved back to the U.S. where he was of course completely unknown. Practically no one in the United States was aware of it when, in 1959, the French government named him a national Chevalier, or Knight.

In 1960, the President of France, Charles DeGaulle, paid a state visit to the United States and when he arrived he said that one of the first things he wanted to do was to meet Bullard. That sent the White House staff scrambling because most of them, of course, had never even heard of him. They finally located him in New York City, and DeGaulle traveled there to meet him personally. At the time, Eugene Bullard was working as … An elevator operator.

Not long after Eugene Bullard met with the President of France, he passed away, and today very, very few Americans, and especially African-Americans, even know who he is. But, now YOU do, don’t you? And I hope you’ll be able to find opportunities to tell other people about this great American hero that probably only 1 American in 1 Million has ever heard of.”

Tyneka Santiago de Laveau

10/04/2020
1885 Historic Makeover

1885 Historic Makeover

This 1885 historic house was destroyed by bad what some people would call home improvements. This video shows a makeover historic restoration bringing back t...

Union Hill Farms
10/03/2020

Union Hill Farms

It’s the first weekend in October and that means that tractor rides to the pumpkin patch have started! Weather permitting, we offer them every Saturday and Sunday through this month from 11am to 4:30pm.

25 Cooper Road
Denville, NJ 07834

10/03/2020
Spanky and the phone call

The Ayres/Knuth farm did not have a phone until the late 1960s when Frank and Susie Knuth were living in the farmhouse. They saw no need. We may assume they knew the Little Rascals movies

09/28/2020
2021 historic preservation groups will celebrate Native Americans in New Jersey.  Ayres/Knuth Farm  is the site of over ...
09/26/2020
Mesmerizing Historical Photos of Native Americans

2021 historic preservation groups will celebrate Native Americans in New Jersey. Ayres/Knuth Farm is the site of over 1500 native artifacts unearthed by Arthur Peach.

The Native American people have long inhabited the land of North America. While they have been known by several names over the course of history that collects them all into a single category, there are over 570 tribes currently living in the United States. The history of the Native American people i...

09/26/2020
Oregon Zoo

Maybe we should be ...

A gourd time was had by all.

A friend of our posted this and it shocked us. The Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation has been working on their annual fundrais...
09/19/2020
media2.giphy.com

A friend of our posted this and it shocked us. The Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation has been working on their annual fundraiser Tree Sale and much more. Stay tuned for details.

AYRES/KNUTH FARM FOUNDATION DID SEVERAL OF THESE EVENTS AND HOPED TO DO SOME THIS YEAR. AFTER COVID LOOK FOR EVENTS AND ...
09/17/2020

AYRES/KNUTH FARM FOUNDATION DID SEVERAL OF THESE EVENTS AND HOPED TO DO SOME THIS YEAR. AFTER COVID LOOK FOR EVENTS AND ACTIIVTIES.

09/16/2020

Amazonsmile is a simple way to support the Farm restoration activites at no cost to you. The prices and selection is the same.
When you shop Amazon donates 0.5% of your purchase to the Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation when you designate the 5013c

09/15/2020

10 YEARS AGO
WE WERE INTERVIEWED ...CUT AND PASTE
Channel 12 Della Crews "Spotlight on New Jersey" Live..Thursday 16 September 8:15... Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation Fall Farm Festival...SWEET...Daily Record TGIF..wahoo!too/two!?! See ya Saturday

History Cool Kids
09/13/2020

History Cool Kids

An outdoor classroom on a ferry in New York City, ca. 1915.

The open air school movement originated in Europe at the beginning of the 20th century to help sickly children. Classes were taught in the middle of the forest—far away from urban centers—with the belief that good ventilation, clean air and sunlight contributed to the overall physical and mental well-being of the students.⁣

In American cities on the East Coast, schools were converted to have large ceiling-high windows that were kept open throughout the school year, even in winter. Students stayed warm by wrapping themselves in thick blankets and warming their feet using heated soapstones. Some schools that couldn't properly convert, resorted to teaching classes on their rooftops or in one case, on an abandoned ferry. The experiment was a resounding success and no children who attended these schools got sick with tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which typically attacks the lungs. TB is spread through the air when an infected individual coughs, spits, speaks, or sneezes.⁣

TB has existed since ancient times. Scientists have discovered evidence of the disease in the remains of a 17,000-year-old Bison discovered in Wyoming. The remains of prehistoric humans and even Egyptian mummies from 5,000 years ago have displayed evidence of having had TB.⁣

In the 1800s, TB was one of leading causes of death in Europe, but by the mid 20th century, mortality rates had dropped considerably thanks to improvements in sanitation and other public health measures. The introduction of the Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine in 1921 and the development of antibiotics helped curb the mortality rate even further.⁣

Today TB is curable and preventable. Despite this, it still killed 1.5 million people in 2018 and is one of the top 10 causes of death according to the World Health Organization (WHO).⁣

Source:⁣

Library of Congress

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/17/nyregion/coronavirus-nyc-schools-reopening-outdoors.html

https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/tuberculosis @ New York, New York

History Cool Kids
09/13/2020

History Cool Kids

A member of the Harlem Hellfighters (369th Infantry Regiment) poses for the camera while holding a puppy he saved during World War 1, 1918.

The Harlem Hellfighters was a regiment made up of decorated Black soldiers who fought as part of the French army because the U.S. did not allow Black soldiers to fight alongside white soldiers. The French accepted the Harlem Hellfighters with open arms and did not racially segregate them.

During World War 1, they fought on the front lines for 191 days, longer than any other American unit. And as a result, suffered the most casualties of any American regiment—losing approximately 1,500 men. Despite the heavy death toll and the poor replacement system, the Harlem Hellfighters never lost a trench or a foot of ground to the enemy; none of them became prisoners of war. Not only were they one of the most successful regiments of World War 1, but they also helped bring Jazz to France.

Upon returning home, the Harlem Hellfighters received a welcome parade in New York City; a privilege that was denied to them before they had left for war. However, the celebrations were short lived as the summer of 1919 became known as the Red Summer, in which the country saw some of the worst racial violence since the Civil War.

The Harlem Hellfighters who dreamed of returning home to a place that would finally treat them with respect and as equal human beings, quickly realized that nothing had changed at all.

Source: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/369th_Infantry_Regiment_(United_States)

History Cool Kids
09/13/2020

History Cool Kids

Delivering ice during World War I from an ice wagon, 1918.

Colorization by @pearcolours

The ice trade was a lucrative business during the 19th and early 20th century. Ice was harvested from ponds and streams and then shipped off either by railroad or ship all across the globe. A network of ice wagons would distribute the ice to its final destination.

In 1806, Frederic Tudor (aka Ice King) began the ice trade in New England by shipping it to his wealthy clients in the Caribbean. His business began to grow over the years as he expanded to Cuba and the southern part of the United States. Soon he was shipping ice all over the world to places like India, Australia, China and South America.

At the peak of the ice trade, the industry in the U.S. employed 90,000 people and 25,000 horses. The demand for ice surged during World War 1, however, once the war ended, the ice trade collapsed due to the emergence of refrigeration cooling systems. By the 1930s, modern refrigerators became more common in homes and by the 1950s, they were nearly ubiquitous in both the U.S. and Europe.

Source: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_trade

History Cool Kids
09/13/2020

History Cool Kids

Wearing masks with a smudge of social distancing during a football game in 1918.

This was a Georgia Tech home game at Grant Field in Atlanta. The Georgia Tech Golden Tornadoes handedly beat NC State 128 to 0.

Just two years prior in 1916, Georgia Tech soundly defeated Cumberland 222 to 0, which still holds the record for most points scored ever in a football game. At the time, Georgia Tech was coached by John Heisman, the man whose name is on the Heisman trophy—awarded annually to the most outstanding college football player.

In 1916, Heisman wrote that he wanted to get even after Cumberland's baseball team that was filled with pro players defeated Georgia Tech 22 to 0.

Source: https://www.nydailynews.com/coronavirus/ny-photo-mask-georgia-tech-1918-pandemic-flu-coronavirus-20200525-fbkqrf6tqjgf7plck2emfjdjvi-story.html

History Cool Kids
09/13/2020

History Cool Kids

"For a small amount of perspective at this moment, imagine you were born in 1900. When you are 14, World War I starts, and ends on your 18th birthday with 22 million people killed. Later in the year, a Spanish Flu epidemic hits the planet and runs until you are 20. Fifty million people die from it in those two years. Yes, 50 million.

When you're 29, the Great Depression begins. Unemployment hits 25%, global GDP drops 27%. That runs until you are 33. The country nearly collapses along with the world economy. When you turn 39, World War II starts. You aren’t even over the hill yet.

When you're 41, the United States is fully pulled into WWII. Between your 39th and 45th birthday, 75 million people perish in the war and the Holocaust kills six million. At 52, the Korean War starts and five million perish.

At 64 the Vietnam War begins, and it doesn’t end for many years. Four million people die in that conflict. Approaching your 62nd birthday you have the Cuban Missile Crisis, a tipping point in the Cold War. Life on our planet, as we know it, could well have ended. Great leaders prevented that from happening.

As you turn 75, the Vietnam War finally ends. Think of everyone on the planet born in 1900. How do you survive all of that? A kid in 1985 didn’t think their 85 year old grandparent understood how hard school was. Yet those grandparents (and now great grandparents) survived through everything listed above.

Perspective is an amazing art. Let’s try and keep things in perspective. Let’s be smart, help each other out, and we will get through all of this. In the history of the world, there has never been a storm that lasted. This too, shall pass."

Photo by Lewis Hine

Follow me on instagram.com/historycoolkids

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25 Cooper Rd
Denville, NJ
07834

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Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation, Inc. is US IRS a 501 (3) (c) status, incorporated in the State of New Jersey in 1998 as a non profit. As a public charity it is dependent on donations and membership which if qualify are tax deducible. The Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation, Inc. is a community based organization located in Denville Township, NJ. It welcomes members from throughout the country and volunteers in all capacities.

The Ayres/Knuth Farm is listed on the State and Federal Historic Sites Registers. It was purchased by Denville Township in May 1996. The Foundation has a lease on a portion for restoration and preservation purposes. 72 contiguous acres are now owned by the municipality It has been farmed for over 200 years, an endeavor that continues today on a portion of the acreage.

Missions Statement....The purpose of the Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation, Inc. is to engage in activities which focus on the protection and enhancement of the historical, agricultural, and environment aspects of the Denville Township Ayres/Knuth Farm. To support these endeavors, the Foundation will raise and direct funds and organize volunteer efforts towards the preservation of the historical and environmental components of the multi-use open space facility.

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https://www.nj.gov/dca/news/news/2019/approved/20190918a.html The Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation was awarded a significant grant to restore the tenant house. Matching funds are necessary, but COVID is the major obstacle this year.
https://www.nj.gov/dep/hpo/1identify/survey_report_bibliographies/MORRIS.pdf Ayres/Knuth Farm was the first site on the State and National Historic Registers in owned by Denville Township.
https://www.nj.gov/dep/hpo/1identify/survey_report_bibliographies/MORRIS.pdf The Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation is pleased to have funded many of the reports held at DEP and approved by the SHPO.
The Ayres/Knuth Farm Foundation is still attempting to locate this large painting. It was painted by Lucille Hobbie at our suggestion and hung for many years in the Clerk's office after which it was promised to us We inquire periodically if it turns up
Aviation is history
Make your cat happy Buy a live tree this weekend and support historic preservation
He is on his way to Ayres Knuth Farm Foundation annual tree sale Thanks for the support Santa
Perhaps this is a better way
Maybe we should have our pets pick the tree
Just a share
From all fire departments